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FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | .... | 3 | 4 | (Page 5) | 6 | 7 | .... | 57 | newer

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    1. Let It Be
    2. You Won't See Me
    3. Lady Madonna
    4. The Long And Winding Road.mp
    5. We Can Work It Out
    6. In My Life
    7. Across The Universe
    8. Michelle
    9. Hey Jude
    10. Yesterday




    Let It Be   Scans


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    1. HEP
    2. Assaut Sur Mon Grand-Père (Parodie De_ I Saw Her Standing There)
    3. A Walibi J't'emmene (I Wanna Hold Your Hand)
    4. Look Anorak (You Can't Do That)
    5. Hard Des Smacs (A Hard Days Night)
    6. Triste Chat (Twist N' Shout)
    7. Sergent Pepere (Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band)
    8. Sodo Sous Marine (Yellow Submarine)
    9. Pas D'papier Water (Paperback Writer)
    10. L'usine In The Sky (Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds)
    11. Hey Jules (Hey Jude)
    12. Comme Tu Degueules (Come Together)
    13. Les P'tites Bites (Let It Be)
    14. Des Claques (Get Back)

    AMG:
    "French parodic punk band founded by members of Les Vampires. They change their name for each parody."



    4 Beadochons Dans Le Vent   Scans


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  • 12/31/11--09:23: 2012
  • Happy New Year!

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    Info

    AMG:
    "Sarah Vaughan recorded frequently during her three years with Roulette, and all 16 albums she completed for them plus five previously unissued tracks are included in this comprehensive eight-CD boxed set from Mosaic. The gifted singer is heard in a variety of settings, from superb small-group sessions to big-band settings and various dates bordering on easy listening; the sessions omitting the often syrupy string sections are the cream of this bumper crop. It's a joy to hear Vaughan sharing the spotlight with Joe Williams and the Count Basie Orchestra (with its leader sitting out in favor of her regular pianist, Kirk Stuart) in a swinging 'Teach Me Tonight' and a playful take of 'If I Were a Bell'; it's a shame that they never recorded an entire album together. Benny Carter's big-band charts also bring out the best in Vaughan. With the exception of the forgettable 'The Green Leaves of Summer,' Billy May's provides the vocalist with very compatible settings. The scaled-down session with guitarist Mundell Lowe and bassist George Duvivier is among her greatest achievements of her career; the singer is relaxed and stimulated by her accompanists. A similar follow-up date with Barney Kessel and Joe Comfort is equally rewarding. The sessions which add strings, led by various musicians (Jimmy Jones, Quincy Jones, Lalo Schifrin, Joe Reisman, Don Costa, and Marty Manning) serving as both arranger and conductor, vary greatly in quality. Often first-rate (and sometimes somewhat obscure) material is sabotaged by heavy-handed writing awash in strings. But for the most part, Vaughan's gorgeous voice is able to overcome even bland backgrounds. Mosaic remains the pinnacle of reissue labels with this handsome boxed set, which includes detailed liner notes by James Gavin, lots of session photos, and a thorough discography."



    Disc 1   Disc 2   Scans 1-2
    Disc 3   Disc 4   Scans 3-4
    Disc 5   Disc 6   Scans 5-6
    Disc 7   Disc 8   Scans 7-8


    or

    Disc 1   Disc 2   Scans 1-2
    Disc 3   Disc 4   Scans 3-4
    Disc 5   Disc 6   Scans 5-6
    Disc 7   Disc 8   Scans 7-8


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    1. Rhine & Courtesan 6:40
    2. The Voyage of Camille 4:22
    3. Tea Merchants 4:53
    4. Lloyd's Register 9:48
    5. With More Air Than Words 2:15
    6. All Is Calm Noble 3:17
    7. Cypress Branches 7:44
    8. Sirens 2:20
    9. Night at Sea 3:45
    10. Letters Home 3:30
    11. To Rest Near to You 2:48
    12. The Blue-Skinned Waltz 3:15
    13. His Eyes 4:24

    Rachel Grimes - Piano, Vibraphone
    Christian Frederickson - Viola
    Edward Grimes - Drums
    +
    Ann Kim - Violin
    Jim Maciukenas - Saw
    Sarah Hong - Cello
    Eve Miller - Cello
    John Upchurch - Cello, Clarinet, Clarinet (Bass)
    Jason Noble - Bass, Guitar, Piano, Vibraphone
    Bob Weston - Bass, Trumpet
    John Baker - Bells
    Kevin Coultas - Drums, Tympani

    AMG:
    "Formed out of the ashes of Rodan, this loose collective thrives on the neo-classical compositional skills of pianist Rachel Grimes, bassist/organist Jason Noble, and violinist Christian Frederickson. Augmented by a rotating cast of cellists, trumpeters, and drummers, the trio concocts an emotive symphony that, though thoroughly modern, seems timeless. The songs on The Sea and the Bells flow together so seamlessly, it almost seems like one brilliant hour-long epic composition. 'Rhine & Courtesan' opens the album with a dynamic, wistful melody that evokes the feeling of riding on ocean waves, then crashes to a startling halt, only to re-emerge with a claustrophobic eeriness that foretells impending doom. Other songs continue the nautical theme, from the haunting 'Night at Sea' to the hallucinatory 'Letters Home.' In an alternative scene where instrumental rockers are a dime a dozen, Rachel's stands out like diamonds on the ocean floor."



    The Sea And The Bells   Scans


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    1. Song for the Bearded Lady 10:30
    2. Elastic Rock 6:03
    3. Snakehips Dream 8:13
    4. Easy Does It Now 9:33
    5. The Pretty Redhead 9:06
    6. For Miles and Miles 6:37

    Ian Carr - Flugelhorn, Flute, Trumpet
    Karl Jenkins - Baritone, Oboe, Piano (1-3)
    Brian Smith - Flute, Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor) (1-3)
    Tim Whitehead - Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor) (4-6)
    Chris Spedding - Guitar (1-3)
    Mark Wood - Guitar (4-6)
    Jeff Clyne - Bass (1-3)
    Joe Hubbard - Bass (4-6)
    John Marshall - Drums

    AMG:
    "The six BBC tracks on The Pretty Redhead boast fine sound and were recorded at sessions on March 9, 1971 and October 6, 1982. The tracks present Nucleus at quite different phases of their career. The personnel differ quite a bit on each session, too, though Ian Carr and John Marshall are present on both. The first three tracks are from the 1971 date, and show them as an instrumental jazz fusion band not too far removed in tone from the latter-day Soft Machine - hardly a surprise as Karl Jenkins and John Marshall would both join that band the following year. The influence of early electric Miles Davis is heavily felt as well, in a performance that marked one of guitarist Chris Spedding's last appearances with the outfit. As the sleeve notes point out, the version of 'Song from a Bearded Lady,' a tune from their second album, differs markedly from the studio arrangement in its introductory portion. Despite the large shuffle in personnel, Nucleus were playing in pretty much the same style, though perhaps a tad more inside, on their 1982 session, which marked their only known recording with the lineup featuring Carr, Marshall, saxophonist Tim Whitehead, guitarist Mark Wood, and bassist Joe Hubbard. It's also notable for the inclusion of the group's only known recording of Carr's composition 'The Pretty Redhead,' though Carr's brief comment at the top of the liner notes laments his failure to hit a couple of high notes in the intro and coda."



    BBC: The pretty redhead   Scans

    or

    BBC: The pretty redhead   Scans

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    1. Grand Canyon Sunrise 7:20
    2. Morning Echoes 2:35
    3. Bright Angel 3:57
    4. Raven Dance 2:35
    5. Bedrock Cathedral 2:09
    6. River Run 7:14
    7. Elves' Chasm 2:11
    8. Sockdolager 4:12
    9. Air 3:36
    10. Grand Canyon Sunset 5:02

    Paul Winter - Sax (Soprano)
    John Clark - French Horn
    Paul McCandless - Oboe
    Oscar Castro-Neves - Guitar
    Paul Halley - Harmonium, Organ, Piano, Pipe Organ
    David Darling - Cello, Vocals, Voices
    Eugene Friesen - Associate Cello
    Glen Velez - Bendir, Drums, Gaval, Multi Instruments, Pandereta
    Will Channing - Rainstick, Rattles
    Nancy Rumbel - Rattle

    AMG:
    "Released in 1985, half of the compositions for Canyon were actually recorded in the Grand Canyon, while the rest were recorded in St. John's Cathedral in New York. The musicians were Paul McCandless, David Darling, Eugene Friesen, Glen Velez, Paul Halley, John Clark and Oscar Castro-Neves."



    Canyon   Scans


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    1. Variaçães Em Re Maior 2:39
    2. Canção Verdes Anos 3:02
    3. Divertimento 3:01
    4. Romance No. 1 3:33
    5. Dançãs Portuguesas No. 2 3:36
    6. Valsa 2:40
    7. Fantasia No. 2 2:16
    8. Variações Sobre Uma Dança Popular 2:16
    9. Mudar de Vida Tema 2:32
    10. Mudar de Vida (Musica de Fundo) 4:17
    11. Antõnio Marinheiro (Tema de Peça) 2:52
    12. Canção 2:07
    13. Melodia No. 1 2:54

    Carlos Paredes - Guitar
    Fernando Alvin - Guitar
    Tiago Velez - Flute

    AMG:
    "The Portuguese guitar is a 12-string instrument with double courses (string pairs) and a small body, similar in tone to the mandolin or Greek bouzouki. Its penetrating sound is championed by Carlos Paredes, a sensitive, even shy performer who balances tradition and spontaneous invention. His original approach was likened to the freshness of Ornette Coleman by bassist Charlie Haden, who is himself a minor cultural hero in Portugal."



    Guitarra Portuguesa   Scans


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    1. Polyphonie X, for 18 instruments (withdrawn by composer) 16:39
    2. Poésie pour pouvoir, for 5-track tape and 3 orchestra groups 18:39
    3. Tombeau (5th part of "Pli selon pli"), for soprano & orchestra 7:26
    4. Structures, Book II, for 2 pianos 35:11

    Pierre Boulez - Conductor, Piano
    Yvonne Loriod - Piano
    Michel Bouquet - Voices
    SWR Baden-Baden and Freiburg Symphony Orchestra
    Hans Rosbaud - Conductor

    AMG:
    "After initially studying mathematics, Boulez entered the Paris Conservatoire as a student in theory and harmony (he failed the pianists' entrance examination). His principal teacher was Messiaen, and he also studied counterpoint privately with Andrée Vaurabourg. According to Boulez, composition is a form of aesthetic research and should be pursued logically. He viewed personal stylistic development as having no importance and deemed atonality as necessary. He adopted 12-tone serialism after being exposed to it by Liebowitz, a student of Schoenberg. In Structures for two pianos (1952), Boulez utilized a serial control of rhythm, dynamics and tone. These works brought him initial public recognition, but it was his Le Marteau sans Maître (1954) that was to become a landmark of 20th century music. Scored for small ensemble, it is rhythmically monotonous with sudden tempo changes and large sections of improvisatory melodies. The success of these pieces led to an invitation to teach at Darmstadt, as a professor of composition. It was here that he gave a series of lectures that was to become the book Musikdenken Heute, an outline of his ideas concerning total serialization. At this time Boulez was expanding his serial techniques to include open form, or 'organized delirium.' He also developed techniques that allowed performer and conductor to make many more creative choices in form and tonal duration. Boulez is also an active conductor, his performances marked by analytical clarity. He has served as head conductor for the BBC Symphony in London and the New York Philharmonic."



    Orchestral Works & Chamber Music   Scans


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    1. Me Dá Un Beijo 2:28
    2. Virgem Virgínia 3:27
    3. Mister Mistério 2:47
    4. Novena
    5. Cordão Do Rio Preto 2:53
    6. Planetário 2:56
    7. Seis Horas 2:29
    8. Erosão 2:29
    9. 78 Rotações 1:46
    10. Talismã 3:43
    11. Ciranda De Mãe Nina 2:20
    12. Horrível 4:16

    Alceu Valença - violão e vocal
    Geraldo Azevedo - violão e vocal
    Alexandre Pascoal Geto - órgão e piano
    Gabriel Bahlis - baixo
    Zequinha - bateria e percussão
    Messias - viola caipira e cavaquinho

    AMG:
    "Alceu Valença is an extremely successful composer and the owner of a distinctive style that mixes his northeastern roots and contemporary grooves; he is also an energetic and mesmerizing live performer. His songs have been recorded by several major artists, including Luiz Gonzaga (with whom he wrote 'Plano Piloto'), Maria Betânia, and Elba Ramalho. His life was depicted in Anamelia Maciel's book Alceu Valença em Frente e Verso (Edição do Autor, recife, 1988).
    The son of a locally renowned lawyer, Valença always worried his father with his rebellious character. At four, he participated in an infant concourse promoted by the postman Luís Jacinto, singing a Capiba tune. He didn't win the competition or the prize (a soap box), but his acrobatic performance during the prize delivery won the sympathy of the audience and he won another soap box. Moving with his family to Recife PE, Valença was always a bad student, and was even expelled from school, until he finally graduated from law school in 1970, but he never worked in that profession. There, he began his first professional musical experiences with the band Tamarineira Village, after transforming into Ave Sangria. He later incorporated new musicians into his band who were highly successful artists: Zé Ramalho (who played the Brazilian viola) and Elba Ramalho (as chorus girl). In 1968, Valença did his first show, Erosão: a Cor e o Show, to enthusiastic critical praise. In September, he participated in the I Festival Universitário Brasileiro de Música Popular (Rio) with 'Maria Alice' (written with Sérgio Bahia), defended by Ivete e Arlete. The next month, he concurred in the I Festival Regional Universitário da MPB (Recife). In the next year, he classified two songs at the regional phase of the IV Festival Internacional da Canção: 'Acalanto Para Isabela' (first place) and 'Desafio Linda' (third place). At the national phase in Rio, he unsuccessfully defended the first song. With a scholarship from Harvard University (Boston), he knew some of the U.S. and reconciled himself to the indigenous culture of his home state, perceiving its universalizing possibilities through the interest displayed by passersby while he played on streets and squares.
    Returning to Brazil in 1970, Valença married Eneida in June and worked together at the III Festival Universitário de Música Popular Brasileira, receiving second place with 'Manhã de Clorofila.' He returned the trophy to the jury (under applause), declaring (euphemistically) that the jury already had its decision, regardless of the manifest desire of the audiences. It led him to decide to move to Rio with his wife, son, and a recommendation letter from José Humberto Patu. There he met Geraldo Azevedo, another pernambucano (from the Pernambuco state) who had abandoned music and was working with industrial design. Valença convinced him to return to music and they both wrote a song. Valença participated in July at the V Festival Internacional da Canção (Rio) with the songs 'Fiat Lux Baby,' 'Erosão,' and 'Desafio Linda'; and at the IV Festival Universitário da Música Brasileira (August 1971, Teatro João Caetano), Valença participated with 'Água Clara,' '78 Rotações' (with Geraldo Azevedo), and 'Planetário.' Also with Azevedo's songs (which competed against Valença's at the festivals), they recorded together their first LP Alceu Valença & Geraldo Azevedo (Copacabana, 1972). In 1972, Valença asked the great Jackson do Pandeiro to defend his 'Papagaio do Futuro' at the VII Festival Internacional da Canção (September, Rio). The song wasn't classified, but was presented with success in several shows by Valença and Azevedo throughout the country, and opened the doors for a friendship with Pandeiro that resulted in live performances by the duo at the Teatro João Caetano's (Rio), Projeto Seis e Meia (1975), and in the national tour of the Projeto Pixinguinha series (1977). Still in 1972, Valença became disappointed with the result of the FIC and returned to Recife with the decision to abandon music. In January 1974, he opened the show O Ovo e a Galinha (Nosso Teatro, Recife), touring several upstate Northeastern cities. In that same year, participated in Sérgio Ricardo's film A Noite do Espantalho as the main character, and recorded its soundtrack (released on LP by Continental in 1974) as singer. He also released his first solo album, Molhado de Suor (Som Livre). The album didn't get major interest from the audiences, but was well-received by critics. In February 1975, he got a big hit with 'Vou Danado pra Catende,' inspired in the verses by modernist Pernambucan poet Ascenso Ferreira at the Festival Abertura (Rede Globo). The support from the audience led the jury to create a special 'Research' prize. It made possible the show Vou Danado pra Catende (Teatro Teresa Rachel, Rio, 1975), which was a complete failure in the first three days until Valença got dressed as a clown and swept through downtown Rio with a megaphone, promoting the show. It then became a full-house success at the theater and in all subsequent national tours. In the next year, he recorded Vivo, a rock album, and in 1977, Espelho Cristalino. In 1979, he recorded Saudade de Pernambuco, and in the same year, began to record frevos on the LP series Asas da América (compilations with several interpreters). The series and the subsequent dedicated shows by Valença, in parallel with his solo career, turned Olinda's Carnival a national success. During a tour in 1979, he recorded an album in Paris, France, that is still unreleased in Brazil.
    In 1980, he released Coração Bobo, which had the hit 'Na Primeira Manhã,' and in the next year, Cinco Sentidos. In 1982, he recorded Cavalo de Pau with the hits 'Tropicana' and 'Como Dois Animais.' In 1983, he released Anjo Avesso with 'Anunciação,' and from the live show recorded at the Montreux Jazz Festival (Switzerland), Brazil Night -- Ao Vivo em Montreux was released. In 1984, he recorded Mágico, which had the hit 'Solidão,' and in the next year, Estação da Luz.
    At that point, with his career established, several of his songs became soap opera themes (the fastest way of reaching high selling records in Brazil). In 1986, he recorded the live album Ao Vivo, and in the same year, Rubi. In 1987, he recorded Leque Moleque, and in the following years, Oropa, França e Bahia (1988), Andar, Andar (1990), and Sete Desejos (1991), which had the hit 'Tesoura do Desejo.' In that year, he participated in the megafestival Rock in Rio 2. In 1994, he recorded Maracatus Batuques e Ladeiras featuring the track 'Pétalas' (with Herbert Azul), which received the Sharp prize for the Best Song of the Year. Together with Geraldo Azevedo, Elba Ramalho, and Zé Ramalho, he recorded the 1996 live album O Grande Encontro and the solo CD Mourisco. In 1997, he released Sol e Chuva and, in 1998, Forró de Todos os Tempos. Sino de Ouro followed in early 2001.

    Romantic lyricism set to virtuosic guitar playing has made Geraldo Azevedo one of the top pop musicians in Brazil. Many of his compositions, including 'Caravana,' 'Copacabana,' 'De Outra Maneira' and 'Barcarola Do Sao Francisco,' have become Brazilian pop classics.
    Born in Petrolina, a small town near the banks of the San Francisco River, Azevedo was heavily influenced by João Gilberto, who lived in Juazeiro, a city on the other side of the river. Self-taught on the guitar, he mastered the instrument by the age of twelve. Moving to the capital city of Recife in 1963, Azevedo formed Grupo Construcao with vocalist Teca Calazans and percussionist Naná Vasconcelos.
    Four years later, he accepted an invitation by vocalist Eliana Pittman to relocate to Rio de Janeiro. Azevedo soon became one of the city's leading musicians and a highly respected accompanist for many top-ranked vocalists. Together with Vasconcelos, Nelson Ângelo and singer/songwriter Geraldo Vandré, with whom he co-wrote the popular 'Cancao de Despedida' ('The Farewell Song'), Azevedo formed a band, Quarteto Livre. After the military government closed the Brazilian congress and instituted censorship in December 1968, the group disbanded.
    Azevedo attained international acclaim in 1991 when he teamed with Alçeu Valença to compose and perform two songs -- '78 Rotaces' and 'Planetario' -- at a festival sponsored by Tupi TV in Sao Paulo. Signed by Casablanca, Azevedo and Valença released a self-titled duo album. In 1972, the two joined with folk singer Jackson Do Pandeiro to perform at an International Song Festival in Rio.
    Azevedo began to achieve recognition on his own, as well. Several of his songs were featured on the soundtrack of the Globo TV series Gabriela and Saramandaia. Azevedo's debut solo album released in 1973 became a major hit. In 1979, Azevedo and actress/singer Elba Ramalho recorded Bicho de 7 Cabcas. Azevedo recorded a live album in the Golden Room of the Casablanca in Rio in 1985."



    Alceu Valenca & Geraldo Azevedo   Scans


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    1. Through the Ages Jehovah 4:36
    2. Navigator 9:46
    3. Module 3:57
    4. Music in Us 5:30
    5. So That Life Can Endure...P.S. With Love 10:04
    6. Circumfusion/The Magnificent Bimbo 10:46

    Teddy Daniel - Flugelhorn, Trumpet
    Sonelius Smith - Piano
    Nick de Geronimo - Bass
    Andrew Cyrille - Percussion

    AMG:
    "Cyrille displayed his facility at sympathetically and smartly guiding other players throughout this date, interacting with bassist Nick Di Geronimo to design a framework that allowed trumpeter Ted Daniel maximum space and room for his piercing solos, and spurred pianist Sonelius Smith. When necessary, Cyrille soloed with a rigorous discipline and percussive vitality, but was more concerned with overall group dynamics and sound. Daniel was particularly impressive on longer cuts, where his lines, phrases and solos were crisp, expertly articulated and surging. The sound was bright and full, and this is an example of thoughtful, nicely played group improvisation."



    The Navigator   Scans

    or

    The Navigator   Scans

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    1. It's Been So Long 2:07
    2. Happy Doing What We're Doing 4:43
    3. Surrender to the Rhythm 3:25
    4. Don't Lose Your Grip on Love 4:24
    5. Nervous on the Road (But Can't Stay at Home) 4:58
    6. Feel a Little Funky 5:09
    7. I Like It Like That 3:06
    8. Brand New You, Brand New Me 4:39
    9. Home in My Hand 2:56
    10. Why, Why, Why, Why, Why 3:49

    11. (What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace, Love and Understanding? 3:34
    12. Ever Since You're Gone 4:08
    13. The Ugly Things 2:48
    14. I Got the Real Thing 3:37
    15. The Look That's in Your Eye Tonight 4:14
    16. Now's the Time 2:06
    17. Small Town, Big City 4:31
    18. Trying to Live My Life Without You 3:24
    19. I Like You, I Don't Love You 3:27
    20. Down in the Dive 4:54

    Brinsley Schwarz - Guitar, Sax, Vocals
    Ian Gomm - Guitar, Vocals
    Bob Andrews - Keyboards, Sax, Vocals
    Nick Lowe - Bass, Guitar, Vocals
    Billy Rankin - Drums

    AMG:
    "Pub rock, the English roots rock movement of the early '70s, would never have earned a cult following if it wasn't for Brinsley Schwarz. Initially, Brinsley Schwarz was a rambling, neo-psychedelic folk-rock band that borrowed heavily from Crosby, Stills & Nash and the Grateful Dead. Following a disastrous publicity stunt to promote its debut album, the band went into seclusion outside of London and developed a laid-back, rootsy sound inspired by Eggs Over Easy, an American band that had been playing a mixture of originals and covers in English pubs. Following their conversion to pub rock, the Brinsleys ditched their pretensions of stardom and became a down to earth, self-effacing rock & roll band. Between 1971 and 1974, Brinsley Schwarz toured England innumerable times, playing pubs across the country. Along the way, they established a circuit for similar bands like Dr. Feelgood and Ducks Deluxe to follow. Though the group was nominally guitarist Brinsley Schwarz's band, bassist/lead vocalist Nick Lowe provided the bulk of the group's songs. Lowe developed a distinctive songwriting voice - conversational, melodic, offbeat, and funny - and the band was infused with his skewed sense of humor. Despite strong reviews and a dedicated fan base, the Brinsleys never managed to escape cult status, yet they influenced a legion of other artists, creating an underground, back-to-basics movement that laid the foundation for punk rock.
    Brinsley Schwarz didn't plan to start a grassroots movement - the bandmembers wanted to be stars. Lowe and Schwarz had already spent several years in Kippington Lodge, a Tunbridge Wells-based guitar pop group that released five singles on Parlophone during the mid-'60s to no success. By 1968, the members of Kippington Lodge were beginning to feel restless with their straight-ahead pop/rock and were eager to explore psychedelia. Keyboardist Bob Andrews joined the band later that year and drummer Billy Rankin came aboard in the fall of 1969. By that time, Kippington Lodge had completely revamped its musical style, evolving into a folk-rock band with psychedelic pretensions and appropriately changing its name to Brinsley Schwarz after the group's lead guitarist. Ironically, it was around this time that Lowe became the band's lead singer and primary songwriter.
    Within a few months, Brinsley Schwarz had come to the attention of Dave Robinson, a fledging rock & roll manager who had founded the Famepushers Agency. Robinson developed a complex scheme to elevate Brinsley Schwarz to stardom. According to his plan, the Brinsleys would play an opening set for Van Morrison at the Fillmore East in New York in the spring of 1970, and he would fly all of the leading rock journalists to America to review the show. Late in 1969, Brinsley Schwarz signed a record contract with United Artists, and the band financed the publicity stunt with its advance. The group planned to leave a few days before the show in order to rehearse, but the Brinsleys were denied visas on a technicality. They were finally given visas on the morning of the show, and arrived in New York hours before the concert. Back in Britain, the journalists ran into trouble, as their plane developed a mechanical fault, delaying the flight for four hours. When the journalists arrived at the Fillmore 18 hours later, they were either drunk or hung over. When Brinsley Schwarz finally hit the stage, the band gave a competent but underwhelming performance, setting the stage for a flood of scathing reviews for both the concert and the eponymously titled debut album, which appeared weeks after the showcase.
    Reeling from the Fillmore fiasco, the group rented a house outside of London and spent days and nights playing music. By the end of 1970, the Brinsleys released a second album, Despite It All, which indicated that they were evolving into a country-rock outfit; guitarist/vocalist Ian Gomm joined the band at the end of the sessions for the record. For much of 1971, Brinsley Schwarz rehearsed, developing a blend of country, folk, R&B, and rock & roll that was largely inspired by the Byrds, Van Morrison, and the Band, as well as Eggs Over Easy, which the group met at the Tally Ho pub in Kentish Town. Silver Pistol, released early in 1972, demonstrated a new versatility, but the group truly flexed its muscles in concert, particularly during regular concerts at the Tally Ho. Soon, they had built a small but loyal following, and a number of likeminded bands began playing the same circuit. Eventually, this grassroots phenomenon came to the attention of the U.K. press, which dubbed the groups' style as 'pub rock' and proclaimed Brinsley Schwarz as the style's leaders.
    Nervous on the Road, released in the fall of 1972, was Brinsley Schwarz's best-reviewed album to date, and while it didn't chart, it helped the group land an opening slot for Paul McCartney. Throughout 1973, the Brinsleys toured constantly, not only playing pubs, but also colleges. As a result, they weren't able to record frequently, which hurt their already weak recording career. In an attempt to land a hit, the band released a series of non-album singles, none of which charted; they were compiled for the Please Don't Ever Change album, which was released in late 1973. Early the following year, the group cut its fifth album with producer Dave Edmunds. Released in the summer of 1974, New Favourites of Brinsley Schwarz was more polished than the band's previous albums, yet the record failed to generate any sales. The group continued for nearly another year, turning out a handful of singles under other names, before deciding to call it a day in the spring of 1975. Following the band's demise, Schwarz and Andrews became members of Graham Parker's backing band, the Rumour. Gomm pursued a solo career; Rankin played with Terraplane and Big Jim Sullivan's Tiger before retiring from music. Lowe became a successful solo artist and producer, scoring his biggest hit in 1980 with 'Cruel to Be Kind,' a Brinsley leftover that the band never recorded."



    Nervous On The Road / The New Favourites Of   Scans


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    1. Introduction by Jerry Gonzalez 0:27
    2. Elegua 2:06
    3. Bebop 11:38
    4. Rio Esta Hondo 6:32
    5. Guiro Apache 1:47
    6. Parisian Thoroughfare 13:07
    7. Wawina Era Wo 6:48

    Jerry Gonzalez - Bells, Conga, Coro, Flugelhorn, Trumpet
    Frankie Rodrigues - Claves, Conga, Vocals
    Wilfredo Velez - Sax (Alto)
    Steve Turre - Trombone, Trombone (Bass)
    Angel Papo Vasquez - Trombone
    Edgardo Miranda - Cuatro, Guitar
    Jorge Dalto - Piano
    Andy González - Bass, Coro
    Steve Berrios - Bata, Chekere, Coro, Drums
    Gene Golden - Bata, Bells, Chekere, Conga
    Héctor Hernández - Bata, Chekere, Conga
    Nicky Marrero - Guataca, Percussion, Timbales

    AMG:
    "Jerry Gonzalez, equally proficient at trumpet and congas, leads his Fort Apache Band through a live set concentrating on Latinized versions of bop standards and pieces directly from the Afro-Cuban santeria tradition. The bop pieces, Dizzy Gillespie's 'Bebop' and Bud Powell's 'Parisian Thoroughfare,' are given rough and tumble treatments, bobbing along on extensive percussion and tight arrangements. They feature some fine soloing from pianist Jorge Dalto and altoist Wilfredo Velez especially, the latter stretching things a bit beyond the changes. But the real highlights are the songs by vocalist Frankie Rodrigues, including the title track (though it's listed in Spanish as 'Rio Esta Hondo'). The call and response of the singers over the crackling, extraordinarily complex rhythms of the percussionists is very exciting stuff, providing a unique sort of tension and release. The final cut, 'Wawina Era Wo,' makes the African part of Afro-Cuban crystal clear: a wonderful interlocking melody reminiscent of parts of Clifford Thornton's The Gardens of Harlem, with the horns and percussion in an intricate and heady dance. On the whole, The River Is Deep has perhaps a shade less bite than the preceding release, Ya Yo Me Cure on American Clave, but it's an invigorating session nonetheless. Recommended."



    The River Is Deep   Scans

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    The River Is Deep   Scans

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    1. Dead Silence 4:00
    2. Behold the Man 4:23
    3. This Weird Wind 8:02
    4. Les Etudes d'Organism 14:00
    5. Maelstrom 3:32
    6. The Aesthete 4:35
    7. Kingdom Come 13:46

    Mike Johnson
    - electric, acoustic nylon string, 12-string, and Lap steel guitars, synth, computer sequencing
    David Kerman - drums, percussion
    Mark Harris - Soprano, Alto, Tenor, and Baritone saxes, clarinet, flute, bass clarinet
    Deborah Perry - voice
    Dave Willey - bass guitar, accordian
    Shane Hotle - piano, synth, Mellotron
    Bob Drake - bass guitar, voice, violin, electric piano, banjo
    Kirk Jameson - bass
    Kim Marsh - piano, synthesizers
    Sanjay Kumar - synthesizers
    Scott Brazieal - piano, synthesizers
    Mark Fuller - drums
    Katie Cox - violins
    Mike Fitzmaurice - double-bass, Erhu
    Rick Benjamin - trombone

    AMG:
    "The group of Colorado experimentalists known as Thinking Plague explore jazz, rock, and folk with increasingly symphonic contexts, around the aegis of guitarist and composer Mike Johnson. The band was initially formed in the early '80s by Johnson and bassist/drummer Bob Drake; after releasing an album titled A Thinking Plague on their own Endemic Records, the duo added vocalist Suzanne Lewis and released Moonsongs in 1987 for the British label Dead Man's Curve. Critical praise for their avant-fusion was glowing, but Thinking Plague continually added members - reed player Mark Harris, keyboardist Shane Hotle - and recorded In This Life for ReR in 1989. Though Lewis and Drake later left the area for other projects, drummer Dave Kerman (of 5uu's), vocalist Deborah Perry, and bassist/multi-instrumentalist Dave Willey of Hamster Theatre joined for In Extremis, released by the Cuneiform label in 1998. (And Johnson and Harris returned the favor by joining Willey's Hamster Theatre group.) The Early Plague Years, a remastered compilation of the group's first two albums, A Thinking Plague and Moonsongs, followed two years later. Dave Kerman subsequently left the band, and was replaced by drummer David Shamrock; the new Thinking Plague lineup released the Cuneiform CD A History of Madness in 2003."



    In Extremis   Scans


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    1. Sometimes I Cry 5:22
    2. Let's Gather 1:13
    3. Anticipation 0:52
    4. The Dunbar High School Marching Band 6:07
    5. Soaring (At Dawn), Pt. 1 5:54
    6. The Harlem Buck Dance Strut 5:55
    7. Interlude 0:33
    8. Before I Rest 3:43
    9. Let's Play ('til Mom Calls) 4:26
    10. It Never Stopped in My Home Town 1:54
    11. Soaring (At Sunset), Pt. 2 8:03

    Les McCann - Clavinet, Piano, Synthesizer, Tympani [Timpani]
    Buck Clarke - Bongos, Conga, Percussion
    Ralph MacDonald - Bells, Conga, Percussion
    Donald Dean - Bells, Drums, Percussion
    Jimmy Rowser - Bass, Violin

    AMG:
    "This groundbreaking jazz synthesizer record is really unlike any other Les McCann ever made. Aside from a three-man percussion section and electric bassist Jimmy Rowser, Layers is entirely electronic, one of the first jazz albums with such an emphasis. According to the liner notes, McCann's ambition was to be the entire orchestra he heard in his head, and to that end the record explores the sonic possibilities of the new ARP synthesizer in great detail, though McCann also overdubs himself on electric piano in spots. The variety of tones on the ARP gives McCann a lot to play with, and he mimics woodwinds, horns, strings, slapped bass, and even the intonations of human speech. McCann's kaleidoscopic array of tonal colors and contrasts gives the album a rich, full sound, as does the recording process - Layers was the first album ever to be recorded in 32-track format. But what really gives Layers its surprisingly warm, human dimension is how emotionally engaged McCann sounds. He laid most of his parts down in only one take, and allowed different sections to flow directly into one another, producing two side-long continuous suites. The resulting stream-of-consciousness feel - not to mention the near-one-man format - seems to free up McCann's sense of personal expression; there's a pronounced mood of reflection and nostalgia on the slower, spacier pieces, and on the funkier groove numbers, McCann works his new instrument like a kid in a candy shop. It's true that in some places, Layers is more about texture than theme development, so traditional jazz fans likely won't find it much more than a curiosity. In truth, it's pretty avant-garde - not in its sound (we're not talking Sun Ra's Atlantis), but certainly in its sensibility; this music is truly forward-looking and ahead of its time."



    Layers   Scans

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    Layers   Scans

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    1. Unknown - Blue Basket
    2. Unknown - Sat Tee Touy (Look At The Owl)
    3. Unknown - Untitled
    4. Meas Samon - Untitled
    5. Sim Sisamouth - Don't Let My Girlfriend Tickle Me
    6. Unknown - Instrumental
    7. Son Thoeung - Untitled
    8. Unknown - Srey No (Lady Named NO)
    9. Unknown - Instrumental
    10. Prum Manh - Two Wives Are Twice The Problem
    11. Unknown - Untitled
    12. Unknown - Untitled
    13. Unknown - Blue Basket (Instrumental)
    14. Unknown - Untitled
    15. Unknown - Untitled
    16. Unknown - Untitled
    17. Unknown - She Doesn't Need Your Money
    18. Unknown - Untitled
    19. Unknown - Untitled
    20. Unknown - Birds Are Singing But My Love Won't Return

    discogs:
    "This collection was culled from over 150 ravaged cassettes found in Oakland, California, at the public library. Many of the tracks were recorded post Pol Pot holocaust between the 1970s and 1990s in Khmer-operated studios spread throughout the geography of the diaspora - From Cambodia to Thailand, Rhode Island to Long Beach and points in-between. Tracks 4, 5, 8, 11, 12 and 20 were recorded in Pnom Pehn between the mid-1960s and early 1970s."



    Khmer Folk and Pop Music   Scans


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    namsebangdzo:
    "The Diamond Path, Tibet's Vajrayana Buddhism, is notable for rituals that fully express the power of its inner spiritual practice. This album presents one such ritual, the exceptional Yamantaka Trochu rite of Khampagar Monastery. Khampagar is celebrated for the power and beauty of its chanting and ritual orchestra. Performed by Lama Kaygyu Tsatul Rinpoche, (director) Rigdrol (umze), Yetop, Ngawang Zimba, Damcho, Choyung Nyima, Rinchen Nyingpo, Sherab, Dakpa, Lodue Rinchen, Lekshed, Thekchok, Chopal, Thamchok, Sangye Nyima, Ngawang Chodok, Jamyang, Zabe, Drimey Kunga, and Phuntsog."


    The Diamond Path   Scans


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    1. Music in Twelve Parts-Part 1
    2. Music in Twelve Parts-Part 2
    3. Music in Twelve Parts-Part 3
    4. Music in Twelve Parts-Part 4

    5. Music in Twelve Parts-Part 5
    6. Music in Twelve Parts-Part 6
    7. Music in Twelve Parts-Part 7
    8. Music in Twelve Parts-Part 8

    9. Music in Twelve Parts-Part 9
    10. Music in Twelve Parts-Part 10
    11. Music in Twelve Parts-Part 11
    12. Music in Twelve Parts-Part 12

    Philip Glass - Keyboards
    Michael Riesman - Keyboards
    Richard Landry - Flute, Sax (Soprano) (1-6)
    Jack Kripl - Flute, Sax (Soprano) (7-12)
    Jon Gibson - Flute, Sax (Soprano)
    Richard Peck - Sax (Alto), Sax (Tenor)
    John La Barbera - Voice (1-6)
    Dora Ohrenstein - Voice (7-12)

    AMG:
    "Many of Philip Glass' works seem to find themselves in a confrontational relationship with musical history, intentionally or otherwise: his 'Low' Symphony answers 200 years of entrenched orchestral tradition with tunes by David Bowie; Songs from Liquid Days aspires to the status of a kind of pop music Liederkreis. Glass' monumental Music in Twelve Parts positions itself at what was, at the time of its composition, the culmination of a musical style with an uncertain future. Composed between 1971 and 1974, the three-and-a-half hour work stands as a comprehensive compendium of the compositional techniques that Glass had developed up to that point in his career - a sort of 'Oxford English Dictionary of Minimalism' - and as such, effectively marked the end of the period for which Glass thinks the term 'minimalism' applies to his music. By cataloging his style, he codified it, resulting in the search for new sounds that eventually resulted in the groundbreaking opera with Robert Wilson, Einstein on the Beach.
    As an encyclopedia of musical techniques, Music in Twelve Parts places itself in company with other famous catalogs, like the Magnus Liber Organi, J.S. Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier - a gesture that might seem more than a little audacious for a composer who had all but apostatized from his academic, serialist indoctrination and his French traditionalist studies under Nadia Boulanger. The confrontation here is not as direct as it seems, however. In fact, it started out as an accident. Glass had begun work on what would become Part I, which he intended eventually to score for three keyboards (six hands), three winds, and three additional parts then undetermined, for a total of 12 polyphonic lines - thus the title Music in Twelve Parts. Upon playing the piece-in-progress for a friend, she responded favorably, but asked what the other 11 parts would sound like. Glass took the misunderstanding as a challenge, and set out to compose a large scale work that would demonstrate, in detail, his entire battery of additive/subtractive rhythmic techniques, augmentational/diminutive melodic operations, canonic metamorphoses, and textural transformations. There is a bit of historicism, too: the harmonic progressions of the last movement are underscored by a curiously chromatic line in the bass, which turns out to be an antithetically applied twelve-tone row.
    The piece was composed for the forces of the Philip Glass Ensemble, which around this time had graduated from an ad hoc group of players to an organized institution. Twelve Parts thus stands as a prime exemplar of Glass' mature minimalist style. A crucial component to the sound of the piece is the precise dynamic balance of the heavily amplified instrumental ensemble, whose overall blend is controlled by a sound engineer manning a mixer board (often occupying the position on the stage where the conductor would normally stand). The effect is a shifting, electrified wall of sound whose surface and opacity slowly changes within each of the 12 movements."



    Music in Twelve Parts   Scans


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    1. Super Mulher
    2. Olhar Bestial
    3. Estrela da Noite
    4. Chuva Princesa
    5. Anjo Infernal
    6. Quero Ser Locomotiva
    7. Sheridan Square
    8. From Faraway
    9. Sapo Caruru
    10. Relaxa, Meu Bem, Relaxa
    11. Planeta Dos Macacos
    12. Rock Da Barata (ao vivo)

    Jorge Mautner - Vocals, Violin
    Nelson Jacobina - Guitar
    Sérgio Amado - Guitar
    Alexandre - Bass
    Tide - Percussion
    Otoniel - Percussion

    AMG:
    "An important composer with solid ideas and a background in politics, philosophy, and poetry, Jorge Mautner influenced movements like the Cinema Novo and Tropicália. His compositions have been recorded by many artists - Gal Costa ('Lágrimas Negras'), Wanderléa ('Ginga da Mandinga'), Gilberto Gil ('Maracatu Atômico,' 'Herói das Estrelas,' 'O Rouxinol'), Moraes Moreira ('A Lenda do Pégaso'), Elba Ramalho ('Sonho de Uma Noite de Verão'), Caetano Veloso ('Vampiro'), Zé Ramalho, Fagner, Vânia Bastos, Lulu Santos, Celso Sim, Chico Science, and others. At seven, he started to have violin lessons with his father. At 14, he began learning the mandolin, and later, the piano. Beginning to write in 1956 about his visions around a certain 'Kaos,' Mautner's texts inspired the genial Gláuber Rocha, creator of the Cinema Novo, and also influenced the inception of Tropicália. In 1958 he wrote 'Olhar Bestial.' His outsider profile was already evident in his first book, Deus da Chuva e da Morte, written in that period and not published until 1962. He also wrote Kaos, Narciso em Tarde Cinza, and Vigarista Jorge. In 1965, he released his first single ('Radioatividade' and 'Não Não Não'), playing at São Paulo's bars and nightclubs. That single, together with the book Vigarista Jorge, provoked his exile, still three years before the institution of the AI-5, the presidential decree of censorship that revoked many civil rights in Brazil. Going to the U. S., Mautner worked at several jobs, including as a secretary for the American writer Robert Lowell. In 1969, he wrote, with Carla Bley, the eventual standard 'Olhos de Gato.' In 1971, he moved to London, England, where Gilberto Gil and Caetano Veloso were also exiled, writing 'From Far Away' (with Caetano) and 'The Three Mushrooms,' 'Babylon,' and 'Crazy Pop Rock' (with Gil). In the same year, he directed the film O Demiurgo. Returning to Brazil, Mautner recorded live his first LP in 1972, Para Iluminar a Cidade. With Nelson Jacobina, he wrote his biggest hit, 'Maracatu Atômico,' recorded by Gilberto Gil in 1973 with great success and re-recorded also with success by Chico Science e Nação Zumbi in 1996. In 1974, he participated, with Gil and Caetano, in a show in Salvador BA which was recorded and released as an LP. Jorge Mautner continues to record, perform shows, and write books."



    Para Iluminar a Cidade   Scans


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    1. Together Alone 5:39
    2. Dawn Dance One 13:46
    3. Morning [Including Circles] 2:18
    4. Ck7 (GN) 436 6:10
    5. SBN-A-1 66k 14:53

    Anthony Braxton - Clarinet (Contrabass), Flute, Piano, Sax (Alto), Voices
    Joseph Jarman - Bells, Flute, Sax (Alto), Sax (Soprano), Sopranino, Synthesizer, Voices

    AMG:
    "Joseph Jarman and Anthony Braxton play a wide variety of reeds on this duet session, really stretching their range of expressive sounds. The originals are split between the two musicians, but not a lot of magic or close communication occurs, and the improvisations tend to ramble. Overall, a slight disappointment considering the talents involved."



    Together Alone   Scans

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    Together Alone   Scans

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