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FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

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    1. Burning in Stockholm 49:00

    Per Henrik Wallin - Piano
    Johnny Dyani - Bass
    Erik Dahlback - Drums

    Wiki:
    "Per Henrik Wallin (July 17, 1946; June 15, 2005) was a Swedish jazz pianist and composer. He was acclaimed in Continental Europe, but relatively obscure in the United States.[1] He received the Swedish variant of the Golden Django two years before his death."


    Burning in Stockholm
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    or

    Burning in Stockholm
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    1. Sixteen
    2. Different Face
    3. Where Do We Go from Here
    4. Get Together
    5. My Baby
    6. You Better Find Someone to Love
    7. I'm Gonna Make It
    8. If This World Were Mine
    9. Dreaming Isn't Good for You
    10. Crabby Day
    11. Don't Tell Me How to Love

    Joe Mattioli - Vocals
    Pete Skelton - Guitar
    Joe Gallo - Piano
    Vincent "Butch" Biocca - Bass
    Joe Bertola - Drums

    AMG:
    "This underground rock group from Rochester, NY, cut this sole album of Grand Funk Railroad-inspired hard rock in 1970, which was released on Gallo to little recognition and few sales, thus elevating their mystique in the collector world. This record was in fact sorely overlooked at the time and is a classic soulful rock album produced to a standard that begs popularity, with a production that is in fact almost middle-of-the-road '70s-sounding rather than underground psychedelia. It is rumored that Lou Gram, later of Foreigner, was with the band for a spell. What to expect: a funky and soulful hard rock album that will appeal to fans of Thin Lizzy and Uriah Heep with some keyboard-driven white soul and boogie and a great version of Buffalo Springfield's 'Where Do We Go From Here'."



    Lucifer
    Scans



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    1. Yudach 15:52
    2. Milky Way 8:38
    3. Vision 4:37
    4. Motive 16:23
    5. Bouyancy 3:40
    6. Sun 9:36

    Tone Jansa - Sax (Alto), Sax (Tenor)
    Andre Jeanquartier - Piano
    Ewald Oberleitner - Bass
    Johann Preininger - Drums

    AMG:
    "This compilation taken from two seminal albums in the history of Eastern European jazz - particularly in what used to be Yugoslavia - is a welcome find in the bins of the United States and England. Saxophonist Tone Jansa is a giant of a man, and a saxophonist who has much in common with both Pharaoh Sanders and the giant who influenced him, John Coltrane. This quartet made a total of five records, and one in quintet and sextet settings. But the two that are referred to here should be reissued in their entirety. Oh well, what can ya do? The first two tracks of this outrageously beautiful, spiritually motivated open modal jazz is from the Tone Jansa Jazz Kvartet disc on RTB in 1976, and the last four are from the Tone Jansa Kvartet disc on the same label from 1978. There is a quiet fire in Jansa's playing; like Sanders, he seeks out the melodic propensity in scalar problems - especially in contrapuntal situations with pianist Andre Jeanquartier on 'Motive' and 'Yutach.' Both men tend to emphasize the mode inside the interval that creates sparks of lyrical fire between them and generates the most intricate of solos. The rhythm section here, Ewald Oberleitner and drummer Johann Preininger, is above journeyman status as well, but far from virtuosos in their own rights. Still they move rhythms and meters through some interesting color phases throughout this collection, turning the time against itself on 'Sun,' which closes the album so that both soloists have to reinvent the mode each time they solo. These recordings are so fine in their spiritually transcendent way, they would have been right at home on the Strata East label a few years earlier. There is no higher compliment one can pay than that."



    Bouyancy
    Scans


    or

    Bouyancy
    Scans


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    1. Dunes 15:00
    2. 33 1/3 7:40
    3. Rainsong 5:03
    4. The Monks Song 6:01
    5. Shadows 5:08
    6. Ishi 6:59

    Stomu Yamashta - percussion
    Daito Fujita - bass
    Brian Gascoigne - piano, clavinet, synthesizer
    Hozumi Tanaka - drum kit
    Tsuneo Matsumoto - guitar
    Gary Boyle - guitar
    Hisako Yamashta - violin
    Murray Head - vocal
    Maxine Nightingale - vocal

    AMG:
    "Stomu Yamashta was closely connected to the acting world, composing music for the Parisian Red Buddha Theater group, pieces which were transformed into his debut Red Buddha album, and for cinema - his soundtrack for the film One on One was recorded and released as his band East Wind's second album. Raindog, the band's follow-up, began life as a multimedia event held at London's Roundhouse in 1975, featuring the Red Buddha players as well as a number of British actors. Yamashta had recently expanded East Wind's lineup with the addition of two British vocalists - Murray Head and Maxine Nightingale, fresh from West End success in Jesus Christ Superstar, along with a Japanese rhythm section and guitarist Hozumi Tanka. Invariably then, of all the band's albums, Raindog by far is festooned with the most Eastern sounds, smoothly flowing into the set's more western jazz and prog rock currents. But this is a highly diverse set. The title track and 'The Monks Song' both wade into pop territory, albeit with a strong progressive undertow. The epic 'Dunes,' in contrast, shifts treacherously between haunting Arabesque and space rock, a disconcerting hybrid to begin with but one you wish Yamashta would pursue even further. 'Shadows' chases ribbons of classical piano and violin, while '33 1/3' is a percussive showcase where East meets West. Understandably, considering its genesis, Raindog is not quite as coherent a set as its predecessors, but it remains a fascinating musical journey."



    Raindog
    Scans



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    1. Herman Wright 3:21
    2. Sunday Telephone 2:27
    3. Two Minutes Classical 2:08
    4. Love Child Is Coming Home 2:31
    5. Lady Coryell 6:31
    6. The Dream Thing 2:23
    7. Treats Style 5:42
    8. You Don't Know What Love Is 2:35
    9. Stiff Neck 7:12
    10. Cleo's Mood 4:20

    Larry Coryell - Guitar, Bass, Vocals
    Bobby Moses - Drums
    Elvin Jones - Drums (7,9)
    Jimmy Garrison - Bass (7)

    AMG:
    "This 1968 set is for anyone who felt let down when the early '70s promise for a truly creative, genre-busting fusion of jazz and rock swiftly disappeared in a wave of vapid, show biz values and disco frippery.
    On Lady Coryell, the 25-year-old Larry Coryell already possessed a virtuoso's technique and a rich harmonic and melodic imagination. He uses these gifts here to build swirling, multi-tracked, oftentimes intensely psychedelic performances that range seamlessly across the jazz and rock landscape. The most important tracks are 'Treats Style' and 'Stiff Neck.' On the former, the guitarist is teamed with jazz masters Jimmy Garrison (bass) and Elvin Jones (drums) in a power trio of cool swagger and screaming blues. 'Stiff Neck'is a furious duet between Jones and the guitarist. Coryell begins in a driving, post-bop vein, segues to a raw, acid blues and then out into a splintered, barrage of power chords and feedback.Jones navigates the way ahead, countering Coryell's audacity with controlled fury and an assured, muscular pulse. On the rest of the session, Bob Moses, a bandmate from the guitarist's first recordings, takes the drum chair, while Coryell overdubs the bass parts. Together they calmly probe the shifting sections and layers of the title track before transforming a Junior Walker R&B shuffle, 'Cleo's Mood,' into a mind-bending, rave-up. Even Coryell's hoarse-throated singing is effective. On 'Sunday Telephone,' - over a maelstrom of phased, fuzzed, and wah-wahed guitars - he yowls dementedly, 'One more dime operator, can't you see it's Dr. Strange on the line.' The album's only lapse is the country corn of 'Love Child Is Coming Home,' where Coryell tries to transcend one genre too many."



    Lady Coryell
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    or

    Lady Coryell
    Scans


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    1. No Other Woman
    2. Another Man
    3. Westbound Plane
    4. Marijuana
    5. Kung Fu Man
    6. River Jordan
    7. Natty Dread Is the Greatest
    8. Zion
    9. Dread Are the Controller
    10. She Is Mad with Me
    11. Six Babylon
    12. Murder
    13. Brown Skin Girl
    14. Rastafari Is My Religion
    15. Lump Sum
    16. Don't Be Afraid

    AMG:
    "This nicely chosen and lovingly packaged retrospective of the work of reggae legend Linval Thompson makes a couple of things clear: first, that it's crazy and unjust that he is primarily known for his production work rather than his singing. He had (and still has, as the accompanying documentary DVD makes clear) one of the prettiest and mostly subtly expressive voices in reggae music - not quite on the same level as Cornel Campbell or Johnny Clarke, but surely more supple and attractive than those of many more popular artists of the era. But the other thing this collection makes clear is the reason why his work as a singer has been less successful than his work as a producer: it's his lyrics, which are almost always banal and sometimes sound like they're being improvised in the studio, and not particularly well. Banal lyrics are hardly anything new in reggae music, though, and if you don't listen to the words too carefully you'll have no trouble at all basking in the rock-hard roots rhythms, smoky dub mixes and ecstatic vocal performances that are on offer here. Skip past the silly 'Kung Fu Man' and the strangely halting 'Westbound Plane' and immerse yourself in the brilliant 'No Other Woman,' the wonderful showcase track 'Six Babylon' (featuring a dub mix by Scientist and a toast by Ranking Trevor) and the stone classic 'Dread Are the Controller' (in an extended mix with another Scientist dub appended). Then turn to the DVD, which offers a half-hour long interview with the artist and live footage of a recent performance at the Sierra Nevada World Music Festival. A roots classic."



    Early Sessions
    Scans



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    1. Fidayda 4:49
    2. Onbesli 3:48
    3. Cifte Telli 5:27
    4. Bazalika 3:28
    5. Harmandali 7:07
    6. Malatya 2:37
    7. Ay Giz 6:31
    8. Bergama Gaydasi 3:41
    9. Izmir'in Kavaklari 7:36
    10. Ramize-Deryalar 3:22
    11. Gökte Yildiz Ay Musun-Tababcamin Sapi 2:20

    Hüsnü Şenlendirici - Clarinet, Trumpet, Davul
    Özkan Alıcı - Bağlama
    Nuri Lekesizgöz - Kanun
    Ergun Hepbildik - Violin
    Mehmet Akatay - Perkussion
    Volkan Öktem - Davul
    Nurhat Şensesli - Bass guitar
    Caner Tepecik - Keyboard




    Bergama Gaydasý
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    1. In C 42:01

    Terry Riley - Saxophone
    Margaret Hassell - Piano
    Darlene Reynard - Bassoon
    Jerry Kirkbride - Clarinet
    David Rosenboom - Viola
    Edward Burnham - Vibraphone
    Lawrence Singer - Oboe
    Jon Hassell - Trumpet
    David Shostac - Flute
    Stuart Dempster - Trombone
    Jan Williams - Marimbaphone

    AMG:
    "After creating several graphically notated and pattern-based works for jazz ensembles in the late 1950s and early 1960s, Terry Riley developed a new type of pattern music strongly influenced by gamelan music and the classical traditions of India. In C, the composer's best-known work, is both the purest example of this phase of Riley's musical development and a landmark of the minimalist aesthetic.
    The one-page score, which calls for any ensemble of pitched instruments, consists of 53 discrete, concentrated gestures - sometimes as small as a two-note motive - of varying lengths. The players enter independently, moving gradually through this progression of cells; each cell may (and should) be repeated indefinitely and independently of the other players. The result is that the interlocking of patterns, the evolution of texture, density, and sonority, and the work's duration are all unique to each performance. The work's main unifying element is a metronomic pulse on the pitch C, normally played in octaves in the highest register of a piano, which provides a fixed tempo and tonal center. Because of its inherent instrumental flexibility, In C has been performed in a countless variety of configurations, from conventional chamber groups to massed keyboards and percussion to an ensemble of Chinese instruments.
    In C is significant for its deconstruction of the European classical tradition, accomplished partly through its harmonic and tonal stasis, partly through its lack of hierarchical development. Further, the work emphasizes the importance of the ensemble (group) over the virtuoso (individual), granting each player an autonomous though guided role in creating the work anew each time it is performed.

    Terry Riley would certainly bristle at the idea of there being a 'definitive' version of In C since it was created with the intention of having an infinite number of interpretive possibilities, but this version, a reissue of the original Columbia recording, led by the composer, has a certain authority since it was the means by which the piece was introduced to a broad public and it paved the way for the biggest revolution in classical composition in the second half of the twentieth century. It has the hallmarks that came to define musical minimalism: triadic harmony, a slow rate of harmonic change, a steady pulse, and the use of repetitive patterns. In this performance, it has a shiny, almost metallic brightness and a visceral energy that immediately set it apart from the intellectually rigorous and austere trends in the new music establishment of the 1960s. The performance, by members of the Center of the Creative and Performing Arts of SUNY Buffalo, is disciplined, staying within the parameters Riley prescribes, but is also freely inventive, taking advantage of the opportunities Riley gives the performers for creative self-expression. The result sounds spontaneous but assured, never chaotic or capricious. The ensemble understood and had rehearsed the piece thoroughly, performing it at Carnegie Hall not long before this recording was made in 1968, when the piece was already four years old. For listeners with a sympathy for minimalism, the energy of this performance can be a wild and exhilarating ride, and it will be a nostalgic trip for anyone who knew it in its earlier incarnations on LP or cassette tape. The original tape has been remastered by Bob Ludwig and has all the vitality and clarity of a spanking new recording."



    In C
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    1. The Coming Generation 2:35
    2. Blast Off 1970 2:36
    3. I Can't Say 1:54
    4. Never You Mind 2:18
    5. A Man's Gotta Be a Man 2:11
    6. Don't Just Stand There 2:45
    7. Ain't That Loving You Baby 2:39
    8. Ballad of a Busker 2:19
    9. But She's Gone 2:29
    10. It's Easy to Say 2:00
    11. You Gotta Believe It 2:03
    12. Kinsforth Hemmingseen 3:11
    13. Sunday Breeze 1:54
    14. Understand Our Age 2:34
    15. The Only Thing on My Mind 2:10
    16. I Want Your Love 2:40
    17. Listen to Me 2:24
    18. Don't Ya 1:40
    19. That's What I Want 2:14
    20. Oh My Word 1:50
    21. The Great Drain Robbery, No. 1 0:46
    22. The Great Drain Robbery, No. 2 0:45

    Glyn Conway - Lead Vocls
    Paddy Mcaneney - Lead Guitar
    Peter Davies - Guitar
    Daron Curtiss - Guitar
    Ben Grubb - Bass, Organ
    Ces Good - Bass
    Roger Wiles - Drms

    AMG:
    "All 19 songs from the Gremlins' 1965-68 singles are on Coming Generation: The Complete Recordings 1965-1968, along with all four tracks from a 1966 EP. It's the work of a pleasant, very accomplished band, albeit one that, like many outfits from New Zealand and Australia, were emulating various British and American trends of the era more than they were forging a path of their own. Nonetheless, it does have a leg up on the '60s output of many other bands from their part of their world in featuring largely original material (mostly written by singer-guitarist Glyn 'Conway' Tucker), rather than faithful covers of songs originating in other countries. There's effects-laden pop-psychedelia ('Blast Off 1970'), decent Merseybeat-soaked pseudo-British Invasion sounds ('I Can't Say,' 'But She's Gone,' 'It's Easy to Say'), chunky mod rock ('Never You Mind'), sullen folk-rock ('A Man's Gotta Be a Man,' 'Understand Our Age'), observational pop in the spirit of the mid-'60s Kinks and early Bee Gees, and even a Troggs imitation ('You Gotta Believe It'). For all that, the best song is their big 1966 New Zealand hit 'The Coming Generation,' a cover of an obscure Knickerbockers song that was actually an improvement on the original. Lengthy liner notes with many quotes from Tucker also help make this a definitive retrospective of this obscure (at least to non-New Zealanders) band."



    The Complete Recordings 1965-68
    Scans



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    1. Tree Theme Ii 11:54
    2. Cluster Quartet Ii 19:00
    3. Like It is 27:42

    Burton Greene - Piano
    Marion Brown - Sax (Alto)
    Reggie Johnson - Bass
    Rashied Ali - Drums

    AMG:
    "Burton Greene figured prominently in New York's free jazz movement of the '60s, performing with such major figures as Marion Brown, Sam Rivers, Gato Barbieri, and Alan Silva. As a child, Greene studied classical music at the Fine Arts Academy in Chicago; from 1956-1958 he studied jazz with Dick Marx. Greene moved to New York in the early '60s, as the city's free jazz movement was gathering momentum. There, he formed the Free Form Improvisation Ensemble with Silva in 1963 - reputedly one of the first groups devoted to playing a wholly improvised music. In 1964, he joined the Jazz Composer's Guild. During the mid-'60s, he recorded for the ESP-Disk label as a leader, before moving to the Netherlands in 1969. Greene became something of a journeyman, performing all over Europe while maintaining a residence on a houseboat in Amsterdam. He recorded intermittently in the '70s and '80s. Greene became one of the few free jazz musicians to experiment with synthesizers. He's played solo and led various bands of unusual instrumentation; a recent project is a klezmer group called Klez-Jazz, which features clarinetist Perry Robinson. During the '90s, Greene recorded more frequently in the U.S., notably for the Cadence Jazz and C.I.M.P. labels. Greene's autobiography is entitled Memoirs of a Musical 'Pesty Mystic' - or - From the Ashcan to the Ashram and Back Again, published by Cadence Jazz Books."



    Live At The Woodstock Playhouse
    Scans


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    Live At The Woodstock Playhouse
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    1. Germania 6:52
    2. Rock and roll revolution 3:05
    3. Got no shadows 2:30
    4. Cool and collected 4:00
    5. Get back to you 4:10
    6. No future 5:40
    7. I'm so down 2:37
    8. Driving me crazy 2:07
    9. When I went to the scene 2:35
    10. Southern line 5:25

    Klaus Hess - lead guitar, vocals
    Charly Maucher - bass, vocals
    Peter Panka - drums

    AMG:
    "Jane's late-'70s and '80s albums noticeably drift away from the progressive sound that was prevalent on 1972's Together or 1975's Fire, Water, Earth, Air, which combined jazzy elements of guitar and percussion with a subtle space rock sound. With Germania, the trio is found playing straight-ahead hard rock, with only hints of their older sound emerging once in awhile through Klaus Hess's guitar playing. Just before the release of Germania, bass player Martin Hesse left to form Rizzo, replaced by the average-sounding Charly Maucher, whose style isn't quite so dramatic or pronounced. One of the better songs comes in the form of the title track, which uses German lyrics for only the second time in the group's career and has an advancing rock & roll flow initiated by Peter Panka's stalwart drumming. Switching gears completely is the swaying reggae beat of 'Get Back to You,' a very unique attempt from a European band but is catchy nonetheless. 'I'm So Down,' 'Driving Me Crazy,' and 'Rock & Roll' are hard, driving rock tunes that fail to cast any distinct characteristics of Jane, but still show some positive energy. By the time Germania was released, which was the album that ended their stint with the Metronome label, the band began to resemble the Scorpions to a slight degree, and even the smallest trace of Jane's progressive rock leanings had disappeared."



    Germania
    or
    Germania

    Scans



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    1. Manhã Do Carnaval 6:01
    2. Old Folks 7:39
    3. Up Jumped Spring 4:35
    4. Straight, No Chaser 4:15
    5. Here's That Rainy Day 4:41
    6. Yardbird Suite 3:58
    7. Ev'ry Time We Say Goodbye 5:54

    Walter Bishop, Jr. - Piano
    Sam Jones - Bass
    Billy Higgins - Drums

    AMG:
    "Walter Bishop, Jr. was a valuable utility pianist on many a modern jazz session during the bebop era, remaining an active performer until his death at the age of 70 in early 1998. The son of composer Walter Bishop, Sr., he grew up in Harlem's Sugar Hill area, and as a teen counted among his friends Sonny Rollins, Kenny Drew, and Art Taylor; acknowledging Art Tatum, Bud Powell, and Nat King Cole as important influences, Bishop first attracted notice on the Manhattan club circuit around 1947, going on to play and record in bands led by Art Blakey, Charlie Parker, Oscar Pettiford, Kai Winding, and Miles Davis in the years to follow. In 1960 he played in trombonist Curtis Fuller's group before forming his own trio the next year with bassist Jimmy Garrison and drummer G.T. Hogan. In 1964 Bishop toured with vibist Terry Gibbs, and in the late '60s he studied at Juilliard with composer/pianist Hall Overton. He moved to Los Angeles in 1969, where he continued to study and work as a freelancer with local groups, including Supersax and trumpeter Blue Mitchell's band. From 1972 to 1975 Bishop taught jazz theory, both privately and in local colleges. He returned to New York in 1975. The next year Bishop authored an insightful if neglected book on jazz theory, A Study in Fourths, in which he proffered a technique of chromatic improvisation based on the use of cycles of fourths and fifths. Bishop played in trumpeter Clark Terry's big and small bands in 1977. He continued to lead his own groups, and in the early '80s began teaching at the University of Hartford; in 1983 he played a solo concert at Carnegie Hall. In the mid-'90s Bishop appeared to great acclaim at the Charlie Parker Jazz Festival on New York City's Lower East Side."



    Old Folks
    Scans


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    Old Folks
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    1. Queenside 5:19
    2. Hobart Got Burned 2:40
    3. Horsebones 2:40
    4. Antidote to Drydock 5:06
    5. Zoom Resume 1:28
    6. Boxed & Crossed 5:38
    7. Under Dali's Wing 3:17
    8. Vanity, Vanity 2:47
    9. Dancing in Sunrise, Switzerland 3:11
    10. Blind Arch 8:51
    11. Expected Freedom 2:21
    12. In the Red 5:08
    13. Not Alone 13:38
    14. Open City 0:52

    Dave Newhouse
    - piano, organ, baritone, alto & soprano sax, bass clarinet, percussion
    Tom Scott - Alto & soprano sax, Bb & alto clarinet, oboe, flutes, percussion
    Billy Swann - electric bass, guitar, percussion, vocals
    Paul Sears - drums, percussion
    +
    Fred Frith - guitar, piano
    Mark Hollander - Alto sax

    AMG:
    "Open City collects outtakes and rehearsal recordings from most of the Muffins' career. The sound quality is usually good to very good and, considering how very little music this exciting band had the chance to release through official channels, every unreleased bit counts. And most of these tracks contain valuable musical pleasure both for the seasoned fan and the newcomer. The first seven pieces were captured at a rehearsal. They would all end up on the band's last LP 185 with many studio tweakings. Here they are presented live - proof that the band was able to play them 'for real.' The next two tracks are outtakes from Fred Frith's Gravity sessions where the Muffins served as backing band. 'Blind Arch' is a live improvisation, while 'Expected Freedom' is an unreleased track from the Manna/Mirage sessions. The last three tracks were recorded for a radio show. These are not half-baked songs, but show the Muffins in top musical shape. For example, the 14-minute 'Not Alone' was one of their oldest compositions, a tune in the style of the material found on Manna/Mirage, but was never recorded. Fans of complex Canterbury-style prog fusion will find Open City very much worthwhile."



    Open City
    Scans



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    1. City of Spring 6:25
    2. Man of the Light 9:29
    3. Stillness 4:49
    4. Turbulent Plover 7:13
    5. Love in the Garden 6:03
    6. Carol 6:41

    Zbigniew Seifert - Violin
    Joachim Kühn - Piano (1,2,4,6)
    Jasper Van't Hof - Piano (5)
    Cecil McBee - Bass (1-4,6)
    Billy Hart - Drums (1,2,4,6)

    AMG:
    "A masterful improviser who could have ranked at the top with Adam Makowicz and Michal Urbaniak, Zbigniew Seifert's early death robbed Poland of one of its top jazz artists. Seifert started on the violin when he was six, and ten years later started doubling on alto sax. He studied violin at the University of Krakow, but when he started leading his own band in 1964, he mostly played alto, showing off the influence of John Coltrane. When he was a member of Tomasz Stanko's very advanced quintet (1969-1973), Seifert switched back to violin and largely gave up playing sax. He moved to Germany in 1973, was with Hans Koller's Free Sound from 1974-1975, and freelanced (including with Joachim Kuhn). Seifert played at the Monterey Jazz Festival with John Lewis in 1976, and the following year recorded with Oregon. As a leader, Seifert (who was affectionately known as 'Zbiggy') performed music that ranged from free jazz to fusion. Seifert recorded for Muza in 1969, Mood from 1974-1976, MPS in 1976, and Capitol from 1977-1978. He died of cancer at the age of 32."



    Man of the Light
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    Man of the Light
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    1. An Hour In Paradise: Scene 1
    2. An Hour In Paradise: Scene 2
    3. An Hour In Paradise: Scene 3
    4. An Hour In Paradise: Scene 4
    5. An Hour In Paradise: Scene 5
    6. An Hour In Paradise: Scene 6
    7. An Hour In Paradise: Scene 7
    8. How Do I love Thee
    9. Song Of Love
    10. Caprice Americaine

    The Nova Orchestra
    Armando Sciascia - Violin, Conductor
    Karen Hlvik - Vocals

    Discogs:
    "Founder of Vedette Records, a Lombardian label active from 1962 to the early nineties."



    An Hour In Paradise
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    1. Dreamer's Chant 2:04
    2. Solstice Prayer 2:02
    3. Atoká, Atoká 1:59
    4. Whirlwinds Dancing 3:41
    5. Red-Tailed Hawks 3:40
    6. Coyote Rainbows 5:59
    7. Saguaro Sunsets 10:30
    8. The Young Old Warrior 3:27
    9. Red Streaking Into the Water 3:44
    10. Willow People 3:36
    11. Black World 3:40
    12. Blue-Green World 4:08
    13. Yellow-White World 3:14
    14. Rainbow World 5:47
    15. Amazing Grace 2:17

    R. Carlos Nakai - Flute

    AMG:
    "Tucson-based multi-instrumentalist R. Carlos Nakai is a Native-American musician and cultural anthropologist of Navajo-Ute descent. Though he received classical training on the trumpet, his numerous recordings consist primarily of resonant solo performances of Native-American flute improvisations with a judicious use of synthesizers, chanting, and nature sounds. Nakai only occasionally features arrangements of traditional melodies from various tribes; instead, he is primarily concerned with creating original compositions that capture the essence of his heritage in highly personalized ways. In addition to his solo recordings, Nakai has had the opportunity to create new avenues of expression for the Native American flute through collaborations with various artists over the years, including the ethnic jazz band Jackalope, keyboardist Peter Kater, contemporary classical composer James DeMars, and multi-instrumentalist William Eaton."



    Songs of the Rainbow World
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    1. Metamusik, symphony for piano & orchestra 47:51
    2. Postludium for piano & orchestra 19:53

    Alexei Lubimov - Piano
    ORF Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra
    Dennis Russell Davies - Conductor

    AMG:
    "'Music is still song, even if one cannot literally sing it: it is not a philosophy, not a world-view. It is, above all, a chant, a song the world sings about itself, it is the musical testimony to life.' - Valentin Silvestrov
    It's not at all hard to hear the image of a 'world singing itself its own song' in Ukrainian composer Valentin Silvestrov's works. His string quartets, his songs, and his masterful symphonies all radiate with the slow steady force of a rotating planet, spinning lonesomely in the void. The notion that these vast, lethargic bodies sing to themselves as they turn, and we hear their music as a symphony or song cycle, admittedly carries an aspect of Romantic fancy to it. But the image also voices a serious metaphor for Silvestrov - the concept of 'meta-music,' a music which hovers around, above, and especially after all other musics, like an atmosphere encircling a post-apocalyptic globe. Silvestrov has written much about the idea of 'coda' and 'epilogue' in his music, that place in which there is 'a gathering of resonances, a form which is open.' This coda-state is for Silvestrov 'not the end of music as an art, but the end of music, an end in which it can linger for a very long time. It is very much in the area of the coda that immense life is possible.' Hence Silvestrov's 'metaphorical style' from the 1970s onwards: a body of slow, lovely, and astoundingly detailed 'postludes,' emanating the air of a Mahler adagio through vast waves of time and subtle decay.
    Valentin Vasil'yevich Silvestrov was born in Kiev, Ukraine, on September 30, 1937, arguably the darkest year in the Russian history. He came rather late to music, beginning study at 15, first privately and then at an evening music school. By 1955, he graduated with a gold medal and enrolled at the Kiev Institute of Construction Engineering; but three years later Silvestrov began serious pursuit of music at the Kiev Conservatory, studying with Lyatoshyns'ky and Revutsky. Even with earliest works like the Piano Quintet (1961), Silvestrov was already drawn to the dramatic potential in contrasting strong tonality with strong atonality; in his massive Third Symphony 'Eskhatofoniya' (1966), this preoccupation with polarities took the form of 'cultural' (strictly notated) sounds and 'mysterious' (improvised) ones. The place of magic and invocation - those elements that always defy material, that arise only in the process and afterwards - began to rest more firmly in Silvestrov's works.
    1971's gigantic Drama for piano trio - 'virtually a clinical study of an artistic crisis,' Silvestrov's biographer writes - was a breakthrough work. And it was beginning in 1973 that Silvestrov embarked on his 'metaphorical' or 'allegorical' style, strongly reminiscent of late-Romantic cliché, to which he still adheres today - 'metaphorical' because Silvestrov knows these sounds to be irrefutably 'past' and has no interest in merely 'resurrecting' them; and 'allegorical,' because Silvestrov wishes to use this music obliquely, as an estranged means rather than a predictable end.
    Silvestrov's Symphony No. 5 of 1982 is perhaps an ideal symbol of this style: in its three-quarter-hour cycle of nine slow movements, it 'recycles' a whole world of banal, almost kitschy melodies on its scarred, cloudy surface. But underneath this floating music lies a tremendous complexity, both technically and emotionally; the accumulative expressive effect is undeniable and unexpected. Malcolm MacDonald perhaps put it best when he wrote that the 'Russian sense of lamentation...reaches in Silvestrov a new expressive stage: he seems to compose, not the lament itself, but the lingering memory of it, the mood of sadness that it leaves behind'."


    Metamusik-Postludium
    Scans



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    1. Overture 2:03
    2. Mr. Armageddon 4:25
    3. Now Is the End-The End Is When 3:14
    4. Lay Me Down Gently 3:58
    5. Nobody Asked You to Come 3:15
    6. You Must Be Joking 3:59
    7. A Day in Shining Armour 3:28
    8. The Loves of Augustus Abbey, Pt.1 1:07
    9. Rain 3:25
    10. The Loves of Augustus Abbey, Pt.2 1:29
    11. Coming Down/Love Song for the Dead Ché 4:29
    12. The Loves of Augustus Abbey, Pt.3 1:22
    13. Time of Light and Darkness 4:34
    14. Mr. Armageddon [Mono Single Version] 4:38
    15. There's Got to Be a Way 3:45
    16. I'm Never Gonna Let You Go 3:14
    17. You Must Be Joking [Mono Single Version] 4:01
    18. Movin' Down the Line 2:45
    19. Roll Over Mary 3:02

    Mike Taylor - Trumpet
    Norman Haines - Keyboards, Vocals
    Mick Hincks - Bass, Vocals
    Bob Lamb - Drums
    +
    Lyn Dobson - Saxophone
    Dick Heckstall-Smith - Saxophone
    Bill Madge - Saxophone
    Chris Mercer - Saxophone
    Henry Lowther - Trumpet
    Chris Wood - Wind

    AMG:
    "Locomotive was a Birmingham-based band that went through some serious evolution in the final years of the 1960s, releasing consistently good music in several genres during their three-year history. Their early lineup included future Traffic flautist Chris Wood.
    In contrast to Mike Sheridan & the Nightriders, the Moody Blues, the Move, and the Idle Race, all Birmingham bands that aimed for what is variously perceived as the mainstream, whether it was British beat, R&B, or mod-punk, Locomotive started out playing ska. With Norman Haines (late of a band called the Brumbeats) handling the songwriting, they picked up on Bluebeat as it developed in 1967, but rather than evolving along the next natural step to reggae, Locomotive hung a 90-degree turn into psychedelia.
    After recording initially for the Direction label with the single 'Broken Heart' b/w 'Rudy a Message to You' in late 1967, they moved to EMI's Parlophone label in 1968 and charted in the Top 30 with their first single, the lyrical and low-key melodic 'Rudi's in Love.' In 1969, they released a single called 'Mr. Armageddon,' a piece of tight, big-band psychedelia that never managed to chart despite a unique sound for its time, doomsday rock with a heavy brass component.
    The band cut one album, We Are Everything You See, for Parlophone in 1969, with Dick Heckstall Smith on sax and Chris Wood (by then a member of Traffic) on flute augmenting the core lineup. The album failed to ignite any fires with the public, although it was interesting, containing a pair of songs that had been written for and recorded by the band the United States of America, as well as 'Mr. Armageddon.' The group also recorded a single incognito for the Transatlantic label under the name Steam Shovel, which resurfaced in the '90s on the CD re-release of the Parlophone LP. They might've made the jump to the newly formed Harvest label easily enough, but Locomotive broke up just as EMI was getting serious and methodical about psychedelia and progressive rock. Norman Haines later led a band bearing his own name, and Lamb ended up playing drums with Steve Gibbons during the mid-'70s."



    We Are Everything You See   Scans


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    1. Sortie 10:39
    2. Black Elk 8:23
    3. Helmy 1:34
    4. Fork New York 2:07
    5. Living T. Blues 13:47
    6. 2-Fou 3:36
    7. Shuffle Boil 5:14
    8. Barble 3:24
    9. Chary 2:49
    10. Tune 2 8:16
    11. Pannonica 3:28
    12. M's Transport 4:00
    13. Comin' on the Hudson 3:26
    14. There We Were 2:59
    15. Generous 1 3:40

    Steve Lacy - Sax (Soprano)
    Enrico Rava - Trumpet (1-6)
    Kent Carter - Bass
    Aldo Romano - Drums

    jazzloft:
    "Digitally remastered two-fer containing a pair of rare complete original LPs by Jazz legend Steve Lacy recorded in Italy: Sortie (which appears here on CD for the first time ever) and Disposability. Both albums focus on Free Jazz. Sortie is a quartet excursion with trumpeter Enrico Rava sharing the front line. The long unavailable Disposability presents Lacy with the same bassist and drummer as Sortie in a trio set that includes a mixture of original tunes with compositions by Thelonious Monk, as well as a song by Cecil Taylor and another by Carla Bley."



    Sortie + Disposability   Scans

    or

    Sortie + Disposability   Scans

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    1. Norwegian Wood
    2. You've Gotta Hide Your Love Away
    3. Ob-la-di Ob-la-da
    4. If I Needed Someone
    5. You Can't Do That
    6. Love Me Do
    7. Got to Get You Into My Life
    8. Across the Universe
    9. With a Little Help from My Friends
    10. I Saw Her Standing There
    11. Things We Said Today
    12. John Lennon Tribute
    13. Norwegian Wood (Radio Edit)
    14. Got to Get You Into My Life (Radio Edit)
    15. I Saw Her Standing There (Radio Edit)
    16. John Lennon Tribute (Radio Edit)

    Madoo - Vocals
    Uli Geissendoerfer - Keyboadrs
    Louis Banks - Keyboadrs
    Rob 'A.K.A.' Britney - Guitar
    Xoli Redmond - Guitar
    Esaan Norani - Guitar
    Eric Stiller - Bass
    Karl Peters - Bass
    Ranjit Barrot - Drums

    AMG:
    "Indian-born, New York-based singer Madooo (aka Madhukar Chandra Dhas) has pursued a part-time career as a performer of Western pop/rock with an Indian flavor both in his native country and his adopted one, while paying the bills working in advertising agencies. In 2002, he self-released his debut album, This Day Is Forever, which contained his interpretations of the Beatles songs 'With a Little Help From My Friends,' 'Love Me Do,' and 'Got to Get You Into My Life' beside his originals. For his second album, he has recorded an all-Beatles program, and it is an entertaining collection. The Beatles music has been interpreted in many different ways, of course, but an Indian take has a certain validity given the group's (and particularly George Harrison's) professed attraction to the country's art and culture. Madooo has steered clear of Beatles songs already presented in an overtly Indian style, such as 'Within You, Without You,' though he begins with a version of 'Norwegian Wood,' an early example of a Western pop song that employed an Indian sitar. But then, the singer is not interested in simply translating Beatles songs into traditional Indian arrangements. Rather, he is a contemporary musician with a combination of Indian and Western rock influences, and his versions are hybrids. They tend to work best when he is trying lesser-known Beatles songs such as 'You Can't Do That' and 'Things We Said Today,' although he demonstrates that Harrison already had a certain Indian leaning in 'If I Needed Someone' even before he went public with his interests. The best of the remakes is 'I Saw Her Standing There,' probably because Madooo seriously alters it, creating a dance-rock version reminiscent of the Power Station, even down to his Robert Palmer-like vocal. The world may not need another Beatles tribute album, but Madooo demonstrates his affection for the music and gives it some surprising twists."



    To The Fab Four From Liverpool   Scans


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