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FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | .... | 52 | 53 | (Page 54) | 55 | 56 | 57 | newer

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    1. Love 200 20:04
    2. Sights & Sounds of 69 32:09

    Terry Wilson - vocals, guitar, flute
    Richard Lockwood - flute, sax, clarinet, piano
    Michael Carlos - keyboards
    John Blake - bass
    Ken Firth - bass
    Robert Taylor - drums

    chaptermusic:
    "Two rare live recordings from quintessential Sydney prog group Tully, including their 1970 performance of Australia’s first ever rock opera. These recordings capture the band in their first incarnation, before they joined forces with members of revered folk-psych band Extradition to explore more contemplative territory.
    Sights & Sounds Of 69, from a May show of the same name, is the only live Tully recording to have survived the intervening four decades, and documents a typically far-ranging, mind-expanding performance.
    Perhaps Australia’s greatest living composer, Peter Sculthorpe wrote Love 200 specifically with Tully and vocalist Jeannie Lewis in mind. The work, commemorating Captain Cook’s expedition to map the Transit of Venus in 1769, was dismissed by the stuffy classcial establishment at the time, but Sculthorpe now calls it simply “one of my best works.” Heard here for the first time since the early 70s, Love 200 is an astounding piece, both elegant and jarring, serene and chaotic.
    Sadly, all three of Tully’s studio albums are still to be officially reissued. Until then, Live at Sydney Town Hall, 1969-70 is a fascinating insight into the early work of one of Australia’s most heralded, but least heard bands."



    Live at Sydney Town Hall

    or

    Live at Sydney Town Hall


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    1. Feel It 3:46
    2. Mato Pato 4:07
    3. Puerto 5:36
    4. I Think Of You 3:10
    5. New Morning 3:04
    6. Digno Dschirglo 4:17
    7. Primrose Samba 4:45
    8. Song For Paul 5:05
    9. Stars And Clouds 4:38
    10. The Ballad 1:25

    Kitty Winter – Vocals
    Martin Spiegelberg – Acoustic Guitar, Flugelhorn, Percussion
    Kuno Schmid – Piano, Electric Piano, Synthesizer, Percussion
    Willi Gärtner – Electric Bass, Percussion
    Ringo Hirth – Drums, Congas, Timbales, Percussion

    fagostore:
    "One of the most sought after European bossa / vocal jazz albums."



    Feel It

    or

    Feel It


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    1. Come with Me 2:58
    2. Honey Chile 2:40
    3. Tell Me No Lies 1:57
    4. Alice Is There 2:43
    5. I Dig Your Act 2:23
    6. I Know Why 4:04
    7. I Can Show You 2:42
    8. Forever 2:50
    9. Mr. Whippy 2:23
    10. Start by Giving to Me 3:32
    11. If I Had the Time 3:36
    12. Home 3:06
    13. Orphan 2:53
    14. Lady Scorpio 2:27
    15. Nature 2:53
    16. Bang On Harry 2:26
    17. My Mama George 3:03
    18. Fortune 2:37
    19. Cosy Picture Theatre 2:43
    20. Sally's Line 3:10
    21. Fun 3:03

    Carl Evenson - vocals
    Martin Hope - guitar, vocals
    Wayne Mason - keyboards
    Ali Richardson - bass
    Chris Parry - drums

    AMG:
    "The success of Fourmyula marked a major turning point in the development of New Zealand rock: to an industry long dependent on cover versions of international hits, this Hutt Valley-based quintet offered proof positive that native talent could reach the national charts on the strength of their own original material. Fourmyula evolved in early 1967 from the ranks of the Insect, a fixture of area high school dances and other social gatherings; comprising vocalist/guitarist Martin Hope, keyboardist Wayne Mason, bassist Alistair Richardson, and drummer Chris Parry, their popularity soared after they took home top honors in a 'National Battle of the Sounds' competition, although the consensus was that they needed a stronger lead vocalist. Toward that aim, singer Carl Evensen was recruited from Kal-Q-Lated Risk, with Hope now focusing solely on guitar duties.
    After buying an instructional book on songwriting, Mason and Richardson penned Fourmyula's first original composition, 'Come with Me'; it was originally scheduled to appear as the B-side to their 1968 debut single, 'Honey Child,' a cover of a Martha & the Vandellas hit, but their label HMV took such a liking to the new song that 'Come with Me' was instead promoted as the A-side. The single was a smash, reaching the number two spot on the Kiwi charts; overnight, Fourmyula became superstars, and Mason and Richardson quickly wrote a dozen new songs for release as their self-titled 1968 LP debut. Demand for the group was so high that HMV even issued two new singles, 'Alice Is There' and 'I Know Why,' simultaneously; both rocketed into the Top Ten, and after quickly recording a sophomore album, Green B. Holiday, the band toured Britain, later recording the single 'Lady Scorpio' at the famed Abbey Road studios.
    Fourmyula spent four months overseas, catching live appearances from groups including Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple, and Spooky Tooth; acknowledging that their mod aesthetic was out of touch with emerging trends, they grew their hair out and adopted a heavier, louder sound which they intended to introduce upon returning home. New Zealand audiences were baffled by the new, heavy metal-influenced Fourmyula, however, and after just one disastrous gig, they returned to their trademark four-part harmonies and softly psychedelic pop. Their third LP, Creation, appeared in late 1969, followed by the chart-topping single 'Nature'; Mason was now the group's sole songwriter, and as the band returned to Europe to tour, his material again adopted a heavier approach. To avoid conflict with a similarly named group, Fourmyula rechristened themselves Pipp; after scoring a minor hit with the 1970 single 'Otaki,' their fortunes dwindled, and by the following year, they were no more. Parry later founded Fiction Records."



    Inside The Hutt

    or

    Inside The Hutt


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    1. Parade at the Funny Farm 8:21
    2. Head Amusement 0:32
    3. Raunchy Boog a Loo 3:01
    4. After Six 2:31
    5. The Truth 3:12
    6. Head Games and Other Assorted Crap 6:11
    7. Head Job 3:02
    8. Happy Academy 3:46
    9. Trans Luv Airlines 3:50
    10. Let's Split 2:53

    AMG:
    "Little is known about this late-'60s band other than they were Canadian, recorded their sole album Bedlam on the Burnaby, British Columbia-based Condor exploit label (home to a wide diversity of bands, among them Latin Holiday, Blues Train, the Surf Riders, and the Jimmy Cole Unlimited), and were intensely weird even for the era. From there, perhaps appropriately enough, everything gets a bit fuzzy.
    Much of the Crazy People legend is couched in mystery and subject to various rumors and speculation. It is thought, because of the label it is on, that the band was actually an exploitation studio project rather than a proper combo. The most plausible theory is that it is the brainchild of Johnny Kitchen, whose name may seem terribly arcane to the casual music fan but is well-known among '60s collectors despite the fact that his identity remains a complete enigma. What is known about Kitchen is that he was something of a poor-man's Kim Fowley. He had a hand in literally dozens of crazed and experimental underground records in America during the latter years of the decade. Ending up in Los Angeles in late 1968 or early 1969, he began making records on the Crestview label beginning with the self-titled Victims of Chance debut. He was also involved that year with the bizarre first album from certified schizophrenic and acid freakazoid Larry 'Wild Man' Fischer, Evening with Wild Man Fischer, which was released on Frank Zappa's Bizarre label.
    This is where a connection turns up that is both veiled in conjecture and seemingly more than coincidental. Fischer's album shares not a few similarities with the Crazy People album. In fact, the two contain a couple identical elements, including an entire chorus and vocal on one song. Some attribute the shared moments to pure happenstance or perhaps musical borrowings. Others (among them Gear Fab head Roger Maglio in the CD reissue liner notes) have suggested that the two albums are possibly the work of a single man: Wild Man Fischer himself, who perhaps also used the pseudonym Johnny Kitchen for outside projects. Crazy People's Bedlam precedes Fischer's debut by nearly a year, and, in fact, it is known that Kitchen was in Canada during 1968, involved in another Condor release, The World With the Trio of Tyme. He has two songwriting credits on Bedlam as well. From there the guessing game gets muddier and more inexact, and other plausible names have been tossed around, including a local Vancouver personality, television weatherman Jack Millman, who also has several songs on the album. More than likely, however, the truth of the matter has lived and died with the 1960s themselves."



    Bedlam

    or

    Bedlam


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    1. Stusle Sundagskvelden 5:54
    2. La Mélancolie 4:25
    3. Belg og slag 4:12
    4. Grålysning 3:10
    5. Sylkje-Per 3:49
    6. Solstraum 5:25
    7. Theme From Nocturne 1:52
    8. Eg ser deg utfor gluggjen 4:57
    9. Ole Bull-vals 2:29
    10. I Rosenlund under Sagas Hall / La Folia 5:27
    11. Tjødn 3:29
    12. Jeg har så lun en hytte 4:32
    13. Solveigs sang 3:32
    14. Sylkje-Per 4:00
    15. Mélancolie 2:18
    16. Sæterjentens Søndag 2:25

    Nils Økland - Hardanger Fiddle, Violin
    Sigbjørn Apeland - Harmonium, Piano

    allaboutjazz:
    "The problem with being tagged as traditional is an inherent and immediate perception as being somehow retro or backwards-looking when, in truth, traditions ought to be living, breathing things whose definable frames of reference aren't necessarily confined by them. Norwegian violinist Nils Økland and pianist/harmonium player Sigbjørn Apeland know this better than most; in their 1982 trio, with drummer Øyvind Skarbo, they mine a most contemporary kind of free improvisation that can't help but be informed by the traditional Norwegian music that's been a consuming focus for the entire trio. Lysøen, with Økland and Apeland sharing the marquee, harkens back to an earlier time in its homage to violinist/composer Ole Bull (1810-1880), who bought the island of Lysøen, off the coast of Bergen, in 1872, building an opulent summer home that remains an attraction to this day.
    While overt extemporization went out of vogue with classical musicians in the 1850s, Bull remained known as a powerful improviser, drawing on a broad variety of sources both internal and external to his native country. A relative contemporary of Edvard Grieg—who became better-known internationally for his Peer Gynt suite—Bull was a mover and shaker in his own right, soliciting parliamentary funding (but, sadly, refused) for a Norwegian music academy to focus on the country's rich tradition. In a program that combines Bull originals with uncredited traditional sources, new original music and a couple of spontaneous compositions, Økland and Apeland give Bull the attention he deserves, with a recital that brings Norwegian traditionalism into the 21st century—or, at least, demonstrating that this music remains timeless in a new millennium.
    'Belg og slag' harkens to contemporary minimalism, with Økland striking, rather than drawing, his bow over the strings, creating a persistent eighth-note pulse with shifting harmonics—a concept explored solo, to even greater effect , on 'Solstraum'—under which Apeland's rich harmonium creates a slowly unfolding landscape. 'Grålysning' is more tranquil, Apeland's piano giving its harmonic stasis life like gentle ripples in a pond, while Økland's remarkable bow work—sometimes so delicate as to be more like breathing—hints at an unexpected link with Poland's Zbigniew Seifert, who mined similar modal territory but with more passionate fire on 'Stillness,' from the late violinist's Man of the Light (MPS, 1977).
    Two versions of Bull's appropriately titled 'La Mélancolie' nearly bookend the disc, one with piano (and a lengthy a capella intro), the other harmonium, while the traditional, 'Sylkje-Per' is similarly treated, the harmonium-driven version possessing a soft majesty, while its piano-based sister, a solo feature for Apeland, evoking a more pastoral feeling.
    Throughout, Økland and Apeland's instrumental mastery and adherence to the core of each song creates a compelling entry point into music largely overlooked and ultimately forgotten, but deserving another look more than 130 years after its source left this mortal coil. More than any of its other many successes, Lysøen: Hommage à Ole Bull suggests that international attention on Norway's music scene is, in fact, a latecomer to a party that's been going on for two centuries. Time to catch up."



    Lysoen (Hommage a Ole Bull)

    or

    Lysoen (Hommage a Ole Bull)


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    1. I'm Glad There Is You
    2. Polka Dots and Moonbeams
    3. One for My Baby (And One More for the Road)
    4. I hear music
    5. Autumn in New York
    6. I Can't Give You Anything But Love
    7. Spring Is Here
    8. These Foolish Things
    9. From This Moment On
    10. The Things We Did Last Summer
    11. Too Marvelous for Words
    12. But Not for Me

    Oscar Peterson – Piano, Vocals
    Barney Kessel – Guitar (1-7,10-12)
    Herb Ellis - Guitar (8,9)
    Ray Brown – Bass

    AMG:
    "Over a decade prior to Oscar Peterson's 1965 vocal tribute to Nat King Cole, the pianist recorded a series of vocal numbers (over three sessions between 1952 and 1954) for Verve, accompanied by his regular trio (bassist Ray Brown and either Barney Kessel or Herb Ellis on guitar). Peterson's interpretations of the dozen standards, all ballads, are generally slow. His vocals are warm and friendly, though they lack the variety of an established singer. His emphasis is more on his singing than his piano, which is rather conservative when compared to his instrumental recordings. His swinging treatment of 'I Hear Music' is a bit brisker than most of the other tracks, with both the leader and Kessel taking solos. This obscure LP is lesser known than With Respect to Nat but Peterson fans are advised to look for it, as they will enjoy him in a more relaxed setting. The album was reissued in Europe during the 1980s but it will be fairly difficult to find."



    Romance

    or

    Romance


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    1. Sing Don't Speak
    2. Celestial Plain
    3. Sing Don't Speak
    4. 2 B Free
    5. Summer
    6. Morning Light
    7. Glittery Obituary
    8. Get It All To Me
    9. My Oh My
    10. Bye Bye Birmingham
    11. Messiah
    12. You Need Love
    13. Moonshine
    14. Corrie

    Tom Farmer - Bass, Keyboards, Lead Vocals
    Eddie Galga - Lead Guitar, Keyboards, Vocals
    Alan Jones - Guitar, Vocals
    Dave Farmer - Drums, Vocals

    AMG:
    "Blackfoot Sue don’t immediately spring to mind when discussing early 70s hit-makers; indeed, they don’t even qualify for the more recent back-handed compliment of being classed “junk shop glam”, scoring a No 4 single in August 1972 before disappearing forever. There was a time, however, when they meant something to pre-pubescent glam fans whose only source of information was Disco 45, TOTP and the Radio 1 chart run-down.
    Bearded hipsters who perused NME and Melody Maker were, however, more able to follow the rise and fall of this able but oddly misplaced bunch of rock/ glamsters. The No 4 single was Standing In The Road – not unlike Slade with strange percussion – but, by the time glam kids flipped its B-side, Celestial Plane, they were already hearing more straightforward rock. Follow-up single Sing Don’t Speak scraped into the Top 40 at No 36, with shades of the Glitter Band, but it just revealed a band with an identity crisis. Third single, the dreamy, breezy instrumental Summer, was reminiscent of Fleetwood Mac’s Albatross and only confused potential fans further.
    All these years later, though, this set – which rounds up most of the troupe’s single tracks – reveals a strong rock band with some finely-crafted songs."



    The Singles Collection

    or

    The Singles Collection


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    1. Old Fashion 5:41
    2. Don't Break Step 5:49
    3. Lost in Little Space 5:02
    4. Piece 4:36
    5. It's Done 6:24
    6. Square Brown 6:34
    7. Where Am I? 3:36
    8. Kannada 7:08
    9. Mike's 'Piece' 0:45
    10. Old Men's Home 4:49
    11. All in a Row 3:57
    12. The Same New Story 7:41

    Mike Mainieri - Vibraphone
    Marnix Busstra - Bouzouki, Guitar, Sitar (Electric)
    Eric Van Der Westen - Double Bass
    Pieter Bast - Drums

    AMG:
    "Mike Mainieri's work as a leader or alongside his friends in Steps Ahead has never vaulted him to the top of the critics' polls, despite the fact that he is unquestionably a gifted vibraphonist and staunchly confident contemporary figurehead in the fusion-to-neo-bop movement. Perhaps this recording, with the equally talented guitarist Marnix Busstra, will allow both musicians the due they deserve. This is a finely crafted effort featuring all original compositions that expand the color palate of the principal's instruments while keeping volume levels out of the rock & roll range. There's taste and invention, colors and shadings, along with a good diversity when Mainieri plays minimalist-type rhythms or Busstra picks up a sitar or bouzouki. Acoustic double bassist Eric Van Der Westen and drummer Pieter Bast - like Busstra - are from the Netherlands where this band toured extensively, inspiring Mainieri to evolve his sound post-Seventh Avenue South/mean N.Y.C. streets, and away from rhythm & blues. At times, Busstra has the unmistakable influence of John Scofield shining through, as evident on the low, slow, lazy New Orleans rolled blues 'Old Men's Home,' the tick-tock beat in varying pacings and accents during the 12-tone-based 'All In a Row,' or the funky overdubbed 'Don't Break Step.' Then again, a distinct Eastern Indian feel creeps up within a tango saunter for the pretty and twangy 'Old Fashion,' or the resonant 'Lost in Little Spain,' with vibes and guitar unison lines with backdrop sitar leading to a modal vamp and uncharacteristic sky church guitar à la Jimi Hendrix. 'The Same New Story' is also based on the lustful Argentinean tango beat, but more in a light acoustic guitar-framed stance. The lush 'Piece' has the underlying rush work of Bast buoying subtle melodies and the insistent bass of Van Der Westen, while 'Square Brown' recalls Larry Coryell's strumming and singing guitars in brotherhood. There's a ballad of finality in 'It's Done,' a spare, free, atmospheric 'Where Am I?,' the adapted Indian vocal children's song 'Kannada,' and Mainieri doing a solo vibes snippet 'Mike's 'Piece'' in the middle of the ensemble segments. Mainieri himself is completely supportive of Busstra, and is happily a big and democratic part of this cohesive team. This is an excellent example of modern contemporary jazz music beholden to no vintage traditions, making its way on its own merits, which display a high degree of quality."



    Twelve Pieces

    or

    Twelve Pieces


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    1. Liliane 3:51
    2. La Femme Tuante 5:02
    3. Spanish Eyes 4:55
    4. Celoso 4:49
    5. I Can't Stop Loving You 4:27
    6. Summer Time 5:27
    7. Chachita 5:10
    8. La Paloma 5:21

    Webert Sicot - Flute, Alto Saxophone
    Rober Aaron - Tenor Saxophone, Piano
    Henry M. Gilles - Guitare
    Joe Charles - Basse
    Almando Keslin - Batterie

    Wiki:
    "Webert Sicot (1930 – February 1985) was a talented Haïtian sax player, composer and band leader. He is recognized as one of the creators of konpa dirèk, a style of Haïtian dance music born in the 1950s that he will name cadence rampa after he left Nemours band to make a difference in 1962. Because of his frequent Caribbean tours with his brother Raymond in the Caribbean, cadence became very popular in Dominica and the French Antilles of Guadeloupe and Martinique.
    Sicot was born in Port-au-Prince, Haití, in 1930. He took his first musical lessons from Augustin Bruno. He made his debut as professional with Claudin Toussaint's Jazz Capois. He also worked with the groups Jazz des Jeunes and the Saieh orchestra, in the second half or the 1950s.
    He founded with Nemours Jean-Baptiste the Conjunto Internacional and took part in the Citadelle orchestra and Casino Internacional Band. With Jean Baptiste, he created the konpa dirék, a variation of the Haïtian meringue. In 1961 he commenced a solo career and became one of the pioneers of cadence rampa. He played several instruments as trumpet, bass, piano and drums.
    Sicot died in February 1985 and is considered as one of the most influentials band leaders in Haïtian popular music."



    For Lovers

    or

    For Lovers


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    1. Descenso en el Mahellstrong 5:27
    2. Amantes de le Irrealidad 6:15
    3. Cobarde O Desertor 4:56
    4. Buenos Deseos 3:54
    5. Marchanda Una del Cid Pt. 1, 2 7:45
    6. Si Todo Hiciera Crack 10:11
    7. Epillogo 2:19

    Alberto Fontaneda - guitar, flute, vocals
    Rafael Rodríguez - guitar
    Mento Hevia - keyboards, vocals
    Alex Cabral - bass
    Manolo Jiménez - drums

    progarchives:
    "This Spanish band came from Gijon, the northern part of the Iberian Peninsula. The members were Alex Cakrul (bass), Alberto Fontaneda (guitar, flute and vocals), Mento Heria (keybaords and vocals), Manda Jimenez (drums) and Rafael Rodriguez (guitar).
    Their only album 'Si Todo Hiciera Crack' is one of the jewels of the Spanish progressive rock. It contains seven tracks, all with a beautiful harmony between keyboards, guitar and flute. There are hints of early Genesis (sensitive piano chords and moving Mellotron waves) and Jethro Tull (flute) but the typical Spanish climate and the elaborate compositions makes this album to an enthralling and emotional experience."



    Si Todo Hiciera Crack

    or

    Si Todo Hiciera Crack


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    1. Le Lundi au Soleil 2:59
    2. Nina, Nana 2:23
    3. Il N'Y a Que l'Amour Qui Rende Heureux 2:19
    4. On Ne Choisit Pas 2:38
    5. Soudain il Est Trop Tard 3:15
    6. Qu'on Ne Vienne Pas Me Dire 3:26
    7. Bélinda 2:38
    8. Une Fille et des Fleurs 2:51
    9. Celui Qui Reste 3:00
    10. L' Amour Se Meurt 2:37
    11. Mon Mensonge et Ma Vérité 3:01
    12. Tu as Tes Problemes, Moi J'Ai Les Miens 3:31

    AMG:
    "Along with Johnny Hallyday, Claude François was one of the biggest stars of French rock & roll, emerging during the so-called 'yé-yé' movement of the early '60s. Like Hallyday, his early success came mostly from French adaptations of English-language rock and folk hits, rather than from original material written specifically for him. However, his image -- immaculately coiffed hair and glitzy sequined suits -- played just as big a role in his popularity, and made him a major teen idol in his heyday, when fans dubbed him 'Clo-Clo.' He dressed his much-imitated quartet of backup dancers, the Clodettes, in even more flamboyant costumes (some self-designed), which gave his act a definite kitsch appeal and became a visual signature for much of his career. Appropriately for the singer who recorded the original version of the song that became 'My Way,' François lived the outsized life of a star, cycling through a series of high-profile affairs and acquiring a reputation for being extremely difficult to work with. Despite continued popularity, he endured a run of bad personal luck in the '70s that culminated in his freak accidental death at only 39 years old, electrocuting himself in the bathtub while changing a light bulb.
    Claude Marie Antoine François was born on February 1, 1939 in Ismailia, Egypt, where his French-born father worked as a shipping traffic controller on the Suez Canal. His Italian-born mother encouraged him musically, getting him into violin and piano lessons; François preferred the drums, however. When Egypt nationalized the Suez Canal in 1956, François and his family were repatriated to France, settling in Monte Carlo. His father fell seriously ill not long after, and François was forced to get a job and help support the family. He worked in a bank by day, but soon caught on as a drummer with local orchestras on the hotel and nightclub circuit. He made his professional debut with Louis Frozio in 1957, over his father's strenuous objections. Around 1959, François started to try his hand at singing, and proved a hit with resort audiences around the French Riviera. In 1961, he and his first wife moved to Paris.
    François found a gig performing with Les Gamblers, but soon decided to embark on a solo career, hoping to take advantage of the rock and roll fad emerging among the youth of Paris. Still in 1961, he landed a record deal and issued a debut single, 'Nabout Twist,' under the name Koko. It flopped. However, his second release, an Everly Brothers adaptation retitled 'Belles, Belles, Belles,' was a million-selling smash for Philips in 1962. Adopted as a teen idol by the French music press and the popular Salut Les Copains show, he scored several more hits over the next year, including 'Marche Tout Droit,''Pauvre Petite Fille Riche,''Dis-Lui,' and the late-1963 chart-topper 'Si J'Avais un Marteau' (a French version of 'If I Had a Hammer'). Thus established as a star, François embarked on a headlining tour of France in 1964, and wound it up with an appearance at the famed Olympia theater in Paris.
    François recorded prolifically during the mid-'60s, cranking out single after single and adaptation after adaptation. He added the first version of the Clodettes to his stage show in 1966, which gave him a whole new appeal in concert, and mounted another hugely successful tour. By now long since separated from his first wife, he had a brief and well-publicized romance with singer France Gall in 1967. In the aftermath of the breakup, he co-wrote and recorded a song called 'Comme d'Habitude,' which was later adapted by Paul Anka into the English-language pop standard 'My Way.' François started his own Flèche label in 1968, the same year he had the first of two children with a new girlfriend.
    François continued to perform and record with considerable success for the next few years, but broke down and collapsed on-stage in 1971 during a concert at Marseille. He recuperated in the Canary Islands for a short time, and returned to France only to break several bones in a serious car accident. In 1972, he discovered songwriter Patrick Juvet, who composed his smash hit 'Le Lundi au Soleil'; however, more bad luck followed, as François was found to owe more than two million francs in back taxes. He had several more hits in 1973, the biggest of which was 'Ça S'en Va et Ça Revient,' but suffered more misfortune when the windmill at his country home caught fire, and when he was accidentally head-butted by a fan during another concert at Marseille.
    François had a huge hit in 1974 with 'Le Telephone Pleure,' which when translated into English (as 'Tears on the Telephone') gave him his first U.K. chart single. While in the U.K. on a promotional tour in 1975, he narrowly avoided being killed by an IRA bombing. By this time, he had solved some of his financial problems by acquiring a couple of magazines (one teen-oriented, one with adult nude photography) and a modeling agency. In 1977 he reinvented himself as a disco singer with the smash hits 'Alexandrie, Alexandra' and 'Magnolias Forever,' two of the most enduringly popular songs of his career (and enhanced live by the Clodettes' disco routines). Sadly, they would also be the last. On March 11, 1978 -- not long after taping a U.K. TV special -- François was taking a bath at his Paris apartment when he noticed that the overhead light bulb needed changing. He stood up to do so, still standing in water, and was fatally electrocuted. News of his death was met by an outpouring of grief from French music fans, who continue to enjoy much of his latter-day work."

    Claude Francois - Le lundi au soleilby thisurf


    Le Lundi Au Soleil

    or

    Le Lundi Au Soleil


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    1. Sea Journey 9:19
    2. Nacada 4:15
    3. The Whopper 5:33
    4. B&G (Midwestern Night Dreams) 8:27
    5. Yellow Fields 7:03
    6. Claude And Betty 6:16

    Gary Burton - Vibraphone
    Pat Metheny - Guitar
    Steve Swallow - Guitar (Bass)
    Eberhard Weber - Bass
    Danny Gottlieb - Drums

    AMG:
    "Guitarist Pat Metheny was a member of vibraphonist Gary Burton's group from 1974-1976, but although he had recorded with Burton twice previously, both of those dates also included guitarist Mick Goodrick. This particular set puts more of a focus on Metheny in a quintet that also includes drummer Danny Gottlieb and both Steve Swallow and Eberhard Weber on basses. Metheny contributed three of the six selections, which are joined by a song apiece from Swallow, Weber, and Chick Corea ('Sea Journey'). Although none of the individual songs caught on, the attractive sound of the post-bop unit and an opportunity to hear Pat Metheny in his formative period make this a CD reissue worth exploring."



    Passengers

    or

    Passengers


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    1. A Rainbow in Curved Air, for electric piano, dumbak & tambourines (partially improvised) 18:39
    2. Poppy Nogood and the Phantom Band, for soprano sax, electronic keyboard & tape delay 21:38

    Terry Riley - Dumbek, Electric Harpsichord, Keyboards, Rocksichord, Sax (Soprano), Tambourine

    AMG:
    "After several graph compositions and early pattern pieces with jazz ensembles in the late '50s and early '60s (see 'Concert for Two Pianists and Tape Recorders' and 'Ear Piece' in La Monte Young's book An Anthology), Riley invented a whole new music which has since gone under many names (minimal music - a category often applied to sustained pieces as well - pattern music, phase music, etc.) which is set forth in its purest form in the famous 'In C' (1964) (for saxophone and ensemble, CBS MK 7178). 'Rainbow in Curved Air' demonstrates the straightforward pattern technique but also has Riley improvising with the patterns, making gorgeous timbre changes on the synthesizers and organs, and presenting contrasting sections that has become the basic structuring of his works ('Candenza on the Night Plain' and other pieces). Scored for large orchestra with extra percussion and electronics, some of this work's seven movements are: 'Star Night,''Blue Lotus,''The Earth Below,' and 'Island of the Rhumba King'."



    A Rainbow In Curved Air

    or

    A Rainbow In Curved Air


    0 0


    1. Concrete Sea 2:21
    2. I'm Gonna Love You Too 2:36
    3. Pumpkin Eater 2:44
    4. Again and Again 2:36
    5. Since Your Broke My Heart 2:29
    6. Fire on the Skyline 3:05
    7. The Love Game 2:17
    8. I'm So Lonely Here Today 2:23
    9. It's Been There from the Start 2:15
    10. Sail Away 3:02
    11. Seasons in the Sun 3:28. MOG.
    12. Put the Bone In 1:52
    13. If You Go Away 2:32
    14. Me and You 2:07
    15. Rock N Roll (I Gave You the Best Years of My Life) 3:44

    AMG:
    "It's been a long time since 'Seasons in the Sun' became a monster hit for Canadian Terry Jacks, but the syrupy 1974 single is still top dog among all best-sellers issued by Canadian acts. The release spent more than three months on the U.S. charts and more than four months on the charts in Jacks' native country. Its accumulated sales topped more than 11 million copies. Jacks, who moved on to producing for artists such as the Beach Boys, Nana Mouskouri, DOA, and Chilliwack, reaped the good life from the monster hit's royalties, which he acknowledged by naming his power boat Seasons in the Sun. Royalties also spill in from 'Which Way You Goin' Billy?' He and former wife Susan Pesklevits recorded the song under the name the Poppy Family in 1969. The release hit number two in the U.S. and topped the Canadian charts, raking in four Juno Awards and selling more than two million copies.
    Power boats and hit singles aside, life hasn't all been smooth sailing for Jacks. His marriage to Pesklevits dissolved in 1973. A second marriage produced a daughter, Holly, and later charges of spousal abuse. According to Canada's CNEWS, when officers in Sechelt, British Columbia, arrived at Jacks' home in 2001, they leveled a charge of improperly storing a firearm against him in addition to the abuse charge, although the rifle was not related to the alleged assault.
    As a youth, Jacks resisted family pressures to turn him into an architect. Favoring music instead, he joined the Vancouver-based Chessmen, playing guitar and providing vocals on a pair of singles released by London Records and on two more released by Mercury Records during the mid-'60s. Jacks met his first wife through the Chessmen's appearance on Music Hop, a Canadian television program. Eventually the pair formed the Poppy Family after recruiting guitarist Craig McCaw and Satwant Singh, who played the tabla.
    Before 'Which Way You Goin' Billy' landed the group in the spotlight, Jacks and the Poppy Family released two singles that didn't go anywhere, 'What Can the Matter Be' and 'Beyond the Clouds.' Later they scored two lesser hits, 'Where Evil Grows' and 'That's Where I Went Wrong.' But Jacks did not take well to performing live. That aversion, coupled with the pressures of stardom, led to his decision to break up the band. In 1973, he produced his wife's eponymous debut album and wrote one of the songs, 'I Thought of You Again,' which garnered a Juno Award nomination. Despite their working relationship, or perhaps because of it, Jacks and his wife split that year.
    A major concern for the musician is environmental pollution, and he has transformed himself into something of a major obstacle for large-scale pulp and logging companies that are suspected of noncompliance with Canadian pollution laws. To that end, he established an organization called Environmental Watch."



    Seasons In The Sun

    or

    Seasons In The Sun


    0 0
  • 12/31/13--04:43: Happy New Year!

  • 0 0


    1. One Mint Julep 9:04
    2. Women of Ireland 8:00
    3. Westchester Lady 7:23
    4. Storm King 6:33
    5. Jamaica Farewell 5:21

    Bob James - Keyboards
    Hubert Laws - Flute
    Eddie Daniels - Flute, Sax (Alto), Sax (Tenor)
    Grover Washington, Jr. - Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor)
    Jon Faddis - Horn, Trumpet
    Wayne Andre - Trombone
    Eric Gale - Guitar
    Gary King - Bass
    Harvey Mason, Sr. - Drums
    Idris Muhammad - Drums
    Ralph MacDonald - Percussion
    Rudy Van Gelder - Engineer
    and others...

    AMG:
    "By Three, Bob James - the pianist, composer, and arranger - was deep into jazz-funk. The five tracks here reflect his obsession with hard, danceable grooves that take as much from the soul-jazz book as they do his years with CTI. Using many of the same session players he bonded with at his former label - including Eric Gale, Hugh McCracken, Hubert Laws, Will Lee, and Harvey Mason - and a large host of stellar horn players (among them Lew Soloff and Jon Faddis), James offers five selections of simple but fun jazz-pop. On 'One Mint Julep,' Grover Washington's tenor goes head to head with James' Rhodes and synths. 'Women of Ireland' is a solid take on the ballad with fine guitar work from Gale as a contrast to the watershed of strings. The laid-back, space groove contains another killer solo by Washington, while 'Westchester Lady' borders on disco without ever falling headlong into it. The closer, 'Jamaica Farewell,' is another shimmering ballad with a whistle solo by Washington playing the melody. The faux-reggae rhythm and slippery bassline are the only things that keep it from slipping into a lightweight ether. Unfortunately, the Koch CD reissues do not contain the bonus track 'Look Look.' The remastered sound is welcome, though, and while the sound here is somewhat dated, the feel is timeless."



    Three

    or

    Three


    0 0


    1. Mungo Jerry - In The Summertime
    2. B.J. Thomas - Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head
    3. Freda Payne - Band Of Gold
    4. The Beach Boys - Cotton Fields
    5. Jimmy Cliff - Vietnam
    6. Blue Mink - Cood Morning Freedom
    7. Canned Heat - Let's Work Together
    8. Shocking Blue - Never Marry A Railroad Man
    9. Herman's Hermits - Years May Go
    10. Pipkins - Gimme Dat Ding
    11. Dave Edmunds - I Hear You Knokin'
    12. Tee Set - She Likes Weeds
    13. Ray Stevens - Everything Is Beautiful
    14. The Hollies - Gasoline Alley Bred
    15. Al Martino - Spanish Eyes
    16. Glen Campbell & Bobbie Gentry - All I Have To Do Is Dream
    17. Tom Jones - I (Who Have Nothing)
    18. Georg Baker Selection - Little Green Bag
    19. Shirley Bassey - Something
    20. The Hollies - I Can't Tell The Bottom From The Top



    1. Peter Noone - Oh Your Pretty Thing
    2. Tom Jones - She's A Lady
    3. Greyhound - Black & White
    4. Ike & Tina Turner - Proud Mary
    5. Helen Reddy - I Don't Know To Love Him
    6. Fortunes - Here Comes That Rain Day Feeling Again
    7. Mungo Jerry - Baby Jump
    8. Focus - Hocus Pocus
    9. CCS - Tap Turns On The Water
    10. Atomic Rooster - The Devil's Answer
    11. The Buoys - Give Up Your Guns
    12. Blue Mink - The Bannerman
    13. Dave & Ansel Collins - Double Barrel
    14. Fortunes - Freedom Come, Freedom Go
    15. Engelbert Humperdinck - Another Time, Another Place
    16. Nitty Gritty Dirt Band - Mr. Bojangles
    17. Cilla Black - Something Tells Me (Something's Gonna Happen Tonight)
    18. Hurricane Smith - Don't Let It Die
    19. Benny Hill - Ernie The Fastest Milkman In The West
    20. The Congregation - Softly Whispering I Love You



    1. Don McLean - American Pie
    2. Lynsey De Paul - Sugar Me
    3. Joe Tex - I Gotcha
    4. Earth & Fire - Memories
    5. E.L.O. - 1538 Overture
    6. Hawkwind - Silver Machine
    7. The Raspberries - Go All The Way
    8. 10CC - Donna
    9. Hot Butter - Popcorn
    10. Fortunes - Storm In A Teacup
    11. Donnie Elbert - Where Did Our Love Go
    12. The Hollies - Long Cool Woman In A Black Dress
    13. Lieutenant Pigeon - Mouldy Old Dough
    14. Les Humphries Singers - Mexico
    15. Alex Harvey - You Make My Life So Beautiful
    16. New World - Sister Jane
    17. Gary Glitter - Rock & Roll (Part 1)
    18. Tom Jones - The Young New Mexican Puppeteer
    19. Hurricane Smith - Oh Babe What Would You Say
    20. Lynsey De Paul - Getting A Drag



    1. E.L.O. - Roll Over Beethoven
    2. Focus - Sylvia
    3. Wizzard - See My Baby Jive
    4. Ike & Tina Turner - Nutbush City Limits
    5. 10CC - Rubber Bullets
    6. Bobby Goldsboro - Summer (The First Time)
    7. Blue Suede - Hooked On A Feeling
    8. Golden Earring - Radar Love
    9. Suzi Quatro - Can The Can
    10. Cozy Powell - Dance With The Devil
    11. Mud - Dyna mite
    12. Gary Gitter - I'm The Leader Of The Gang
    13. New York City - I'm Doin' Fine Now
    14. Al Wilson - Show And Tell
    15. Helen Reddy - Delta Draw
    16. Lynsey de Paul - Won't Somebody Dance With Me
    17. Leo Sayer - The Show Must Go On
    18. Kenny - Heart Of Stone
    19. Timmy Thomas - Why Can't We Live Together
    20. Hot Chocolate - Brother Louie



    1. Disco Tex & The Sex O Letters - Get Dancing
    2. George McCrae - Rock Your Baby
    3. Carl Douglas - Kung Fu Fighting
    4. Pilot - Magic
    5. Mud - Tiger Feet
    6. Suzi Quatro - Devil Gate Drive
    7. Cunningham - Norma Jean Wants To Be A Movie Star
    8. 10CC - The Wall Street Shuffle
    9. Andy Kim - Rock Me Gently
    10. Kenny - The Bump
    11. Leo Sayer - One Man Band
    12. Sweet Sensation - Sad Sweet Dreamer
    13. Hot Chocolate - Emma
    14. Lulu & David Bowie - The Man Who Sold The World
    15. Ken Boothe - Everything I Own
    16. John Holt - Help Me Make It Through The Night
    17. Ray Stevens - The Streak
    18. B.T. Express - Do It
    19. First Class - Beach Baby
    20. Paul Anka & Odia Coates - (You're) Having My Baby





    1970 : 1971 : 1972 : 1973 : 1974

    or

    1970 : 1971 : 1972 : 1973 : 1974


    0 0


    1. Gloryland 3:07
    2. Everybody Will Be Happy 2:35
    3. Hear My Call, Here 4:10
    4. Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen 2:34
    5. I'm Willin', Pt. 1 2:55
    6. I'm Willin', Pt. 2 3:15
    7. Great Day 2:02
    8. Do You Know Him? 2:14
    9. New Born Soul 2:11
    10. A Dying Man's Plea 2:48
    11. New Home 3:45
    12. Wish I Had Answered 2:47
    13. A Better Home 3:17
    14. Old Time Religion 2:30
    15. Swing Down, Chariot 2:38
    16. Motherless Children 3:00
    17. Gamblin' Man 2:42
    18. I Know I've Been Changed 2:37
    19. Jesus Is All 3:32
    20. You Got Shoes 2:34
    21. What Are They Doing (In Heaven Today) 2:09
    22. Will the Lord Remember Me 2:50
    23. My Dying Bed 2:29
    24. Let Jesus Lead You 2:15
    25. Praying Time 2:07
    26. I Can't Help from Cryin' Sometime 2:17
    27. Masters of War 4:34

    Roebuck Staples - Guitar, Vocals
    Cleotha Staples - Vocals
    Mavis Staples - Vocals
    Pervis Staples - Vocals
    Yvonne Staples - Vocals
    Johnny Pate - Bass
    Phil Upchurch - Bass
    Leonard Gaskin - Bass
    Gus Johnson - Drums
    Al Duncan - Drums
    Joseph Marshall - Drums

    AMG:
    "This two-album Fantasy reissue is an anthology of the material the Staples recorded for Riverside between 1960 and 1963. For Riverside, the Staples recorded mostly gospel but the shouting was toned down a bit. A few modern-day 'message' songs make their way into their repertoire as well, including Bob Dylan's 'Masters of War.' Not quite as cataclysmic as their Vee-Jay material but still essential."



    Great Day

    or

    Great Day


    0 0


    1. Falling off the Roof 4:00
    2. Amarillo, Barbados 4:41
    3. Bemshaw Swing 4:21
    4. Sunday at the Hillcrest 5:54
    5. Au Privave 3:06
    6. Our Spanish Love Song 5:21
    7. C.B.C. Mimps 6:49
    8. Skeleton 5:57
    9. Vino Vecchio 3:56
    10. The Day the Sun Came Out 8:23
    11. Taney County 5:23

    Bill Frisell - Guitars
    Charlie Haden - Bass
    Ginger Baker - Drums
    +
    Béla Fleck - Banjo (2,5,11)
    Jerry Hahn - Electric Guitar (4)

    AMG:
    "The second project to match drummer Ginger Baker with guitarist Bill Frisell and bassist Charlie Haden does not reach the heights of the first effort. Guest appearances by banjoist Bela Fleck on three songs and guitarist Jerry Hahn on one are welcome, but the diversity and wide scope of the first Baker trio set are not reached. The music often leans toward country (Frisell was probably preparing mentally for his Nashville project), the originals are less memorable than before, and the element of danger is mostly absent. A bit of a disappointment."



    Falling Off The Roof

    or

    Falling Off The Roof


    0 0


    1. The Eve of the War 9:06
    2. Horsell Common and the Heat Ray 11:36
    3. The Artilleryman and the Fighting Machine 10:36
    4. Forever Autumn 7:43
    5. Thunder Child 6:10

    1. The Red Weed 5:55
    2. The Spirit of Man 11:41
    3. The Red Weed part 2 6:51
    4. The Artilleryman Returns
    5. Brave New World 12:13
    6. Dead London 8:37
    7. Epilogue Part 1 2:42
    8. Epilogue Part 2 NASA 2:02

    Jeff Wayne - synthesizer, keyboards, conductor
    David Essex - vocals
    Justin Hayward - vocals
    Julie Covington - vocals
    Phil Lynott - vocals
    Chris Thompson - vocals
    Richard Burton - vocals
    Jo Partridge - guitar, vocals
    Chris Spedding - guitar
    George Fenton - zither, taragat, santur
    Ken Freeman - synthesizer, keyboards
    Herbie Flowers - bass
    Barry Morgan - drums
    Ray Cooper - percussion
    Roy Jones - percussion
    Barry Da Souza - percussion
    Billy Lawrie - vocals (background)
    Gary Osborne - vocals (background)
    Paul Vigrass - vocals (background)
    ULLAdubULLA string orchestra

    AMG:
    "Released 40 years after Orson Welles' infamous radio version of the H.G. Wells tale, Jeff Wayne's musical version of War of the Worlds straddles old-style radio drama and contemporary orchestrated narratives by Rick Wakeman and David Bedford. And while it lacks the sophisticated arrangements of, say, Journey to the Centre of the Earth, it does boast an impressively odd cast - this may be the only time that a member of Thin Lizzy worked with Richard Burton, and the presence of Julie Covington and the Moody Blues' Justin Hayward in very attractive singing roles attest to its pop/rock aspirations. It's Burton's sonorous tones that sustain this work; his frequent solo narrations are eminently listenable, whereas sections featuring dialogue with other characters often come off as a bit stilted. The music is competent studio rock, and 'Horsell Common and the Heat Ray' does strike just the right balance between Burton's narration and an accompaniment built around a buzzsaw guitar riff. Overall, it's pleasant as a period piece, and still a fine way to introduce younger listeners to Wells' classic tale. (And if you can find it in a vinyl, it comes with a nicely produced narrative booklet with gloriously lurid illustrations by Geoff Taylor.) The album was actually appealing on too many fronts for its own good in many ways - the Justin Hayward-sung ballad 'Forever Autumn,' extracted from a much longer piece on the double-LP - showed some signs of appealing to AM radio listeners and climbed to the Top 40 based on airplay alone, but by the time Columbia Records in America (missing this boat entirely) got copies of the single into stores so that people could actually buy the record, the song had dropped back down; in the meantime, the record became a favorite of discos and dance clubs in New York and elsewhere, where its extended, highly rhythmic, synthesizer-driven sections delighted deejays and audiences, and Columbia missed another bet by not releasing an instrumental-only assembly of those long passages. (In New York, for years after it went out of print on vinyl, the album was sought after by club deejays eager to spin it)."



    Musical Version Of The War Of The Worlds

    or

    Musical Version Of The War Of The Worlds


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