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FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | .... | 44 | 45 | (Page 46) | 47 | 48 | .... | 57 | newer

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    1. Merry-Go-Round 4:51
    2. Love Rollercoaster 5:57
    3. Alone 8:02
    4. Skin Tight 4:34
    5. Fopp 4:27
    6. Magic Trick 3:53
    7. Good Luck Charm 7:43
    8. Fire 11:00
    9. O-H-I-O 3:49
    10. Sugar's Blues 2:49
    11. O-H-I-O (Reprise) 1:25


    Clarence Satchell - Flute, Percussion, Saxophone, Vocals
    Mervin Pierce - Trumpet
    Leroy Bonner - Guitar, Vocals
    Calrence Willis - Guitar, Vocals
    Billy Beck - Keyboards, Percussion, Vocals
    Marshall Jones - Bass
    James Williams - Drums, Flugelhorn, Percussion, Timbales, Vocals
    Robert Jones - Congas


    AMG:
    "Polygram couldn't be hurting for cash, or could they? This recording has all the elements of a cash cow. It's advertised as the Ohio Players' jammin' in the studio; it's most likely a rehearsal for a live-on-stage recording. If you have the Ohio Players' albums, cassettes, or CDs, or one of their greatest-hits compilations, you already have the best versions of these songs. The liner notes claims these are new arrangements of their old hits, but the changes are so slight you won't even notice them. That Polygram thinks the public wants 11 minutes of 'Fire' is a problem in itself. Unless you're just a hopelessly addicted Ohio Player fanatic and have to possess everything and anything with their name stamped on it, avoid this."



    Jam

    or

    Jam


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    1. Epigraph, No. 1 3:01
    2. Upland 4:01
    3. Wakening 4:07
    4. Epigraph No. 1, Var. 1 1:35
    5. Pavane 3:34
    6. Fantasia 1:56
    7. Epigraph No. 1, Var. 2 2:16
    8. The Guest 2:37
    9. After Celan 3:41
    10. Song for TKJD 1:02
    11. Silent Dream 4:38
    12. The Lake 4:09
    13. Gothic 4:05
    14. Epigraph No. 1, Var. 3 1:22
    15. Le Jour S'endort 3:41
    16. Factus Est Repente 4:54


    Ketil Bjørnstad - Piano
    David Darling - Cello


    AMG:
    "Those familiar with previous work by these two instrumentalists will find no surprises on their second duo album, which consists primarily of compositions by pianist Bjornstad, interspersed with fragments of works by composers of the European Renaissance (William Byrd, Orlando Gibbons, Guillaume Dufay, and the obscure German composer Gregor Aichinger) and a couple of David Darling compositions, one of them written for multi-tracked cello. The sixteen pieces on this disc are highly consistent in terms of mood and texture: from Bjornstad's 'Epigraph No. 1' that opens the program to the Aichinger compositions 'Factus Est Repente' that closes it, the feeling is one of deep calm and contemplation. To call this music 'minimalist' wouldn't be entirely accurate, since there's quite a bit of harmonic movement and not much repetition, but because Bjornstad and Darling's playing is so consistently gentle and the music is so consistently quiet and pleasant, this album has a flavor that will be familiar to fans of Philip Glass and Arvo Part. Recommended."



    Epigraphs

    or

    Epigraphs


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    1. Pavuciny 16:01
    2. Autoportrét slobodného umelca 5:52
    3. Conitnuo 16:55


    ¼udovít Nosko - guitars, vocal
    Karel Witz - electric guitar
    Marián Varga - piano, organ, synthesizer
    Fedor Freso - bass guitar
    Dusan Hájek - drums


    progarchives:
    "This band is an historical band in Czechoslovakia. They was active from 1971 until 1981 with 6 releases plus one live lp. Their style is like ELP with Wakeman, The NICE and clear classical influences. The band was composed by vocals, guitars (Ludovít Nosko); keyboards (Marián Varga); guitars (Karel Witz); bass (Fedor Freso) and drums (Dusan Hájek).
    The lp always contain long tracks all composed by Varga that give to compositions solid classical inspirations an example is 'Hommage a J.S. Bach' or 'Concerto in D' and other tracks, the guitar have much space supported by superb keyboards (hammond, minimoog, piano, spinetta) base and solos. I support people who think this is one of the best east Europe bands of ever."



    Continuo

    or

    Continuo


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    1. The First and Royal Queen 3:59
    2. The Birds Near Her House 11:40
    3. Scary Children 4:07
    4. She Drove Me Mad 4:21
    5. Queen of All Ears 5:25
    6. Monsters Over Bangkok 10:13
    7. Three Crowns of Wood 4:01
    8. John Zorn's S&M Circus 6:13
    9. Yak 5:41
    10. Queen Reprise 3:46


    John Lurie - Sax (Alto), Sax (Soprano), Vocals
    Michael Blake - Clarinet (Bass), Sax (Tenor)
    Steven Bernstein - Trumpet
    David Tronzo - Slide Guitar
    Evan Lurie - Organ, Piano
    Jane Scarpantoni - Cello
    Erik Sanko - Bass
    Calvin Weston - Drums
    Ben Perowsky - Percussion


    AMG:
    "John Lurie's so-called 'non-jazz' approach is in full flower on this fascinating record. The ever-growing (nine-piece at this point) band builds layers of rhythm and melody with unique effect throughout. On 'The Birds Near Her House,' a serpentine melodic line weaves through a steady rhythmic bed, building to a frenetic climax. 'Scary Children' is a foreboding dirge that still manages to exude true humor. Perhaps that is the most significant aspect of this music: it has real character and life. It doesn't just groove - it starts a conversation."



    Queen of All Ears

    or

    Queen of All Ears


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    1. In Memoriam Jon Higgins (for Clarinet in a and Slow-Sweep Pure ...) 19:06
    2. Septet for Three Winds, Four Strings and Pure Wave Oscillator 19:36
    3. Crossings 16:06


    Bob Bielecki - Oscillator
    Robert Dick - Flute, Piccolo
    William Purvis - French Horn
    Thomas Ridenour - Clarinet
    Gary Bennett - Bassoon
    Andy Seligson - Tuba
    Veronica Salas - Viola
    Christopher Finckel - Cello
    Wesleyan University New World Consort


    AMG:
    "This CD offers three significant electro-acoustic works by Lucier which explore interference or wave-beating effects between acoustic instruments and electronic oscillators. 'In Memoriam Jon Higgins' for clarinet in A and slow-sweep pure wave oscillator (1984), played here by Thomas Ridenour, has an oscillator which changes pitch every 30 seconds while a clarinet tone is held for a full minute. The interference of these close pitches causes the psychoacoustic illusion of the tones spinning across the room. 'Septet for Three Winds, Four Strings and Pure Wave Oscillator' (1985), performed here by The New World Consort of Wesleyan Universiy, is in four sections with the grouping of the instruments and the microtonal movements changed for each section. Fascinating beat patterns result. With 'Crossings', composed in 1982, for a small orchestra of 16 players equally divided on either side of the stage, and a slow-sweep pure wave oscillator that slowly ascends throughout the entire seven octave range of the orchestra, Lucier creates a beautiful and peacefulness inducing illusion. During the oscillator's ascent, the instrumentalists, cued by video monitors, catch onto and hold a particular pitch, before, during, and after that same pitch is played from the oscillator. As the pitches slowly move toward each other, you can hear the beat of the frequencies slow down until reaching a steady pitch with no beating, instruments and electronics in exact unison. Then the beating speeds up again as the oscillator moves away from the instrument's pitch. For all their directness and apparent simplicity, Lucier's works provide an elegant listening experience."



    Crossings

    or

    Crossings


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    1. Turning Green 6:06
    2. Boy on the Bayou 3:28
    3. Country Joe 4:36
    4. Cameramen, Wilson & Holmes 4:53
    5. Spanish Room 1:57
    6. It's Alright 6:01
    7. Poor Howard 1:58
    8. Away 3:33
    9. Bangerine 5:00
    10. Ruby Farm 3:34
    11. Rocking Shoes 3:18
    12. One Fine Day 2:02


    Jackie McAuley – Vocals, Guitar, Banjo
    Tony Roberts – Flute
    Henry Lowther – Flugelhorn, Violin
    Mike McNaught – Piano, Vibraphone, Harpsichord
    Roy Babington – Bass
    Mike Travis – Drums, Percussion
    Producer – Barry Murray


    AMG:
    "Van Morrison may have the most exalted career of any ex-member of Them, but Jackie McAuley is a close runner-up, at least in terms of longevity. Born in Northern Ireland in 1946 and the younger brother of Pat McAuley - himself later a drummer - Jackie McAuley grew up surrounded by traditional Irish music, and revealed a serious proficiency at the piano as a boy. He later showed a facility with numerous other instruments, including the guitar, and along with a broadening of his skills came a widening interest in music - by the start of the 1960s, he was a serious fan of American-style R&B. He and his older brother (who became a drummer) headed for London, where the 17-year-old Jackie made the acquaintance of Gene Vincent, the American rock & roll legend, who was making most of his records in England by then. McAuley subsequently attributed his emergence as a songwriter to Vincent's influence. Both McAuley siblings passed through the lineup of the Irish-spawned R&B-based band Them, though Pat McAuley lasted longer in what was, at best, a highly fluid personnel situation. During the mid-'60s, following his exit from Them, the younger McAuley sibling worked on the folk circuit in Dublin, in the process crossing paths with the Dubliners, and joined with future Planxty member Paul Brady in a blues-based outfit called the Cult. Some time in 1966 or 1967, following the breakup of Them, Pat McAuley had grabbed the name for himself and organized a group that eventually got rechristened the Belfast Gypsies - which included Jackie McAuley on lead vocals. They fell under the wing of producer Kim Fowley for a couple of failed singles and a posthumous album, somewhat confusingly titled Them Belfast Gypsies, recorded in Copenhagen and released by the Sonet label. Although it was hopelessly intertwined (and confused with) Them's history, the album was a killer showcase for McAuley, working in a multitude of blues and rock idioms, including a gloriously expressive rendition of 'It's All Over Now, Baby Blue,' that's worth tracking down, plus performances intersecting with the styles of Bo Diddley, Howlin' Wolf, et al.
    McAuley later teamed up with original Fairport Convention lead singer Judy Dyble and recorded for Pye Records as Trader Horne. They lasted into the early '70s before Dyble decided to give up music, and McAuley cut his first solo album, a self-titled release, for Pye in 1971. Alas, the album was still-born commercially, appearing at a time when Pye was losing ground as a major label.
    McAuley was most visible as a session player in the '70s and '80s, his musically diverse skills serving him well in the company of the Heptones, Jim Capaldi, Rick Wakeman, and Rebop, among others. He was later a sideman to skiffle legend Lonnie Donegan, and enjoyed a hit as a songwriter - in collaboration with renowned bassist John Gustafson - with 'Dear John,' which made the U.K. Top Ten in the hands of Status Quo. He set up a Celtic rock band called Poor Mouth - of Gael Force fame - in the mid-'80s. His career as a performer was nearly ended in 1988, however, by an accident with a kitchen knife that came close to costing him his left hand. He managed to recover with extensive therapy and work, but as a result of that near-tragedy, he didn't get around to cutting another album of his own until the '90s. McAuley has continued to perform into the 21st century, and the first authorized reissue of his work with the Belfast Gypsies in 2003 has even allowed his early work to catch up with him in his sixties."



    Jackie McAuley

    or

    Jackie McAuley


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    1. Cover Girl 5:38
    2. Tyrone 11:38
    3. Rocks 4:48
    4. The Eyes Of Love 3:21
    5. Planet End 8:45

    Larry Coryell - guitar
    Mahavishnu John McLaughlin - guitar (2, 5)
    Chick Corea - piano (2)
    Miroslav Vitous - double bass (2, 5)
    Billy Cobham - drums (2, 5)

    The Eleventh House:
    Larry Coryell - guitar
    Mike Lawrence - trumpet (1, 3)
    Mike Mandel - piano, synthesizer (1, 3)
    Danny Trifan - bass (1, 3)
    Alphonse Mouzon - drums (1, 3)

    AMG:
    "During 1968-75, guitarist Larry Coryell recorded a wide variety of interesting material for Vanguard. This album, a CD reissue of the original Lp, was Coryell's final one for the label. The five selections, although originals, have the feel of a jam session. Coryell's Eleventh House (which includes trumpeter Mike Lawrence, keyboardist Mike Mandel, bassist Danny Trifan and drummer Alphonse Mouzon) is featured on two tracks (their final recordings), Coryell plays all of the instruments on the brief 'The Eyes Of Love' and on two lengthy jams he is matched with fellow guitarist John McLaughlin, bassist Miroslav Vitous, drummer Billy Cobham and (on Larry Young's 'Tyrone') keyboardist Chick Corea. The lively music is very much of the period and this CD is a bit brief (at 34 minutes) but the high-quality of the solos makes this one worth picking up by listeners interested in Larry Coryell's early period."



    Planet End

    or

    Planet End


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    1. If I Could Keep From Laughing
    2. Medicine Weasel
    3. Rambling Boy
    4. Me And Your Boogie
    5. Time Will Tell
    6. The End Game
    7. Me And The Lady


    Nick Pickett - Guitar, Keyboards, Violin, Vocals
    Adrian Pietryga - Guitar
    Iain Thompson - Bass, Vocals
    John Dummer - Drums


    discogs:
    "British blues-rock drummer, Born 19 November 1944 in Surbiton, Surrey. Leader of numerous late 60's to early 70's blues rock bands carrying his own name with line-up including many notable names in british blues rock. In the late 70's with the 50's nostalgia band Darts."



    Blue

    or

    Blue


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    1. 44
    2. Už to tak vyzerá hosť: Ema Müllerová
    3. 21 rokov
    4. Chcem
    5. Ty
    6. Samota
    7. Bez Adama Eva
    8. Do Smrti
    9. Viera
    10. Ticho a tma
    11. Pri orgazme
    12. Szidi
    13. Ria z Ria
    14. Sníh hosť: Iva Bittová


    Richard Muller - vocals
    Juraj Bartoš - trumpet
    Hiram Bullock - vocals, guitar
    Mike Caffrey - guitar
    Will Lee - vocals, bass guitar
    Anthony Jackson - Bass
    Jeff McErlain - guitar
    Omar Hakim - vocals, drums
    Iva Bittova - vocals
    Eva Mullerova - vocals
    Vrabec - vocals
    Robo Opatovský - vocals
    Soňa Norisová - vocals


    Wiki:
    "Richard Müller (born September 6, 1961) is a Slovak singer, songwriter, and occasional actor. He is one of the most successful singers both in the Czech and Slovak Republics where he sold more than 1 million records.
    He started as a music journalist. In the beginning of the 1980s, while studying the theory of drama and screenplay at the Academy of Performing Arts in Bratislava (VŠMU), he started writing for the daily paper and the only specialized periodical at the time, Popular, and, later, for Gramorevue. As a journalist, in his own words, he could get close to the musicians he admired easier. His first song, Radio, was recorded with the Burčiak Pavla Daněka band. The track was very successful in the music chart 5xp, which encouraged Müller to start a band with Martin Karvaš, it was called Banket. Their debut album, Bioelektrovízia (1986) was full of hits, including the immortal song written by Vašo Patejdl – Po schodoch ('Up the Stairs')). Co-operation with Andrej Šeban produced and was very perceivable in the two suceceding albums Druhá doba?! and Vpred. He has also made a very popular song with Daniel Junas in the '90's called Na Zlatých pieskoch v lete.
    After 1990 Richard Müller started his solo career. In the very beginning he experienced great success with 'federal' Czechoslovak hits, songs sang in Czech such as Štěstí je krásná věc ('Hapiness is a Beautiful Thing') and Rozeznávám ('I Am Distinguishing'), from the album V penzionu Svět written by Petr Hapka and Michal Horáček. Müller's first two solo albums, produced by Henrich Leško, were Neuč vtáka lietať and 33, where he collaborated with Jaro Filip, who wrote songs for him for couple of years afterwards as well. The result of this were three albums L.S.D. (1996), Nočná optika (1998) and Koniec sveta (1999). The album 01 was created with the help of his musical partner and producer Ivan Tásler from a well known Slovak band I.M.T. Smile and it received many awards. In 2003 during his stay in New York, Müller created his first author album Monogamný vzťah ('Monogamous Relationship') with a couple of American musicians. When Henrich Leško got back on the post of the producer, 44 the newest album was created in co-operation with musicians such as drummer Omar Hakim, bass guitarists Anthony Jackson, Will Lee and guitarist Hiram Bullock. With this line-up, with the addition of guitarist Mike Caffrey and Clifford Carter on the piano, Richard Müller toured Slovakia and Czechia in December 2005.
    Between 1984 and 1991, Müller was the lead singer of the pop band Banket, considered legendary today due to their pioneering role as one of the main proponents of electronic pop music in Czechoslovakia in the 1980s."



    44

    or

    44


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    1. Limehouse Blues 10:13
    2. I'm Confessin' 8:02
    3. High Life 7:11
    4. Jeep's Blues 7:04
    5. Oh, Lady Be Good 9:18
    6. Take Five 6:57
    7. Everything Happens to Me 5:15
    8. Barbados 8:17
    9. Stuffy 7:05


    Arne Domnérus – Saxophone, Clarinet
    Lars Erstrand – Vibraphone
    Bengt Hallberg – Piano
    Georg Riedel – Bass
    Egil Johansen – Drums


    Wiki:
    "Sven Arne Domnérus (20 December 1924 – 2 September 2008) was a Swedish jazz alto saxophonist and clarinetist, popularly nicknamed Dompan.
    He was best known for his recordings with visiting American players such as James Moody, Art Farmer and Clifford Brown. Domnérus also played with Charlie Parker when he made his tour of Sweden 1950. Domnérus worked with the Swedish Radio Big Band from 1956 to 1978, and wrote for television and films during the period. He also recorded extensively with Bengt Hallberg.[1] Together with fellow Swedes Bengt-Arne Wallin, Rolf Ericson and Åke Persson (the latter two both former members of Duke Ellington's Orchestra), he participated at the Jazz Workshops, organised for the Ruhrfest in Recklinghausen by Hans Gertberg from the Hamburg radio station."



    Jazz at the Pawnshop

    or

    Jazz at the Pawnshop


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    1. Swanee River 3:10
    2. So Many People 2:44
    3. Night 2:38
    4. It Won't Be Long 3:06
    5. I Can Feel It 2:51
    6. Woman Of The Dark 5:56
    7. Ennea: Cronus Saturn 4:46
    8. Ennea: Zeus Jupiter 4:36
    9. Ennea: Poseidon Neptune 2:27
    10. Ennea: Aphrodite Part I Venus 2:02
    11. Ennea: Aphrodite Part II Venus 3:36
    12. Ennea: Hades Pluto 3:34

    13. Weird Song No. 1 5:38
    14. Run Back To Mama 3:11
    15. Twinkles 7:12
    16. Bochawa 5:47
    17. Love Is On The Way 3:45
    18. Close Up Tight 7:36


    Bill Chase - Lead Trumpet
    Ted Piercefield - Trumpet, Vocals
    Alan Ware - Trumpet
    Jerry Blair - Trumpet
    Angel South - Guitar
    Phil Porter - Keyboards
    Dennis Johson - Bass
    Gary Smith - Drums
    Jay Burrid - Drums
    Terry Richards - Vocals
    G.G. Shinn - Lead Vocals

    Bill Chase - Trumpet
    Jay Sollenberger - Trumpet
    Joe Morrissey - Trumpet
    Jim Oatts - Trumpet
    Wally Yohn - Keyboards
    John Emma - Guitar, Vocals
    Dartanyan Brown - Bass, Vocals
    Tom Gordon - Drums
    Jim Peterik - Vocals


    AMG:
    "Mention the term 'jazz-rock' and listeners will likely think of such acts as Blood, Sweat & Tears, Chicago, and Weather Report, but in the early '70s a band called Chase rivaled all of them, and bid fair to take the country by storm; in fact, for a little while in 1971, they did precisely that with a chart-topping single, a Grammy nomination, and a high place in reader polls. Chase were formed by trumpet virtuoso Bill Chase in 1970, at a time when, thanks to outfits like Chicago and Blood, Sweat & Tears, the public was beginning an infatuation with jazz-rock fusion. Though their roots went back to 1968, Chase came along at just the right moment to ride that wave to major chart success in 1971, with the hit single 'Get It On' and the accompanying self-titled debut album.
    Bill Chase (born William Edward Chiaiese on October 24, 1934) hailed from Boston, MA; the family (which changed its name to 'Chase' while Bill Chiaiese was a boy) was musical on both sides, especially his mother's - one great-uncle had even played trumpet with the New York Philharmonic and the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra. Bill Chase took up violin as a boy and later played percussion in the school band, but he found his real musical calling in 11th grade when, for the first time, he started playing the trumpet. He never looked back, and the only change in course on his way to a career was his shift from classical music to jazz, which took place around 1951, in the wake of attending a Stan Kenton concert, where he first encountered the playing of Maynard Ferguson. Chase later attended the Berklee School of Music, where he studied both classical and jazz, and his teachers included John Coffey and Herb Pomeroy.
    In the course of a decade, from the mid-'50s through the mid-'60s, he went from playing in local Boston dance bands to playing with Woody Herman and Maynard Ferguson - he was recording with Ferguson in the late '50s and became a featured soloist, writer, and arranger in Woody Herman's Herd, and could be seen prominently in the Herd's appearances on television as well as heard on their records. He later established himself in Las Vegas and was requested as a musician whenever he could appear on The Ed Sullivan Show or The Tonight Show. The seeds for his own band were planted in 1968, at just about the point when he found himself growing bored with the lot of a star soloist and began looking for a new vehicle through which to express himself and play his music. He began putting a group of his own together informally that year, and pulled together the beginnings of a core of a permanent band in 1969 - this was the group that was eventually known as Chase, once it coalesced the following year. Bill Chase's original notion was that it would be an instrumental outfit, but he later added room for a singer and for vocals in the group's work, in order to extend its range and audience appeal.
    The lineup that made it to their actual first record, in addition to Bill Chase, consisted of Jay Burrid on drums, Phil Porter on keyboards, Dennis Johnson on bass and vocals, John Palmer on guitar, and Alan Ware, Jerry Van Blair, and Ted Piercefield on trumpet (the latter two also sang), with Terry Richards on lead vocals. All of these musicians were superb, though it was the four trumpets that gave the band its edge and distinctive sound. Chase were signed to Epic Records and were roaring up the charts in 1971 with 'Get It On,' an original that they'd been kicking around for months in various lineups (and initially without words), blasting it out over AM radio right to the number one spot. The group's debut album marked its musical and commercial peak - Chase were nominated for a Grammy Award that same year, and Bill Chase placed in the number two spot (behind Frank Zappa) in a poll of the top pop musicians of the year, while Down Beat rated the Chase LP as the top pop album of 1971. Ironically, that first album sounded at times just a little bit like the original late-1967-era Al Kooper-led version of Blood, Sweat & Tears, a group whose inspiration had also come from Maynard Ferguson (in that case, Kooper's admiration for Ferguson's sound).
    Chase delivered even more in their live performances where, by most accounts, they seemed to put out a 100 percent effort at every show. Indeed, they wrecked some of their potential as an opening act because their performances were so strong and overpowering that they embarrassed the headliners. Their reputation soon expanded beyond national boundaries as Chase toured Europe, Africa, and Asia, and in 1972 they recorded a second album, entitled Ennea - by the time it was cut, Burrid had been replaced by Gary Smith and Terry Richards was out, replaced by G.G. Shinn who, in addition to singing, also played the trumpet. Unfortunately, this was also when Bill Chase, who had written the material for the new album, lost the ear of the critics, who didn't like the second album nearly as much as they had the first. Other problems cropped up over the ensuing year, including more personnel changes and Bill Chase being driven into personal bankruptcy. He kept teaching and performing, but the band ceased to exist for several months.
    In late 1972, Bill Chase re-formed the group with a new lineup, and during the following year he went through numerous personnel under the Chase name, trying to come up with a new band sound that would work musically for him and that the public would accept. A third Chase album, Pure Music, was forthcoming in 1973 with a new lineup. But the promise and excitement in the press for the 1971 album had dissipated by now, and the new LP received a lukewarm reception, though the band was getting enough gigs to work steadily.
    On August 9, 1974, Chase were traveling by plane to Minnesota for a performance at the Jackson County Fair when they flew into bad weather - in the ensuing crash, Bill Chase, along with bandmembers Wally Yohn, John Emma, and Walter Clark, were killed with their two pilots. The tragedy generated shock waves throughout the jazz community, although in the world of popular music, which was becoming dominated by arena rock acts and beginning its embrace of disco, as well as encountering the noise of the punk rock sideshow, Chase were soon forgotten by listeners without long memories. A tribute album entitled Watch Closely Now, by surviving band alumni and longtime associates of Bill Chase, was recorded in 1977. In the late '90s all three Chase albums were reissued on CD on the Collectables label."



    Ennea/Pure Music

    or

    Ennea/Pure Music


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    1. Shake Up The World! 9:52
    2. Float Like A Butterfly, Sting Like An Afro Asian Bumblebee! 10:580
    3. No Vietnamese Ever Called Me Nigger! 16:35
    4. Rope-A-Dope 8:23
    5. Worthy Of Praises Most High aka The Greatest! 13:15
    6. In A Pan-African Mood 9:51
    7. Teaching The Ape To Write Poems 5:13


    Bobby Zankel - alto sax
    Jim Hobbs - alto sax
    Bhinda Keidel - tenor sax
    Salim Washington - tenor sax
    Ben Barson - baritone sax
    Fred Ho - baritone sax
    Winston Byrd - trumpet
    Stanton Davis - trumpet
    Nabate Isles - trumpet
    Amir ElSaffar - trumpet
    Bob Pilkington - trombone
    Marty Wehner - trombone
    Richard Harper - trombone
    Earl McIntyre - bass trombone
    David Harris - bass trombone, tuba
    Amanda Monaco - guitar
    Art Hirahara - keyboards
    Wes Brown - bass
    Royal Hartigan - drums, percussion
    Haleh Abghari - vocals
    Whitney George - conductor


    AMG:
    "The Sweet Science Suite is a musical evocation of Muhammad Ali's 'mojo' conjured through Afro Asian scientific soul music, combining the 'swing' of 'jazz' and American and Asian boxing, martial arts and hand-to-hand combat 'feels' and forms, with the elasticity of temperament and pitch intrinsic to the raw, 'folk' musical characteristics of AfroAmerica and much of the Asiatic world. During Ali's match against the juggernaut George Foreman in Zaire during the mid-1970s, Ali's employ of the 'rope-a-dope' was the quintessential methodology of the trickster, intrinsic to many Asian martial arts, such as JuJitSu, of turning the strength of one's opponent against them. This work of five movements spans the musical geography of the Black and Yellow worlds, just as Ali spanned those two worlds in his boxing training and abilities, and in turn inspired and influenced martial forms and techniques, including the footwork of the late great martial arts innovator and iconoclast, Bruce Lee.
    An added two-track bonus on this recording include the Jacob Epstein arrangement of Ellington's classic In A Sentimental Mood, now re-titled by Fred Ho as In A Pan African Mood, an evocation and conjuring to mother Africa and its cultural heritage as the source for anti-imperialist and anti-technocentric inspiration. The second bonus track features Persian American vocalist Haleh Abghari and baritone saxophonist Fred Ho employing esoteric and extended techniques for both, on the Ho composed works based the James Tate poem 'Teaching the Ape to Write Poems.'
    During his war against advanced colo-rectal cancer (from 2006), which included two primary tumors and two recurrences, Fred Ho, hammered by massive chemo and radiation, found inspiration in the fight for his life from watching movies of The Greatest, Muhammad Ali.
    Ali's bold, militant, defiant and spirited resistance to the forces of American racism, combined with his élan, grace and humor (both poetical and personal), his indisputable athletic abilities and genius, and the inspiration to the world's peoples (especially the oppressed) and their embrace of him, served as constant inspiration to Fred Ho. During one of his recovery periods, Ho decided to compose a work for his Green Monster Big Band to honor The Greatest."



    Sweet Science Suite

    or

    Sweet Science Suite


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    1. Melodien, for orchestra (or chamber orchestra) 13:12

    Chamber Concerto, for 13 instruments:
    2. Corrente 5:47
    3. Calmo, sostenuto 6:18
    4. Movimento preciso e meccanico 3:35
    5. Presto 3:38

    Piano Concerto:
    6. Vivace molto ritmico e preciso 4:05
    7. Lento e deserto 6:44
    8. Vivace cantabile 4:12
    9. Allegro risoluto, molto ritmico 4:50
    10. Presto luminoso 3:42

    11. Mysteries of the Macabre (arr. from "Le Grand Macabre" by E.Howarth) 7:57


    Pierre-Laurent Aimard - Piano
    Peter Masseurs - Trumpet
    ASKO Ensemble - Ensemble
    Schoenberg Ensemble
    Reinbert de Leeuw - Director


    AMG/smcq.qc.ca:
    "Melodien: To call a piece of music 'Melodies' in the context of the experimental milieu in which Ligeti operated in the 1960s and early 1970s was rather an audacious move. Scored for orchestra, Melodien was written in 1971, and first performed in Nuremberg on December 10 of that year.
    In the preface of the score, Ligeti refers to the three 'strata' of the piece: the foreground which features the melodies of the title, the middle layer made up of secondary figures (some of them ostinato-like), and a background consisting of long, sustained tones. Despite its title, the actual music shares many traits with other of Ligeti's works of the time. Dense tone clusters are heard at some points, as are the upward scale-like patterns that are present in so many contemporaneous works of the composer (for example, the solo harpsichord piece Continuum of 1968). Those scales work their way farther and farther up as they interact with the middle and background layers, which become more or less prominent as the piece progresses.

    Chamber Concerto: Ligeti embarked on his Chamber Concerto just after completing Ramifications; the Chamber Concerto was premiered on October 1, 1970 in Berlin by the ensemble Die Reihe, under the direction of Ligeti's like-minded colleague Friederich Cerha. Similarly to Ten Pieces for Woodwind Quintet (1968), each of the four movements focus on a particular quality of musical expression, rather than on a motivic or melodic base. Ligeti seems to be casting back to a similar approach found in Bartók, or even Bach, in a conscious consideration of music history that he seemed to avoid while developing his style in the decade or so after he had left Hungary.
    The scoring for the Chamber Concerto is flute, clarinet (doubling bass clarinet, horn, trombone, harpsichord (doubling Hammond organ), piano (doubling celeste), and solo strings. As he did in Continuum for harpsichord (1968) and Ramifications (1968 - 1969), Ligeti superimposes rapidly articulated, simple motifs to form a glittering surface both moving and still. This is how the first movement of the Chamber Concerto begins; it continues in this fashion with some registral and dynamic variation until the three-minute mark. At that point, the ensemble interrupts the texture with a sustained E-flat in several octaves, a favorite Ligeti gambit mirroring both the first movement of the Cello Concerto (1966) and the first movement of the Ten Pieces for Woodwind Quintet. There is also a relatively brief moment of broad atonal melody in octaves before the Chamber Concerto's first movement ends. The second movement is timbrally quite different, with more defined gestures, and a generally greater tendency toward melody. Ligeti's harmonic language, which evolved from the virtually undifferentiated clusters in Atmosphères (1961), and became more clarified in the Ten Pieces and String Quartet No. 2, is yet more refined and specific here. The third movement is an extended 'roomful of clocks,' a clear example of Ligeti's polymetric tendencies, of which there are shorter sections in the Cello Concerto, String Quartet No. 2, and, of course, the (literally) one-hundred metronomes of Poème symphonique (1962). Again in this movement, the listener perceives Ligeti's increasing concern for distinct harmony. The fourth movement shows clearly the soloistic, 'concerto' aspects of the piece. A solo clarinet tremolo becomes a fast ascending scale for several instruments; the rapidly cycling chromatic gestures form the fabric through which the occasional melody shines. The Chamber Concerto is the clearest link between Ligeti's supersaturated textural music of the 1960s, and the harmonically clarified, polyrhythmic pieces of the 1970s (Monument-Selbsportrait-Bewegung for two pianos) and the early 1980s (the Horn Trio).

    Piano Concerto: György Ligeti completed his Piano Concerto in 1988. It is in five movements, twenty-five minutes in duration, and perhaps the finest concerto from the 1980s. In the late 1960s and early 1970s the composer wrote many successful concertos. In these earlier works, Ligeti was writing extremely dense and dissonant works in a style that utilized micropolyphony, a method of writing he created where numerous independent melodic lines become a larger, sonorous mass of sound. Ligeti had acquired enough listeners and imitators to be at the forefront of the avant-garde. Then in the late 1970s he suffered a heart condition that made him incapable of composing for years. When he returned to health in the 1980s the music he was writing was different, in some ways returning to his original love of Bartók which preceded his period of micropolyphony compositions.
    Ligeti's Piano Concerto is a super-modern piano concerto, featuring all the knowledge and musicality of a brilliant composer who had carefully absorbed the musical lessons and currents of the twentieth century. It eludes serialism but does not shy completely away from the sonorities associated with it. Ligeti and Boulez were good friends, and Boulez often conducted and recorded Ligeti's. It is interesting that Boulez had once championed a specific kind of avant-garde approach and claimed it to be the only one of value, but became an advocate of one of the very few composers who ignored this mandate completely.
    The beginning of the Concerto is among the most consonant moments in Ligeti's catalog, spiraling into regions of timbre and rhythmic impetus that have no precedent. It is not regressive or grindingly rigorous, never sounding as though it attempts to fit a new method of composing into an exclusive musical envelope. Other important influences at work here are the piano rolls of Conlon Nancarrow, and fractal mathematics. Clearly, this is synthetic music. Furthermore, Ligeti is not afraid to have a horn solo sail over the burgeoning musical engine of great excitement, even though the idea is unoriginal in theory. In this work, there is very little of a foreground/background duality. The piano steers the ship from within, making its presence not a separate component but rather a vital one. What is really wondrous about this work is its lack of lofty tone. Ligeti here seems jubilant, having a great time, and is well-disposed towards all. Ligeti's Piano Concerto is an excellent piece for introducing the uninitiated to the world of the avant-garde; it is welcoming, warm, and makes a total lack of triviality sound as approachable as a Buster Keaton film.

    Mysteries of the Macabre: A tour de force for soprano and chamber orchestra, György Ligeti’s Mysteries of the Macabre (1991) exemplifies the Hungarian composer’s cartoonesque virtuosity of composition and his use of irony, wit and absurdity in delivering a dark and deadly message. The vocal writing for this particular piece has its roots in Rossini and Mozart’s fireworks-filled coloratura arias: technically demanding for the singer, but composed entirely within the vocal tradition despite its challenging intervals and rhythms. Mysteries of the Macabre is an arrangement by Elgar Howarth of the 3 arias sung by the Gepopo character in Ligeti’s opera, Le Grand Macabre (1974-77). The piece can also be performed by solo trumpet (instead of soprano) and ensemble, after the virtuoso Swedish trumpeter Håkan Hardenberger took over for an ailing soprano on short notice in a Vienna performance of the opera, and this piece is dedicated to him.
    The character Gepopo, the chief of the secret police of Brueghelland, approaches Prince Go-Go to warn him and the people of Brueghelland that intelligence has learned of a huge comet heading through space towards them which will destroy their planet. Unfortunately, Gepopo is paralyzed with fear and paranoid hysteria, so his almost unintelligible, coded warning is not easily understood by Prince Go-Go, who, mainly interested in a hearty meal, drives Gepopo to further convulsions of highflying vocal panic as the piece draws to a anxiety-ridden finale. The chamber orchestra mimics and grotesquely accompanies the soloist, with cock-crows from the contrabassoon, a sinister trombone solo, police and slide-whistles, whispered vocal sounds and a countdown screamed out by the players as Gepopo cries out desperately for help."



    The Ligeti Project #1

    or

    The Ligeti Project #1


    0 0


    1. Charlie 1:29
    2. Big City Tension 4:30
    3. New Karenski 4:08
    4. Urban Cowboy 3:43
    5. Elaine 4:34
    6. Home At Last 2:55
    7. All Around My Grandmother's Floor 3:13
    8. Richmond 4:53
    9. Baby, Baby 2:26
    10. Poison Apple Lady 4:15


    Andy Roberts - Dulcimer, Guitar, Vocals
    Dick Parry - Saxophone
    Martin Carthy - Banjo
    B.J. Cole - Pedal Steel Guitar
    Neil Innes - Guitar
    Richard Thompson - Guitar
    John Megginson - Piano
    David Richards - Bass, Harmonium, Piano, Vocals
    Bob Ronga - Bass, Guitar, Vocals
    Timi Donald - Drums
    Mike Kellie - Drums
    Gerry Conway - Tambourine
    Paul Kent - Vocals
    Iain Matthews - Vocals
    Zoot Money - Vocals
    Gillian Noel - Vocals
    Karene Wallace - Vocals


    AMG:
    "Urban Cowboy, its title predating the John Travolta movie popularization of that phrase by seven years, typified both why folk-rock fans have a soft spot for Andy Roberts, and why he'll never have a wide following. It falls between the average and excellent in quality, with enough good moments and aspects to make it worth a spin, but not enough quality or energy to get too excited about. It's not quite as good as his earlier 1970s albums either, but it's not too far off the mark of those, with a similar unassuming blend of pop, country, and blues influences into an early-'70s pop/rock-folk sound. It might be more pleasant than attention-grabbing, and there might be too-strong echoes of others for some listeners' taste, with faint traces of James Taylor and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young here and there. Still, a few songs here are among Roberts' best, including the wistful country-folk title track, even if one of the lines gets kind of close to Neil Young's 'Country Girl.' 'Elaine' is about as good a country blues-colored tune as he managed, and the memorably titled 'Poison Apple Lady' a solid ballad. While it's not representative of the album as a whole, the clear standout is the magically haunting minor-keyed folk-rock of 'All Around My Grandmother's Floor,' which sounds like a lost British acid folk classic."



    Urban Cowboy

    or

    Urban Cowboy


    0 0


    1. Sun Goddess 8:31
    2. Living for the City 5:22
    3. Love Song 5:55
    4. Jungle Strut 4:43
    5. Hot Dawgit 3:03
    6. Tambura 2:55
    7. Gemini Rising 5:54


    Ramsey Lewis - Fender Rhodes, Piano, Synthesizer
    Don Meyrick - Sax (Tenor)
    Johnny Graham - Guitar
    Byron Gregory - Guitar
    Charles Stepney - Fender Rhodes, Guitar
    Cleveland Eaton - Bass
    Verdine White - Bass, Vocals
    Maurice White - Drums, Percussion, Timbales, Vocals
    Philip Bailey - Congas, Percussion, Vocals
    Derf Reklaw-Raheem - Congas, Drums, Vocals
    Maurice Jennings - Congas, Drums, Percussion, Tamboura, Tambourine


    AMG:
    "Lewis's most popular album since The In Crowd. Very good for what it is. Gold album."



    Sun Goddess

    or

    Sun Goddess


    0 0


    1. Pt. 1: He's a Dreamer/Look Around You/So You Can See/I'm Only One Man 18:42
    2. Pt. 2: You Don't Really Care/Rememberance Of/Things Past/Finale 11:29


    Bob Rowe - Vocals
    Martin Horne - Guitar
    Gary Ohlson - Organ, Vocals
    Gus Hernandez - Bass
    George Wolff - Percussion, Vocals


    Fuzz, Acid & Flowers:
    "The album features bluesy psychedelic guitar with organ jams. The 45 is interesting keyboard-dominated prog-rock 'psych' with many shifts and the occasional good solo. From New York City."



    I'm Only One Man

    or

    I'm Only One Man


    0 0


    1. 007
    2. Fancy Dance
    3. From Russia with Love
    4. Kinky
    5. English Garden
    6. Lover's Clasp
    7. The Loneliness of Autumn
    8. Elizabeth Theme
    9. Elizabeth Waltz
    10. London Theme
    11. Fire of London
    12. Elizabeth in London
    13. London
    14. Lover's Tension
    15. Normal Leaves
    16. Four in the Morning
    17. River Walk
    18. River Ride
    19. Troubadour
    20. Zulu


    John Barry & His Orchestra

    AMG:
    "John Barry was one of the best-known composers of soundtrack music of the late 20th and early 21st centuries, but his career carried him through a multitude of music genres and styles. He was best-known in film in connection with his work on the James Bond pictures, but Barry was also the holder of five Academy Awards, none of them for the Bond movies. Born Free (for which he won Oscars for Best Score and Best Song), The Lion in Winter, Out of Africa, and Dances with Wolves are hardly unknown films or scores. Additionally, from 1957 until the early '60s as leader of the John Barry Seven, Barry was one of the best-known figures in popular music and early rock & roll in England. Born in York, England, on November 3, 1933, John Barry was the son of a small movie theater chain owner and a former concert pianist. He showed an avid interest in music as a boy and initially studied piano, although he switched to the trumpet in his teens. After spending much of his boyhood steeped in classical music, he discovered jazz - his idol was Harry James and his favorite music was made by Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Woody Herman, and the Dorsey Brothers.
    Barry studied piano and composition with the music master of York Minster Cathedral, Dr. Francis Jackson, and had a deep interest in arranging. Growing up around his father's movie theater business, Barry was always cognizant of the power and influence of the cinema, but it was a specific film, A Song to Remember, dealing with the life of Frédéric Chopin, that first demonstrated to him the power of music in movies and got him interested in the field. He also credits Max Steiner's score for The Treasure of the Sierra Madre and Anton Karas' music for The Third Man as favorite film scores from his early life. Barry played with a local jazz band in his mid-teens, and was lucky enough to get himself assigned to a musical unit in the British Army when he was called up for National Service at age 18. During his two years of Army service, he tried his hand at arranging, and he later enhanced his skills by taking a correspondence course offered by Bill Russo, one of Stan Kenton's arrangers. Once he was back in civilian life, Barry offered his arrangements to some of the top bandleaders in England, among them Ted Heath, Jack Parnell, and Johnny Dankworth. Dankworth actually used two of them, and at Parnell's suggestion, Barry started his own band. The result was John Barry & the Seven, later known as the John Barry Seven. He moved the group to London in 1957 and approached Jack Good, the producer of British television's top music showcase The Six-Five Special, but was turned down for the show. After a few weeks and some successful live engagements including a gig as the backing band for Tommy Steele, the show's producers changed their minds and the John Barry Seven made it onto The Six-Five Special. The group became immensely popular from their appearances on the program, and Barry was the star, not only playing trumpet but also handling the vocal chores. By this time, the rock & roll boom was going full swing, and his singing frequently required Barry to do his best Elvis- or Carl Perkins-style vocalizing.
    It was out of their appearances on the program that they were signed to EMI's Parlophone Records label. The group's next big gig was as one of the resident house bands for Good's new program, Oh Boy!, which was a showcase for many of the most dynamic young rock & roll singers coming up in England, including Cliff Richard. It was from there that Barry moved on to become music director for Drum Beat, a dramatic program starring a young singer/actor named Adam Faith. From 1959 until 1962, he and Faith were an unbeatable combination, both onscreen and in the recording studio, releasing a string of major British hits through the Parlophone label. During this period, Barry also arranged and led the accompaniment for numerous other EMI recording artists, including Desmond Lane, the England Sisters, and Bill and Bret Landis. the John Barry Seven also enjoyed hits of their own, including 'Hit or Miss' and a version of the Ventures' 'Walk Don't Run.' They were known for their unusual sound, owing to their bold yet precise playing and their heavy use of electric piano and other relatively uncommon instruments (this in a time when the electric bass was barely tolerated). They were among the star instrumental acts of the day and, surprisingly, cut albums for EMI's Columbia Records, which was already the home of the Shadows, the group's biggest rivals.
    In 1960, Barry was also invited to write his first film score, for the juvenile delinquency drama Beat Girl starring Adam Faith. The results were an impressive mix of brass, heavy electric guitar (courtesy of John Barry Seven guitarist Vic Flick), and orchestra. Barry also later devised an entire album, Stringbeat, in which he juxtaposed the group's sound with that of a string orchestra. Barry was involved with numerous projects of all kinds during this period. Although it seems hard to believe in retrospect, at that point, the John Barry Seven were the major rivals to the Shadows, Cliff Richard's backing group, who were known for their instrumental singles. The group started the year with a release called The Cool Mikado, an update of the Gilbert & Sullivan operetta, but there were far more important milestones in his career that year. Barry was engaged by the producers of a film called Dr. No to write and arrange a finished score from work begun by composer Monty Norman. The film itself was a hit and Barry's work sufficiently impressed the producers, Harry Saltzman and Albert Broccoli, to get him the gig writing the full score for the next movie, and for more than two decades' worth of subsequent James Bond movies up through 1985's A View to a Kill. Several of these featured songs that Barry had co-written, including 'Goldfinger,' 'Thunderball,' and 'You Only Live Twice,' became hits of varying proportions and longevity in their own right for artists such as Shirley Bassey, Tom Jones, and Nancy Sinatra. The best of his James Bond songs may be the most unusual, 'We Have All the Time in the World' from On Her Majesty's Secret Service, which was sung by Louis Armstrong. If Beat Girl had established Barry's British film credentials, Dr. No and the next two movies in the James Bond series, From Russia with Love and Goldfinger, made Barry's name international.
    It was with Born Free, however, that he moved into the front ranks of popular film composers, with the score and the Oscar-winning title song. From then on, he was in a position to score some of the biggest and most daring films being made in England or Hollywood, ranging from the hourlong experimental film Dutchman to high-profile dramas like The Lion in Winter (for which he won his third Oscar). In 1962, the same year he composed the music for the first James Bond movie, Barry also left EMI to join the independent Ember Records label. In addition to doing his own recordings, Barry produced and arranged the music for dozens of Ember artists, including Chad & Jeremy, and also produced such best-selling comedy albums as Fool Britannia, Anthony Newley and Leslie Bricusse's savage satire of the Profumo scandal that had nearly toppled the British government.
    In the midst of his burgeoning film work, Barry found time to make albums of his own on occasion, usually featuring re-recordings of his best movie-related music. In 1999, he also released an album of his classical instrumental-style compositions, The Beyondness of Things. Barry suffered a life-threatening injury at the end of the '80s from which his recovery seemed problematic. He survived with help from a very good physician and one of the first results of this new lease on life was Barry's music for Dances with Wolves, which was one of his most ambitious soundtrack creations ever, filled with complex orchestral parts and sweeping, almost Mahler-like melodic arcs and textures, earning his fifth Oscar in the process. In 1992, he was nominated for a sixth Oscar for his music for Chaplin. In 2001 Barry composed the score for Enigma, in addition to recording a new album of non-soundtrack material, Eternal Echoes. Among Barry's last work was a co-composing credit (with lyricist Don Black) for the song 'Our Time Is Now,' sung by Shirley Bassey on her 2009 comeback album, The Performance. John Barry died of a heart attack in Glen Cove, NY on January 30, 2011, and although his work in the 21st century had been comparatively sporadic, his wide-ranging career, both critically acclaimed and popular, secured his position as one of the most respected musical figures of the latter half of the 20th century."



    The Name is Barry ... John Barry

    or

    The Name is Barry ... John Barry


    0 0


    1. Finnish Line 4:36
    2. Improvisation 17:06
    3. Hail to the Spirit of Liberty 4:07
    4. Massive Breath Attack 5:59
    5. Composition 168 + (103) 18:24
    6. Schizoid 5:10

    Anthony Braxton - Sax (Alto), Sax (Baritone), Sopranino, Soprano
    John McDonough - Trumpet

    AMG:
    "A set of six intimate duets was realized by trumpeter John McDonough and saxophonist Anthony Braxton in July 2006 and released five years later on the label run by Chuck Nessa, who helped produce Braxton's groundbreaking album For Alto back in 1968. Since becoming established as a respected and beloved educator at Wesleyan University, Braxton has been involved in several recording projects affiliated with that worthy institution. Most of these feature him as one half of an improvisatory duo. An album of Wesleyan duets with percussionist Abraham Adzinyah was released in 1994, and Braxton's accomplished pupil, Taylor Ho Bynum, cut an album of duets with him there in 2002. When in 2005 McDonough helped Bynum to organize the premiere of Braxton's Composition 103 for seven choreographed and costumed trumpeters, the composer showed his appreciation by inviting McDonough to participate in a duo recording session. The resulting album, which was produced by McDonough, opens with his angular bop construct 'Finnish Line' and closes with 'Schizoid,' a John Zorn-inspired collage piece during which the trumpeter pays homage to the rambunctious spirit of Lester Bowie. The third selection credited to McDonough, 'Massive Breath Attack,' materialized as a friendly exchange of elongated tones. 'Hail to the Spirit of Liberty' was composed by John Philip Sousa in 1900. Revisited here, the tidy little march is infused with the gracious good humor and camaraderie that characterize the best of Braxton's one-on-one collaborations. The 17-minute 'Improvisation' is comparably companionable, with contours which are recognizable imprints of Braxton's endearingly thoughtful persona. His composition 168 was first unveiled in duo performance with accordionist Ted Reichman in 1993 at Leipzig. It re-emerged as an element in the Small Ensemble Music project at Wesleyan in 1994, only to resurface in duets with bassist Joe Fonda in 1995, and with multi-reed improviser Scott Rosenberg in 2000. The Braxton-McDonough manifestation of 168 lasts more than 18 minutes and contains elements of the previously mentioned Composition 103, the very work which in essence triggered this collaborative recording date. McDonough, who is founder of the Thelonious Monk reinterpretation band Brilliant Coroners, is heard at his most relaxed and creative in the best imaginable company. Anyone who really loves and respects Anthony Braxton should most certainly track down a copy of this heartwarming tête-á-tête."



    6 Duos

    or

    6 Duos


    0 0


    1. Playthings of the wind 3:03
    2. Joinin the crowd 3:42
    3. Delight 2:44
    4. Upside down 4:15
    5. Farewell my friend part 1 3:21
    6. Farewell my friend part 2 3:21
    7. Blowin Tiffany 7:23
    8. Fire of my lifetime 5:11
    9. G flat road 5:43


    Bjoern Christiansen - guitar, vocal
    Bengt Jensen - keyboards
    Svein Gundersen - bass, piano and vocal
    Kjetil Stensvik - drums, vocal


    AMG:
    "Aunt Mary was a Norwegian prog rock band from the seventies. Signed a contract with Polydor in Denmark to release Aunt Mary in 1970. The group gradually moved towards progressive rock with the records Loaded in 1972 and Janus in 73. The group was disestablished in 1973 but has been reunited for several concerts since 1978."



    Loaded

    or

    Loaded


    0 0


    When The Nation Was Sound
    1. Theme And Variations 6:09
    2. Shouts And Meditations 12:17
    3. When Not Then 9:21

    Suite For A Better World
    4. Introduction 1:29
    5. Section 2 3:01
    6. Section 3 3:17
    7. Section 4 4:13
    8. Finale 1:48

    Colors
    9. Part 1 6:29
    10. Interludes 9:08
    11. Part 2 5:12

    Bruce Ackley - Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor)
    Steve Adams - Sax (Alto), Sax (Soprano)
    Larry Ochs - Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor)
    Jon Raskin - Sax (Alto), Sax (Baritone)

    AMG:
    "ROVA saxophone quartet provide a tiered, three-dimensional look at the interaction of soprano, alto, tenor, and baritone saxophone. The arrangement of these instruments in the stereo mix - left to right on all tracks in the sequence soprano, baritone, alto, and then tenor - offers great contrast in the three-dimensional sound. Even the bright little spark of piccolo or sopranino saxophone involves in these works of sonic texture. While Steve Adams of the group contributes one piece to the three-work album ('The Gene Pool'), the rest are commissions. Robin Holcomb wrote 'Laredo' for the group, and Muhal Richard Abrams contributes 'Quartet #1.' Still, each work is a showcase for group improvisation. These explorative forays by the group are not usually intensely challenging Niagaras of notes, but just as often sparkling and moving moments of lyricism."



    The Works

    or

    The Works


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