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FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | .... | 15 | 16 | (Page 17) | 18 | 19 | .... | 57 | newer

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    1. A vous, douce debonnaire (Rondeau)
    2. Hareu! hareu! le feu/Helas! ou sera pris confors (motet)
    3. Amours me fait desirer (ballade)
    4. Trop plus est belle/Blauté paree/Je ne suis mie certeins (motet)
    5. Amis tout dous vis (rondeau)
    6. Se ma dame m'a guerpy (virelai)
    7. Se je souspir (virelai)
    8. Dame se vous m'estés lointeinne (ballade)
    9. Quant je sui mis au retour (virelai)
    10. Mes esperis se combat (ballade)
    11. Ma fin est mon commencement (rondeau)
    12. Douce dame jolie (virelai)
    13. De Bon Espoir/Puis que le douce rousee (motet)
    14. De toutes flours (ballade)
    15. Quant Theseus/Ne quier veoir (double ballade)
    16. La Septime estampie Real (dance)
    17. Quant j'ay l'espart (rondeau)
    18. Phyton le mervilleus serpent (ballade)
    19. Armes amours/O flour des flours (double ballade)
    20. A l'arme a l'arme
    21. Phiton Phiton (virelai)
    22. Two variants on the tenor 'Roussignoulet du bois'
    23. Fumeux fume (rondeau)
    24. De home vray (ballade)
    25. Istampitta Tre fontane (dance)
    26. Ma douce amour (ballade)

    1. Trés doulz amis/Ma dame/Cent mille fois (rondeau)
    2. Plasanche or tost (virelai)
    3. Amour m'a le cuer mis en tel martire (ballade)
    4. Tribum quem (motet)
    5. Hélas! je voy mon cuer (ballade)
    6. Contre le temps
    7. Andray soulet (canon)
    8. La greygnour bien (ballade)
    9. Restoés restorés (virelai)
    10. Ce moys de may (rondeau)
    11. La belle se siet (ballade)
    12. Je ne fai tousjours que penser (rondeau)
    13. Chansons (1973 Digital Remaster): Filles a marier
    14. Amoreux suy et me vient toute joye (rondeau)
    15. Je loe Amours et ma dame mercye (ballade)
    16. Navré je sui d'un dart penetraitif (rondeau)
    17. Lamentatio Sanctae Matris Ecclesiae Constantinopolitanae (motet)
    18. La Spagna (Variant I) (basse danse)
    19. Par droit je puis bien complaindre (rondeau)
    20. Donnés l'assault (rondeau)
    21. Vostre trés doulx regart (rondeau)
    22. Helas, mon dueil (virelai)
    23. Bien puist (rondeau)
    24. Vergine bella (stropha)
    25. Donna di dentro della tua casa (quodlibet)

    David Munrow - Conductor

    AMG:
    "David John Munrow, in his brief career, was one of the most exciting and influential leaders of the British early music movement. After he completed his school education, he taught for a year in South America. He returned to England to attend Pembroke College, Cambridge, where he read for a degree in English from 1961 to 1964. He was an avid and talented flute player and while at Cambridge founded an organization to play early music. After he graduated, he studied seventeenth century music at Birmingham University. It was his exposure to South American indigenous music, with its strong use of wooden instruments of the flute family, that stimulated his interest in such instruments, including the recorder.
    At that time, interest in England in early music was growing. Munrow found himself in great demand as a recorder player. In 1967, he founded the Early Music Consort of London, with counter tenor James Bowman, violist Oliver Brookes, lutenist James Tyler, and harpsichordist Christopher Hogwood. They gave their first performance at Louvain the same year, making a London debut in 1968. Also in 1967, he became a lecturer in early music at Leicester University. Munrow's consort shook up the regular concert world and the growing early music establishment with its performing style. Their approach was entertaining, attractive, and exuberant, even brash, without traducing the boundaries of what was known to be authentic. Suddenly, 'authentic' performances were no longer scholarly affairs of main interest to academics, but popular concert events eagerly attended by the general classical music audience.
    The Consort appeared on television and in an intriguing development, the group also kept an interest in contemporary music. Therefore, several living composers wrote new music - often in the most advanced musical style - for these old-style instruments. These included Peter Dickinson (Translations, 1971), Elisabeth Lutyens (The Tears of Night, 1972), and Peter Maxwell Davies, who used the group as the on-stage band during his opera Taverner (1972), which is about a medieval English composer.
    In 1969, Munrow became a teacher of the recorder at London's Royal Academy of Music. In 1971, he started making lecture appearances on BBC radio. His show, 'Pied Piper,' was aimed at young listeners and had a listenership among all ages. For reasons that remain obscure, he took his own life in 1976. Had he not, he surely would have been recognized as one of the most influential musicians of the last half of the twentieth century."



    The Art Of Courtly Love

    or

    The Art Of Courtly Love


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    1. Panorâmica 10:07
    2. Influências 6:26
    3. Bailado 5:06
    4. Abertura Nº 2 8:33
    5. Cantares 5:20
    6. Folk Song 10:36
    7. Entr' Act I & II
    8. Floydiana II

    Marco Antonio Araujo - acoustic guitars
    Alexandre Araujo - guitars and percussion
    Eduardo Delgado - flute
    Antonio Viola - violoncelo
    Ivan Correia Baixo - bass
    Mário Castelo - drums

    progarchives:
    "Marco Antonio Araujo was born in Belo Horizonte on 1949. On 1968 he played in a band called Vox Populi, that later would become Som Imaginario. In 1970, and now living in England, he used to be a fan of bands such as: Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin and Genesis, who would have great influence on his musical production. Within the next few years, Marco Antonio Araujo studied guitar and cello in Rio de Janeiro.
    In 1977, once again in Belo Horizonte, he joined the symphonic orchestra and soon (1980) his first album, "Influências" was released. With only six instrumental tracks, he had already achieved an amazing sense of balance and created a personal style.
    Marco Antonio Araujo is a classic when it comes to brazilian prog, and also a highly recomended artist for anyone who likes both symphonic rock and prog folk.
    Sadly, Marco has passed away on Jan, 07, 1986, at the age of 36 of an aneurism."



    Influências

    or

    Influências


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    1. Mountain Dance
    2. Bari Luso
    3. Masisamba
    4. Eastern Blues
    5. Promenade
    6. Dilijan

    Armen Martirosyan - Leader

    armenianjazz:
    "The Armenian State Jazz Band direct successor of the first jazz orchestra in the whole South Caucasus, founded by talented composers and musicians Artemi Ayvazyan and Tsolak Vardazaryan by the order of the Government of the Republic of Armenia in 1938. The outstanding composer succeeded in creating a wonderful band, which would later be admired on the whole territory of the USSR. The basis of the band’s repertoire was the national folk music, which singled out the band among others.
    In 1956 the leadership of the orchestra was entrusted to young and talented pianist and composer Konstantin Orbelian, who became its art director and conductor. A new era opened in the life of the orchestra. Numerous concert tours (the orchestra visited 40 countries), TV appearances, album records made it one of the most popular bands in the country. In 1975 the orchestra was the first among the Soviet jazz collectives to visit the native land of jazz, the USA. In the years of perestroika and economic crisis, the band ceased its existence. However, in 1997, several years after Armenia became an independent country, talented musician, composer and remarkable arranger Armen Martirosyan became the reformed band’s new conductor and art director. Saxophonist Armen Hyusnunts, winner of many jazz festivals became the musical director of the band, while Artur Asatryan became its producer.
    Being highly professional, the young band members have great interest in modern interpretations and arrangements. Building on the glorious achievements and traditions, they were able to find their unique style based on Armenian national roots. The orchestra frequently performs both in Armenia and abroad: in the USA (200, 2001), Russia (2001, 2006), etc. In 2000 the band took part in the Second International Jazz Festival, Yerevan-2000, during which the band had the chance to perform together with contemporary jazz legend, pianist, composer and arranger Chick Corea.
    In 2001 the band recorded its first album, “Mountain Dance”, which was awarded as the Best Jazz Fusion Album at the annual Armenian Music Awards ceremony in the United States in November 2001. Commenting on the album, Chick Corea said: “This music is alive and unique, adventurous and beautiful.”
    In 2002 the band participated in the Jazz Appreciation Month, a festival organized by the Public Affairs Section of the U.S. Embassy in Armenia and hosting professional performers from Armenia and the USA.
    2006 saw the band performing in Moscow during the Days of Armenian Culture in Russia.
    On April 20, 2007, on the occasion of the 10th anniversary of orchestra’s revival the Ministry of Culture and Youth Affairs awarded Armen Martirosyan and Artur Asatryan with gold medals for their contribution to music.
    In 2008 during the National Music Awards ceremony, the Armenian State Jazz Band was named Best Jazz Band of the year.
    In fall of 2010 Armen Hyusnunts replaced Armen Martirosyan and filled the post of art director of the State Jazz Band."



    Mountain Dance

    or

    Mountain Dance


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    1. Elioth 7:37
    2. Thebes 7:11
    3. Baityare 8:11
    4. Cobra 6:38
    5. Yzzo 6:42
    6. Sable 3:48
    7. Ozz 6:07
    8. Sakkarah 5:49
    9. Des Fleurs Pour Nefertit 7:34

    Yochk'o Seffer - saxophone
    Patrick Tilleman - percussion, violin
    Faton Cahen - piano
    Dominique Bertram - bass
    Jean-My Truong - drums

    wiki:
    "Zao was a progressive rock/zeuhl band that was founded by Yochk'o Seffer (saxophone, clarinet) and François Cahen (piano). They were active from 1971 to 1994 and released 6 studio albums. Both Seffer and Cahen were ex-members of Magma. In 1976, Magma violinist Didier Lockwood also joined the band and appeared on their albums Kawana and Live!"



    Akhenaton

    or

    Akhenaton


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    1. Lungs 12:08
    2. Love Song 4:34
    3. Ralph's Piano Waltz 5:21
    4. Red In Orange 5:21
    5. Remembering 4:32
    6. Timeless 11:57

    John Abercrombie - guitars
    Jan Hammer - Hammond organ, piano, synthesizers
    Jack DeJohnette - drums

    AMG:
    "Guitarist John Abercrombie's first in a long line of recordings for ECM was also his debut as a leader. Teamed up with Jan Hammer (who here plays organ, synthesizer, and piano) and drummer Jack DeJohnette, Abercrombie plays four of his originals, plus two by Hammer. These performances differ from many of the guitarist's later ECM dates in that Hammer injects a strong dose of fusion into the music, and there is plenty of spirited interplay between those two with fine support by DeJohnette. Thought-provoking and occasionally exciting music that generally defies categorization."



    Timeless

    or

    Timeless


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    1. What They Doin? 3:26
    2. Walk On By 3:57
    3. Merry Go Round 2:43
    4. Santana Part 1 3:01
    5. The Touch Of You 3:36
    6. Santana Part II 2:59
    7. Ain't No Sunshine 3:33
    8. Cisco Fare 3:53
    9. Where Is Love? 4:36

    Calvin Billups - alto sax
    Renon "R.J." Sumpter - tenor sax
    Daniel "Buddy" - Slade trumpet
    Carlton Savage - guitar
    Wayne Jones - - organ
    Benjamin Crawford - bass
    Alvin Paige - drums
    Leo Davis - vocals
    "Coach" Frank Johnson - vocals

    dustygroove:
    "Rare 70s funky soul from The Equatics – just the kind of record that keeps us digging and still excited after all these years – resurrected by the like minded diggers at Now Again! You know the kind of album we're talking about, the ones you come across with enigmatic cover art, no names on the back you recognize or even anything indicating where or when it's from. Then you take a spin and it's the real thing from the get go! The production is nice and raw but not ragged, and a funky vibe that groups today emulate but just can't recapture. This set's mid 70s R&B, mostly instrumental but with a few vocal numbers, all nicely done up in a very groovy, funky fashion. There's a couple of nice covers, like their Isaac Hayes-ish take on 'Walk On By' and a nice rendition of 'Ain't No Sunshine', but the rest of the set's mostly originals, like 'Merry-Go-Round' and some nice raggedy instrumentals like 'What They Doin?', 'Santana' done up in parts 1 and 2 (maybe on a 45 somewhere. . .), 'Cisco Fare' and the jazzy 'The Touch Of You'. Amazing!"



    Doin It!!!!

    or

    Doin It!!!!


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    1. Lorau 4:13
    2. Momil Rano 5:50
    3. Kohiari 6:40
    4. Lal Mori Pat 6:42
    5. Bhairveen 5:50
    6. Sorath 10:56
    7. Pahari (Tune of Sindhi Folk Song and Dance) 6:18
    8. Pahari (Folk Tune in Raga) 4:07

    jazztimes:
    "Here's a thrilling bit of antique exotica, which winds up making a statement about the universality and timelessness of world music tradition. In the dark ages of the '50s, Olympic Records originally put out the album by Iqbal Jogi and Party, just now reissued by Rykodisc's new Traditions label under the title The Passion of Pakistan Tradition (Rykodisc 1045; 50:23). Led by Iqbal Jogi on the reed instrument known as the murli, the music, now digitally buffed-up, contains the kind of entrancing, rolling Sufi devotional music modern western listeners have grown accustomed to, thanks to the recent popularity of Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan. Original liner notes go easy on the details, referring to the work as 'snake-charmer music.' Whatever marketeers want to call it, it's snaky, it's deep, and it's charming on a profound level, in the '50s or the '90s."



    The Passion of Pakistan

    or

    The Passion of Pakistan


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    Woodwind Quintet
    1, Movement 1: Lively 6:49
    2. Movement 2: Slow 6:33
    3. Movement 3: Lively 5:28
    4. Imprints ... on ivory and string, for piano 16:15
    5. Sound Dreams (In memory of James Jones), for chamber ensemble 11:54

    Five Pieces for Piano
    6. No. 1, Moderate 1:27
    7. No. 2, Slow 1:49
    8. No. 3, Moderate 1:47
    9. No. 4, Moderate 1:34
    10. No. 5, Fast 1:28

    Brass Quintet
    11. Movement 1: Fast, Driving 5:33
    12. Movement 2: Moderate 3:48
    13. Movement 3: Slow 4:04
    14. Movement 4: Lively 4:02

    Wanda Maximilien - Piano
    Collage (Chamber Ensemble)
    American Brass Quintet

    AMG:
    "Bazelon studied at De Paul University and also with composers Bloch and Milhaud. His compositions are mainly for orchestra and chamber groups, and he is especially known for his works for brass and percussion. =Propulsions= (1974), a concerto, is considered an important part of the percussion repertory. Bazelon has also written for the theatre, cinema and television and is the author of a book on the music of film."



    Woodwind Quintet/Five Pieces...

    or

    Woodwind Quintet/Five Pieces...


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    1. The Boudoir Stomp 5:13
    2. It Hurts Me Too 5:12
    3. Edward's Thrump Up 8:11
    4. Blow with Ry 11:05
    5. Interlude a la el Hopo 2:04
    6. Highland Fling 4:20

    Mick Jagger - Harmonica, Vocals
    Ry Cooder - Guitar
    Nicky Hopkins - Keyboards
    Bill Wyman - Bass
    Charlie Watts - Drums

    AMG:
    "Though many feel that the Stones were at their best when playing loose, sloppy rock & roll à la Exile on Main St., with this 1972 release on Rolling Stones Records the unrehearsed style of the album is more of a hindrance than a call to ragged glory. Not an official Rolling Stones release, the assembled band does contain three-fifths of the group (Mick Jagger, Bill Wyman, and Charlie Watts) along with session man extraordinaire Nicky Hopkins and guitarist Ry Cooder. The band stumbles through keyboard-dominated original numbers such as 'Boudoir Stomp' and 'Edward's Thrump Up,' as well as more conventional cuts like a cover of Elmore James' 'It Hurts Me Too.' Yet the songs never get beyond giving the listener the impression they were thrown together during a drunken night's rehearsals. In that sense the album is a bit of a letdown; though any Stones fan would surely clamor for lost material from the band's golden age, Jamming With Edward instead makes one wish it had never been released."



    Jamming with Edward

    or

    Jamming with Edward


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    1. Coney Island 9:27
    2. Corazón 8:29
    3. The Hill 12:29
    4. Hope Scope 8:00

    David Murray - Sax (Tenor)
    Fred Hopkins - Bass
    Steve McCall - Drums

    AMG:
    "David Murray's string of recordings for Black Saint were among the most rewarding of his career. This one differs from many in that the adventurous tenorman improvises in a sparse trio with bassist Fred Hopkins and drummer Steve McCall. Murray stretches out on four of his originals (which clock in between eight and twelve-and-a-half minutes) and shows plenty of fire but also a healthy dose of lyricism. This is exciting music very much in the avant-garde."



    Sweet Lovely

    or

    Sweet Lovely


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    1. Hymn of the Souls Who Are Passing 1:56
    2. Pozzi Winning 1:07
    3. Willie's Room 3:50
    4. Pozzi Losing 1:27
    5. Walking to the Hotel 0:25
    6. Discovering the Body 1:01
    7. The Contract 0:33
    8. Atonal Hillbilly Music 3:21
    9. The Last Poker Game 1:06
    10. Drawing 1 2:35
    11. Waiting 4 0:50
    12. JSG Boggs 2:42
    13. Money 3:17
    14. The Four Just Men 2:36
    15. Carmen's Fantasy 1:19
    16. Traveling Music 1:19
    17. Carmen Robs the Bank 2:49
    18. Eternal Rendezvous 2:53
    19. Prolouge 1:41
    20. First Typhoon 0:47
    21. Last Umbrellas, No. 1 2:09
    22. Storm Rising 2:26
    23. Closing Umbrellas 1:07
    24. Last Umbrellas, No. 2 1:35
    25. Raising Umbrellas 2:57
    26. Drawing 2 1:10
    27. Life's Other Mystery 4:19
    28. Carmen's Fantasy 2 1:23
    29. Carmen's Romance 2:34
    30. Werner/Gabriella Theme 1:23
    31. Carmen's Waltz 0:56
    32. Drawing 5 1:28

    Phillip Johnston - Sax (Soprano)
    Don Davis - Sax (Alto)
    Allan Chase - Sax (Alto)
    Paul Shapiro - Sax (Tenor)
    Robert DeBellis - Clarinet, Flute, Flute (Alto), Sax (Tenor)
    Mike Sim - Clarinet, Sax (Baritone)
    Ray Vega - Trumpet
    Cenovia Cummins - Violin
    Sue Pray - Violin
    Laura Seaton - Violin
    Juliet Haffner - Viola
    Erik Friedlander - Cello
    Beverly Lauridsen - Cello
    David Tronzo - Dobro
    Kevin Trainor - Guitar (Acoustic)
    Jody Harris - Guitar
    Adam Rogers - Guitar (Acoustic), Guitar
    Stew Cutler - Guitar, Guitar
    Elizabeth Panzer - Harp
    Guy Klucevsek - Accordion
    Joe Ruddick - Hammond B3, Piano, Sampling
    Richard Dworkin - Drums, Talking Drum
    Kevin Norton - Drums, Percussion, Vibraphone
    +
    Steven Bernstein - Trumpet
    Dave Douglas - Trumpet
    Mark Feldman - Violin
    Joel Forrester - Organ, Piano
    Dave Hofstra - Double Bass, Tuba

    AMG:
    "A series of short pieces set a variety of moods, from mournful introspection to waltzy vibraphone pop to upbeat, funk sassiness to the kind of trance craziness that only psychotic banjos can bring. On Music for Films, Philip Johnston shows off his amazing breadth and depth, with compositions for four films: Geld directed by Doris Dörrie; Money Man and Music of Chance both directed by Philip Haas; and Umbrellas directed by Henry Corra, Grahame, Weinbren, and Albert Maysles. The tracks are not entirely in order by film (for example, the songs from Geld are tracks 13-18 and 27-31), which makes it difficult at times to get an overall feel for the music of a particular film. The music within each film, however, is so varied that it makes little difference. This album has the kind of non-obtrusive beauty that makes film music great. It is easy to imagine it coloring a scene and helping to make it unforgettable, and difficult to imagine it distracting or overpowering one. This is a fine addition to Johnston's work."



    Music For Films

    or

    Music For Films


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    1. De Sábado Prá Dominguinhos 4:38
    2. Meu Barco 0:52
    3. Viagem 4:28
    4. Zurich 9:31
    5. O Correio 0:51
    6. Intocável 3:00
    7. Flávia 5:05
    8. Cadango 4:17
    9. Suíte Mundo Grande 4:05
    10. Parnapuã 1:07
    11. Cancão Da Tarde 2:37
    12. Mente Clara 2:16
    13. Ilha Das Gaivotas 4:51
    14. Republiço 2:38
    15. Conventó 0:56
    16. Quiabo 5:18
    17. Menina Azul 8:44
    18. Garrote 3:06
    19. Rancho Das Sogras 4:14

    Hermeto Pascoal - bandola, keyboards, flugelhorn, tuba, percussion, harmonium, flute, craviola, sanfona, bombardino and clavinet
    Carlos Malta - saxophones and flutes
    Jovino Santos Neto - keyboards and flutes
    Itiberê Zwarg - bass
    Marcio Bahia - drums
    Pernambuco - percussion
    +
    Dominguinhos - sanfona (1)
    Rafael Rabello - acoustic guitar (6)
    Teco Cardoso - flute (8)
    Mauro Rodrigues - flute (8)
    Arismar do Espírito Santo - bass solo (16)
    Silvana Malta - vocals
    Ana Maria Malta - vocals
    Antônio Bruno Zwarg - vocals

    AMG:
    "A self-taught musician, Hermeto Pascoal ascended from his humble upcountry origins to an international acknowledgment still unfair to his musical stature. Developing his ears from an early age at his grandfather's blacksmith shop, Pascoal used to pick up pieces of iron and hit them, trying to create music (not to emulate the harmonics of his father's eight-bass button accordion, as has been spread). This led to an unusual approach to music, where the tones themselves give a stronger conducting motif than chord connection, scales, or modes. His understanding of music as a vital force, emanating organically from everything in Earth, is reminiscent of Kepler's music of the spheres and conducted to eccentric performances and recordings with pigs, kettles, and anything at hand. He has also developed the Sound of the Aura concept, in which music is developed out of people's speech, traffic noise, and out of every possible source of sound. That didn't impede him from conquering the admiration of world-class musicians such as Miles Davis, for whom he recorded as instrumentalist and composer. John McLaughlin, Duke Pearson, Gil Evans, Berlin Symphony, Copenhagen Symphony, and many others played and recorded his compositions. He also recorded with Ron Carter, Alphonso Johnson, Tom Jobim, Cal Tjader, and several others. As a sideman, he recorded with Brazilians Aquilo del Nisso, Luiz Avellar, Maria Bethânia, Fagner, Galo Preto, Eduardo Gudin, Joyce, Edu Lobo, Elis Regina (including a live concert recorded at the Montreux Jazz Fest), Walter Santos, Mauro Senise, Robertinho Silva, Sivuca, Marcio Montarroyos, Taiguara, Sebastião Tapajós, and Geraldo Vandré, to name a few. Down Beat's Howard Mandel, wrote about him 'as pan-global a leader as Sun Ra and as surefooted an individualist as Rahsaan Roland Kirk.'
    Live Evil
    His father used to animate parties with an eight-bass button accordion. Beginning to play at local parties at 11, in three months' time, Pascoal advanced so much that he took his father's place because he became ashamed to play together with him. In 1950, his family moved to the capital Recife PE, and he debuted at radio stations in that city and around. In 1958, he moved to Rio, working with the Regional de Pernambuco do Pandeiro, Fafá Lemos Group, and Orquestra do Copinha. In 1961, he moved to São Paulo, playing in several nightclubs there. Already playing brass and wood instruments, he formed the group Som Quatro with Papudinho (trumpet), Dilsom (drums), and Azeitona (contrabaixo). With Sivuca, he had an accordion trio called O Mundo em Chamas. In 1964, he began a fertile association with Brazilian percussionist Airto Moreira, joining his Sambrasa Trio (which also had Humberto Clayber on the double bass). His first recording was accompanying singer Walter Santos' LP Caminho in 1965, soon following the historical album No Fino da Bossa, Vol. 3, on which he backed Elis Regina on one track. The album was recorded in 1966 but was issued in 1994. Moreira was then in a band called Trio Novo which had guitarist Heraldo do Monte and bassist Teo de Barros; Pascoal joined them the next year and the group changed its name to Quarteto Novo. The first proponents of a Northeastern sound based on baião mixed with jazz improvisations, the group would be highly influential despite having recorded just one album, Quarteto Novo (Odeon, 1967). The album had Pascoal's first recorded composition, 'O Ovo.' In October of that year, the group accompanied Edu Lobo on 'Ponteio' (Lobo/Capinam), the winning composition at TV Record's III FMPB (III Brazilian Popular Music Festival). In 1968, Pascoal toured France. In 1970, he was invited by Miles Davis to record with him on the live album Live Evil. Davis also selected two of Pascoal's compositions for that album: 'A Igrejinha' and 'Nenhum Talvez.' In fact, he selected 11 songs of Pascoal's material, but Pascoal wanted to release his solo album and let go only those two. As Miles had a habit of taking credit for tunes written by his groups' members, both were erroneously published under his name. Pascoal credits that to producer's tactics, not to Miles'. Pascoal's first solo LP, Hermeto (Cobblestone), was recorded in 1971 in New York and was produced by Ron Carter and Flora Purim. In that same year he, and Carter recorded another LP, with Pascoal's 'O Gaio da Roseira,' awarded as one of the best of the year by English critics.
    Slaves Mass
    In 1973, he toured through the U.S. and Mexico, recording in Brazil A Música Livre de Hermeto. By the Association of Critics of São Paulo (APCA), he was awarded as Best Soloist and, in the next year, Best Arranger. He toured the U.S. again in 1974 and had his song 'Porco na Festa' awarded as Best Arrangement at the Globo Network's Festival Abertura. Recorded in 1976 with Sérgio Mendes and Brazil '77, he recording two more albums for Mendes in that period. His LP, Slaves Mass, released in 1977, also had Carter. In 1978, he recorded Zabumbê-Bum-Á. Since then, he has recorded 12 solo albums. His live performance at the 1979 Montreux Jazz Festival was recorded on a double LP and released through Warner: Hermeto Pascoal ao Vivo. In 1996, he was awarded with the Prêmio Sharp as Best Arranger for the Duo Fel CD Kids of Brazil. In the same year, he received the Prêmio Ary Barroso. His recordings as a sideman add to over 79 albums. In April 2000, Pascoal toured again through the U.S. and the Boston Globe, in a recent review of one of his American performances, commented: 'With equal parts virtuosity and eccentricity, Pascoal's sextet gave the rare example of a band that actually earned its standing ovation'."



    So Nao Toca Quem Nao Quer

    or

    So Nao Toca Quem Nao Quer


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    1. Express Yourself 5:23
    2. Soulful Drums 4:38
    3. Super Bad 5:25
    4. Wander 11:08
    5. By the Red Sea 8:51
    6. Peace and Rhythm Suite: Peace 11:54
    7. Peace and Rhythm Suite: Rhythm 5:55
    8. Brother You Know You're Doing Wrong 5:35
    9. Don't Knock My Love 4:50
    10. I'm a Believer 5:16

    Idris Muhammad - Drums, Percussion
    Clarence Thomas - Flute, Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor)
    Virgil Jones - Trumpet
    Willie Bivins - Vibraphone
    Alan Fontaine - Guitar
    Angel Allende - Percussion, Timbales
    Buddy Caldwell - Congas
    Sakinah Muhammad - Vocals
    +
    Melvin Sparks - Guitar
    Kenny Barron - Piano (Electric)
    Harold Mabern - Piano (Electric)
    Ron Carter - Bass
    Jimmy Lewis - Bass

    AMG:
    "Drummer Idris Muhammad's first two albums as a leader (Black Rhythm Revolution! and Peace and Rhythm) are reissued in full on this single CD. The former set has a few worthy tracks (including Muhammad's colorful feature 'Soulful Dreams'); the latter recording...has a pair of soul vocals and some R&B material. Trumpeter Virgil Jones and saxophonist Clarence Thomas get in their spots, and the music is danceable...The pseudo-psychedelic graphics make the back cover largely unreadable."



    Legends Of Acid Jazz

    or

    Legends Of Acid Jazz


    0 0


    1. Intro
    2. Egyptian Kings
    3. Jam 1
    4. Jam 2
    5. Egyptian Kings (Reprise)
    6. Jardins/Rainbow
    7. Era of Technology, Pt. 1
    8. Jam 3
    9. Era of Technology, Pt. 2
    10. Visions
    11. Intro (Reprise)
    12. I've Told Every Little Star
    13. Philly Dog
    14. I'll Wait for You
    15. Hear Me, Help Me
    16. Get Out of My Life Woman
    17. Barbagia
    18. Tangana

    Jane Free - lead vocals, percussion
    Rolf Hug - guitar, tabla, vocals
    Joël Vandroogenbroeck vocals, organ, piano, flute, sitar
    Martin Sacher - bass, flute
    Barney Palm - drums, percussion

    AMG:
    "The obscure late-'60s/early-'70s experimental/Krautrock outfit Brainticket originally formed in 1968, consisting of members from Swiss, German, and Italian descent. Although members came and went during their tenure together, their most popular lineup consisted of Joel Vandroogenbroeck (organ, flute), Ron Bryer (guitar), Werni Frohlich (bass), Coismo Lampis (drums), Wolfgang Paap (tabla), Dawn Muir (vocals), and Hellmuth Kolbe (potentiometers, generators, and sound effects). The multi-member band issued a trio of albums in the early '70s -- 1971's Cottonwoodhill, 1972's Psychonaut, and 1974's Celestial Ocean -- before disbanding. Brainticket resurfaced in the early '80s with a pair of albums, Adventure and Voyage, but soon disappeared once more. The late '90s saw Brainticket's hard to find first two albums reissued on CD."



    Live In Rome 1973

    or

    Live In Rome 1973


    0 0


    1. Wednesday of the rain
    2. Barong
    3. Forte de party
    4. No Money, No Girl, No Business - But We Still Have Music!
    5. Pona Pela
    6. Karula
    7. Stomp Gurorizu
    8. On The Beach
    9. Iron Claw
    10. Merci Brice
    11. Flor

    Kazumi Watanabe - Guitar
    Vagabone Suzuki - Electric Bass
    Rikiya Higashihara - Pearl Drums
    Tomohiro Yahiro - Percussion

    AMG:
    "Kazumi Watanabe has for the past 20 years been one of the top guitarists in fusion, a rock-oriented player whose furious power does not mask a creative imagination. Watanabe studied guitar at Tokyo's Yamaha Music School and he was a recording artist while still a teenager. In 1979, he formed the group Kylyn and, in 1983, he put together the Mobo band. Several of his recordings have been made available by Gramavision and they show that he ranks up with Al DiMeola (when he is electrified) and Scott Henderson among the pacesetters in the idiom."



    Resonance Vox

    or

    Resonance Vox


    0 0


    1. What's in a Bird 3:21
    2. Horoscope 2:54
    3. Imbécile 6:26
    4. Hi!3:07
    5. Chaque Nuit Bébé 3:31
    6. Elégance 3:44
    7. Poisson d'Avril 2:54
    8. Week-End Doux 2:35
    9. Spiele Mich an Die Wand 4:46
    10. White Spirit 4:23

    Alain Bashung - Vocals, Guitar
    Oli Guindon - Guitar
    Manfred Kovacic - Sax, Piano, Synthesizer
    François Delage - Bass
    Phillippe Drai - Drums, Percussion, Rhythm Box

    AMG:
    "Though he was present at the birth of '60s rock & roll in France, it took another 15 years for Alain Bashung's star to rise. Born in Paris in 1947, he was raised in Alsace but left home at the age of 16 to begin playing in a cover band with several friends. The group lasted several years, until Bashung began recording on his own, for Philips, in 1966. Ten years would pass before any degree of success, though he did play a prominent role in 1972's La Revolution Française, the French rock opera produced by Claude-Michel Schoenberg. In 1976, Alain Bashung began working with lyricist Boris Bergman and songwriter Andy Scott. The change in atmosphere proved helpful, and after test runs on Bashung's long-delayed 1977 debut album and 1979's Roulette Russe, the 1980 single 'Gaby, Oh Gaby' became a monster hit. After Bashung became a star and gained his first gold record that year, he then recorded another with 'Vertigo de l'Amour,' from the album Pizza. He fulfilled a lifelong dream in 1982 when he recorded with Serge Gainsbourg. During the mid-'80s, Bashung remained at the top of the French pop firmament, with singles like 'S.O.S. Amor' and 'Touche Pas à Mon Pote.' He endured a fallout with critics - and consequently, the public - during the late '80s, but then roared back with 1991's Osez Joséphine. The album, a song cycle concerning one of the most famous women in French history, became the biggest hit of Bashung's career, selling well and earning him three Victoires de la Musique awards. Besides the similarly thematic follow-up Chatterton, Bashung released several live shows, plus a career-spanning box set. Bashung died of lung cancer in 2009 at age 62."



    Figure Imposée

    or

    Figure Imposée


    0 0


    1 Invocation of the God (Itako Kamiyose) 4:45
    2 Heron's Dance (Sagi Mai) 1:57
    3 Rice Cake Preparation Dance (Mochitsuki Odori) 3:14
    4 Kagura of the Tsuno Mountain (Tsunoyama Kagura) 3:57
    5 Suzaki Dance (Susaki Odori) 4:57
    6 Mitsukuri Kagura: Introduction/Demon's Dance (Shibaki Shin-No Mai) 7:17
    7 Fire-Burning Festival (O-Hitaki Matsuri) 2:59
    8 Nô Dance (Nô Mai) 5:59
    9 The Three Gods of Purification (Misogi Misutsuo) 5:30
    10 The Heavenly Rock-Cave (Ame-No-Iwato) 5:19
    11 Shrine Maiden's Dance (Miko Mai) 3:14
    12 Shinto Court Ceremony (Mi-Kagura) 4:42

    Wiki:
    "Shinto music is the ceremonial and festive music of Shinto, the native religion of Japan. Its origin myth is the erotic dance of Ame-no-Uzume-no-Mikoto which lured Amaterasu from her cave.
    Kagura or 'entertainment of the gods' includes music, dance and poetry and comprises mi-kagura of the court, o-kagura of major shrines such as Ise Jingū, and village sato-kagura."



    Ritual Music

    or

    Ritual Music


    0 0


    1. No. 1, Introduction 6:25
    2. No. 2, Chant d'amour I 8:13
    3. No. 3, Turangalila I 5:25
    4. No. 4, Chant d'amour II 11:02
    5. No. 5, Joie du sang des etoiles 6:42
    6. No. 6, Jardin du sommeil d'amour 12:38
    7. No. 7, Turangalila II 4:10
    8. No. 8, Developpement de l'amour 11:41
    9. No. 9, Turangalila III 4:27
    10. No. 10, Final 7:42

    Yvonne Loriod - Piano
    Bastille Opera Orchestra
    Myung-Whun Chung - Conductor

    AMG:
    "Turangalîla-Symphonie (1948) was commissioned - without restrictions to instrumentation or length - by Sergey Koussevitzky for the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Consequently, Turangalîla is scored for a large orchestra with a solo piano part, and makes use of the Ondes Martenot - an early electronic instrument - for eerie glissandi and sustained melodic gestures. The work is written in ten movements and lasts in excess of 75 minutes. It was premiered by Leonard Bernstein and the BSO in 1949. Though Turangalîla is Messiaen's most popular orchestral work, it is often mistaken for his most typical; its secular subject material and relatively sparse use of bird songs makes it unique in his orchestral oeuvre. Along with the song cycles Harawi (1945) and Cinq Rechants (1948), Turangalîla is the second of a three-work cycle inspired by the 'Tristan' myth. Compiled by Messiaen, the title is derived from Sanskrit and collectively means love song, and hymn to joy, time, movement, rhythm, life, and death.
    Turangalîla contains many themes that relate to each of its ten movements, but there are also four larger, cyclic themes that recur throughout the work. The first cyclic theme is based on thirds and is most often played by fortissimo by the trombones. Messiaen refers to this as the 'statue theme,' metaphoric for the oppressive brutality of ancient Mexican monuments. The second 'flower' theme is heard pianissimo in the clarinets, alluding to the colors of flowers. Messiaen considers the third 'love' theme to be the most significant of the four. The fourth theme is a chain of chords that undergoes rhythmic, contrapuntal, and registral transformations.
    Messiaen uses three rhythmic 'characters' that function in contrapuntal augmentation (attackers), diminution (victims), and unchanging (observers) note values. He also makes extensive use of non-retrogradable rhythms, or rhythmic units that are the same forwards as backwards. Relating to architecture and other decorative arts, non-retrogradable rhythms are ordered around a central axis where two equivalent halves meet.
    Turangalîla also displays Messiaen's vivid sense of orchestral color. The woodwinds are grouped in threes and have extensive solos, dense contrapuntal webs, bird songs, and highly colored harmonic collections. The brass are led by the trumpets, especially the brilliant piccolo trumpet in D, along with three trumpets in C, cornet, four horns, three trombones, and tuba. The string section is generally heard as a homogeneous group, with the exception of the ninth movement, where 13 individual string parts play independently of the orchestra. The percussion writing emphasizes pitched and metallic instruments such as xylophone, glockenspiel, celeste, gongs, and vibraphone. Coupled with the piano, the percussion section forms an orchestra within an orchestra, and bears a likeness to the Balinese gamelan. The solo piano part is concerto-like in scope, including fiery displays of virtuosity in the cadenzas, several bird songs, and its role as part of the gamelan percussion orchestra. The piano part was written for and dedicated to his wife Yvonne Loriod, as was the Ondes Martenot part for her sister Jeanne Loriod.
    Turangalîla is also a study in contrasts: melismatic contrapuntal strands contrast with sustaining, block-like sonorities moving in homorhythm; loud and arresting orchestral sound with passages of near inaudibility; dense chromaticism with the major mode; mystery with ecstasy; and brightness with darkness."



    Turangalila Symphonie

    or

    Turangalila Symphonie


    0 0


    1. To B Without a Hitch
    2. Autumn Lullaby
    3. Curl Your Toes
    4. Like Never Before
    5. Curious Crystals of Unusual Purity
    6. Barefeet and Hot Pavements
    7. I Like To Be With You In The Sun
    8. Lizard-Long-Tongue Boy
    9. Hello Again (Of Course)
    10. Many Happy Returns
    11. Broken Faith
    12. Ask Me No Questions

    13. Day a Way
    14. City Crazy
    15. Back To Stay
    16. Seagull-Sunday
    17. If You'd Been There
    18. Song For the Laird of Connaught Hall
    19. Making Losing Better
    20. Lady and the Gentle Man
    21. Downderry Daze
    22. Pebble and the Man
    23. It Seems Very Strange

    Bridget St. John - Guitar, Keyboards, Vocals
    Richard Sanders - Guitar
    Moon Martin - Guitar (1-12)
    John Martyn - Guitar (1-12)
    Dominic - Bongos (1-12)
    Edward Beckett - Flute (13-23)
    William Bennett - Flute (Alto) (13-23)
    Robert Bourdon - Flute (Alto) (13-23)
    Alan Stivell - Horn (13-23)
    Colin Busby - Trombone (13-23)
    Tony Parsons - Trombone (13-23)
    Derek James - Trombone (13-23)
    John Pritchard - Trombone (13-23)
    Ron Geesin - Guitar, Keyboards (13-23)
    Kate Jacobs - Violin (13-23)
    Elizabeth Edwards - Violin (13-23)
    John Thompson, Jr. - Viola (13-23)
    Charles Tunnell - Cello (13-23)
    Derek Simpson - Cello (13-23)
    Angela East - Cello (13-23)
    Geoffrey Mitchell - Counter Tenor (Vocal) (13-23)
    Peter Hall - Tenor (Vocal) (13-23)
    Brian Etheridge - Bass (Vocal) (13-23)

    AMG:
    "Including virtually the entire contents of Bridget St. John's first two albums on one CD ('Early-Morning Song' from the second was excised for space), this compilation is a trip back in time to the English hippie days. Very grounded in nature, like the rain shower of 'To B Without a Hitch' or the litany of tree names in 'Autumn Lullaby,' Saint John paints a very pastoral picture of life. Ask Me No Questions keeps that gentle mood throughout, very sparse - occasional extra guitar and violin add some coloration - but it doesn't need more, whether exploring the countryside or the city of 'Barefeet and Hot Pavements.' The title cut is a gentle Sunday morning lullaby, and John Peel's non-production works well with Saint John's picking and velvety, autumnal voice. Songs for a Gentle Man is altogether a different affair, tenderly orchestrated by Ron Geesin, often to the point of smothering and over-sweetening the songs, as is the case on John Martyn's 'Back to Stay,' which ends up sounding like a music box tune. But it's a reminder of why Saint John was one of Britain's top singer/songwriters in the late '60s and early '70s (and the brass of 'The Lady and the Gentle Man' indicates the arrangements Geesin would do for Pink Floyd on Atom Heart Mother). Naïve, yes, and nostalgic, but still lovely."



    Ask Me No Questions/Songs for the Gentle Man

    or

    Ask Me No Questions/Songs for the Gentle Man


    0 0


    1. Foreign One 9:15
    2. Eternal Interlude 19:20
    3. Guarana 8:36
    4. The Cloud 13:09
    5. Perseverance. 17:47
    6. No Boat 2:01

    Ben Kono - Flute, Sax (Alto), Sax (Soprano), Whistle (Human)
    Tony Malaby - Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor)
    Ellery Eskelin - Sax (Tenor)
    Dan Willis - Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor), Whistle (Human)
    Jeremy Viner - Clarinet, Sax (Tenor)
    Dave Ballou - Flugelhorn, Trumpet
    Laurie Frink - Flugelhorn, Trumpet
    Tony Kadleck - Flugelhorn, Trumpet
    Jon Owens - Flugelhorn, Trumpet, Whistle (Human)
    Jacob Garchik - Horn (Tenor), Whistle (Human)
    Bohdan Hilash - Bass, Clarinet, Contra-Alto Clarinet, Whistle (Human)
    Mike Christianson - Trombone, Whistle (Human)
    Robert Hudson - Trombone, Whistle (Human)
    Alan Ferber - Trombone
    Theo Bleckmann - Vocals, Whistle (Human)
    Gary Verse - Keyboards, Organ, Piano
    Kermit Driscoll - Bass
    John Hollenbeck - Drums, Whistle (Human)
    Mallet Percussion - Percussion
    Matt Moran - Percussion
    John Ferrari - Percussion

    AMG:
    "Known for his work as the leader of the Claudia Quintet and his contributions to veteran trombonist Bob Brookmeyer's New Art Orchestra, John Hollenbeck has shown himself to a very intuitive and far-reaching drummer, percussionist and composer who can handle a variety of jazz situations - some of them avant-garde and left-of-center, some of them more mainstream (by jazz standards). Hollenbeck, who is a native and resident of New York City and is associated with the experimental Downtown Manhattan music scene, brings an inside/outside perspective to the table. Hollenbeck is comfortable with outside expression and has been influenced by free jazz, but he has also been affected by ECM Records' catalog and is equally comfortable playing more accessible post-bop. The long list of people Hollenbeck has played with in the '90s or 2000s underscores his versatility and broad-mindedness; that list ranges from pianist Fred Hersch (who has a strong Bill Evans influence) to Vietnamese trumpeter Cuong Vu and singer/pianist Theo Bleckmann. And even though jazz is Hollenbeck's primary focus, the drummer has played with some non-jazz groups as well (including New York clarinetist David Krakauer's risk-taking Klezmer Madness! and a group led by trumpeter Frank London, who was a founding member of the Klezmatics). Hollenbeck is jazz-oriented without being a jazz snob; he also appreciates everything from the European classical tradition to a variety of Latin music.
    After recording with a lot of musicians as a sideman in the '90s, Hollenbeck began to build a catalog of his own in the early 2000s when recorded some albums for Blueshift/CRI: No Images and Quartet Lucy. The early 2000s were also when Hollenbeck recorded some albums with his Claudia Quintet, which has employed Chris Speed on tenor sax and clarinet, Matt Moran on vibes, Ted Reichman on accordion and Drew Gress on acoustic bass. That group's albums have included 2002's The Claudia Quintet on Blueshift/CRI and 2004's I, Claudia on Cuneiform."



    Eternal Interlude

    or

    Eternal Interlude


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