Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | .... | 53 | 54 | (Page 55) | 56 | 57 | newer

    0 0


    1. Fight on the corner 4:37
    2. Hamachikaze 8:35
    3. Song For One 8:26
    4. Dust song 7:50
    5. Nakajimazaimokuten Co., Ltd. 4:43
    6. P-Chan Rearrange 5:14
    7. We are a Fisherman Band 8:44
    8. theme for Inuhime 10:25
    9. theme for Inuhime 7:55

    Daisuke Fuwa - Dando-list (Conductor)
    Aya Murodate - Flute, Vocal
    Yoichiro Kita - Trumpet
    Mitsuhide Tatsumi - Trumpet
    Keiko Komori - Soprano Sax
    Yoshiyuki Kawaguchi - Alto Sax
    Hideki Tachibana - Alto Sax
    Hiroaki Katayama - Tenor Sax
    Han Sato - Tenor Sax
    Tetsu "Rima" Hirosawa - Tenor Sax
    Akira Kito - Baritone Sax
    Ryuichi Yoshida - Baritone Sax
    Gideon Jukes - Tuba
    Yasuyuki Takahashi - Trombone
    Fumihiko Tamura - Trombone
    Hiroyuki Otsuka - Electric Guitar
    Ryoichi Saito - Electric Guitar
    Fang Taeil - Electric Guitar
    Hiroshi Higo - Electric Bass Guitar
    Aki Ono - Electric Bass Guitar
    Hiromichi Sakamoto - Cello
    Sachiko Nakajima - Keyboards
    Koichi Yamaguchi - Keyboards
    Hitoshi Kuramochi - Drums
    Jun Isobe - Drums
    Masataka Fujikake - Drums
    Mari Sekine - Percussions, Voice
    Takayuki Matsumura - Percussion
    Lucky Kawasaki - Percussion
    Shinichi Watabe - Vocal, MC
    Ayako Sasaki - Vocal
    Sayaka - Dance
    Pero - Dance
    Sugako - Dance
    Kae Minami - Dance
    Kenichi Aoyama - Live drawing
    Kotaro Yokozawa - Visual designer

    AMG:
    "Shibusashirazu (roughly, 'we don't understand/are unaffected by cool'), often lengthened to Shibusashirazu Orchestra, is a popular Japanese free jazz orchestra. The group was formed in 1989 by bassist Daisuke Fuwa and since then many of Japan's best free jazz musicians, Butoh dancers and other performance artists have passed through the orchestra.
    The majority of the group's original work is composed and arranged by Daisuke Fuwa. Their style stems from the free jazz movement of the 60s, with the influence of 80s punk and No Wave. Although featuring extended free improvisation, there is also an element of rock music that makes the orchestra more accessible to a wider audience than a lot of other free jazz.
    In 2007 they signed to Avex Trax, one of Japan's leading labels for commercial pop and dance music.
    The orchestra performed four times in a row at the annual Fuji Rock Festival from 2000 and have also performed at the Glastonbury Festival in 2002. They tour Europe frequently although are not well known in the United States."



    Shibuki

    or

    Shibuki


    0 0


    1. To the Edge of the Earth 4:05
    2. Big My Secret 2:52
    3. A Wild and Distant Shore 5:52
    4. The Heart Asks Pleasure First 1:36
    5. Here to There 1:02
    6. The Promise 4:16
    7. A Bed of Ferns 0:48
    8. The Fling 1:29
    9. The Scent of Love 4:18
    10. Deep into the Forest 3:00
    11. The Mood That Passes Through You 1:14
    12. Lost and Found 2:27
    13. The Embrace 2:36
    14. Little Impulse 2:12
    15. The Sacrifice 2:50
    16. I Clipped Your Wing 4:36
    17. The Wounded 2:30
    18. All Imperfect Things 4:03
    19. Dreams of a Journey 5:29

    Andy Findon - Flute, Flute (Alto), Sax (Baritone), Sax (Tenor), Tenor (Vocal)
    John Harle - Sax (Alto), Sax (Soprano), Soprano (Vocal)
    David Roach - Sax (Alto), Sax (Soprano), Soprano (Vocal)
    Michael Nyman - Conductor, Piano
    Munich Philharmonic Orchestra - Guest Artist, Performer, Primary Artist


    AMG:
    "This crossover hit, the soundtrack to Jane Campion's film, is subtle, pretty, and just a little bit bland. Nyman keeps the theatrics to a minimum, crafting an evocative work that manages to be both personal and universal. He also lets the music run its course, never pushing or cutting off a piece until it says what it needs to. A towering commercial achievement from a decidedly non-commercial artist."



    The Piano

    or

    The Piano


    0 0


    1. Wandering Around 3:24
    2. Solution 5:36
    3. A Sad Man's Story 2:49
    4. Jesus Freaks 5:44
    5. 1999 5:00
    6. Scared 3:58
    7. Nightmare 4:52
    8. The End 5:38

    Axel P.J. Einarsson – Electric Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Vocals
    B. Ómar Óskarsson – Bass, Acoustic Guitar (With Bow), Vocals
    Ásgeir Óskarsson – Drums, Backing Vocals, Percussion
    Tommy Seabach – Keyboards (3)

    discogs:
    "Hard Progressive-Psychedelic Rock band from Iceland founded by Axel Einarsson and Ásgeir Óskarsson in 1972. Full of Heavy & Doomy Elements. Their only album was recorded in Denmark but issued in Iceland only. Ásgeir and Óskar left the band in early 1973 to form a band called Ástarkveðja but Icecross relocated to the USA in 1974 with only Shady Owens and Axel Einarsson as permanent members but disbanded in 1975."



    Icecross

    or

    Icecross


    0 0


    1. No Time For Time 7:16
    2. More Cymbals 3:02
    3. Pox 3:33
    4. Craggy Mountains 3:55
    5. The Tamborim 2:51
    6. P. T. 7:46
    7. Only Two 3:05
    8. Mauve Stripes 4:24
    9. May, 17th 2:21

    Terje Rypdal - Guitar
    Arild Andersen - Bass
    Pål Thowsen - Drums (Left Channel)
    Jon Christensen - Drums (Right Channel)

    Wiki:
    "Pål Thowsen (born 15 July 1955 in Lillestrøm, Norway) is a Norwegian drummer, mainly playing jazz. He is known for his collaborations with a number of Norwegian and international jazz musicians, has also released several solo albums and received two Spellemannprisen awards.
    Thowsen started his career in the early 1970s as a musician in Arild Andersen's quartet, finding international success throughout the decade. At the same time he was a member of the jazz rock band Moose Loose. In 1973 he collaborated for the first time with jazz guitarist Jon Eberson, a collaboration that has lasted throughout his career in various groups, and has recorded about ten albums with Ketil Bjørnstad. Other musicians he has worked with include Radka Toneff, Terje Rypdal, Palle Mikkel Borg, Odd Riisnæs and Dag Arnesen and a member of the Jazzpunkensemblet, the Net, Halle / Eberson / Thowsen / Kjellemyr, Ole Paus and Finn Kalvik, Sinikka Langeland and Metropolitan.
    Thowsen, along with Jon Christensen, won the 1977 Spellmanprisen for jazz album for the album No Time for Time, and the 1979 Spellmanprisen for jazz album for his album Surprise.

    Jon Ivar Christensen (born 20 March 1943 in Oslo, Norway) is a Norwegian jazz musician (drums and percussion), married to actor, minister and theater director Ellen Horn (born 1951), and the father of singer and actress Emilie Stoesen Christensen (born 1986).
    In the late 1960s Christensen played alongside Jan Garbarek on several recordings by the composer George Russell. He also was a central participant in the Jazz band, Masqualero, with Arild Andersen, and they reappeared in 2003 for his 60th anniversary. He appears on many recordings on the ECM label with such artists as Keith Jarrett, Jan Garbarek, Bobo Stenson, Eberhard Weber, Ralph Towner, Barre Phillips, Arild Andersen, Enrico Rava, John Abercrombie, Michael Mantler, Miroslav Vitous, Rainer Brüninghaus, Charles Lloyd, Dino Saluzzi and Tomasz Stanko. He, along with Jan Garbarek and Palle Danielsson, was a member of the legendary Keith Jarrett 'European Quartet' of the 1970s which produced five excellent jazz recordings on ECM Records.

    Andersen started his musical career as jazz guitarist in «The Riverside Swing Group» in Lillestrøm (1961–63), started playing double bass in 1964, and soon became part of the core jazz bands in Oslo. He was a member of Roy Hellvin Trio, was in the backing band at Kongsberg Jazz Festival in 1967 and 68, was elected Best bassist by Jazznytt in 1967, og started as bass player in the Jan Garbarek Quartet (1967–1973), including Terje Rypdal and Jon Christensen. After completing his technical education in 1968, he became a professional musician and collaborated with a number of the best known musicians next Garbarek, like the Norwegian Jazz singer Karin Krog, George Russell and Don Cherry (Berlin 1968), and was in the line up (rhythm section) for visiting American musicians like Phil Woods, Dexter Gordon, Bill Frisell, Hampton Hawes, Johnny Griffin, Sonny Rollins, Sheila Jordan and Chick Corea. In the samenperiod he also worked with Don Cherry, George Russell, Ferenc Snétberger and Tomasz Stańko.
    Andersen collaborated in the early 1970s with Norwegian musicians like Magni Wentzel, Jon Eberson, Ketil Bjørnstad and Terje Rypdal, before leaving for an eventful visit to the U.S.A. in the winter 1973-1974, and has since 1974 led his own bands, at first a Quartet (1974–79). He was in the line up for the astonishing Radka Toneff Quintet (1975–81), and has more than a dozen album releasesas as band leader on the label ECM, initiated critically acclaimed band Masqualero, and appeared as side man on a series of recordings. In January 2009 he was named 'Musicien Europeen 2008' by the French 'Academie du Jazz', and in 2010 Andersen received yet another prestigious award, the Ella Award presented at the Oslo Jazzfestival.

    Terje Rypdal (born 23 August 1947 in Oslo, Norway) is a Norwegian guitarist and composer. Most of his music has been released on albums of the German record label ECM. Rypdal has collaborated both as a guitarist and as a composer with other ECM artists such as Ketil Bjørnstad and David Darling. Over the years, he has been an important member in the Norwegian jazz community, and has also given show concerts with guitarists Ronni Le Tekrø and Mads Eriksen as 'N3'.
    The son of a composer and orchestra leader, Rypdal studied classical piano and trumpet as a child, and then taught himself to play guitar as he entered his teens. Starting out as a Hank Marvin-influenced rock guitarist with The Vanguards, Rypdal turned towards jazz in 1968 and joined Jan Garbarek's group and later George Russell's sextet and orchestra. An important step towards international attention was his participation in the free jazz festival in Baden-Baden, Germany in 1969, where he was part of a band led by Lester Bowie. During his musical studies at Oslo university and conservatory, he led the orchestra of the Norwegian version of the musical Hair. He has often been recorded on the ECM record label, both jazz-oriented material and classical compositions (some of which do not feature Rypdal's guitar).
    His compositions 'Last Nite' and 'Mystery Man' were featured in the Michael Mann film Heat, and included on the soundtrack of the same name."



    No Time For Time

    or

    No Time For Time


    0 0
  • 01/07/14--14:43: Feel Beat: Cigarette (Jazz)

  • 1. Chris Connor: Gone With The Wind
    2. Chris Connor: The Thrill is Gone
    3. Chris Connor: All Dressed Up With A Broket Heart
    4. Marilyn Moore: Ill Wind
    5. Marilyn Moore: Lover Come Back to me
    6. Marilyn Moore: I Cried For You
    7. Carmen McRae: Misery
    8. Carmen McRae: The Last Time for Love
    9. Mal Waldron: You Don't Know What Love is
    10. Julie London: Don't Worry About me
    11. Pat Moran Quartet: Lover Man
    12. Nina Simone: Don't Smoke in Bed
    13. Nina Simone: I Love You Porgy
    14. Nina Simone: Little Girl Blue
    15. Betty Roche: Go Away Blues
    16. Betty Roche: You Don't Love me No More
    17. Mal Waldron: Left Alone




    Cigarette

    or

    Cigarette


    0 0


    1. Motherlight 3:28
    2. On a Meadow - Lea 4:38
    3. Mona Lose 3:00
    4. Wanna Make a Star, Sam 2:09
    5. House of Many Windows 3:39
    6. Chant 4:08
    7. Burning the Weed 3:24
    8. The Lens 6:48

    Mike Bobak - Guitar
    Will Malone - Drums, Keyboards
    Andy Jons – Engineer

    AMG:
    "A seemingly random one-off album from England in 1970, Motherlight is one of those odd little delights that, as the 2001 reissue's liner notes freely acknowledge, gains its reputation in large part given what happened to the three people behind it, with later production credits ranging from Paul McCartney to Iron Maiden and Television. A studio creation given a green light by Morgan Blue Town label owner Monty Babson, the trio consisted of recording engineers Mike Bobak and Andy Johns (that actually being the correct spelling of his last name) teaming with Wilson Malone, lead figure of never-quite-stars Orange Bicycle. Without trying to draw an exact parallel, one can say this was the equivalent to something like Curt Boettcher's work with the Millennium or Sagittarius, though on a smaller scale and with slightly different goals. With Malone on guitar, keyboards, singing and most songwriting chores while Bobak and Johns handled rhythm and recording duties, the trio created an easygoing and often quite attractive collection of eight songs, generally pitched somewhere between acid folk bliss-out and the kind of heavy riffage starting to coalesce into heavy metal, with sometimes strident piano tying all the songs together. A song like 'On a Meadow-Lea' shows the various sides well, as Malone's calm repetition of the chorus towards the end offers him a chance to turn in a nicely fried solo over the top. Motherlight isn't deathless, and a couple of songs probably could have been dropped (though the ridiculous pseudo-country 'Burning the Weed' is a classic novelty goof), but it's still a nice peek into a time and place. Meanwhile, David Wells' 2001 liner notes provide all the information one could want, as well as a wisely observed knock on the industry surrounding reissues or bootlegs of obscure U.K. albums from that era -- a bit of biting the hand that feeds, perhaps, but one done with humor and wit."



    Motherlight

    or

    Motherlight


    0 0


    1. Scubba feat. Moana - Fool to Cry
    2. Amazonics - Let's Spend the Night Together
    3. Urban Love + Astrud C. - Out of Time
    4. Freedom Dub - Sympathy for the Devil (Pleased Remix)
    5. Anakelly - Under My Thumb
    6. Michelle Simonal - (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction
    7. Marvin meets Banda do Sul - Harlem Shuffle (Favela Remix)
    8. Dual Sessions - Ruby Tuesday (The Dubby Mix)
    9. Sao Vicente feat. Uschi - Angie
    10. Groove da Praia - Miss You (Back 2 Remixes)
    11. Corcovado Frequency - Start Me Up/Brown Sugar (Remix)
    12. Karen Souza - Wild Horses

    AMG:
    "The songs of one of the world's greatest rock bands meet the sensuous grooves of bossa nova on this album. Bossa n' Stones features bossa nova arrangements of a dozen classic tunes by the Rolling Stones, adding a new dimension to the melodies and offering a unique look into how versatile they truly are. Selections include 'Let's Spend the Night Together,''Miss You,''Sympathy for the Devil,''Angie,''Out of Time,' and more."


    1. Sao Vicente Feat. Ituana - As Tears Go By (Luxury Strings Mix)
    2. Amazonics - Jumpin' Jack Flash
    3. Urban Love + Aneka - Beast Of Burden
    4. Freedom Dub - Emotional Rescue (2 Many Beats Remix)
    5. Scubba Feat. Dew - Tumbling Dice
    6. Michelle Simonal - Mixed Emotions
    7. Groove Da Praia - Honky Tonk Women (Three Knocks Mix)
    8. Sixth Finger - Paint It Black
    9. Glambeats Corp. - She's So Cold (Ipanema@7_ Mix)
    10. Banda Do Sul Meets Natasha - It's Only Rock 'n Roll (But I Like It)
    11. Corcovado Frequency Feat. Uschi - I'm Free (Wizard Edit)
    12. Ituana - You Can't Always Get What You Want

    AMG:
    "The difference between simply covering an artist and covering said artist in a different genre is that the latter shows how well the artist's songs are actually written, how well they can convert to new and different styles and rhythms. On Bossa n' Stones, Vol. 2, classic Rolling Stones tracks are given a Brazilian makeover, which has the potential of creating some pretty interesting things. Unfortunately, the problem with the album is that it's not really bossa nova, but more like adult contemporary pop/rock with occasional Brazilian instrumentation and beats. While it's true that bossa nova is definitely a lighter genre, especially in comparison to its upbeat sister samba, and the Stones' songs are good enough in themselves that they can take this kind of transformation, there's still something off about the album. The covers seem too processed, too controlled, and not at all Stones-ian. Perhaps this is just because they aren't any good, and true bossa nova could in fact renovate these songs successfully. All of which is to say that there are definitely more successful, more honest, and much more fun Rolling Stones tributes out there."



    Bossa n' Stones : Bossa n' Stones 2

    or

    Bossa n' Stones : Bossa n' Stones 2


    0 0


    1. Sanctuary 2:22
    2. Good Old Friends 2:22
    3. Catch the Wind 2:54
    4. If in Swimming 3:55
    5. Follow Your Dream's Way 6:44
    6. Live and Let Live 2:22
    7. City Sidewalks 3:01
    8. Let's Get Together 4:30
    9. Winter Boy 2:23
    10. The Times They Are A-Changin' 3:06
    11. Johann Sebastian Cheetah 3:03

    Liza Gonzales - Vocals
    Dave Riordan - Vocals
    Greg Likins - Guitar
    Bill Masuda - Organ
    Billy Reynolds - Bass
    Nick Alexander - Drums

    AMG:
    "Very minor band that released an LP with both folk-rock and psychedelic overtones for Dot in 1968. Their male-female harmonic blend was in the spirit of the Jefferson Airplane and the Mamas & the Papas, and indeed, some of the tracks sound a bit like a garage Mamas & the Papas with their prominent organ parts."



    Yankee Dollar

    or

    Yankee Dollar


    0 0


    1. Wild Thing 3:39
    2. Mony Mony 3:40
    3. Souled Out 4:15
    4. Funky Broadway 4:23
    5. Red Onions 6:47
    6. Viva Peraza 4:58
    7. Al Bajar el Sol 3:17
    8. Granny's Samba 4:15

    Armando Peraza - Bongos, Congas, Percussion
    Sadao Watanabe - Flute, Sax (Alto)
    Johnny Pacheco - Flute
    Sol Schlinger - Sax (Baritone)
    Garnett Brown - Trombone
    Michael Abene - Piano
    Chick Corea - Piano
    Chuck Rainey - Fretless Bass
    Bobby Rodriguez - Bass
    Donald MacDonald - Drums
    Cal Tjader - Percussion
    Tommy Lopez - Percussion

    AMG:
    "Armando Peraza has long been considered one of popular music's top percussionists - a master of both the conga and bongos. In addition to being a long-standing member of Santana, Peraza has guested on numerous recordings by other popular recording artists. Born in Havana, Cuba, on May 30, 1924, Peraza lost both parents at an early age, and by the age of 12, was living on his own, supporting himself around this time as a vegetable vendor, semi-pro baseball player, boxing trainer, and a loan shark. It wasn't until Peraza was 17 years old that he got his start with music; One day at a baseball park, Peraza overhead local bandleader Alberto Ruiz (a brother of one of Peraza's teammates) say that he was in dire need of a conga player for a performance that night, as part of one of Havana's most popular bands at the time, Conjunto Kubavana. Although Peraza had no musical experience, he was able to convince Ruiz to give him a shot, and after practicing for just several hours that afternoon, pulled off the performance with flying colors. After relocating to the U.S. (first New York City, and then San Francisco), Peraza became an instantly sought-after musician, playing over the years with such renowned artists as Eric Clapton, Herbie Hancock, Eartha Kitt, Wes Montgomery, Peggy Lee, John McLaughlin, and Harvey Mandel, among others. But it is his work with Santana that he is best known for, playing on most of the group's recordings from the early '70s through the late '80s."



    Wild Thing

    or

    Wild Thing


    0 0


    1. Cantate Domino Canticum Novum (Psalm 95) (1977, rev. 1996)
    2. Berliner Messe (rev. V 1992) - Kyrie
    3. Berliner Messe (rev. V 1992) - Gloria
    4. Berliner Messe (rev. V 1992) - Allaluia Verses I & II
    5. Berliner Messe (rev. V 1992) - Veni Sancti Spiritus
    6. Berliner Messe (rev. V 1992) - Credo
    7. Berliner Messe (rev. V 1992) - Sanctus
    8. Berliner Messe (rev. V 1992)- Agnus Dei
    9. De Profundis (1980)
    10. Summa (1977)
    11. The Beatitudes (1990, rev. 1991)
    12. Magnificat (1989)

    Jurgen Petrenko - Organ
    Elora Festival Singers And Orchestra
    Noel Edison - Conductor

    AMG:
    "Estonian composer Arvo Pärt has always drawn attention (and occasionally criticism) for the heavily religious content of his works, and even a preliminary sampling of his Berliner Messe testifies to the depth of the composer's spiritual sensibilities. The very compositional techniques he uses here can be read as religious symbols, and the care with which he applies them enhances the profound reverence that the work conveys.
    Composed for the 1990 'German Catholic Days' and premiered in an ecclesiastical context, the Berliner Messe is a liturgically complete work. The inclusion of two Alleluias and the sequence 'Veni Sancte Spiritus' identifies it as a mass for Pentecost, though the added sections are optional in concert or church settings. Its original incarnation was for four SATB soloists and organ; after its premiere, the composer arranged it for strings and SATB choir.
    To understand the inherent musical religiosity of the work - a spiritual element that exists independently of this composition's liturgical nature - one must first understand the Pärt's compositional method. After stylistic periods in which Pärt variously explored modern 'Russian tonality' (à la Prokofiev and Shostakovich), serialism, and collage techniques, he suspended public composition for several years, during which time he applied himself - as did other minimalist composers, including Steve Reich - to the study of Medieval and Renaissance music (the influence of which can be found in the numerous Josquin-esque voice-pair textures that appear throughout the Berlin Mass). Pärt emerged from his sabbatical with an approach to composition that emphasized tonality in a new way: rather than using 'functional' harmony to create tension with, and resistance to, a kind of tonic gravitational pull, he explored the sonic possibilities of an omnipresent tonic triad combined with diatonic contrapuntal dissonances. Adopting the name 'Tintinnabuli' (after the complexly tonic sound of a bell), such pieces utilized paired lines: one voice - identified conveniently by Paul Hillier as the 'M-voice' - undertook scalar passages, while the 'T-voice,' usually in homophony with the M, restricted itself to tonic chord tones beneath and above the melodic line. The effect is striking: an atmosphere of absolute harmonic stability filled with colorful and irregular dissonances.
    This technique has poignant religious connotations. Pärt himself associates the M-voice with things mortal and carnal, like temptation, sin, and death. The triadic purity of the T-voice (for 'Tintinnabula') has divine connotations, suggesting redemption, immortality, and godliness. The combination of these two voices suggests all sorts of corollaries - man's eternal spirit housed in the mortal tabernacle, or perhaps the paradox of Christ's essential humanity and divinity.
    Certainly the text and context of the mass provides numerous interpretive possibilities. In the Berliner Messe, this symbolism is most striking in Pärt's setting of the Pentecostal sequence, 'Veni Sancte Spiritus.' The texture is extremely sheer - it consists entirely of duets (until the 'Amens' at the end), and its translucence is enhanced by the very sparse participation of the T-voice within each of the duet passages. Moreover, the M-voice seems to mimic the ethereal sonority of the T-voice, eschewing its usual scalar figures in favor of nearly triadic motion by leap. Recalling the Biblical account of the Pentecost, the mortal voice seems to aspire the divine, as embodied by the T-voice. Such enlightenment seems to have been obtained: the Credo that follows brims with exuberance and energy. Recalling Pärt's Summa (another Credo setting) with its lilting, leaping eighth notes that jump out of the otherwise strictly homophonic texture, the tintinnabular technique used in the Credo the Berliner Messe is carefully controlled in order to allow for an unusual degree of lyricism."



    Berliner Messe

    or

    Berliner Messe


    0 0


    1. Günaydın 2:04
    2. Kediler 3:33
    3. Olmalı Mı Olmamalı Mı 2:11
    4. Anlamsız 1:34
    5. Herşey Sevgiyle Başlar 3:05
    6. Suna Abla 1:54
    7. Bahar Türküsü 2:23
    8. Benimle Oynar Mısın 2:24
    9. Yağmur 2:34
    10. Sen Varsın 2:11
    11. Yüzünü Dökme Küçük Kız 2:18
    12. Şık Latife 2:54
    13. Dört Kişili Düş 3:13
    14. Günaydın II 1:53

    Bülent Ortaçgil – Vocals, Acoustic Guitar
    Erol Duygulu – Saxophone (Elektro Tenor)
    Erdoğan Ergun – Trumpet
    Metin Örser – Trumpet
    Tuncer Özcan – Trumpet
    Attila Özdemiroğlu – Vibraphone, Flute, Trombone
    Şat Yapım Yaylı Sazlar Topluluğu – Strings
    Ergun Pekakçan – Piano
    Cezmi Başeğmez – Drums
    Nükhet Ruacan – Vocals

    AMG:
    "Admittedly one of the best Turkish songwriters, Bülent Ortaçgil is the life jacket for the intellectual music listener. Over the years, getting more and more upset at being thought of as making peaceful songs, he combined his acoustic creations with his deeply thought, multi-layered critical lyrics and recorded with some of the best musicians in the country. Although his albums never come close to selling like the popular artists and he never sells out gigs, his timeless albums continue to be reissued in small numbers and occupy a revered place in every Turkish music lover's collection.
    Ortaçgil was born in March 1, 1950 in the capital city of Turkey, Ankara. Born in the city, his family later moved to Istanbul, where he would enjoy his education as well as his musical development. Throughout his high-school years he showed a strong interest in the fine arts. He acted in school plays and tried to play the drums, but ended up playing the guitar in concession. He shared the same corridors with Mazhar Alanson - later a famous member of MFO - and a group of soon-to-be musician friends. Unlike his peers, however, he didn't want to become a rock star. Known to be a quiet and hard-working student, he kept playing his acoustic guitar. Later, while his friend Ahmet Güvenç was recording with his band Bunalim, he was offered the opportunity to record a single during their session. His first single was recorded in 1971 and consisted of 'Anlamsiz' b/w 'Yuzunu Dokme Kucuk Kiz.'
    In 1974, while studying chemistry at the university, he recorded his debut album, Benimle Oynar Misin ('Will You Play with Me'). It didn't sell millions or top the charts, but it was later appreciated as one of the best albums ever recorded by a Turkish pop artist. It didn't have any Turkish folk themes like every other record in those days, but it also wasn't a rip-off of what was going on around the world. Vastly unique and truly sensitive, even after years passed, Benimle Oynar Misin remains fresh, with instantly classic songs like 'Olmali Mi Olmamali Mi,''Benimle Oynar Misin,' and 'Sen Varsin.' The artist also showed the first hints of his favorite subject with the album, the concept of 'playing games.' That debut album marked the beginning of the end, however, when Ortaçgil had to choose whether to become an artist or an engineer. He went on with the second, later regretting his choice since he could have written more good songs in his time spent studying engineering. Although he said he never believed he could earn money from music, he teamed up with musician Fikret Kizilok to form an art house called Cekirdek Sanatevi in 1981, a center for like-minded musicians where lvie sessions were recorded and hand-copied while the art works were hand-drawn and colored. Ruzgara Soylenen Sarkilar and Biz Sarkilarimizi were the fruits of those times, while his first major album, combining the talents of Ortaçgil and Kizilok, was 1986's Pencere Önü Çiçegi ('The Windowsill Flower').
    Although Ortaçgil shared a similar musical tastes with Kizilok, they parted ways after 16 years and Ortaçgil decided to concentrate solely on music. His second solo effort, 2. Perde, ('Second Act'), was recorded in 1990 and produced by Onno Tunc, who had also produced his first album. With more of an '80s synth pop sound, this second album was far from the acoustic recipe of his legendary debut album, but it retained the same songwriting quality: 'Sicak,''Ciglik Cigliga,''Bu Is Cok Zor Yonca,' and 'Bozburun' in particular showed the clear genius behind these songs. The third Ortaçgil album reflected what his future was going to sound like. He joined forces with bandmates Erkan Ogur (fretless guitar), Gurol Agríbas (bass), and Cem Aksel (drums). 1991's Oyuna Devam ('Carry on with the Game') features - in addition to Ortaçgil's lyrics - guitar solos from one of the most talented Turkish guitarists, cleverly timed drums, and strong bass playing. From that point on, Ortaçgil started publishing new albums every three or four years. 1994 saw him departing from his standard line of recording and songwriting. Büyükler Icin Cocuk Sarkilari ('These Songs Won't Do Any Good'), was harder, heavier,and more complicated than its predecessors. And for the first time, an Ortaçgil album had vocal effects. In 1998, he recorded Light which is thought to be his best work by the majority of his fans, aside from his landmark debut, of course. Ortaçgil, who had preferred to disguise his messages via the layers of his lyrics up to that point, chose to spell out his social criticism more clearly and loudly with Light.
    1999's Eski Defterler ('Old Books') should be seen as a reinterpretation rather than a best-of album. Believing that songs are living organisms, Ortaçgil re-recorded his pre-'90s songs, reinterpreting them to show what they've come to mean to him over the years. In 2000, first decent tribute album for a Turkish artist was recorded in his name. The album contained cover versions of Ortaçgil songs from 22 Turkish artists with different backgrounds. These artists varied from popular rock acts like Bulutsuzluk Özlemi, Mor Ve Ötesi, and Sebne Ferah to pop diva Sezen Aksu and jazz queen Yîldîz Ibrahimova. Ortaçgil recorded his own studio album in 2003. For Gece Yalanlari ('Night Lies') he recruited a string quartet aside from his classic lineup. In 2007, he released two albums: a live recording of his collaborations with pop act Teoman, and Buyukler Icin Cocuk Sarkilari ('Children's Songs for Grown-Ups'), which features his work with Fikret Kizilok from the '80s when the two recorded children's songs for a TV program. Bülent Ortaçgil lives half of the year in Bozburun - a coastal village - and the rest in Istanbul where he performs live time to time."



    Benimle Oynar Mısın

    or

    Benimle Oynar Mısın


    0 0


    1. Richard's Tune 18:10
    2. Dialogue Between Malcolm and Betty 21:47

    Don Pullen - Organ, Piano
    Jeff Berlin - Bass
    Steve Jordan - Drums
    Raphael Cruz - Percussion
    Sammy Figueroa - Percussion

    AMG:
    "A masterful inside/outside pianist whose percussive solos often made his music sound more accessible than one would expect (considering the fact that he often played atonally), Don Pullen is heard on two extensive side-long explorations on this LP: 'Richard's Tune' and 'Dialogue Between Malcolm and Betty'. Pullen is assisted by electric bassist Jeff Berlin, drummer Steve Jordan, and on the latter piece, both Raphael Cruz and Sammy Figueroa on percussion."



    Montreux Concert

    or

    Montreux Concert


    0 0


    1. Por La Mañana 2:38
    2. Oda a la Gente Mediocre 3:07
    3. Hay Un Extraño Esperando en la Puerta 1:49
    4. Si la Guerra Es Buen Negocio, Invierte A Tus Hijos 2:14
    5. Reflejos de la Olla 3:01
    6. Historia de un Loto Que Florecio en Otoño 3:34
    7. Niños 2:09
    8. No Como Antes 2:47
    9. La La Banda Le Hace Ud. Caer en Cuenta Que... 2:42
    10. Nosotros, Nuestra Arcadia, Nuestra Hermanita Pequeña, Gracias por los Buenos Ratos 2:50
    11. Un Sueño Mágico 2:08
    12. Salmo Siglo XX, Era de la Destrucción 2:39

    Rodrigo García - Guitar, Harpsichord, Guitar, Piano, Harmonica, Vocals
    Moisés Castellanos – Clarinet
    Fernando Acuña – Recorder
    Miguel Ospina – Saxophone
    Efrain Herrera – Tenor Saxophone
    Hautkoppet – Oboe
    Jorge Rodriguez – Trumpet
    Neftali Garcia – Tuba
    Humberto MonroyBass – Drums, Glass Harmonica
    Roberto Fiorilli – Drums, Bongos, Guiro

    AMG:
    "Colombia was not exactly a fertile breeding ground for '60s rock groups, but los Speakers are one of the few from that country - indeed, one of the few from anywhere in South America - to have been discovered by intense '60s collectors. Singing mostly in Spanish, they released a fair album in 1966 with an odd but appealingly crude, echo-laden production and arrangements. Amidst the Byrds and Beatles covers are more interesting original tunes with sad, sentimental melodies and strange touches of weepy brass."



    En El Maravilloso Mundo De Ingeson

    or

    En El Maravilloso Mundo De Ingeson


    0 0


    1. Death of an Analogue 12:19
    2. Weird Caravan 5:08
    3. The Looper Isn't a Hooker 8:22
    4. Synthasy 22:59

    Klaus Schulze - Keyboards, Vocals
    Fred Severloh - Drums

    AMG:
    "Dig It is a pure Berlin school CD by Klaus Schulze. Deep sequences, persistent rhythms, metallic atmospheres, and sci-fi sound effects dominate the sound design. Schulze uses only electronic instruments to construct these psychedelic walls of sound. This album is from 1980, during an era when this kind of e-music had no real home. It is too heavy for new age and too avant-garde for rock & roll. But it has distinct rock & roll influences. There are definite similarities to '60s acid rock and progressive rock from the late '60s and early '70s. It is more intricate and complicated than those styles, but the echoes don't lie. This is a very interesting CD with a cool retro sound. It will appeal to fans of early Pink Floyd and early Tangerine Dream."



    Dig It

    or

    Dig It


    0 0


    0 0


    1. Lizard Eyes 5:30
    2. Don't Be A Cry Baby, Whatever You Do 6:35
    3. So Small, So Weak, This Body Sweat Of Loving 4:25
    4. Headfirst Into The Flames 3:00
    5. A Knight Of Ghosts And Shadows 6:25
    6. Jesus! What Gorgeous Monkeys We Are 11:01
    7. Hanged Men Are Always Naked 10:05
    8. No One Knows Anything 5:15
    9. I Must Confess I'm A Cannibal 10:40

    Peter Brötzmann – Reeds
    Sonny Sharrock – Guitar
    Bill Laswell – Bass
    Shannon Jackson - Drums

    AMG:
    "Never let it be said that Last Exit didn't take advantage of recording their live shows or playing in front of adoring Europeans. With cover art and song titles courtesy of the late avant-garde British poet Kenneth Patchen, Headfirst kicks off with the brain fry of 'Lizard Eyes' only to launch into a Sharrock improv called 'Don't Be a Cry Baby, Whatever You Do.' Brotzmann blows wild and free here, and his squeal and blurt provides a great counterpoint to the rumble of the rhythms and the pummeling sonic overload of Sharrock's guitar. Another piece of blurt that will make you head spin."



    Headfirst Into The Flames

    or

    Headfirst Into The Flames


    0 0


    1. Future Song 4:07
    2. Crabs 5:06
    3. Moses in the Bullrushourses 3:40
    4. What the Morning Was After 5:30
    5. The Pirate's Dream 11:06
    6. Same Old Thing 6:27
    7. Moses In The Bullrushourses (Live) 7:43
    8. The Pirate's Dream (Live) 10:18
    9. No Amount Of Loving (Live) 9:24
    10. I'll Go Back To Venus 3:43
    11. I Can't Get It 2:58

    Chris Farlowe - vocals
    Dick Heckstall-Smith - winds
    Caleb Quaye - guitars
    Chris Spedding - guitar
    Dave Greenslade - piano
    Graham Bond - organ, synths
    Gordon Beck - keyboards
    Mark Clarke - bass, vocals
    Jon Hiseman - drums
    Rob Tait - drums
    Paul Williams - vocals

    AMG:
    "Rather than a story ended, Dick Heckstall-Smith's debut album was in some ways a continuation of the stories written by his previous bands Colosseum and the Graham Bond Organisation. For the record was recorded with the assistance of several of his past associates from those two groundbreaking British blues-rock-jazz groups, including Mark Clarke, Dave Greenslade, Chris Farlowe, and Jon Hiseman (who both played drums and produced) of the just-disbanded Colosseum, as well as Graham Bond. Pete Brown, who'd worked with several of the musicians who sprang from the Graham Bond Organisation crowd, co-wrote most of the songs with Heckstall-Smith; Chris Spedding and famed Elton John sideman Caleb Quaye contributed guitar. As often happens on solo projects stuffed with contributions by famous friends, however, the album was something of a disappointment in comparison to the leader's respectable track record. It sounds like a slightly heavier, slightly jazzier Colosseum, with songs that strain and tumble over themselves where the best Colosseum tracks had a powerful glide. Vocals were never Colosseum's strong suit, but the singing here, particularly on those tracks paced by Farlowe's blustery bellow, really drags the lyrically ambitious (and at times convoluted) material down. It might have been better to have had Pete Brown himself sing on those numbers he co-composed, as he was capable of projecting a real sense of his lyrics in spite of his vocal limitations. Instead we're left with a confused-sounding (and at times grating) set that doesn't add up to the sum of the individual talents, though in the most melodic and laid-back number ('What the Morning Was After'), you get a hint of the kind of moody songs that Brown helped craft for Jack Bruce's early solo recordings."



    A Story Ended

    or

    A Story Ended


    0 0


    1. El Chancho 15:18
    2. In the Tradition of Switzerland 9:21
    3. No One Can Explain It 6:27
    4. The Holy Grail of Jazz and Joy 25:20

    Sheila Jordan - Vocals
    Charlie Mariano - Flute, Reeds, Sax (Alto), Sax (Soprano)
    Seppo Paakkunainen - Flute, Reeds, Sax (Tenor)
    Ernst-Ludwig Petrowsky - Clarinet, Reeds, Sax (Alto), Sax (Soprano)
    Howard Johnson - Clarinet, Clarinet (Bass), Sax (Baritone), Tuba
    Tom Varner - French Horn
    Palle Mikkelborg - Flugelhorn, Trumpet
    Peter Gordon - French Horn
    Marcus Belgrave - Flugelhorn, Trumpet
    Dave Bargeron - Euphonium, Trombone
    Tom Harrell - Flugelhorn, Trumpet
    Bill Pusey - Flugelhorn, Trumpet
    Julian Priester - Trombone
    David Taylor - Trombone, Trombone (Bass)
    Dino Saluzzi - Bandoneon
    George Gruntz - Keyboards
    Mark Egan - Bass
    Bob Moses - Drums

    AMG:
    "The unusual Theatre is nearly as much theater and performance art as it is jazz. The music is frequently dramatic, featuring the vocals of Sheila Jordan on two of the four works. 'El Chancho' is a showcase for the bandoneon of Dino Saluzzi, while the 25-minute 'The Holy Grail of Jazz and Joy' has portrayals of the Knights of the Round Table with short spots for many of the musicians in the all-star group. Slightly more conventional are 'In the Tradition of Switzerland' (even if it has a spot for Seppo 'Baron' Paakkunainen on a Finnish birch bark flute) and 'No One Can Explain It' (though Jordan's vocal is otherworldly). There are solo spots along the way for avant-garde altoist and soprano saxophonist Ernst-Ludwig Petrowsky, trombonists Dave Bargeron, bass trombonist David Taylor, and trumpeter Palle Mikkelborg. However the music overall is for selective tastes and it never really seems to flow, making it of limited interest."



    Theatre

    or

    Theatre


    0 0


    The Perilous Night, for prepared piano
    1. I 2:27
    2. II 0:49
    3. III 4:32
    4. IV 1:07
    5. V 0:38
    6. VI 3:28

    Four Walls, for voice & piano
    7. Act One. Scene I 3:07
    8. Act One. Scene II 3:59
    9. Act One. Scene III 6:35
    10. Act One. Dance. Scene IV 6:46
    11. Act One. Dance. Scene V 4:03
    12. Act One. Scene VI 3:14
    13. Act One. Scene VII (vocal interlude) 2:26
    14. Act One. Scene VIII 3:30
    15. Act Two. Scene IX 5:36
    16. Act Two. Scene X 2:05
    17. Act Two. Scene XI 4:10
    18. Act Two. Scene XII 1:13
    19. Act Two. Scene XIII 11:24

    Margaret Leng Tan - Piano, Prepared Piano
    Joan La Barbara - Soprano (Vocal)

    AMG:
    "This beautiful piece for piano solo, with a scene for unaccompanied solo voice in the middle, is of approximately one hour's duration. It was written originally as music for a theater piece, a 'dance play' psychodrama about a family conceived by the dancer Merce Cunningham, which had only one performance in Steamboat Springs, Colorado on August 22, 1944. The music is played entirely on the white keys of the piano, which gives the work natural modal qualities, and the music is not complex, as it was designed to be easily played by a pianist unknown to either Cage or Cunningham, and there was no travel money for Cage to attend the rehearsals with the pianist. All of these circumstances resulted in a work of direct, evocative, mesmerizing musical gestures, some set off by silences of varying length, some of insistent rhythm with simple variation. There are 14 Scenes, plus 2 sections for dance alone, each with a different dynamic - the text they were to accompany, now lost, can only be imagined by the listener. The text for the solo singer in Scene VII reads 'Sweet love, my throat is gurgling, the mystic mouth, leads me so defted, and the black nightingale, turned willowly by love's tossed treatment, berefted.' Written at a time when Cage was considering the serious move of ceasing to write music in order to devote time to being psychoanalysed, the title (as in the expression 'staring at four walls' for intense, cabin-fever boredom) must have taken on poignant personal significance for the composer. He resolved to keep on with music, which lead to the radical and highly influential solutions of his post-1950 work."



    The Perilous Night/Four Walls

    or

    The Perilous Night/Four Walls


    0 0


    1. Flamenco Zero 1:45
    2. Why Do We Treat Ourselves Like We Do? 6:45
    3. Tally & Orlando Meet The Cockpot Pixie 3:13
    4. See You On The Moontower 5:46
    5. Poet For Sale 3:55
    6. Crocodile Nonsens Poem 1:00
    7. Only Make Love If You Want To 5:29
    8. I Am 11:04
    9. Deya Goddess 6:36

    Daevid Allen - guitar, vocals
    Victor Peraino - synthesizer
    Pepsi Milan - tablas
    Juan Biblioni - tablas
    Sam Gopal - tablas
    Vera Blum - violin (2)
    Xaver Riba - violin (4)
    Marianne Oberascher - harp (8)

    AMG:
    "The follow-up to Good Morning is another tranquil, organic outing by Allen that re-introduces his imaginary green hero, Zero, from the Gong trilogy. Allen is his usual playful self, although by this time the flying teapot/pothead pixie fixation was getting a little stale. No matter, since the music wafts along at a casual pace, with unusual sounds such as tablas by Sam Gopal and harp by Marianne Oberascher.
    Despite his seeming frivolity, Allen has always had a vein of counterculture protest running through his music, and this comes to fruition in 'Poet for Sale,' a song that Allen directs with venom toward the business end of music. 'Only Make Love If You Want To' is a hypnotic piece driven by a carousel-sounding synthesizer and Allen's sly vocals. 'I Am' is an 11-minute musical rendering of a Daevid Allen morning meditation from his home in Deya, Majorca. Like 'Wise Man in Your Heart' from Good Morning, this tune harkens to the spacy side of Gong, with Allen's patented glissando guitar creating a serene, meditative state. The record closes with the acoustic 'Deya Goddess,' dedicated to the moon goddess Diana. It's an appropriate coda to Now Is the Happiest Time of Your Life, one of the most pleasant records to spring from the fertile mind of rock's oldest and most overlooked hippie poet."



    Now Is the Happiest Time of Your Life

    or

    Now Is the Happiest Time of Your Life


older | 1 | .... | 53 | 54 | (Page 55) | 56 | 57 | newer