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FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

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    1. Proverb
    2. Nagoya Marimbas
    3. City Life I (Check It Out)
    4. City Life II (Pile Driver - Alarms)
    5. City Life III (It's Been a Honeymoon - Can't Take No Mo')
    6. City Life IV (Heartbeats - Boats and Buoys)
    7. City Life V (Heavy Smoke)

    The Steve Reich Ensemble

    AMG:
    "'How small a thought it takes to fill a whole life!' These words supply the entire text of Steve Reich's Proverb (1995), and in doing so reaffirm their own truthfulness: in Proverb, a single kernel of an idea serves as the basis for an entire musical composition. In this regard, Proverb is the ultimate expression of a compositional ideal that has marked much of Reich's music: the creation of complex works from relatively simple and few components.
    In Proverb, Reich brings together seemingly disparate elements: organum from the twelfth-century school of Leonin and Perotin, the ideas (and text) of Viennese philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein, and the harmonic and metric intensity of American minimalism. The idea for the work was originally suggested to Reich by Paul Hillier, the noted singer and conductor of medieval music; indeed, Proverb takes advantage of the crystalline vocal style most closely associated with the performance of early music. A soprano begins the work a cappella with a plaintive, descending melody; she is gradually joined by two other sopranos, two tenors, and an instrumental ensemble consisting of two electric organs and two vibraphones. This eclectic group continues to express the central theme in word and musical gesture, repeating the same text while inverting the original downward line into a melodic ascent or stretching it into a larger structural element by drastically augmenting the note values.
    The influence of Leonin's and Perotin's Notre Dame polyphony is evident in the soprano's syllabic declamation of the text as well as in the tenors' occasional melismatic excursions. Other medieval echoes are present in the use of augmentation canon (in which one voice is accompanied by a second voice singing the same line at half or double the speed). All the while, the organs double the voices, while the vibraphones emphasize the sudden and frequent metric shifts and provide a rhythmic drive and unique timbre that decidely pull the listener out of the twelfth century and into the twentieth.

    Although a late piece, this 1994 composition revives some aspects of the works of the 1960s and 1970s that made Reich famous, namely repeating patterns on both instruments, one or more beats out of phase. However, in older works Reich's system would have been to continue playing these, with the phase relationship of them shifting one beat-unit each repetition, until their snapped back into exact unison. In this work, though, the patterns change through a process of development, and usually don't repeat more than three times. The parts for the two instruments are through-composed, both of them requiring virtuoso quality players. It was commissioned by the Nagoya Conservatory in Japan for the inauguration of a new auditorium, Shirakawa Hall.

    As early as It's Gonna Rain in 1965 and Come Out in 1966, Steve Reich was experimenting with the sound of the spoken word as music. Later, in Different Trains (1988), the melodies played by the violins mimic the melodic rise and fall of words and phrases heard on tape. In City Life, the sounds of speech are combined with acoustic and electronic instruments, as well as 'environmental' sounds gathered from various noisy venues in New York City. Two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two pianos, and percussion are joined by two electronic samplers. Often, these sounds are treated as if they were instruments - screeching brakes and foghorns harmonize with the woodwinds, while the sounds of machinery join the percussion section.
    The work is in five movements. The first, third, and fifth are based largely on speech samples: a street vendor saying 'Check it out,' a vocal activist at a rally hollering 'It's been a honeymoon - can't take no mo'!,' and, eerily, a series of messages taken from actual fire department communications after the 1993 World Trade Center bombings, starting with 'heavy smoke.' The second and fourth movements contain no speech; each is underpinned with a rhythmic sound effect. Movement two features pile drivers and car alarms, while the sound of a human heart beating begins movement four.
    City Life marks an important step in the performance of music that utilizes 'nonmusical' sound sources. In Reich's earlier works that contained speech and other sound effects, the sounds were recorded onto a tape, with which the performers had to play along in performance. In City Life sound effects are instead produced by sampling keyboards. This allows the sounds of speech and of the city to become fully integrated into the performance of the music. This integration represents the culmination of the 'found sound' techniques that Reich developed over a span of thirty years."



    Works

    or

    Works


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    1. Blue Eyes 2:50
    2. I Must Be Somebody Else You've Known 2:18
    3. A Satisfied Mind 2:31
    4. Folsom Prison Blues/That's All Right 4:24
    5. Miller's Cave 2:49
    6. I Still Miss Someone 2:47
    7. Luxury Liner 2:55
    8. Strong Boy 2:04
    9. Do You Know How It Feels to Be Lonesome? 3:36

    Gram Parsons - Guitar, Vocals
    Bob Buchanan - Guitar, Vocals
    John Nuese - Guitar
    Ian Dunlop - Bass
    Chris Ethridge - Bass
    Jon Corneal - Drums, Vocals
    Earl Ball - Piano
    Jay Dee Maness - Guitar (Steel)

    AMG:
    "Safe at Home, Gram Parsons' first full-length album (and the only LP he would record with the International Submarine Band), today sounds like a dry run for the country-rock he would later perfect with the Byrds and the Flying Burrito Brothers; it's also a major changeup from the psychedelically shaded pop/rock of the ISB's hard to find debut singles. In many ways, the album sounds more purely 'country' than Parsons' best-known work; the Burritos' crucially important R&B edge had yet to make its presence felt in Gram's music, and on these sessions the rock influence is often more felt than heard (probably due in part to the presence of Nashville session veterans who pitched in on piano and pedal steel). But Parsons' considerable gifts as a songwriter were already evident on tunes like 'Blue Eyes' and 'Luxury Liner,' and while there's a touch less grace in Gram's vocals than on his best work, his passion, understated wit, and deep love for country music are always in the forefront. And while Gram is the star of this show, his bandmates - John Nuese and Bob Buchanan on guitars, Jon Corneal on drums, and future Burrito Chris Ethridge on bass - are solid, soulful, and firmly in the pocket throughout. If Safe at Home sounds like a rough draft for Gram Parsons' later triumphs, it's also a fine record on its own terms, and leaves little doubt that the International Submarine Band's leader had something special right from the start."



    Safe at Home

    or

    Safe at Home


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    1. Assemblage (Suite) 21:59
    2. Heroicredolphysiognomystery 11:40
    3. Make Love Not War to Everybody 8:47

    Gunter Hampel
    - Clarinet (Bass), Flute, Vibraphone
    Willem Breuker - Clarinet, Clarinet (Bass), Sax (Alto), Sax (Baritone), Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor)
    Piet Veening - Bass
    Pierre Courbois - Percussion

    AMG:
    "This CD is the debut from two of the premier pioneering creative improvising musicians that in time became the most enduring players in their style. While peers of Ornette Coleman, Albert Ayler, and Archie Shepp, German Gunter Hampel and Dutch native Willem Breuker were introduced to American audiences with this breakthrough recording, now on its second straight reissue for the ESP-Disk label. Hampel is clearly a devotee of Eric Dolphy on bass clarinet, doubles on vibraphone, and handles the flute on occasion. Breuker also wields the low-end woodwind Hampel prefers, as well as alto clarinet, and his full arsenal of saxophones from soprano to baritone. The near-22-minute seven-part epic suite 'Assemblage' kicks off with a slight melody before Hampel and Breuker immediately slam the transmission into fifth gear, wailing into polyphony with ferocious abandon. They switch instruments almost as furiously, slowing and speeding up, churning, using written and improvised passages with Hampel's shimmering vibes and Breuker's whirring overblown unrefined phrases standing apart from a drum solo by Pierre Courbois, Hampel's flute, or Breuker's bass clarinet. 'Heroicredolphysiognomystery' show the all-pervasive influence of Dolphy, extant in the introductory soprano/flute workout contrasting the arco bass from Piet Veening and clattery percussion via Courbois, building to a consistently intense and dense wall of sound, then surprisingly calming in a classic signature vibes solo from Hampel. 'Make Love, Not War, To Everybody' is not so much a peace chant or mantra as it is a call to arms, identified by slide whistle, pizzicato bass, bowed cymbals all in hushed tones, sparse vibes, tambourine, and sliding bass restrained, then unleashed on Breuker's cue to a full-force phalanx of anxious, scattered warriors battling, then fading to triple pianissimo sexual hums, moans, and a satisfied, joyful clarion climax, all as the title suggests. Admittedly a recording for the challenged listener, with the caveat that these musicians are in their age of discovery, it bears historical and empirical substance as a recording not only reflecting the turbulent times, but part of an era that established personal freedoms for many thousands of players who followed, strived, and continue to stride alongside them."



    Music from Europe

    or

    Music from Europe


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    1. Sand Choir 8:01
    2. Dawn Son 2:01
    3. Hop-Kin 16:51
    4. Stepdance 12:55
    5. Dream 15:48

    William Parker - Sintir, Zither
    Joe Morris - Banjo, Banjo-Ukelele, Banjouki
    Hamid Drake - Frame Drum

    AMG:
    "This delightful recording takes flight toward its solar elopement based on a very simple principle. Three musicians who play together regularly, much of their music totally improvised, get together for another recording session that will feature not their normal instruments but a variation that is deliberately stripped quite bare. Instead of electric guitar, Joe Morris brought his banjo and banjouke, the latter a bastardization that looks like a Mini-Me version of a banjo that can't get out of a ukulele jumper it was trying on. William Parker carted along something called a zintir, no doubt with great relief as it meant one less trip on the subway carrying his normal double bass. Hamid Drake was also no doubt gratified that this session required him to bring only a frame drum rather than an entire set of tubs. The zintir is a stringed instrument of sketchy origins, a variation on a quite basic design found in Africa, Asia, Arabia, and South America. These sorts of axes might have between two and four strings, sometimes less or more, and play in the bass register. Philosophically, then, Parker occupies a similar place in the ensemble sound. The same can be said for the other two players. Drake provides the percussion part of this rhythm section, and Morris agitates as the soloist on the top layer. In situations such as this, players often will create with much the same rhythmic gestures and manner of interaction as on their regular instruments, only the resulting sound comes out completely different. Anyone skeptical about this should be reminded of the difference between getting clocked on the forehead with a freshly sharpened pavement chisel or a piece of heavily salted Danish licorice. This instrumental concept means a much less heavy type of assault than is usual for these artists, yet this becomes a special treasure, a demonstration of expressive mastery packaged simply in a cardboard sleeve. It would be going too far to suggest the music represents a new acoustic hope for the future, but it is a stimulating experience nonetheless. If any criticism can be made, it is that the lack of much preconceived compositional direction gives some of the pieces a certain sameness. 'Stepdance' and 'Hop-Kin' are examples that simply seem like large squares of cloth someone has cut out of a massive quilt. One fades out with a bassline that comes back up again when the other begins. The 15-minute 'Dream' is a wonderful performance."



    Eloping With The Sun

    or

    Eloping With The Sun


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    1. Doushiyoukana 3:39
    2. Nondakure 3:16
    3. Kutabirete 4:13
    4. Ayatsuri Ningyou 3:53
    5. Doraneko 3:22
    6. Ah 3:45

    Chahbo (aka Kazushi Shibata) - vocals
    Fujio Yamaguchi - guitar
    Tetsu Asada - guitar
    Shinichi Aoki - bass
    Sakuro 'Kant' Watanabe - drums

    discogs:
    "Japanese glam rock band, formed in Kyoto in 1970 by Kazushi Shibata and Fujio Yamaguchi. The group split up in 1973 after releasing just one album. They later reformed in 1979."



    Kutabirete

    or

    Kutabirete


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    1. Morning Star 7:57
    2. Let Her Go 4:53
    3. Where Is The Love 4:36
    4. No More 5:01
    5. Amazing Grace 7:19
    6. What Do You Think of This World Now? 6:00

    Hubert Laws - Flute, Flute (Alto), Piccolo
    Romeo Penque - Flute, Flute (Alto), Horn (English), Piccolo
    Phil Bodner - Clarinet, Flute, Flute (Alto)
    Alan Rubin - Flugelhorn, Trumpet
    Marvin Stamm - Flugelhorn, Trumpet
    James Buffington - French Horn
    Garnett Brown - Trombone
    Jack Knitzer - Bassoon
    Gloria Agostini - Harp
    John Tropea - Guitar
    Bob James - Piano (Electric)
    Ron Carter - Bass
    Billy Cobham - Drums
    Dave Friedman - Percussion, Vibraphone
    Ralph MacDonald - Percussion
    Harry Lookofsky - Violin
    Irving Spice - Violin
    Harry Cykman - Violin
    Max Ellen - Violin
    Elliot Rosoff - Violin
    David Nadien - Violin
    Gene Orloff - Violin
    Paul Gershman - Violin
    Emanuel Green - Violin
    Lucien Schmit - Cello
    Charles McCracken - Cello
    George Koutzen - Cello
    Debra Laws - Vocals
    Eloise Laws - Vocals
    Lani Groves - Vocals
    Tasha Thomas - Vocals
    Don Sebesky - Conductor
    Creed Taylor - Producer

    AMG:
    "After the success of 1970's Afro-Classic, Hubert Laws re-teamed with arranger/conductor Don Sebesky for 1972's Morning Star, his third date for producer Creed Taylor's CTI. Laws' sidemen for the date included Ron Carter on bass, Bob James on electric piano, Billy Cobham and Ralph McDonald on drums, guitarist John Tropea, and vibraphonist/percussionist Dave Friedman. Rather than follow up Afro-Classic with another program of primarily classical numbers, Taylor, Laws, and Sebesky employed a large string, wind, and brass ensemble and went to the pop-jazz side of the spectrum. The title track of this gorgeous set is a laid-back, lilting jazz tune with Laws' flute introducing the melody, followed by a tight, economical yet lengthy and expressive James solo and the winds flowing in momentarily before the brass explodes into a gorgeous swing before disappearing again very quickly. James' solo flows through both beautifully. Laws' own break is impressionistic, yet full of elemental swing and classical flourishes. On the beautifully textured reading of 'Where Is the Love,' Laws' flute plays and darts soulfully around the melody as James colors the margins and Carter ushers in a groove change with his diligent lines accenting Cobham's backbeat. The strings, sweet as they are, underscore rather than overpower the band, adding an entirely different dimension to the arrangement. The reading of 'Amazing Grace' is introduced slowly by Laws playing the melody in the lower register. James joins him on the changes before the strings enter sparsely at the minute mark. They color Laws' flute with elegance and a touch of Celtic hymnody. A harp duets with Laws on the third verse; violins and cellos brighten it sparely. When Carter enters, the tempo picks up; the mood changes instantly. It begins to sway, shimmer, and shift, reaching nearly transcendent heights of expression before it all quiets down to Laws' flute unaccompanied, improvising on Bach before returning to the folk roots of the song. These are just the highlights; Morning Star is a joy all the way through, whether it's in the bluesy soul-jazz of 'No More' or the occasionally abstract 'What Do You Think of This World Now?,' which riffs on 'America the Beautiful.' It's Laws at his very best; it helped define the essence of CTI."



    Morning Star

    or

    Morning Star


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    1. Fool 2:43
    2. The Tower of Babel 5:05
    3. The Reaper 4:03
    4. The Loved Ones 5:20
    5. The Demon King 4:18
    6. Pre Dawn 1:12
    7. Sunrise 3:27
    8. The Last Day 7:59
    9. The Flood 1:12
    10. Under the Summer Stars 5:42
    11. Adieu 2:03
    12. Judgement 8:18
    13. In the Region of the Summer Stars 6:19

    Robert John Godfrey - Keyboards
    Stephen Stewart - Bass, Guitar
    Francis Lickerish - Guitar
    Northm Chris - Bass, Drums
    David Storey - Drums, Percussion
    Neil Mitchell - Trumpet

    AMG:
    "This record was a case of being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Punk swept in just as this glorious swathe of prog rock appeared, even though it had been recorded a year earlier. A concept album based on the tarot deck, it features Robert John Godfrey's orchestral keyboards pushing against guitar work that ranges from the sublime to the metallic. Like so many prog bands, the classics raise their heads here, in influence if not in cribs, whether it's the Rachmaninov-style piano of 'The Lovers,' the Bartók harmonies of 'The Fool...the Falling Tower,' or the epic 'The Last Judgement,' where a rhythm based on Ravel's 'Bolero' builds into a theme from a Latin mass before soaring to a climax. The title cut, on the other hand, is lazily pastoral and lilting, reflective until the heavier middle section, then slowly fading away. Really, the closest this band comes to rock as we know it is on 'The Devil,' where heads get down, but never quite bang. It's well worth noting that the CD version is different from the original vinyl, not only in tracks but even down to re-recording some tracks without some of the original members, which offers a different perspective. Comparing the two, it has to be admitted that the original version comes off better in its delicacy and freshness, although the newer recordings do make better use of the available technology."



    In The Region Of The Summer Stars

    or

    In The Region Of The Summer Stars


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    1. Jodler
    2. Chill Out Honey Pie
    3. Eight Slash Eight
    4. Hanne
    5. Mupemo
    6. One for Igor
    7. After All
    8. Gnome's Run
    9. (Grand) Canon

    Christian Muthspiel - Trombone
    Wolfgang Muthspiel - Guitar
    Gary Peacock - Bass
    Paul Motian - Drums

    Wiki:
    "Christian Muthspiel (born 1962 in Judenburg, Austria) is an Austrian composer, trombonist, and pianist most associated with jazz.
    He started with the piano at six and began study of the trombone at 11. From 1987 to 1988 he had a scholarship to study in Banff, Alberta. He also does new classical music.

    Wolfgang Muthspiel (born 2 March 1965 in Judenburg, Styria) is an Austrian guitarist and composer most associated with jazz and brother of the trombonist and pianist Christian Muthspiel.
    He started playing the violin at six and began study of the guitar as a teenager. After studying classical and jazz guitar in Graz, he completed his studies at the New England Conservatory and the Berklee College of Music. His high reputation, even in young years, made him the replacement of Pat Metheny in Gary Burton's band.
    In subsequent years Muthspiel played with many notable jazz musicians, including Maria Joao, Dave Liebman, Peter Erskine, Paul Motian, Bob Berg, Gary Peacock, Don Alias, Gary Burton, Larry Grenadier and John Patitucci. Later a collaboration with famous Norwegian jazz singer Rebekka Bakken followed.
    In 2002 Muthspiel returned to Vienna, founding his record label Material Records, which focuses on publishing own records as well as those of young aspiring musicians.
    Besides his own band, the Wolfgang Muthspiel 4tet, he is collaborating with Brian Blade in the project 'Friendly Travelers' and with Ralph Towner and Slava Grigoryan in a new Guitar Trio named MGT.
    In 2003 he won the European Jazz Prize."



    Muthspiel / Peacock / Muthspiel / Motian

    or

    Muthspiel / Peacock / Muthspiel / Motian


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    1. Lolita Go Home 3:08
    2. What is This Thing Called Love? 2:28
    3. Bebe Song 2:41
    4. Where or When 3:20
    5. Si Ça Peut Te Consoler 3:04
    6. Love For Sale 3:41
    7. Just Me and You 2:45
    8. La Fille aux Claquettes 2:34
    9. Rien Pour Rien 3:06
    10. French Graffiti 2:44
    11. There's a Small Hotel 3:05

    Jean-Pierre Sabar - Conductor

    AMG:
    "Though she looks incredibly sexy on the cover, listeners forced to examine the material between the sleeves here won't find Jane Birkin quite so attractive. Lolita Go Home balances a few lightweight French pop songs - most written and produced by Serge Gainsbourg - with the American pop standards 'What Is This Thing Called Love?,' 'Love for Sale,' 'Where or When,' and 'There's a Small Hotel.' Perhaps the language barrier prevents critical thought, since the French songs are done comparatively well. When Birkin takes on songs not written especially for her narrow range, however, the entire album unravels in a mess of amateurish singing. Over a slinky porn-film production, Birkin's breathy, off-key delivery on 'What Is This Thing Called Love?' and 'Love for Sale' positively slaughters a pair of the best pop songs ever written in English. True, Birkin's voice improved later on in her career (she later treated 'Love for Sale' with much more professionality), but the only redeemable aspect of this mid-'70s excursion is - you guessed it - the artwork."



    Lolita go home

    or

    Lolita go home


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    1. Try Jah Love
    2. Ride On
    3. You're Playing Us Too Close
    4. Before You Make Your Move (Melt with Everyone)
    5. Jah, Jah Children Moving Up
    6. You've Got the Power (To Make a Change)
    7. Inna Time Like This
    8. I Wake up Crying
    9. Low Key-Jammin'

    Michael "Ibo" Cooper - Guitar, Keyboards, Vocals
    Steven "Cat" Coore - Guitar, Vocals
    Bunny Rugs - Guitar, Vocals
    Richard Daley - Bass, Guitar
    Willie Stewart - Drums
    Irvin Jarrett - Percussion, Vocals
    +
    Stevie Wonder - Fender Rhodes, Synthesizer
    Crystal Blake - Vocals (Background)

    AMG:
    "When Third World collaborated with Stevie Wonder, the reggae band was rewarded with their second highest charting single, 'Try Jah Love,' a Top 25 R&B hit. Its follow-up was another Wonder-written and produced single, the ominous-toned 'You're Playing Us Too Close,' which perfectly captures some of the '80s-era concerns of people of color. Other standouts are the soft inspiring title track and a nice cover of the Bacharach/David song and Chuck Jackson hit 'I Wake Up Crying'."



    You've Got The Power

    or

    You've Got The Power


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    1 Lontano 11:45
    2 Atmosphères 8:57
    Apparitions
    3 1. Lento 6:01
    4 2. Agitato 2:40
    5 San Francisco Polyphony 12:56
    Concert Românesc
    6 1. Andantino 2:52
    7 2. Allegro vivace 1:18
    8 3. Adagio ma non troppo 3:00
    9 4. Molto vivace 4:58

    Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
    Jonathan Nott - Conductor

    AMG:
    "Lontano: Composed in 1967, this composition for large orchestra depicts the opening and closing of 'a window on long submerged dream worlds of childhood' (Ligeti). Dream images appear, briefly coalesce and then dissipate. At the start, long tones are slowly compared with other tones setting up beat frequencies spreading across the surface of the orchestra into a cluster; this process is started again with a unison beginning with a tremolo on strings and spreading across the surface. Then a very low bass note is sustained with very high harmonic sounds, leading into a quiet, tonal, romantic harmony of mystery, with chords and clusters coming to the foreground and then disappearing back into the rich, silken texture. (Ligeti likens parts of the work to Bruckner's Eighth Symphony.) The whole surface slowly works its way back into the haze of the dream. Scale-wise but sustained passages then follow in the basses and treble instruments (like scales on a piano with the pedal down), which leads into clusters with wide vibrato. Again the texture recedes almost into nothingness with low sustains at the end.

    Atmosphères: Atmosphères has been heard by its largest audiences through the excerpts of the work used by movie director/producer Stanley Kubrick in his film 2001: A Space Odyssey (along with Ligeti's Lux Aeterna).
    Composed in 1961 for large orchestra without percussion, Atmosphères makes an indelible first impression with a subdued five-octave chromatic chord utilizing every note in this massive span and employing each instrument of the orchestra in its realization. As section after section drops away, flutes, clarinets, and horns are left sounding a bright, piercing tone cluster. Prismatic voices from high strings sounding in quickly pulsing clusters lead a remarkable array of timbral effects. Cadences with the same contours moving at differing tempi, heaving brass players breathing volubly through their horns, and sheets of slithering instrumental voices in highest registers are among other arresting devices employed here by Ligeti.
    The work scarcely hints at forward movement. Rather, the listener hears an all but motionless series of sound evolutions unfolding at various moments. It is, if not a revelation of music in all of its aspects, a study in orchestral timbre, all the more effective, all the more spectacular because of its being employed with such a sizeable number of instruments. It successfully demonstrates the contemporary colors available to the symphony orchestra without reliance upon peripheral electronics. Scarcely any doubt can exist over what attracted Kubrick: it was the perfect realization in sound of his visual exploration of outer space.
    Although first responses to the work were muted, especially from those of the avant-garde, Atmosphères prevailed with the public who desired contemporary music to which they could feel some attraction. Indeed, this work can be regarded as clearing a pathway for minimalist composers of a later period who likewise explored (and sometimes exploited) timbral effects which gradually evolve throughout works composed for orchestra or large ensemble."



    The Ligeti Project II

    or

    The Ligeti Project II


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    1. The Wood 6:48
    2. Waltz 5:49
    3. Just for You 4:43
    4. Yule Horror 6:38
    5. Iron Mickey 6:31
    6. Suburb 4:47
    7. Blue Nightmare 6:42
    8. Laz 9:42

    Jean-Philippe Brun - violin, guitar, vocals
    Gilles Coppin - synthesizers, vocals
    Yann Honoré - bass
    Philippe Di Faostino - drums, percussion

    AMG:
    "The majority of the lyrics to this album are poems written by the late horror writer H.P. Lovecraft (1890-1937). The music that is used as their accompaniment is fusion-tinged progressive rock with the musical influences that are most readily apparent being Genesis, UK, Asia, Kansas, Yes, and ELP. This makes a unique combination as it is not often that you see such traditional progressive rock sounds used in a rather dark and even a bit spooky vein. The musicians on the album are Jean-Phillippe Brun, Giles Coppin, Phillippe Di Fasostino, and Yann Honore."



    Laz

    or

    Laz


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    1. La Sorrella 11:31
    2. Fortunato 8:35
    3. Why Not 6:58
    4. Homecoming 10:15

    Marion Brown - Sax (Alto)
    Stanley Cowell - Piano
    Norris Sirone Jones - Double Bass
    Rashied Ali - Drums

    AMG:
    "Issued in 1968, Why Not? is Marion Brown's second outing for the ESP label as a leader. The saxophonist also guested on a Burton Greene date earlier that same year. Featuring pianist Stanley Cowell, Coltrane alumnus Rashied Ali (Coltrane had been dead less than a year at this time), and bassist Norris Sirone Jones, Brown reveals his great strengths as a composer and bandleader, which are matched by his abilities as a soloist. The opener, 'La Sorella,' features a gorgeous opening solo by Cowell. Using large and intricate chorded modal phrases, Cowell creates a virtual chromatic field for the rest of the rhythm section - Jones, in particular, responds in kind with scintillating three-string figures that add a deeper series of conical figures for ballast. Brown enters just behind Ali in full cry on the alto. Using a Coltrane-esque song figure to respond to Cowell's stunningly beautiful foundation, Brown blows lean but long lines before a long solo by Jones cuts them all quiet. When the band enters, they are in prelude form, with spun-out piano lines ever in anticipation and Brown calling something out of the ether that never quite materializes, which is fine because on 'Fortunata' it does: a ballad that develops into something wholly other without changing tempo. This is jazz as expressionism; it doesn't need to be 'free' because it has been untethered from the opening bars. Brown's solo here lilts on the branches of Cowell's arresting, nearly Debussian chromatic figures that extend harmonic ranges almost without end. By the time the band gets to the title track, a free workout in a dizzying tempo, the listener is grounded enough in Brown's composed lyricism so as not to be surprised at all when the fury of the tempo is elongated by the temperance in tension the band creates. Finally, on 'Homecoming,' where the ballad begins to show its face once more, each member steps in to underline and deconstruct it by using contrapuntal lyricism as a contrast. Even Ali, one of the great powerhouse drummers, dances rather than sprints around the band, even in his lengthy solo. This is a phenomenal album, a place where Marion Brown got to reveal early on why he was such a formidable force: He understood the inherent importance of musical traditions and he also understood how imperative it was to them and to jazz to extend them in a manner that left their roots clearly visible."



    Why Not

    or

    Why Not


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    1. Second Track 7:04
    2. Almost Live But Definitly Plugged 7:14
    3. Bring out the Imps 2:05
    4. Heaven and Bagpipes 8:17
    5. Get a Grip 6:19
    6. Lost in Rostanga 3:52
    7. Return of the Imps 0:33
    8. Uncle Limps (Turkish Version) 8:31
    9. Bubble and Squeak 4:44
    10. Jontys Way 4:25
    11. Instant Imps 0:11

    Ian Chaplin - Sax (Soprano), Electric Piano, Synthesizer, Drums, Percussion, Vocals
    Marcus Henriksson - Sampler
    Sebastian Mullaert - Viola, Electric Piano, Synthesizer
    Philip Rex - Double Bass, Guitar

    popmatters:
    "Minilogue can now lay claim to having a hand in two of the best albums released this year. First off, there was their double-disc odyssey into minimal ambient techno bliss, Animals. And now is a collaboration with Australian jazz musicians Ian Chaplin and Philip Rex, Sebastian Mullaert and Marcus Henriksson called Bring Out the IMPS, a dubbed out excursion into groove and improvisation.
    You’d be forgiven for the instinct to run away at the sound of the description “jazz musicians collaborate with techno band.” After all, history hasn’t been so kind to such fusions, and why should it work after all? Minilogue are masters of the minimal groove, which relies more on repetition and gradually unfolding effects than avant garde improvisation, whereas most jazz musicians are wont to scoff at the concept of such locked reliance on sequencing. On Bring, both sides of this collaborative equation get their way, as solid, mostly slowed-down techno grooves provide a firm, dubby foundation for blissful Rhodes melodies and earthy double bass.
    IMPS creep up out of their shell on the opener, “Second Track” (get it?). A scratchy lock-groove sounding drum loop swaggers about, while keyboard chord stabs and high-pitched synth meandering enjoy a little conversation, perhaps over tea. Chaplin’s hushed soprano sax oscillates and wheezes, and Minilogue, in a show of dedication to the improvisational nature of the group, deconstruct the beat with a series of garbled short delays. This build of percussive pitches and echoes is the centerpiece of the second half of “Second Track”. Things appear to be going more techno on numbers like “Uncle Limps (Turkish Version)”, much of which wouldn’t have sounded out of place on Animals. It’s to Rex’s credit that his electric bass is funky while being able to wander a bit, while Chaplin’s keyboard (a highlight on the album) once again tells its story, before being wah’d out in the final two minutes of the piece.
    Bring was recorded in almost exclusively live takes. This energy and nervousness is palatable on “Get A Grip”, where stabbing saxophone trills and mode-traversing keyboards constantly threaten to break down. This tension between anarchy and brilliance frames the best avant garde jazz, and it’s clear that Minilogue are being pushed in new directions by Chaplin and Rex. Likewise, it has to be refreshing for two jazz improvisers to play over such rigid, complex rhythm locks. Things go more ambient on “Bubble And Squeak”, in which a beat is relegated to hushed blocks. “Bubble” is a prime showcase for Chaplin’s sax, played effervescently through what must be rows upon rows of effects (the press release references “shitloads of toys” in the studio during the creation of Bring). Rex is the star on “Lost in Röstånga”, a lazy, electric bass-led Western sunset with sparse hums and steely guitar, also from Rex. It’s a testament to the simultaneous eclecticism and consistency of the album that each artist has enough room to breathe, without venturing too far outside the scope of the project.
    Perhaps most importantly, Bring Out the IMPS sounds like a joy to make. It’s almost impossible to get through tracks like “Almost Live But Definitely Plugged” or “Bring Out the Imps” without grinning a little. That such a privately enjoyable jam session translates so well to a studio record is just icing, all to the listener’s benefit."



    Bring Out The Imps

    or

    Bring Out The Imps


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    1. Black Gang Chine 5:01
    2. Free Yourself 4:29
    3. Built for Speed 3:55
    4. Many Are the Ways 4:53
    5. I Can Be Tender 4:20
    6. Dreams of the East 6:10
    7. Sacrosanct 5:41
    8. Every King of Stone 3:36
    9. Men With Extraordinary Ways 5:01
    10. Safe in the Arms of Love 5:23
    11. Forgotten Man 4:28

    Phil Manzanera - Guitar, Keyboards
    Andy Mackay - Keyboards, Oboe, Saxophone
    James Wraith - Keyboards, Vocals
    John MacKenzie - Bass
    Blair Cunningham - Drums
    Carol Kenyon - Vocals (Background)

    AMG:
    "Following the commercial and critical failure of the first Explorers album, Manzanera and MacKay attempted to cash in on their names and history (with Roxy Music) for sales. It did not help. James Wraith (the third member of the Explorers) could not have been happy with such a decision, as he is not even pictured on the front sleeve. Perhaps it works in his best interest, as this is yet another mess from these three. Music fans have come to expect a lot more from both Manzanera and MacKay. Besides their stellar career in Roxy Music, these two have produced excellent solo albums. This is not the case. On this outing, Wraith does not sound like a carbon copy of Bryan Ferry, but he does sound remarkably like Andy Bell of Erasure. So picture Andy Bell singing Roxy. To make matters worse, they attempt to sound contemporary and have produced predictable, boring, synth-based, '80s dance music. It just does not go anywhere or say anything. Lyrics are predictable and downright juvenile at times (just look at the titles). Some of the songs are pleasant, but there is nothing here that stands out or sticks in the listener's mind. Completists of these artists should only bother."



    Manzanera & MacKay

    or

    Manzanera & MacKay


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    1. Fly with the Wind 8:26
    2. Salvadore de Samba 12:11
    3. Beyond the Sun 5:31
    4. You Stepped out of a Dream 6:52
    5. Rolem 5:44

    McCoy Tyner - Piano
    Hubert Laws - Flute, Flute (Alto)
    Paul Renzi - Flute, Piccolo
    Raymond Duste - Oboe
    Linda Wood - Harp
    Ron Carter - Bass
    Billy Cobham - Drums
    Guilherme Franco - Tambourine
    Frank Foster - Violin
    Daniel Kobialka - Violin
    Myra Bucky - Violin
    Mark Volkert - Violin
    Peter Schafer - Violin
    Edmund Weingart - Violin
    Stuart Canin - Violin
    Daniel Yale - Viola
    Selwart Clarke - Viola
    Sally Kell - Cello
    Kermit Moore - Cello
    William S. Fischer - Conductor

    AMG:
    "One of the most difficult aspects for producer Orrin Keepnews of recording pianist McCoy Tyner so frequently in the '70s was coming up with new ideas and settings for each record. Fly with the Wind gave Tyner a rare opportunity to write for strings. Joined by bassist Ron Carter, drummer Billy Cobham, flutist Hubert Laws, piccolo, oboe, harp, six violins, two violas and two cellos, Tyner performed four of his originals (including the title cut) plus the standard 'You Stepped out of a Dream.' This CD reissue has plenty of memorable moments and is a surprising but logical success; Tyner's orchestral piano blended with the strings very well."



    Fly With The Wind

    or

    Fly With The Wind


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    1. Hurricane Fighter Plane 'When the Ride Is Over You Can Go to Sleep' 7:24
    2. Transparent Radiation 'Red Signs Out-Side, Which I Contain' 6:51
    3. War Sucks 'You Remember What Happened to Hansel and Gretel' 3:53
    4. Pink Stainless Tail 'Seven Guest Are Quite Now, And Now Not Half ...' 8:07
    5. Parable of Arable Land 3:00
    6. Former Reflections Enduring Doubt 'I Pass in a Rain That Is Always Too 9:09

    Mayo Thompson
    Steve Cunningham
    Rick Barthelme
    Rick McCollum
    Tom Smith
    Rick & Bubba
    Roky Erickson

    AMG:
    "The Red Krayola's debut remains their most celebrated and notorious effort. Although this was categorized as psychedelia when first released, it's more like futuristic avant-noise-rock. Mayo Thompson's flighty songs about hurricane fighter planes and transparent radiation are almost submerged by a cacophony of 'free-form freak-out' noise created on kazoos, flutes, harmonica, hammer, jugs, bottles, sticks, and more by a large ensemble of friends dubbed the 'Familiar Ugly.' Minority opinion holds that the wistfulness of Thompson's tunes (the brittle 'War Sucks' excepted) and voice may have been served better by less self-consciously far-out arrangements. (Several of the songs can be heard in more skeletal form on the Epitaph for a Legend compilation). Parable of Arable Land was quite a daring statement for its day, however, with instrumental cameos by Roky Erickson on a couple of tracks."



    Parable of Arable Land

    or

    Parable of Arable Land


    0 0


    1. Katre van dih
    2. Paralleli
    3. Inuit
    4. Addio
    5. Walser soap
    6. Katia
    7. Aliens
    8. ´81 (piano solo)

    Liliana Bodini - lead vocals, chimes
    Gianni Cristiani - flute
    Oscar Giadanino - piano, synths
    Mauro Cavagliato - bass, guitars, keyboards, xylophone, background vocals, glockenspiel
    Massimo Cavagliato - drums, percussion
    +
    Claudio Bianco - harmonica, backing keyboards (2)
    Gianni Boeretto - cello (6)
    Guido Tonini Bossi - flute (6)
    Rossella Negro - viola (2)
    Dino Pelissero - flute solo (1)
    Massimo Sartori - oboe

    Progarchives:
    "A somptuous mixing between Progressive baroque, Italian classical and medieval musics. ZAUBER is an itaprog band from Torino with an interesting melodic sound, long instrumental suites and great keyboards and flute. The arrangements are full and lush. In addition to the standard instruments they augment their sound with chimes, xylophone, glockenspiel, flute, harmonica, viola, cello, recorder and oboe. Close to JETHRO TULL or FRUUPP but more clever and baroque. Worth to be discovered."



    Aliens

    or

    Aliens


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    1. Paradise 7:03
    2. Arabesque 6:49
    3. Love Affair 3:39
    4. Nothing Will Ever Be the Same Again Forever 6:33
    5. Desire 6:15
    6. Falling 4:58
    7. Walk in Love 4:17
    8. Picasso 4:19
    9. Mardi Gras 5:21

    John Klemmer - Sax (Tenor)
    Oscar Castro-Neves - Cavaquinho, Guitar
    Victor Feldman - Piano
    Roger Kellaway - Piano
    Pat Rebillot - Keyboards
    Abe Laboriel, Jr. - Bass
    Lenny White - Drums
    Airto Moreira - Percussion
    Alex Acuña - Percussion

    AMG:
    "Saxophonist and composer John Klemmer was restlessly following some inner call in the late 1960s through the late '70s. Aside from his big-boned tenor sound and his trademark unique Echoplex on certain tunes, he was making music that crossed numerous jazz, pop, rock, soul, and Latin genres. 1977's Arabesque is a case in point. Co-produced by the saxophonist and Stephan Goldman, Klemmer used a pool of studio players on this date in addition to a small band. Drummer Lenny White and bassist Abe Laboriel made up his trio, while pianists Roger Kellaway, Pat Rebillot, and Victor Feldman alternately held down the piano chair. The most telling thing about this date is Klemmer's employment of some of the best Brazilian percussionists in the game in Airto Moreira and Alex Acuña. The brilliant guitarist Oscar Castro-Neves also appears on a couple of cuts. The musical fare here reflects the new urban jazz at the time - which would eventually give way to smooth jazz. During this period, inspired by the breakthrough success of Herbie Hancock's Head Hunters, and Grover Washington's Feels So Good and Mister Magic albums, this new urban sound was polished, funky, breezy, and meaty. The tunes here walk an interesting line between deep melodic midtempo ballads such as 'Paradise' and 'Falling,' that both make use of strings and shift dynamically from introspection to slightly more expressive forcefulness; airy, exotic, Latin-flavored workouts such as the title track and 'Picasso'; and cooking full-scale workouts such as 'Nothing Will Be the Same Forever' and 'Mardi Gras,' with funk backbeats and breaks. What ties such a seemingly disparate set of tunes together is rhythm. White in concert with Acuña, or Moreira - or both on a couple of cuts - lends a criss-crossing, very diverse set of Latin rhythms to virtually every track here, whether it be samba, light salsa, or Afro-Cuban rhumba. Klemmer, a wonderful melodic improviser who knows his way around the outside margins, keeps it focused and tight here, but his tone is so large and rich that the tunes can't help but soar when he's actually blowing. The album did very well upon its initial release, and served to spread Klemmer's ever-growing fan base while cementing the place of the new urban jazz on the radio as well as on automobile cassette decks."



    Arabesque

    or

    Arabesque


    0 0


    1. Children of the Morning 2:41
    2. Hit and Run 2:15
    3. When You've Been Away for a Long Time 3:07
    4. Lei Pakalana 2:16
    5. Gaze on Other Heavens 2:36
    6. A Taste of Honey 1:44
    7. Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown) 2:21
    8. Put Your Money Away 2:47
    9. Lock All the Windows 3:16
    10. Less of Me 2:25
    11. The Spinnin' of the World 2:02
    12. A Little Soul Is Born 2:56
    13. Where Are You Going Little Boy? 2:23
    14. Go Tell Roger 1:50
    15. Red River Shore 2:32
    16. Runaway Song 2:03

    Bob Shane
    Nick Reynolds
    John Stewart

    AMG:
    "Children of the Morning was the final studio album by the Kingston Trio in its original continuity - they recorded a live album that Decca Records declined to release, which was eventually licensed to Tetragrammaton Records, but this was their last new work. At the time, as is recalled in the notes, music was changing around them almost faster than they could adapt. The Beatles' Rubber Soul was out, and We Five, managed by trio manager Frank Werber, was making the charts with songs like 'You Were on My Mind.' John Stewart wrote most of the songs on this album and did a lot of the singing, which makes this almost a transitional record to his solo career, which started up immediately upon the split in the group. Strangely, Children of the Morning doesn't really sound much like a Kingston Trio album - there's relatively little banjo, and the mood is more the introspective one of a singer/songwriter than an upbeat folk trio. The title track is pleasing, and the group even does a decent if unexceptional job with 'Norwegian Wood' and 'A Taste of Honey.' The four bonus tracks off of the group's Somethin' Else album sound more like the traditional Trio work, with a more outgoing feel to the singing and playing. As with their other Decca reissues, Folk Era have brought the tapes back to Capitol's studios and added the slight touch of reverb that everyone missed on the original Decca albums."



    Children of the Morning

    or

    Children of the Morning


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