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FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

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    1. Let 'Em In 5:05
    2. We All Got a Mission 3:23
    3. How Good Is Your Game 4:10
    4. Love Won't Come easy 4:12
    5. Without You 3:19
    6. Word Sure Gets Around 4:24
    7. I Trust You 4:16
    8. I Think I'll Stay Home Today 6:18

    Billy Paul - Vocals
    MFSB

    AMG:
    "Billy Paul had a good run in the '70s as an R&B vocalist, though he'd been recording since the '50s, when he debuted on Jubilee. Paul was featured on radio broadcasts in Philadelphia at age 11 and had an extensive jazz background. He worked with Dinah Washington, Miles Davis, and Roberta Flack, as well as Charlie Parker, before forming a trio and recording for Jubilee. His original 1959 recording of 'Ebony Woman' for New Dawn was later re-recorded for Neptune as the title of his 1970 LP. He signed the next year with Philadelphia International and scored his biggest hit with 'Me & Mrs. Jones' in 1972, topping both the R&B and pop charts. Paul had one other Top Ten R&B single, 'Thanks for Saving My Life,' in 1974. He remained on Philadelphia International until the mid-'80s. Paul recorded one LP for Total Experience in 1985, Lately, and another for Ichiban before announcing his retirement in 1989 in London. But he's since done several club dates, both in America and overseas."



    Let 'Em In

    or

    Let 'Em In


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    Le bal masqué, for baritone (or mezzo-soprano) & chamber ensemble, FP 60
    1. Préambule et Air de bravoure 4:11
    2. Intermède 3:05
    3. Malvina 2:16
    4. Bagatelle 2:13
    5. La dame aveugle 2:37
    6. Finale 4:38

    Trio for oboe, bassoon & piano, FP 43
    7. Lent-Presto 5:28
    8. Andante con moto 3:57
    9. Rondo: Trés vif 3:15

    Le bestiaire (Cortège d'Orphée), song cycle for voice & piano (or chamber ensemble), FP 15a
    10. Le Dromadaire 1:12
    11. La Chèvre di Thibet 0:45
    12. La Sauterelle 0:24
    13. Le Dauphin 0:29
    14. L'Ecrevisse 0:36
    15. La Carpe 1:07

    Sextet for wind quintet & piano in C major, FP 100
    16. Allegro Vivace 7:54
    17. Divertissement: Andantino 4:46
    18. Prestissimo 5:39

    Thomas Allen - Baritone (Vocal)
    Nash Ensemble
    Lionel Friend - Conductor

    AMG:
    "Francis Poulenc was introduced at an early age into the Parisian cultural circles in which prominent figures like Cocteau and Satie moved, and his early compositions (that is, those that came before his religious awakening in the mid-1930s) reflect the decidedly effervescent aesthetic values that Poulenc and the other members of 'Les Six,' in response to the emotional viscosity and heavy handedness of the Austro-German musical establishment, came to represent. Among Poulenc's contributions to this early Parisian style was an approach to musical development and continuity that neither developed or continued: themes didn't grow out of each other organically, they appeared pell-mell, piled on top of each other, strung along with carnivalesque variety; harmonic progressions bypassed modulation in favor of bootlegger turns and chromatic acrobatics. Fittingly, Poulenc was very fond of the surreal, shape-changing images and incongruous plots that filled the poems of Max Jacob (1876 - 1944), and set many of them to music. Among these are the four poems appearing in Poulenc's 'Profane Cantata,' Le Bal Masqué (The Masked Ball).
    The work came as the result of a commission from the Vicomte and Vicomtesse de Noailles to compose a work for a 1932 concert at the Théâtre de Hyères. The poems, taken from Jacob's 1921 anthology, Laboratoire central, held for Poulenc a kind of odd Bradbury-esque nostalgia, and many of Jacob's images evoked faint fragments of memories. The song cycle reaches our ears, too, as a grab bag of unsorted, mismatched textual and musical remembrances. Poulenc's score calls for a solo baritone (or mezzo), oboe, clarinet, bassoon, trumpet, piano, violin, cello, and percussion. This ensemble offers a broad timbral array, which allows the composer to be as playful with register and orchestration as he is with melody and harmony. His menagerie of melodies is passed from instrument to instrument, treating his clever lines with skillfully idiomatic charm and humor.
    The cycle is structured in such a way that the four songs are separated by instrumental passages - either autonomous movements, such as the Interlude between the first and second songs, and the Bagatelle that separates the third and fourth; or extended instrumental prefaces, such as the Caprice that precedes the Finale, or, for that matter, the long introduction to the first song. The Preamble begins with an infectiously peppy romp, bringing to mind the Darwinian cocktail party from Milhaud's Création du Monde. The baritone enters, singing of a mysterious Madame la Dauphine, Chinese Peasants, and cannons made of goose fat. The most readily identifiable connections between this strange collection of observations are phonetic ones, which Poulenc makes abundantly clear through incessant repetition (Madame la Dauphine-fine-fine-fine-fine.... a peasant from Chine-chine-chine-chine... you get the idea). Elsewhere, the text is treated even more clownishly. A maudlin thirty-second note run introduces the overly-rhapsodic benediction that closes 'Malvina.' Worse yet, the closing lines of the last poem in the cycle - the singer, following the composer's instructions 'très violent' and 'exagérément articulé,' tries to achieve an ever-climactic conclusion, repeating the last words an inexcusable number of times; and just when we think he might be finished, he leaps saucily into his falsetto range for a delightfully ridiculous finish.
    Poulenc eventually sobered up a bit, and in his middle years he composed a large body of rather reverent sacred works. Still, pieces like the 'Laudamus Te' from the Gloria, and the finale of his swansong, the Sonata for Clarinet and Piano, demonstrate the youthful and invigorating wit of his earlier works.

    During the 1920s Poulenc conscioiusly began to pursue a neo-Classical ideal, fashioning many of his works in the molds of Stravinsky and late Debussy. In his Trio for piano, oboe and bassoon - the composer's first true chamber work - he imitated the French Baroque style, with its emphasis on clarity, balance, simplicity and a generous dose of humor. In a letter to the critic Claude Rostand, Poulenc admitted that 'I love my Trio because it sounds clear and it is well balanced.'
    The Trio, which is cast in a traditional three-movement form (Presto, Andante, and Rondo), is imbued with elegant symmetries throughout. As Poulenc acknowledged, the first movement rather self-consciously emulates a Haydn Allegro, while the Rondo draws from the Scherzo of Saint-Saëns' Piano Concerto No. 2. Yet a sly sense of humor is never far beneath the surface. Early in the first movement, the oboe and bassoon play a mocking variation on the military bugle call 'Taps,' as angular piano chords provide a jazzy foundation that suggests Duke Ellington. Later in the movement the oboe offers some lyric phrases while the piano retorts with more splashy, descending chordal figures. The Andante is Mozartian in character, while the Rondo is brisk and whimsical. If the piano dominates the Trio, Poulenc's love of wind sonorities is still present throughout, and the bassoon and oboe never become mere accompanying instruments.

    Though Francis Poulenc's favored poet seems to have been Paul Eluard (the author of about three dozen of Poulenc's song texts), the composer also frequented the writings of Apollinaire; in fact, Edward Lockspeiser, writing in 1940, observed an important parallel between Apollinaire's poetic style and that of Poulenc and his French musical predecessors: '[Apollinaire] reveals a remarkably pure lyrical strain, derived from the music inherent in words.... Yet mated with this entrancing simplicity is a rasping sarcasm, a cynical despondency which French artists have again and again used as an antidote to any semblance of too obvious sentimentality. We find this combination in the music of Poulenc itself, as in the music of Chabrier, Satie, and Ravel.' Scholar and biographer Keith Daniel ventures further in comparing the two: 'On a deeper, more personal level, Poulenc found a kindred spirit in Apollinaire, a spirit of deep tenderness and biting humor, a modern spirit rooted in tradition; in a word, Poulenc and Apollinaire shared a temperament of contradictions.' Though Poulenc had read Apollinaire before, it was a live recitation by the poet in 1919 that inspired the composer to set his texts to music; the resulting song cycle, Le Bestiaire, stands as the first of several convergences between Apollinaire's poetry and Poulenc's music.
    Though the cycle is most often heard today in its version for voice and piano, Poulenc's original scoring called for the singer to be accompanied by a flute, clarinet, bassoon, and string quartet. This perhaps explains the rather unpianistic nature of the accompaniment in the piano/vocal version. Elsewhere, Poulenc's approach to song seems to treat the singer's voice like the white froth discernable at the tip of a contiguous wave of sound; here, the piano must parse itself up to cover the roles of the various instruments. The result is a sonority that is occasionally unidiomatic, but sometimes endearingly so. One example can be found in the rhythmically dwindling bass and martial melody to which Don Pedro's fine quartet of camels saunters in 'Le Dromadaire,' which, when given over to the piano, seem to make the awkward and unwieldy beasts just a little more cartoonish. Likewise, the murky depths through which 'L'Écrevisse' ('The Crayfish') wanders are somewhat overly evoked by the constant 'tidal' shifts in mode and the unmoving bass drone.
    This is not to say that Poulenc means to caricaturize Apollinaire's images. The musical exaggerations in 'Le Dromadaire,' for example, serve only to enhance and comment upon the air of odd ambition exhibited by the mysterious Don Pedro. In recalling his hearing the poet read his own poetry, Poulenc commented that 'Apollinaire's voice is like that of his works, melancholy and joyful at the same time. This is why my Apollinaire songs must be sung without emphasizing the ludicrousness of certain phrases. Le Bestiaire is a most serious work.'
    Other songs in the cycle bear this out. The second, 'La Chèvre du Thibet,' compares a goat's soft coat to the golden fleece sought by Jason; this comparison is then rendered moot upon considering the tresses of the speaker's beloved. As the poem finds ultimate beauty in the simplest or smallest of ideas, so does the music draw comparison between grandeur and plainness: the globe-trotting adventurer Jason is reflected in the music by lush, flowery harmonies and figuration; the greater beauty, as embodied by the lover, is answered in the score by a simple, diatonic line. In passages such as this, Apollinaire and Poulenc demonstrate the complementarity of their styles, characterized by a mode of expression at once concise, precise, and profound.

    The Sextet has earned a place in Poulenc's canon as one of his most popular works, and in the right interpretive hands the work exudes French wit as well as a degree of emotional depth. Poulenc wrote the three-movement work in 1932, scoring it for flute, clarinet, oboe, bassoon, horn, and piano; he revised it in 1939. The piece offers a mix of elegant, deceptively simple motives, rhythmic vitality, and playful harmonic turns in a virtuosic framework.
    In three movements - Allegro Vivace, Divertissement, and Finale - the sextet lasts just over 15 minutes in performance. The first movement opens with a fast, toccata-like statement that is obviously indebted toStravinsky's neo-Classicism. The second movement, marked Andantino, begins with an oboe melody that is passed off to other instruments and developed before returning to the oboe at the conclusion. This symmetry is matched by a slow-fast-slow classical structure. The prestissimo Finale is a modified rondo in which rhythmic and lyrical sections are present in equal measure, with an intense conclusion. The Sextet was first performed in Paris in December 1940."



    Le Bal Masqué/Le Bestiaire/Sextet

    or

    Le Bal Masqué/Le Bestiaire/Sextet


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    PART ONE, 1988
    1. Outsider 5:55
    2. What's in? 3:49
    3. Beginning 5:50
    4. Never die! 3:46
    5. Heart beat 4:23
    6. The passage 1:29
    7. Jester's dance 4:37
    8. Halloween 10:06
    9. Jester's dance 4:27 (live version)
    10. Outsider 5:47 (live version)

    MERLIN, 1994
    1. Le Conseil Des Démons 6:59
    2. Le Procès 7:51
    3. Après La Bataille 5:47
    4. Le Sacre 4:08
    5. Table Ronde 5:08
    6. Morgane 3:42
    7. Arthur Contre Morgane 5:42
    8. Viviane 2:11
    9. Dragon Rouge, Dragon Blanc 5:38
    10. Dernière Bataille 5:59
    11. La Mort De Morgane 6:55
    12. Forêt 4:14

    SILENCE...AU DERNIER RANG, 1998
    1. Conseil des démons 4:30
    2. Le Procès 8:00
    3. Waltz 5:35
    4. Arthur contre Morgane 5:55
    5. Iron Mickey 5:40
    6. House with no Door 4:15
    7. Beginning 6:25
    8. Yule 6:00
    9. What's in 4:45
    10. March 10:00
    11. La Mort de Morgane 5:50

    LE FESTIN, 2001
    1. L'Autre 6:37
    2. Le Retour Du Bouffon 6:26
    3. Neurotic 4:54
    4. Shéhérazade 10:23
    5. Coma 5:06
    6. Araignée 5:25
    7. Le Festin 7:55
    8. Carnage 6:55

    Gilles Coppin - keyboards, vocals
    Jean-Philippe Brun - violin, guitar, bass, vocals
    Jean-François Delcamp - acoustic guitar, luth, bass (2)
    Géraldine Le Cocq - vocals (2-4)
    Jean Pierre Mallet - guitars (3)
    Stéphane (Steph) Kerihuel - guitar, vocals (4)
    Christophe Dagorn - bass (3)
    Emmanuel (Mann) Martre - bass (4)
    Thierry Gillet - drums (1)
    Philippe Di Faostino - drums, percussion (2-4)
    +
    Antoine Guyomard - backing vocals (4)
    Sophie Ballard - backing vocals (4)

    progarchives:
    "The French group Halloween was one of the first new progressive rock groups to emerge from the late 80's. Heavy Prog band with strong influences from the 70's classic bands in general. Very orchestrated sound with a nice violin giving the final touch. 'Part One' in 1988, a dark and mysterious symphonic sound with H.P. Lovecraft (the author) influence. 'Merlin' is a superb third production from this French band. Vocals are in both English and French."



    Part One
    Merlin
    Silence...au dernier rang
    Le Festin

    or

    Part One
    Merlin
    Silence...au dernier rang
    Le Festin


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    1. Fan Fare Bop 5:56
    2. Aztec Two 8:36
    3. Movement Turns & Switches 11:27
    4. Reminds Me 5:13
    5. Input 8:48
    6. Masaai Moves 8:56

    Oliver Lake - Sax (Alto)
    Kenyata Beasley - Trumpet
    Sandra Billingslea - Violin
    Ashley Horne - Violin
    Eileen Folson - Cello
    Donal Fox - Piano
    Belden Bullock - Double Bass
    Neil Clarke - Congas
    +
    Regina Carter - Violin
    Maxine Roach - Viola

    AMG:
    "This is a consistently fascinating set by altoist Oliver Lake's String Project. Best known for his exploratory flights, Lake is an underrated arranger/composer. For the unusual but consistently fascinating effort, he utilizes a string quartet (violinist Ashley Horne and Sandra Billingslea, Ashley Horne on viola, and cellist Eileen Folson) for five of his six originals, occasionally adding bassist Belden Bullock and (on one song apiece) trumpeter Kenyatta Beasley (during the well-titled 'Fan Fare Bop') and Neil Clarke on conga. The music is adventurous but quite coherent, often rhythmic and melodic but very open to advanced ideas. These string players can definitely stretch out; improvised sections coincide closely with written passages, so it is sometimes difficult to know which are which. Lake keeps his solo statements concise, tempering his fire with the desire to blend in with the strings. For variety, the leader is absent on the title cut, a fairly outside duet by violinist Regina Carter and pianist Donal Fox. Overall, this is a CD that rewards repeated listenings and is one of the highlights of Oliver Lake's productive career."



    Movement, Turns and Switches

    or

    Movement, Turns and Switches


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    1. Sweet Sixteen 8:03
    2. Magnificent Sevens 12:55
    3. Happiness Is Drumming 3:17
    4. Razooli 2:50
    5. Tal Mala 12:48

    Mickey Hart - Drums, Gong, Percussion, Timbales, Timpani, Trap Kit
    Zakir Hussain - Drums, Tabla, Taragat
    Ray Spiegel - Vibraphone, Vocals (Background)
    Arshad Syed - Duggi Tarang, Percussion
    Jordan Amarantha - Bongos, Congas
    Jim Loveless - Marimba
    Vince Delgado - Dumbek, Tabla, Talking Drum
    Peter Carmichael - Tabla
    Aushim Chaudhuri - Tabla
    Joy Schulman - Tabla
    Tor Dietrichson - Tabla
    +
    David Freberg
    Jerry Garcia
    Jim MacPherson
    Kathy McDonald

    AMG:
    "Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart has long been a proponent and student of world music. He produced this 1976 all-percussion outing, which is a compelling and powerful recording that draws in the listener with its spellbinding rhythms."



    Diga

    or

    Diga


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    1. Seventh Seal 4:57
    2. On Your Own Again 1:48
    3. World's Strongest Man 2:21
    4. Angels of Ashes 4:21
    5. Boy Child 3:38
    6. Hero of the War 2:28
    7. Old Man's Back Again 3:43
    8. Duchess 2:50
    9. Get Behind Me 3:14
    10. Rhymes of Goodbye 3:04

    AMG:
    "Walker dropped out of the British Top Ten with his fourth album, but the result was probably his finest '60s LP. While the tension between the bloated production and his introspective, ambitious lyrics remains, much of the over-the-top bombast of the orchestral arrangements has been reined in, leaving a relatively stripped-down approach that complements his songs rather than smothering them. This is the first Walker album to feature entirely original material, and his songwriting is more lucid and cutting. Several of the tracks stand among his finest. 'The Seventh Seal,' based upon the classic film by Ingmar Bergman, features remarkably ambitious (and relatively successful) lyrics set against a haunting Ennio Morricone-style arrangement. 'The Old Man's Back Again' also echoes Morricone, and tackles no less ambitious a lyrical palette; 'dedicated to the neo-Stalinist regime,' the 'old man' of this song was supposedly Josef Stalin. 'Hero of the War' is also one of Walker's better vignettes, serenading his war hero with a cryptic mix of tribute and irony. Other songs show engaging folk, country, and soul influences that were largely buried on his previous solo albums."



    Scott 4

    or

    Scott 4


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    Jawbones
    1. Free 2:25
    2. Ihadmyheadoverthechickensouppot 6:54
    3. Mary 4:08
    4. Don't Judge Your Brother 5:23
    5. Cat House Blues 4:29
    6. The Ones Left Behind 1:47
    7. Betrayed 7:47
    8. Bullheads In My Shoes Blues 4:04
    9. Karen 8:26

    Since Washington
    1. Alone and Watching 7:26
    2. Sad Sunday 9:20
    3. Now is Here 6:59
    4. Donna 4:45
    5. 3 AM 6:29
    6. It Doesn't Matter... Yes It Does... But I Can't Stop 4:57
    7. Tender Morning 6:43

    Winter Winds
    1. I'm Wondering Why 5:10
    2. More Than Anything 4:46
    3. It's Got Two Names and That's Alright 4:53
    4. Ill Love Song 5:07
    5. Oma Rakas 4:23
    6. The Winterwind 7:00
    7. Bada Que Bash 4:09
    8. Tuija 3:51

    Charley Forsberg - Sax (Tenor)
    Dick Zemlin - Piano, Trumpet
    Phil Hewitt - Piano, Vibraphone
    Ken Smith - Bass
    Marti Keller - Drums
    Terry Mason - Vocals
    +
    Hal Dunn - Sax (Alto)

    dustygroove:
    "Brilliantly soulful jazz from the PE Hewitt Jazz Ensemble – a group with a style that mixes the sunny and the spiritual – a box set featuring the originally self-released trilogy of releases Jawbones (1968), Since Washington (1969), and Winter Winds (1970) in one great package from Now Again! Of the trilogy, each is rare enough that we hadn't seen an original LP as of the time of release of this set, and a Japanese CD release of Winter Winds was our only intro to the soulful ingenuity of jazz composer/arranger/vibraphonist/pianist Hewitt. The LPs were actually only pressed in runs of 100 pieces per (!!!) – so this set compiling them is quite revelatory! His group works at a level that's definitely in line with some of our favorite indie jazz at the time – really pushing the boundaries with a great sense of spirit – stretching out towards new ideas, yet never getting too free or too outside to lose their sense of swing. But at another level, there's a slightly groovy undercurrent, too – one that comes from the wordless vocals on Winter Winds, a style that reminds us a bit of the singing on the Sound Of Feeling record with Oliver Nelson – particularly given the modal grooves on the best numbers, but the strength of the groove overall holds true on all three albums. Rhythms are really in the lead at the strongest points – driven by Phil Hewitt's work on piano and vibes, and topped with alto sax and flugelhorn, too. Players include Dick Zemlin on trumpet & piano, Charley Forsberg on alto, Richard Zemlin on flugelhorn, Rick Hearns & Marty Keller on drums. Jawbones includes 'Free', 'Don't Judge Your Brother', 'Ihadmyheadoverthechickensouppot' and more. Since Washington includes 'Alone And Watching', 'Sad Sunday', ' 3AM' and more. Winter Wind includes 'I'm Wondering Why', 'Oma Rakas', 'The Winter Wind', 'Tuija', 'Baon Que Bash', 'Ill Love Song', and 'It's Got Two & That's Alright'. The box includes reproductions of the original album art plus liner notes, and a 2009 interview by Eothen Alapatt."



    The Complete Works 1968-70

    or

    Jawbones+Scans
    Since Washington+Winter Winds


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    1. A Modern Lesson 5:00
    2. Palmiers En Pots: Trio / Tango 3:24
    3. Geistige Nacht 5:20
    4. I Viaggi Formano La Gioventu 5:13
    5. Inoculating Rabies 1:59
    6. Cinema 23:03
    7. Bosses De Crosses 7:02

    Michel Berckmans - basson, oboe
    Chris Cutler - drums, percussions, radio
    Fred Frith - bass, guitar, prepared guitar
    Marc Hollander - organ, piano, bass clarinet, Alto saxophone, xylophone
    Catherine Jauniaux - voice
    Denis Van Hecke - cello, electric cello, voice
    Frank Wuyts - piano, synthesizer
    Yvon Vromman - guitars, vocals
    Veronique Vincent - guitars
    Gerard Fenerberg - vocals, guitar
    Vincent Kenis - bass
    Jeanf Jones Jacob III - drums

    AMG:
    "The late '70s were a heady time in European progressive rock circles. Chris Cutler, drummer of the leading group Henry Cow and unrepentant leftist seeking to distance himself from both major-label and American rock influences, found similarly minded groups in France, Sweden, Belgium, and Italy, and brought them together for a British tour under the banner of Rock in Opposition (RIO). New musical influences and adventures gave rise to more short-term formations for Cutler and Fred Frith (Cow's guitarist), including this venture with a Belgian duo, Aksak Maboul, comprised at the time of Marc Hollander and Vincent Kenis. This group had recorded an album in 1977, Onze Danses Pour Combattre le Migraine, which became a cult album in its own right. As Aksak toured, their paths crossed with the various RIO groups, which led to this album in 1980. Cutler and Frith brought a solid rhythm section, but ready to make terrific noise when appropriate (as on the backing tracks of 'Inoculating Rabies'). Michel Berckmans, wind player from Univers Zero (one of the Belgian RIO groups), and Hollander were the wind and reed section. Frank Wuyts and Denis Van Hecke rounded out the group on keyboards and strings. Stylistically, the album is all over the board. For example, the opening track, featuring Catherine Jauniaux on vocals, launches into a twisted blues number, with the singer freely improvising and trading licks with Van Hecke's cello and Hollander's sax. The second part of 'A Modern Lesson' features extremely intricate horn writing, with different players rapidly trading different elements of the lines. 'I Viaggi' uses a Middle Eastern scale, with cello and voice doubling the melody line. 'Palmiersen Pots' is a classical piece for string trio, followed by a tango composed from several popular pieces cut up with scissors and reassembled at random. The album culminates with a long suite (originally all of side two on the vinyl release) based on a shorter arpeggiated figure, composed sections alternating with solos on bass, cello, electric cello, and synthesizer. On top of all of the great musicianship, Frith and lead engineer Etienne Conod performed significant studio wizardry after the sessions. 'A Modern Lesson' contains sounds from a pinball machine as well as bits from every other track (and this is well before the age of samplers). The lead bassoon/oboe lines of 'Inoculating Rabies' would be inaudible over the guitar and percussion noise in a live situation, but the contrast makes the piece. The CD reissue includes a track by a later Hollander/Kenis group, which unfortunately only magnifies the greatness of this Aksak Maboul lineup and this album, which remains a pinnacle of the RIO movement."



    Un Peu De L'Ame Des Bandits

    or

    Un Peu De L'Ame Des Bandits


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    1. Tears of Joy 2:58
    2. 5/4 Getaway 7:49
    3. Bulgarian Bulge 4:54
    4. Get It Together 5:14
    5. Quiet Longing 3:48
    6. Blues in Elf 6:41
    7. Loss 8:21

    1. How's This for Openers? 8:37
    2. Samba Bajada 11:31
    3. Strawberry Soup 17:36
    4. Euphoric Acid 4:25

    Don Ellis - Trumpet
    Paul G. Bogosian - Trumpet
    Bruce Mackay - Trumpet
    Jack Caudill - Trumpet
    Kenneth Nelson - French Horn
    Jim Sawyers - Trombone
    Ken Sawhill - Trombone (Bass)
    Doug Bixby - Tuba
    Jon Clarke - Woodwind
    Sam Falzone - Woodwind
    Fred Selden - Woodwind
    Lonnie Shetter - Woodwind
    Alfredo Ebat - Violin
    Earle Correy - Violin
    Ellen Smith - Viola
    Christine Ermacoff - Cello
    Milcho Leviev - Keyboards, Piano
    Dennis Parker - Bass
    Ron Dunn - Drums
    Ralph Humphrey - Drums
    Lee Pastora - Congas

    AMG:
    "Recorded in 1971, Tears of Joy is a Don Ellis classic. The sheer musical strength of this ensemble is pretty much unparalleled in his career. The trumpeter/leader had backed off - a bit - from some of his outlandish and beautifully excessive use of strange and unconventional time signatures, though there is no lack of pioneering experimentalism in tone, color, arrangement, or style. This double LP/CD features a string quartet, a brass octet (four trumpets, tuba, bass trombone, trombone, and French horn), four winds, and a rhythm section boasting two drummers, a percussionist, a bassist, and the Bulgarian jazz piano wizard Milcho Leviev. This is a sprawling album. Disc one is made up of short- to mid-length pieces, the most notable of which are the intense adrenaline surge of '5/4 Getaway' (with a killer string arrangement by Hank Levy, one of three arrangers on this set) and the blazing Eastern European klezmer meets Bulgarian wedding music meets hard bop blues of 'Bulgarian Bulge.' Leviev's solo on the latter comes right out of the knotty, full-on bore of the tune's melody (written by Ellis, who scored all but three selections), and cites everyone from Wynton Kelly to Scott Joplin to Mal Waldron. Elsewhere, such as on 'Quiet Longing,' the strings are utilized as the base and texture of color. One can hear Gil Evans' influence here, and in the restrained tenderness of this short work one can also hear Ellis' profound lyricism in his flügelhorn solo. The second disc's first moment, 'How's This for Openers?,' is a knotty composition that touches on bolero, Aaron Copland, and operatic overture. Levy's 'Samba Bajada' is a swinging opus that uses tropes from early Deodato in his bossa years, Sergio Mendes, and Jobim, and weaves them through with an elegant, punchy sense of hard bop and the American theater. On the 17-plus minute 'Strawberry Soup' (with a vocal quartet in the background), Ellis gets to show what his band is capable of in its different formations. Full of both subtle and garish colors, timbral grace and vulgarity, elegant and roughly hewn textures, and a controlled yet wildly divergent set of dynamics, this tune is one of the most adventurous and most brilliantly composed, arranged, and executed works to come out of the modern big band literature. It is virtually a big-band concerto. Ultimately, Tears of Joy stands as a singular achievement in a career full of them by a musical auteur whose creativity seemingly knew few if any bounds."



    Tears Of Joy

    or

    Tears Of Joy


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    1. Mambito 7:25
    2. Confluence 5:46
    3. Tangle of Dreams 1:50
    4. Mandala 6:50
    5. Shadow of Heaven 7:42
    6. Nomad 8:31
    7. Fandango Caribe 5:51

    Jorge Strunz - Guitar
    Ardeshir Farah - Guitar
    Omaya Alghanim - Guitar
    L. Subramaniam - Violin
    Greg Lee - Bass
    Ron Wagner - Drums, Marimba
    Luis Conte - Bongos, Congas, Percussion, Timbales

    AMG:
    "The first and still best record for this team of Iranian guitarist Andeshir Farah and guitarist Jorge Strunz. It includes seven originals with a multi-ethnicity that is truly global. Latin, African, and jazz influences most prominent."



    Mosaico

    or

    Mosaico


    0 0


    1. Something 3:35
    2. Spinning Wheel 3:08
    3. Yesterday I Heard the Rain 3:30
    4. The Sea and Sand 4:02
    5. My Way 3:39
    6. What About Today? 3:11
    7. You and I 3:47
    8. Light My Fire 3:28
    9. Easy to Be Hard 2:41
    10. Life Goes On 2:41
    11. What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life? 2:59
    12. Yesterday, When I Was Young 3:54
    13. The Fool on the Hill 3:23

    Shirley Bassey - Vocals
    Bill Parkinson – Guitar
    Tony Campo – Bass
    Harold Fisher – Drums
    Johnny Harris - Conductor

    AMG:
    "Locked out of the singles charts for the past seven years, Shirley Bassey finally returned with this collection of 'contemporary' standards, including her British Top Five single 'Something.' (Bassey, who first heard the song when Peggy Lee sang it, apparently didn't even know it was a Beatles tune until just before recording it.) To parallel the modern material, Johnny Harris' arrangements add an upfront electric bass and hang-loose drumkit to the heavy strings and brass. Of course, Bassey was never a jazz singer, so she makes the transition from traditional pop to contemporary rock with an ease more comparable to Barbra Streisand than Peggy Lee. There are a few jazzy rock standards ('Light My Fire,' 'Spinning Wheel,' 'Something') plus plenty of latter-day show tunes ('Easy to Be Hard,' 'What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life,') and a few '60s vocal pieces ('The Sea and Sand,' 'My Way,' 'Yesterday When I Was Young'). Each tune that comes her way gets stamped with the irrepressible Bassey style, and ends up making a remarkably cohesive album of contemporary pop."



    Something

    or

    Something


    0 0


    1. a) Raga Khamaj 14:22
    2. b) Raga Sindhi Bhairavi 6:13
    3. c) Raga Adana 3:32
    4. d) Raga Manj Khamaj 15:44
    5. Morning Love for sitar & flute 12:06

    Ravi Shankar - Sitar
    Jean-Pierre Rampal - Flute
    Alla Rakha - Tabla
    Kamala Chakravarty - Tanpura
    Terence Emery - Bongos
    London Symphony Orchestra
    André Previn - Conductor

    Wiki:
    "...In October 1970 Shankar became chair of the department of Indian music of the California Institute of the Arts after previously teaching at the City College of New York, the University of California, Los Angeles, and being guest lecturer at other colleges and universities, including the Ali Akbar College of Music.[12][30][31] In late 1970, the London Symphony Orchestra invited Shankar to compose a concerto with sitar; Concerto for Sitar and Orchestra was performed with André Previn as conductor and Shankar playing the sitar.[4][32] Hans Neuhoff of Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart has criticized the usage of the orchestra in this concert as 'amateurish'..."



    Concerto For Sitar & Orchestra/Morning Love

    or

    Concerto For Sitar & Orchestra/Morning Love


    0 0


    1. Slippery Jim de Grize
    2. Canvas
    3. Whisper not
    4. Memphis
    5. Tricycle
    6. Sunshine Superman
    7. On Broadway
    8. Sunny Afternoon
    9. Little Old Lady
    10. 98.6
    11. Con Alma
    12. Change of Direction

    13. Love and Occasional Rain
    14. I Heard it through the Grapewine
    15. Chameleon
    16. Just Lookon'
    17. Rocky Raccoon
    18. Ticket to Ride
    19. Wichita Lineman
    20. General Mojo's Well Laid Plan
    21. In the Heat of the Nicht
    22. Soul Mission
    23. Take me in your arms and Love me
    24. Air

    Harold McNair – Flute
    Jim Sullivan – Guitar
    Ritchie Tattersall – Guitar
    Alan Hawkshaw – Organ, Piano
    Herbie Flowers – Bass
    Brian Bennett - Drums

    AMG:
    "Brian Bennett may not be an internationally known name, aside from parts of the former British Empire and Japan - but in England, as a member of the Shadows since 1961, he has been one of the top drummers in rock & roll for two generations, as well as a top arranger and an award-winning film and television composer. His multi-tiered career, which includes running his own record label, has made Bennett one of the most successful musicians of his generation, well into the 21st century.
    He was born Brian Lawrence Bennett in Palmers Green, North London in 1940. His interest in music dated from an early age, and he left school at 16, in 1957, to take a spot playing drums in a skiffle band. By 1957, he'd become the house drummer at the 2I's coffee bar in Soho, the Mecca for aspiring rock & roll bands in England, and from there he earned a regular spot on the TV music showcase Oh Boy!. By 1959, Bennett was regarded as one of the top rock & roll drummers in England, and part of a growing number of young drummers - he was not yet 20 - capable of playing the music well. That year he joined the Wild Cats, the band backing rock & roll singer Marty Wilde. He remained with Wilde for two years, also playing outside live gigs with stars such as Tommy Steele, and he was also featured on a Wild Cats instrumental release of 'Trambone,' recorded as the Krew Kats.
    In October of 1961, lightning struck for Bennett's career when Tony Meehan - then regarded as the top drummer in England - quit the Shadows, who were then the top rock & roll band in England as well as the backing band for Cliff Richard, the top singer in the field. The opening was one of the most coveted in the country - the Shadows were regularly topping the charts in their own right, and their concerts with Richard were riotous affairs, huge sell-outs in front of hordes of screaming fans across England - Bennett was offered the spot. He accepted and was with the group across a string of hit singles and albums, lasting through their intended official breakup in 1968, on the occasion of the group's tenth anniversary as a professional band. He also showed himself a highly talented songwriter, earning his first Ivor Novello Award for composing the title theme to the movie Summer Holiday, which starred Richard and the band - he also contributed songs to their subsequent movies, up through Finder's Keepers.
    Following the 1968 'farewell' concert, he participated along with lead guitarist Hank Marvin and bassist John Rostill in the band's brief 1969 reunion for a tour of Japan. Starting in 1970, with the group on extended hiatus, Bennett turned to other areas of music. He'd already developed some insights into the mechanics of music through his work as a songwriter, and he took a correspondence course in arranging and orchestration that, when added to his natural ability as a composer, ended up reshaping his whole career. Bennett played with Cliff Richard's backing band, and subsequently became Richard's arranger and organizer and leader of his backing group. Even more important, amid the string of hit albums with Richard that followed, he also started writing music for movies and television. He'd always provided vocals on the Shadows' own recordings, and now he re-established his performing credentials on the piano as well as the vibraphone.
    By the mid-'70s, Bennett's days with the Shadows seemed long past, as he became a record producer as well. And the range of artists that he worked with far transcended the ranks of early British rockers - he could be found playing drums on records by Olivia Newton-John, Al Stewart, and Chris Spedding. His television music also achieved great popularity in England, especially his action-oriented work for the police series The Sweeney. By the '80s, he'd become so successful and ubiquitous a presence in music that he won a second Ivor Novello Award for his career-length contributions to music. And a third award, for his score for The Ruth Rendell Mysteries, followed in 1990. Bennett did find time to participate in the various reunions and tours by the Shadows, culminating with their 2004 final farewell tour. At the outset of the 21st century, Bennett earned the Gold Badge Award from the British Academy of Composers and Songwriters Society, and his work for Murder in Mind earned the Royal Television Society Craft & Design Awards for 2000-2001. At his 50th year in professional music, he was still running a record label of his own, and a studio, and playing on new recordings."



    Change of Direction with the best of The Illustrated London Noise

    or

    Change of Direction with the best of The Illustrated London Noise


    0 0


    1. The Song 7:05
    2. Alifib 4:37
    3. Just As You Are 5:00
    4. O Caroline 7:21
    5. Kew Rhone 6:23
    6. Shipbuilding 3:57
    7. Line 1:05
    8. Alliance 4:20
    9. Vandalusia 5:15
    10. Del Mondo 4:54
    11. Te Recuerdo Amanda 5:13
    12. P.L.A. 4:46
    13. Gegenstand 7:29
    14. Rangers in the Night 4:17
    15. Just as You Are 5:02

    1. P L A 4:46
    2. Gegenstand 7:29
    3. Rangers In The Night 4:18
    4. Just As You Are 5 5:02

    Robert Wyatt - Vocals
    Rokia Traoré - Vocals
    Eve Risser - Vocals
    Daniel Darc - Vocals
    Irene Jacob - Vocals
    Yael Naïm - Vocals
    Jocelyn Mienniel - Electronics, Flute
    Matthieu Metzger - Saxophone, Talk Box
    Antonin Tri Hoang - Clarinet, Piano, Sax (Alto)
    Rémi Dumoulin - Clarinet, Saxophone
    Vincent Lafont - Electronics, Keyboards
    Pierre Perchaud - Banjo, Guitars
    Guillaume Poncelet - Electronics, Piano, Synthesizer, Trumpet
    Eve Risser - Flute, Piano, Prepared Piano
    Sylvain Daniel - Bass, French Horn
    Yoann Serra - Drums
    Daniel Yvinec - Conductor

    allaboutjazz:
    "Hearing that France's National Jazz Orchestra has prepared a program of music by Robert Wyatt, the venerable sage of English rock and roll, is intriguing, but not necessarily shocking. After all, the legendary Soft Machine, for which Wyatt served as drummer and vocalist in the late 1960s and early 1970s, pushed prog rock far into the direction of jazz-inspired improvisation. But Around Robert Wyatt borrows almost nothing from the Soft Machine songbook and points instead toward Wyatt's solo career, dominated by political singer-songwriter fare. Wyatt's thin, angelic voice is featured on several tracks, and a raft of French (or Francophone) singers interpret the remainder.
    It's a quirky bet by the orchestra's new director, Daniel Yvinec, and it's a rousing success. The record is first of all a gorgeous piece of exquisitely orchestrated pop music, a modern variant of the Beach Boys' Pet Sounds (Capitol, 1966); indeed, some of Wyatt's best work, with its multi-layered vocal sweetness, sounded like a distant cousin to the Californian group.
    It's also remarkably hip. Yvinec's predecessor Franck Tortiller released an ONJ tribute to Led Zeppelin, the solid Close To Heaven (Le Chant du Monde, 2006); that was clever, but the Wyatt record seems to be really upping the ante. In comparison, the Zep disc sounds endearingly square. Now, pursuing hip runs the risk of sacrificing depth for flash. As if to stave off that danger, Yvinec includes a splendid and rigorous reading of the title track of the lovely long-lost prog-classical-jazz hybrid Kew. Rhone. (Virgin, 1977) by John Greaves, Peter Blegvad and Lisa Herman (a rumination on the exhumation of a mastodon that includes the following palindrome in its dense lyric: 'Peel's foe, not a set animal, laminates a tone of sleep'). No record featuring such a track could be accused of being crassly fashionable.
    Yvinec generally enhances rather than radically reconfigures the source material—the original 'Just As You Are' also featured a French singer's heavily-accented English, for example. Wyatt's 1980s records often featured him exclusively on overdubbed vocals and synthesizers. Wyatt, who has been confined to a wheelchair since he fell from a third-story window at a party in 1973, recently remarked in a British music magazine that this reflected a sort of 'paraplegic politics'—trying to demonstrate that he could do anything and everything. The orchestral fleshing-out (for example, Elvis Costello's bitter 'Shipbuilding,' or 'Del Mondo,' intoned by actress Irene Jacob) remains true to the originals' spirit but sounds appreciably more lush.
    Nowhere is this more clear than on 'Alliance,' Wyatt's vituperative, venom-dripping screed against the British upper class from his Old Rottenhat (Rough Trade, 1985)—the lyrics obliquely refer the devastating UK coal miners' strike. Here, 'Alliance' is sung by Camille, vocalist of the group Nouvelle Vague, known for their charmingly low-key, acoustic covers of 1980s new wave classics. For 'Alliance,' arranger Vincent Artaud finds some brief horn harmonies in Wyatt's chords; the result sounds like a Todd Sickafoose composition as scored by Guillermo Klein for his Filtros (Sunnyside, 2008). The song is ushered out by Vincent Lafont's exquisitely idiomatic Fender Rhodes solo.
    Where's the jazz in all this? Well, laying bare for all the world to see the hidden connection between Klein and Sickafoose, with funky keyboards to boot, should be enough. If not, there are excellent solos throughout. And then there are the arrangements. There is plenty of praise to go around, but a special share should accrue to arranger Artaud. Victor Jara's tribute to his parents falling in love ('Te Recuerdo Amanda') is given a tender, minimal touch, while 'Kew Rhone' is unabashedly orchestral; his treatment of 'O Caroline,' meanwhile, might have been a Gil Evans chart for Claude Thornhill.
    Pretty, witty, accomplished and fun; a fitting tribute to Wyatt, with not a whiff of the stodgy museum piece, and destined to be one of 2009's best releases."



    Around Robert Wyatt

    or

    Around Robert Wyatt


    0 0


    1.Chromium Nebulae 1 8:25
    2.Chromium Nebulae 2 10:19
    3.Chromium Nebulae 3 10:31
    4.Chromium Nebulae 4 10:16
    5.Chromium Nebulae 5 13:07
    6.Chromium Nebulae 6 10:32
    7.Chromium Nebulae 7 7:21

    AMG:
    "English experimental electronic composer Anthony Manning maintains something of an odd connection to the stylistic involutions of his contemporaries. Although he uses the tools of the techno trade, dabbles in some of dance music's less obvious rhythmic structures, is signed to a techno label (Irdial), and appeals most often to admirers of dance-based experimental electronica, his music is closer in its concerns to academic and minimalist composers such as Steve Reich, LaMonte Young, and Morton Feldman. Manning's compositions for synthesizer and drum machine are generally written on graphic scores, with the final shape of his pieces - while still a combination of planning and the accidents of timbre and shape resulting from the nature of programmable instruments - determined, in certain respects, before a single note is played. His 1994 Irdial debut, Islets in Pink Polypropylene, was composed for a single instrument - the Roland R8 drum machine - and his subsequent full-length, 1996's Chromium Nebulae, was a similarly austere smudge of off-kilter analog experimentation, with Manning's focus on hand-made sounds and interacting textures more often than not surprassing any overtly 'musical' intent. Manning's work has also been featured on the Ash International compilation A Fault in the Nothing, and his third album for Irdial, Concision, was released in early 1998."



    Chromium Nebulae

    or

    Chromium Nebulae


    0 0


    1. Bevezeto
    2. Hangoddal ébreszt a szél
    3. Fekete bárány
    4. A szeretet koldusai
    5. Anyám, vígasztalj engem
    6. Kölykök a hátsó udvarból
    7. Ne állj meg soha
    8. Évszakok, gyertyák a téren, túl az elso éjszakán
    9. A kofalak leomlanak
    10. Kergesd el a felhot a házamról
    11. Kevés voltam Neked
    12. Homok a szélben
    13. Maradj velem
    14. Hazafelé

    Balázs Fecó - billentyűs hangszerek, ének
    Dorozsmai Péter - dob, ütőhangszerek
    Fischer László – gitár
    Fekete Tibor – basszusgitár




    Maradj Velem

    or

    Maradj Velem


    0 0


    1. La Ronda 0:47
    2. Tema de la Quebrada de Humahuaca 3:09
    3. Trigales 3:17
    4. Longuita 1:49
    5. Calambito Temucano 2:56
    6. El Vals 1:46
    7. Ramis 2:14
    8. El Mercado de Testaccio 4:05
    9. Huajira 3:50
    10. Pascua Linda 2:54
    11. San Juanito 2:10
    12. Campanitas - Mis Llamitas 4:12
    13. Alturas 3:02
    14. Danza de Cala-Luna 4:46

    Max Berru
    Jorge Coulon
    Marcelo Coulon
    Horacio Durán
    Horacio Salinas
    Jose Seves

    AMG:
    "For well over 30 years, Inti-Illimani (the name translates as 'Sun God') has held a beacon for Chilean music, both the traditional folk styles and the more contemporary nueva cancion. Back in 1967 a group of students at Santiago's Technical University formed a band to perform folk music. Taking their name from the Aymaran Indian language of the Andes, they began playing traditional music - something few did back then - and quickly earned a reputation around the capital, becoming more and more adept on their instruments. By the '70s they'd grown into a political beast, taking on the nueva cancion (literally 'new song') of many young groups, and being quite outspoken lyrically - enough to be forced into exile in 1973, where they'd stay for 15 years. However, they refused to be cowed by the Chilean dictatorship. Basing themselves in Rome, Italy, they continued to record, and toured more heavily then ever before, earning a powerful reputation around the globe, and becoming very unofficial ambassadors of Chilean music, as well as opponents to the ruling regime. In addition to performing with a number of famous, political figures like Pete Seeger and Mikis Theodorakis, they were included on the famous 1988 Amnesty International Tour, along with Sting, Peter Gabriel, and Bruce Springsteen. It was, perhaps, their highest profile moment, at least in worldwide terms, and set the stage for their return to their homeland, where they've continued to be outspoken. While they've remained a force in world music, their career in the U.S. was hampered by the lack of any consistent record deal until 1994, when they signed with Green Linnet offshoot Xenophile. Prior to that, only a few of their 30-plus discs made it into domestic U.S. record bins. The eight-piece lineup remained stable until 1996, when Max Berru decided to retire from music after almost three decades, shortly after the group had been celebrated with a Best Of disc in Italy (not to be confused with the 2000 Best Of on Xenophile, which collected tracks from their last four releases only). Instead of replacing him, they've continued since as a septet. 1997 saw the band honored with a U.C. Berkeley Human Rights Award for their labors in the past. Since then, although they've continued to release albums and tour, they've cut back on their earlier hectic schedule, but also widened their musical horizons, as 1999's Amar de Nuevo looked at the complete spectrum of Latin roots music and its Creole heritage."



    Imaginacion

    or

    Imaginacion


    0 0


    1. Prelude, Op. 28, No. 20/Variations 7:00
    2. Funtime 4:47
    3. Kind of Blue (For Duke Ellington) 8:37
    4. New Moon 9:59
    5. October 5:26
    6. Patterns 4:48
    7. Jan in January 6:37
    8. First Love 6:03
    9. Praise 8:37

    Warren Bernhardt - Piano
    Anthony Jackson - Guitar
    John Tropea - Guitar
    Robbie Kondor - Synthesizer
    Rick Tuitobene - Synthesizer
    Marc Johnson - Bass
    Peter Erskine - Drums

    AMG:
    "A fine soloist who is influenced by Bill Evans but has his own musical identity, Warren Bernhardt has appeared in many different settings through the years. He studied classical piano, played in Chicago while attending college, and was with Paul Winter's sextet during 1961-1964. After moving to New York, Bernhardt was with Gerry Mulligan, Clark Terry, George Benson, and Jeremy Steig, in addition to doubling as a studio musician on many pop dates. He was with Jack DeJohnette's Directions (1976) and Steps Ahead (1984-1985), and has frequently led his own trios. Bernhardt has recorded several fine dates for DMP."



    Hands On

    or

    Hands On


    0 0


    1. Ile de fièvre 12:59
    2. Le sang des capucines 5:37
    3. Choral 1:52
    4. Himogène 5:15
    5. Lierre d'aujourd'hui 2:19
    6. Laocksetal 10:27
    7. Le dernier 9:12

    Frédéric l'Épée - guitars
    Didier Lustig - Hammond B3, mini-moog, mellotron
    Serge Summa - bass
    André Fisichella - drums and percussion

    planetmellotron:
    "Shylock were one of several rather good late-'70s French progressive bands who all missed the boat as punk arrived, despite signing to CBS France. Their first release, Gialorgues (****) is an excellent instrumental album, probably marginally superior to Île de Fièvre, in fact. King Crimson were a major influence on the band (guitarist Frederic L'Epee even played a black Les Paul while sitting down), though you wouldn't believe it to hear this album's title track; symphonic in a Genesis vein, this is a lengthy synth-heavy piece, strong on melody and very different to the rest of the album. Didier Lustig's Mellotron use is very sparse here, with just a few string chords creeping in towards the end of the piece.
    From Le Sang Des Capucines on, Shylock turn more towards their prime influence and become rather more dissonant, although Choral on side two is precisely what it says on the packet, with some layered 'Tron choirs and strings (Didier actually mailed me to confirm the latter). The album's closing piece, Laocksetal spends several minutes being very Crimson before the Mellotron strings enter, but not in an especially Crimson-like manner, closing the album with a series of repeating chords.
    Île de Fièvre's an excellent album, if slightly derivative, although the fractured funk of Himogene shows where the band may have headed if they'd stayed together. Sadly, after arguments with the record company and the rejection of their third album, they split in 1979. I really can wholeheartedly recommend both albums on musical grounds, although this isn't a full-on 'Tron classic. Top marks to Musea for rescuing these. Incidentally, the chances of there being any footage of the original band are minimal, but here's the reformed version playing Laocksetal in Portugal in 2012 with real Mellotron."



    Ile de Fièvre

    or

    Ile de Fièvre


    0 0


    1. Soul Power 4:25
    2. Teo 4:50
    3. Bemsha Swing 3:53
    4. Shuffle Boil/You Can Have Watergate Just Gimme Some Bucks and I'll ... 5:47
    5. Volunteered Slavery 5:43
    6. Serenade to a Cuckoo 4:55
    7. Freaks for the Festival 3:30
    8. Cold Sweat/Rip, Rip & Panic 4:59
    9. Humph 3:48
    10. Epistrophy 4:15
    11. I Got to Move/In Walked Bud 5:12
    12. Jackie-Ing 0:38

    Will Bernard - Guitar
    John Schott - Guitar
    Charlie Hunter - Bass
    Scott Amendola - Drums, Percussion

    AMG:
    "T.J. Kirk is a guitars/bass/drums quartet whose name reflects a bizarre and wonderful repertoire: they are devoted to the interpretation of works by Thelonious Monk ('T.'), James Brown ('J.') and Rahsaan Roland Kirk ('Kirk'). Like Paul Motian's Electric Bebop Band, these four have a solid grounding in both jazz and rock; unlike the Motian band, these guys all wear fezzes and are capable of making a funkily cogent medley of Monk's 'In Walked Bud' and Brown's 'I Got to Move.' And while Motian's group focuses primarily on solos, T.J. Kirk is all about settings; it's the reggae version of Kirk's 'Volunteered Slavery' (complete with dubwise detour) and the band's almost grungy take on 'Shuffle Boil' that will catch and hold your attention, whereas Will Bernard's and John Schott's solos are mostly workmanlike and not terribly remarkable. Elsewhere, the band gives up the funk without downplaying the harmonic complexity of such classics as 'Epistrophy' and 'Serenade to a Cuckoo.' Plainly put, this is a great album, perfect for bringing along to parties or cranking up in the car."



    T.J. Kirk

    or

    T.J. Kirk


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