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FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | .... | 14 | 15 | (Page 16) | 17 | 18 | .... | 57 | newer

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    1. Today Is the Highway 2:22
    2. Dusty Box Car Wall 2:22
    3. Time for My Returning 3:19
    4. Plains of Nebrasky-O 3:29
    5. Looking Glass 5:05
    6. Never Coming Home 3:09
    7. Come to My Bedside 3:56
    8. Baby, Please Don't Go – 3:22
    9. Everything Ain't Been Said 4:39
    10. Bay of Mexico 3:09
    11. Song to J.C.B. 4:55
    12. Bumblebee 3:20

    Eric Andersen - Guitar, Harmonica, Vocals
    Debbie Green - Guitar (1, 12)

    AMG:
    "Andersen's debut album presented him playing in a folkie style that was just starting to become passé upon its release in 1965. It's an inoffensive set of originals (except for a cover of 'Baby Please Don't Go') in the early-'60s Greenwich Village style, accompanied only by his own guitar and harmonica (and, on two songs, by Debby Green on second guitar). Whether by coincidence or intention, or some combination thereof, it's highly reminiscent in spots of early Bob Dylan, although Andersen is gentler and more subdued. At times it especially recalls the Freewheelin'-era Dylan, or at least Dylan on that album's most reflective and low-key cuts, such as 'Girl from the North Country.' Andersen fills a lot of these early compositions with imagery of bumming around the country (hence the title 'today is the highway'), adding some love songs. Certainly, however, it's not as forceful or original as the best singer-songwriter folk of the era, not just in comparison to Dylan, but also in comparison to others, such as his friend Tom Paxton. Nor is it as accomplished as his best material on subsequent 1960s recordings. The finest composition here is 'Looking Glass,' an elaborate first-person narrative-fantasy with a melody similar to folk tunes such as 'Scarborough Fair'."


    Today Is The Highway

    or

    Today Is The Highway


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    1. Another Bossa Nova
    2. Mirrors
    3. Serena
    4. Panta Rei
    5. Going On
    6. Inside Me
    7. Out of Her Mind
    8. Involved
    9. I Scare Myself
    10. Panic
    11. Passion
    12. North Star

    Beate Sampson - vocals
    Merit Ostermann - vocals
    Bettina Koziol - vocals
    Martin Klingeberg - vocals, trumpet
    Martin Zenker - double bass
    Bill Elgart - drums

    allaboutjazz:
    "In addition to the mainstream, Naxos Jazz has made quite a reputation for itself by releasing a daredevil challenging fare of jazz. Mike Nock's Not We But One (86006-1), Niko Schauble's On The Other Hand (86011-2), Lenni-Kalle Tiapale's Nothing to Hide (86035-2), and Lan Xang's Hidden Gardens (86046-2) are just four of the releases that are quite 'out there.'
    Now the label has really topped itself. Panta Rei is a bit indescribable. It is jazz, to be sure. But, it recombinantly reconstituted jazz, jazz incubated and modified, making itself fresh, as Be Bop did at the end of the Swing Era. Do not mistake Nada for the Manhattan Transfer, New York Voices, of even Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross. No, these three ladies and one man are cut from a different cloth, and a European one at that.
    Nada is the brainchild of conservatory-trained Municher Bettina Koziol. She serves as music director and composer. Classicist Merit Ostermann and the musically omnivorous Beate Sampson join Ms. Koziol in Nada. The lone male in the bunch, Braunschweig's Martin Klingeberg, who toots the trumpet as well as sings. The remainder of the band is made up of a core rhythm section of bass and drums. Munich bassist Martin Zenker, late of Ugetsu ( Cape Town Blues, Naxos Jazz, 86052-2), provides the bedrock and American drummer Bill Elgart brings his experience from performing with Sam Rivers, John Tchcai, and Paul Bley into the creative fray.
    This sparse instrumentation, devoid of harmony instruments, sets up a potent, open environment for vocal invention. This music is Acappella synergy, the sum greater than its parts. The performance is a metastatic exploration of genre, style, and substance. This sets up the listener for a densely ethereal, atmospheric experience. The trio of Ostermann, Simpson, and Klingberg can emulate Ellington muted-trumpets or Basie pianissimo tenor saxophones. Koziol's scat singing can either sound like a classical Ella Fitzgerald or a jazzy Berio Sequenza. Koziol is not the end all. All of the vocalists have the spotlight and all bring that little bit of genius to the mix.
    Talking about individual pieces is pointless in recordings like Panta Rei. This is oddly magnificent music. I find myself in January and already starting my 'best of 2002' list with Panta Rei."


    Panta Rei

    or

    Panta Rei


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    1. Tema etereo
    2. Chuva
    3. Acapulco
    4. Inter vivos
    5. Sonata
    6. Quantum
    7. Pressagio

    Reynaldo Rana Jr - guitars
    Fernando Costa - keyboards
    Segis Rodrigues - bass
    Paulo Eduardo Naddeo - drums, percussion
    Marcos Rosset - guitars, bass (4)
    Felipe Carvelho - bass (7)

    progarchives:
    "A Brazilian band formed at the beginning of the 80s, Quantum remained together for two years only. Anyway, it was long enough for them to release their namesake debut album in 1983, which sold more than 6,000 copies. Their style was clearly influenced by Camel and Hackett-era Genesis with added elements of jazzy nature, which provided some peculiar swing to the overall symphonic sound. The 1993 CD re-released edition included a bonus track recorded before their break-up with a different bass player. This bonus track, 'Presságio', was actually part of the repertoire of a second album that would never get to be released. Or so it seems, since rumor has it that an actual Quantum second album from that era has been briefly circulating among collectors and fans in cassette format. But a definitely real second Quantum offering wnt to see the light of day in 1994, when the group reformed and recorded 'Quantum II'. The new line-up included two keyboardists and no guitarist. This factor made their sound closer to the stylish trend of neo-prog, but the majestic ornaments of old school symphonic prog remained consistent: it way remind the listener of compatriots Dogma and Blesqi Zatsaz."



    Quantum

    or

    Quantum


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    1. Birds Of Fire 6:47
    2. Can't Stand Your Funk 6:43
    3. Celestrial Terrestrial Commuters 4:46
    4. Meeting Of The Spirits 6:51
    5. Jazz 4:53
    6. Dawn 6:34
    7. Lila's Dance 5:22
    8. Faith 5:47
    9. Dance Of Maya 6:16
    10. Follow Your Heart 7:46

    Jeff Richman - guitars
    Mitchel Forman - keyboards
    Kai Eckhardt - bass
    Vinnie Colaiuta - drums
    +
    Jerry Goodman - violin
    Steve Lukather - guitar (1)
    Mike Stern - guitar (2)
    Steve Morse - guitar (3)
    Jimmy Herring - guitar (4)
    Frank Gambale - guitar (6)
    Warren Haynes - guitar (7)
    David Fiuczynski - guitar (8)
    Greg Howe - guitar (9)
    John Abercrombie - guitar (10)

    AMG:
    "Guitarist Jeff Richman conceived of, produced, and arranged for this project. A tribute to the Mahavishnu Orchestra, it utilizes the same instrumentation, with Mahavishnu alumnus Jerry Goodman being a welcome addition on violin. Each song features a different guitarist and there is plenty of heat displayed by the individual but complementary players (practically every top fusion guitarist other than Al DiMeola), all of whom are rockish and passionate. One almost doesn't miss John McLaughlin, since the band is playing his songs and the guitarists are mostly influenced by him. The only change of pace from the intensity is the closer, a version of the relatively mellow 'Follow Your Heart' (which predated the Mahavishnu Orchestra) featuring John Abercrombie. This project is well conceived, and one would imagine that John McLaughlin would appreciate the colorful tribute."



    Visions of an Inner Mounting Apocalypse

    or

    Visions of an Inner Mounting Apocalypse


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    1. Fishin' Blues 2:57
    2. Ain't Gwine to Whistle Dixie (Any Mo') 9:11
    3. Sweet Mama Janisse 3:32
    4. Going up to the Country, Paint My Mailbox Blue 3:24
    5. Big Kneed Gal 5:34
    6. You're Gonna Need Somebody on Your Bond 6:13
    7. Tom and Sally Drake 3:39
    8. Diving Duck Blues 8:45
    9. John, Ain't It Hard 9:45
    10. She Caught the Katy (And Left Me a Mule to Ride) 10:45
    11. You Ain't No Street Walker Mama, Honey But I Do Love They Way You ... 11:45

    Taj Mahal - Chromatic Harmonica, Guitar, Vocals
    Howard Johnson - Horn
    Bob Stewart - Horn
    Earl McIntyre - Horn
    Joseph Daley - Horn, Tuba
    John Hall - Guitar
    John Simon - Keyboards
    Billy Rich - Bass
    Greg Thomas - Drums
    Kwasi "Rocky" Dzidzornu - Percussion

    AMG:
    "Taj Mahal followed up Giant Step/De Ole Folks at Home (1969) with another double-disc concert platter whose title pretty much sums up the contents. The Real Thing (1971) is drawn from a mid-February run of shows at the Fillmore East in New York City where he, Spencer Davis, the Chambers Brothers, and Roberta Flack, among others, shared the bill. Mahal (vocals/banjo/guitar/harmonica/arranger/fife/harp/steel guitar/ harmonica) is supported by an interesting extended aggregate with a brass section consisting of Joseph Daley (tuba/horn/trombone), Bob Stewart (horn), and a pair of former Charles Mingus bandmembers, Earl McIntyre (horn) and Howard Johnson (horn). While at times they tend to overpower the usually intimate nature of the performances, that is certainly not the case for the majority of the arrangements. The opener, 'Fishin' Blues,' is a solo with Mahal accompanying himself on banjo. 'Ain't Gwine to Whistle Dixie (Any Mo')' is significantly lengthened from the form found on Giant Step (1968) as it stretches nearly nine minutes and allows plenty of room for interaction, offering up a spirited fife interlude from Mahal. In addition to providing an overview from his back catalog, The Real Thing contains a few new compositions. The full ensemble gets a workout on the funky 'Sweet Mama Janisse' and the toe-tappin' rural flavor of the instrumental 'Tom and Sally Drake' is lightly augmented by a sole tuba -- presumably that of Johnson. Sleepy John Estes' 'Diving Duck Blues' arguably submits the most successful incorporation of brass, sporting a driving, full-throttle rhythm and soulful interpretation. The 2000 CD reissue was extended to fit the entire live set, adding the previously unavailable 'She Caught the Katy and Left Me a Mule to Ride,' matching the intensity of the sizeable bluesy, closing jam 'You Ain't No Street Walker Mama, Honey But I Do Love They Way You Strut'."



    The Real Thing

    or

    The Real Thing


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    1. Dibi Dibi Rek 4:40
    2. Talibe 4:18
    3. Tadieu Bone 4:23
    4. Raciste 4:06
    5. Rero 3:12
    6. Taar Dousey 5:41
    7. Nabou 4:58
    8. Xiif 4:21
    9. Lotte Lo 3:17
    10. Nafanta 4:15
    11. Khar 4:25
    12. Fa Diallo 4:23
    13. Senegambie 5:41
    14. Setsinala 4:26
    15. Samayaye 5:58
    16. Without Blame feat. Marianne Faithfull 4:26

    AMG:
    "Senegalese guitarist, harmonica player and singer Ismael Lo is a rising star of world music. With his smooth multi-textured voice and low-key folky style, he and his 12-piece band play strong, complex, percussion-laden mbalax songs that discuss important topics in Senegal ranging from racism and respect to immigration.
    He was born into a Muslim family in Dongo Buti, Niger, the son of a Senegalese father and Nigerian mother; they moved to Rufisque, Senegal while Lo was still quite young. His father had two wives and between them they had 18 children. Lo is the only one who became a musician. He loved music from an early age and got his start playing a homemade one-string guitar. Early American influences included Otis Redding, Wilson Pickett and Etta James, and he learned their songs by listening to the radio. At first he only played for the joy of it and never considered performing, but then an older brother, who owned a club, asked him to play on a local television show, 'Tele Variety.' Lo said no the first time, and continued to study decorating and painting at a trade school, but a few months later he reconsidered and appeared on the show. He was an instant hit and this inspired him to think about performing full-time. One week later, Lo again appeared on the show and was paid $300 for his work.
    In 1979, singer/songwriter Omar Pene invited Lo to play in his popular group Super Diamono de Dakar, a band that played mbalax-blues, a mixture of Cuban and Senegalese rhythms. Lo, with his talent for guitar playing and songwriting, quickly established himself as a key figure in the band and soon became the second lead singer, backup singer and rhythm guitarist. By the early '80s he found himself wanting to launch a solo career, but felt like he would leave a gaping hole in the band that could destroy it. In 1984, the pressure became too much and he left for Spain to do some painting. He began recording as a solo artist upon his return. His first albums included Xalat, Xiff, Natt, and Gor Sayina, and a self-titled album released on Mango in 1992.
    Two years later, Lo released his second full-length album, Iso (named for Lo's childhood nickname). The album was met with critical acclaim in France, and Lo toured Africa the following year in support of the release. His first compilation disc, Jammu Africa, featuring a duet with Marianne Faithfull, was released in 1996, and soon after Lo was invited to perform at L'Olympia with Jane Birken. After touring the globe for a few years, a third solo effort, Dabah (named in honor of the Senegalese artist Dabah Malik) came out in 2001, and in the following year the French government dubbed Lo a Knight of the Legion of Honor. He toured Europe and Africa over the course of the next two years, and in 2006 he released Senegal and African Nights."



    The Balladeer

    or

    The Balladeer


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    Symphony No. 1
    1. Lento - Allegretto - Poco Adagio 9:56
    2. Allegro Furioso - Moderato - Allegro Furioso - Moderato 7:34
    3. Sostenuto 7:03
    4. Dirge and Awakening, for orchestra 10:20
    Viola Concerto
    5. Maestoso 10:20
    6. Variations (Largo Assai) 6:27
    7. Allegro Molto 3:48
    Triple Overture, for violin, cello, piano & orchestra
    8. Maestoso - Largo - Moderato 11:48

    Lars Anders Tomter - Viola
    Elvira Bekova - Violin
    Alfia Bekova - Cello
    Eleonora Bekova - Piano
    Russian Philharmonic Orchestra
    Thomas Sanderling - Conductor

    Wiki:
    "Steven Gerber wrote such works as the contrapuntal Fantasy for Solo Violin, which has been recorded on both the CRI and Naxos labels, and Piano Trio, commissioned by the Hans Kindler Foundation.
    His early works are in a free atonal style. During his years as a graduate student, he wrote serial and non-twelve-tone works, such as the a cappella choral works 'Dylan Thomas Settings' and 'Illuminations' (Rimbaud), and throughout the remainder of the seventies most of his works were twelve-tone. Beginning in the early eighties, he abandoned twelve-tone composition, with rare exceptions, and his music became much more tonal, for example in his Piano Sonata. Since then his music has remained largely tonal, sometimes extremely chromatic, sometimes diatonic.
    His music has been reviewed in the New York Times and the Washington Post [October 18, 1999, Page C 5]. His music has been played in the former Soviet Union perhaps more widely than that of any other American composer.
    In 2005, the conductor Vladimir Ashkenazy commissioned Gerber to compose an orchestra work. The resulting six-movement suite, Music in Dark Times, was premiered by Ashkenazy with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra on March 25–28, 2009."



    Symphony No. 1/Viola Concerto/Triple Overture/Dirge and Awakening

    or

    Symphony No. 1/Viola Concerto/Triple Overture/Dirge and Awakening


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    1 Someone I Care About 4:01
    2 Dance With Me 5:56
    3 She Cracked 4:18
    4 Hospital 6:37
    5 Womanhood 2:47
    6 Dignified and Old 2:52
    7 Girlfriend 4:09
    8 Foggy Notion 3:05
    9 Ride on Down the Highway 3:12
    10 Pablo Picasso 5:03
    11 A Plea of Tenderness 7:10
    12 Walk up the Street 5:21
    13 Fly into the Mystery 3:49
    14 I'm Straight 6:26
    15 The Mixer 4:31
    16 Don't Let Our Youth Go to Waste 1:50
    17 Roadrunner 4:54

    Jonathan Richman - Guitar, Vocals
    John Felice - Guitar
    Jerry Harrison - Keyboards
    Ernie Brooks - Bass
    David Robinson - Drums

    AMG:
    "Of the major pre-punk bands of the late '60s and early '70s (such as the Velvet Underground, the MC5, the Stooges, and the New York Dolls), the Modern Lovers probably seemed the most eccentric - while the aforementioned groups each took a very individual approach to rock & roll, they were still rock bands who worked hard to deliver on stage for an audience. Jonathan Richman, on the other hand, was just as likely to let his bruised and bleeding heart hang on his sleeve for five long, slow minutes of 'Hospital' or 'Dance With Me' as he was to rip it up on a tune like 'Roadrunner' or 'Someone I Care About.' Precise Modern Lovers Order combines a ten-song set the Modern Lovers played in Berkley, CA, during a 1972 West Coast tour with a half-dozen tracks recorded at student mixers at Harvard University between 1971 and 1973, and the audiences seem uniformly befuddled throughout this disc - there aren't any audible catcalls of disapproval, but no one seems to know how to react to Richman's vivid tales of teenage angst. And the Modern Lovers sound a good bit more stark and extreme in these performances than they did on their few studio recordings (hard to imagine, but that first album sounds slick by comparison), though Jonathan Richman's vocals are strikingly impassioned, and the band supports him with a clean, sympathetic simplicity (Jerry Harrison and David Robinson, later to play with Talking Heads and the Cars, respectively, were still members of the Modern Lovers at this point, and future Real Kids leader John Felice is on the Harvard-recorded tracks). Precise Modern Lovers Order captures a great and groundbreaking band blazing trails the hard way on stage; it's worth owning as psychodrama, living history, and great music."



    Precise Modern Lovers Order

    or

    Precise Modern Lovers Order


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    1. Tantalizing Sensation 3:49
    2. Laverne's 1:49
    3. Dream Machine 6:17
    4. Mean Woman 3:19
    5. Hawaiian Jack 6:18
    6. Honeydrippin' Boogie Woogie 3:09
    7. Then I Am Part One 2:56
    8. Then I Am Part Two 1:31
    9. My Discovery 4:11
    10. Talkin' 'bout A Woman 6:06
    11. The Last Song 3:08
    12. Headhunterblues 7:24
    13. I Don't Want To Be Your Fool Anymore 4:07
    14. Where Are You Headed? 5:07

    Jason - lead guitar, vocals
    Linus - drums, vocals
    Gernot Pilz - bass
    Marcel Mohr - drums

    longhairmusic:
    "The story of Life and their only album 'spring' began sometime early 1971 after Christian Burchard from Embryo visited composer, musician, producer, sound engineer and artist Julius Schittenhelm in his Munich studio. In his forthcoming autobiography Julius Schittenhelm writes about the beginning of Life, the difficulties of the LP production and the abrupt end of the band.
    'Once again Christian Burchard came to my studio romancing about an American Trio called 'The Wedge' that wanted to make a record in Germany. When I met them they were only a duo - the bass player had gone back to America. The band leader, originally the drummer and lead singer, was called Linus, he spoke German with a strange Frankfurt accent was now a rhythm guitar player. He was of average build like myself, had a scarred face, large nose and a tough look. The second man was called Jason and was half Red Indian. He played lead guitar, sang backing and sometimes lead vocals. They soon found a drummer, Marcel Mohr, and a bassist, Gernot Pilz who both came from the Munich area. Gernot was also a press photographer. An opera singing couple from the Munich suburb of Schwabing had set up a studio and practice rooms in their cellar in Martiusstrasse which they rented out at affordable prices. This is where the band practiced. The music was Rock 'n' Roll with slight Country influences, not exactly my sort of music but fashionable and on the up.
    Most of the songs were written by Linus, three were from Jason and one from Gernot. Linus was a perfectionist and thus the band needed a few months for the precision he found was required for a record production.
    At the beginning of July the Rock 'n' Roll musicians were in perfect harmony with each other so we could start recording. This took place in two of the Martiusstrasse practice rooms. I used 2 Revox machines switched on simultaneously to record four channels at once.
    An electrician I met by chance built me a circuit board with which I could synchronise the Revoxes using a remote control. Until then I had been operating the two machines using two fingers and for the third one I needed help with some 'one-two-threes' and was happy when it worked. The third machine was for the mix.
    It took a whole hot summer month until all the tracks were in the can. After all the tapes were carefully numbered and catalogued we started mixing and at the end of July the master tape was finally finished.
    Linus, who had a way with words, started dealing with CBS. To look good we rented a big Mercedes. Bandleader Linus and myself as Producer, Sound Engineer and Chauffeur drove to Hamburg using the new and still empty Autobahn between Würzburg and Hattenbach where I really put my foot on the gas doing 180 km an hour (112 mph). Linus started shouting and made me promise to slow down to 130 kph (80 mph) as that was all he could handle. Once we got to CBS we didn't have to wait long and played the demo tape straight away. The manager responsible for Rock 'n' Roll seemed to like it and also Linus. Anyway a contract was signed, luckily without me. There was a substantial advance and from this I was paid for my work. The band was named 'Life' and the LP 'spring' was released. An extensive promo tour followed. I have no idea how many or even if any records were sold. Mohr had done his work and left.
    Through the summer we had further recording sessions for the second LP. On New Year's Eve 1971/72 the CBS manager drove under a lorry and was killed. His successor didn't like the music or the band and stopped the project. In February 1972 the band broke up during an Italian tour. There must have been some pretty hefty arguments going on as they arrived back separately. Linus packed up his stuff and apparently disappeared to Sweden. The first I heard from him since then was in June 2002 when we were planning this CD. He is still a musician and he told me that Jason was living in the States'.
    During the research into this album Julius Schittenhelm discovered tapes, believed lost, that he produced with the other recordings in the Munich cellar. From these recordings we have chosen 3 as bonus tracks for this CD and the others will appear on future releases."



    Spring

    or

    Spring


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    1. Star Eyes
    2. Ko-ko
    3. Parker's Mood
    4. Just Friends
    5. Ornithology
    6. April In Paris
    7. Night In Tunisia
    8. Embraceable You
    9. Bird
    10. Lover Man
    11. Be-Bop
    12. Oh, Lady Be Good
    13. Salt Peanuts
    14. I Didn't Know What Time it Was
    15. Yardbird Suite
    16. Lover

    Joe López - Sax (Alto)
    Med Flory - Sax (Alto)
    Warne Marsh - Sax (Tenor)
    Jay Migliori - Sax (Tenor)
    Jack Nimitz - Sax (Baritone)
    Conte Candoli - Trumpet
    Ray Triscari - Trumpet
    Ralph Osborne - Trumpet
    Larry McGuire - Trumpet
    Ernie Tack - Trombone
    Mike Barone - Trombone
    Charles Loper - Trombone
    Ronnell Bright - Piano
    Buddy Clark - Bass
    Jake Hanna - Drums

    Wiki:
    "Supersax was a Charlie Parker tribute band formed by Med Flory and Buddy Clark that debuted in 1972. Their music consisted of harmonized arrangements of Charlie Parker's music played by a saxophone section (2 altos, 2 tenors, and a baritone), rhythm section, and a brass instrument (trombone or trumpet). Notable brass soloists that recorded with the group included Conte Candoli (trumpet), Frank Rosolino (trombone) and Carl Fontana (trombone).
    Warne Marsh was a member in the first edition of the group, and although he was never given freedom to solo on any officially released materials, Lee Konitz has stated that there are bootleg tapes of the group where Warne played a solo. (There are quite a number of privately recorded tapes of Supersax with Warne Marsh playing very impressive solos. Go to the discography section of the Warne Marsh Information web site [1]) They won the Grammy Award for Best Jazz Performance by a Group in 1974."



    The Joy of Sax

    or

    The Joy of Sax


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    1. Moving 7:43
    2. Wolfe Tone 6:24
    3. Erghen Diado 7:08
    4. Elephant House 6:40
    5. Knock Me 6:53
    6. Barking Hoop 5:54
    7. Koka 2:31
    8. Twilights/Walking the Dogma 5:41
    9. Single Whip 6:51

    Laura Seaton - Violin, Vocals
    Kevin Norton - Synthesizer, Percussion, Vocals
    Erik Friedlander - Cello, Vocals

    AMG:
    "Cellist Erik Friedlander grew up exposed to R&B and jazz since his father photographed many album covers for Atlantic during the '50s and '60s. During his childhood and high school years, Friedlander was involved in chamber groups, his school orchestra, and a local rock band. He enrolled at Columbia University in 1978 to pursue a music degree, but it wasn't until a year later, upon hearing and speaking with bassist Harvie Swartz, that Friedlander decided to become a professional musician. Shortly thereafter, he joined Swartz's quintet, and the group released Underneath It All on Gramavision. His idea of what role a cello could play in jazz and modern music changed when he heard Hank Roberts in the string trio Arcado. Not too long after this, Friedlander began working with saxophonists John Zorn and Marty Ehrlich and trumpeter Dave Douglas. He performs on Douglas' 1993 release on Soul Note entitled Parallel Worlds. The next year, he formed his own group, Chimera, a quartet with clarinetists Chris Speed and Andrew D'Angelo and bassist Drew Gress; the group has two CDs out on Zorn's labels, Avant and Tzadik. Friedlander still performs classical music - he has been principal cellist with Marin Alsop's Concordia, for instance - but is focusing more on composition and improvisation; he's toured the U.S. and Europe with Joe Lovano, Myra Melford, John Zorn, and more. Friedlander has made appearances in the pop realm, too, having contributed parts to CDs by Maxwell and Dar Williams; he even performed on MTV with Courtney Love's Hole. In 1996, he formed the group Topaz - originally to accompany a dance recital his wife choreographed - which brought together Andy Laster and the rhythm section of brothers Satoshi and Stomu Takeishi; they recorded a self-titled album (which Siam released) the end of that year. Besides being busy with Topaz, the close of the '90s found Friedlander playing in a new quartet inspired by the work of Balthus, called the Game of Patience, with Ikue Mori; Skin followed in early 2000.

    Percussionist and composer Kevin Norton has performed with many of the major improvisers and modern composers such as Anthony Braxton, Fred Frith, Mark Dresser and Fred Lonberg-Holm, in addition to working with jazz and klezmer musicians such as Slam Stewart and Andy Statman. Norton earned his bachelors degree from CUNY's Hunter College, and his masters from the Manhattan School of Music. Since then, he has received awards and grants from Meet the Composer and the NEA, among others, and has performed at new music and jazz festivals internationally. Norton has also composed for the varied settings he's performed in, such as the Framework ensemble, and his own quintet, as well as for duo and trio line-ups, sometimes with unspecified instrumentation. He has also composed for dance, and plays including The Plot, in 1992. His own ensemble's recording, Knots, released in 1999 on the Music & Arts label, includes renowned clarinetist David Krakauer."



    Framework

    or

    Framework


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    1. Jimbo does accumulate
    2. Smile flower
    3. Train of love
    4. The Rock'n Roller-dedicated to Die Mollie
    5. Night void
    6. Help me
    7. Saida low section
    8. That time
    9. Anton coffin

    cdjapan:
    "Acclaimed producer, pianist, arranger, Makoto Yano's first album in three years."



    Bruckner Festival 2002

    or

    Bruckner Festival 2002


    0 0


    Emanon - 3:44
    Anthropology - 2:45
    Tin Tin Deo - 4:15
    One Bass Hit - 3:26
    Two Bass Hit - 3:31
    Groovin' High - 2:27
    Ooh-Shoo-Be-Doo-Bee - 3:04
    Hot House - 3:01
    Con Alma - 3:35
    Blue 'N' Boogie - 3:08
    The Champ - 3:06
    Ow! - 2:43

    Christiane Legrand - vocals
    Eddy Louiss - vocals
    Ward Swingle - vocals
    Mimi Perrin - vocals
    Jean-Claude Briodin - vocals
    Bob Smart - vocals

    Dizzy Gillespie - trumpet
    James Moody - alto saxophone
    Kenny Barron - piano
    Bud Powell - piano
    Pierre Michelot - bass
    Chris White - bass
    Kenny Clarke - drums
    Rudy Collins - drums


    AMG:
    "This odd (but successful) matchup finds The Double Six of Paris singing vocalese in French to a dozen bebop classics associated with Dizzy Gillespie. Gillepie with pianist Bud Powell and a rhythm section take solos that uplift this date; two songs feature his quintet (with James Moody on alto). Not for all tastes, this is a unique addition to Dizzy Gillespie's discography."



    Dizzy Gillespie and the Double Six of Paris

    or

    Dizzy Gillespie and the Double Six of Paris


    0 0


    1. Katebagiak 17:15
    2. Kutsadura 5:36
    3. Behin une batean 3:49
    4. Neska Adiskidea 6:25
    5. Agurra II 3:16

    Amaia Kareaga - vocals
    Iñaki Urretxaga - winds
    Joxe Portela - vocals and acoustic guitar
    Iñaki Gutierrez - voice and guitars
    Ramón Gardeazabal - guitar
    Iñaki Arnual - bass
    Javi Robador - drums

    progarchives:
    "Another Basque group that benefited from the dislocation of Franco's regime in 75. Indeed the 'ethnic' minorities were not really allowed to express their difference under the fascist leader's dictatorship and once Spain became a democracy, the three Basque Provinces claimed more autonomy, not only political but cultural as well. And a bunch of popular folk rock group appeared on the scene, singing their freedom in their native tongue and probably pushing the spirit of independence as well, much like what was happening in Quebec at the same time. Within a couple of years, groups like HAIZEA, ERROBI, ITZIAR, IZUKAITZ, LISKER, ENBOR , GURE BIDEA and EIDER all appeared on the scene over the next three years, claiming their freedom in the folk rock vein, although everyone of them cultivated their own particularism (sense of identity).
    In this regard, ENBOR was one of the most original, being a sextet, including a wind player, which induced some jazz tendencies. They released two albums on the inevitable Elkar label (the other being the Xoxoa label), the first eponymous in 78 presenting some rather conventional songs (in spite of the frequent use of clarinet), but heavy on the Basque spirit. After losing half the group, ENBOR reconvened without a female singer, but adding a keyboard player and a second sax player, and in 80 recorded their second album, Katebegiak, which left much more space to the music, including a sidelong title track.
    In terms of more international folk prog, ENBOR can't easily be likened to UK groups as they have really their own sound. Should I name one, I'd say THE PENTANGLE (more electric, though) mixed with the better-known Basque group ITOIZ (sax player Carlos Jimenez playing in both groups). Like most of their 'compadres' (if the Basque will allow me), ENBOR folded at the turn of the decade when the nationalism took on a violent form with ETA, with only ITOIZ surviving most of that dreadful 80's decade."



    Katebegiak

    or

    Katebegiak


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    1. Tema Sobre Campo
    2. Le Lis
    3. If You Leave Me Now
    4. Primal Scream
    5. Son for Father
    6. Bahia
    7. Eloisa
    8. El Ladron
    9. Angeles de Charlie
    10. Carly Carola
    11. Maranata

    Carlos Sastre – Sax (Tenor), Flute
    Eduardo Martiarena – Trumpet
    Alexis Buenseñor – Trombone, Cor Anglais
    Francisco Schlotthauer – Viola
    German Prentky – Cello
    Victor Adiego – Cello
    Luis Di Matteo – Accordion
    Jose Luis Mussetti – Keyboards
    Julio Cesar Olivera – Keyboards
    Aldo De Ferrari – Guitar, Bass
    Roberto Giordano – Guitar, Bass (2)
    Santiago Ameijenda – Drums
    Ruben Montaldo – Percussion
    Santiago Ameijenda – Percussion

    gullbuy:
    "Vampisoul's reissue of Maranata includes the sole album released by the Uruguayan group Maranata featuring Roberto Giordano originally released in 1978. Roberto Giordano was a jingle writer and the bass player for the Uruguayan band Totem, before he decided to release the Maranata album as a promotional tool to showcase the Sondor recording studio. The result is a groovy bit of lost Uruguayan instrumental funk and easy music.
    The Maranata album consists of a bunch of covers of the day (Deodato, Henry Mancini, Billy Cobham, Chicago, Maynard Ferguson, Ruben Rada) with a few oldies covers (Horace Silver, Ary Barroso, Eduardo Fabini) mixed with a couple of Roberto Giordano originals.
    The best cut on the album is the opening Tema Sobre Campo, a funky cover of the Eduardo Fabini tune. Eduardo Fabini was one of the most important Uruguayan classical music composers, and the Campo theme was used by the SODRE (Servicio Oficial de Difusión, Radiotelevisión y Espectáculos, formerly, it meant Servicio Oficial de Difusión Radio Eléctrica and its the official government broadcasting service for Uruguay) shortwave service as an interval signal. The Maranata version updates this old classical theme to be a funky workout with some sweet fuzz guitar and ominous orchestrated funk and wah wah.
    The album continues in a laid back funk vibe with some electric keyboard and more fuzz guitar on a cover of Le Lis ( the Fox), which was written by former Mahavishnu Orchestra drummer Billy Cobham from his 1973 album Spectrum.
    That mellow, slinky, funky vibe is continued on a sweet version of Son For Father (Song For My Father) by Horace Silver. Added wordless vocals are a nice treat.
    The disco-inspired big-band funk of Maynard Ferguson's Primal Scream (from the album of the same name released in 1976) is improved upon by accenting the funky James Brown vibe here.
    The Ary Barroso composed Bahia which has been covered by the likes of Caterina Valente, Xavier Cugat, Arthur Lyman and John Coltrane in the late 1950s, gets the updated 70s easy funk take in the Maranata version. It reminds me of the Deodato 70s sound. Fittingly, the Deodato tune Carly Carola (Carly and Carole) from Prelude, the Deodato 1972 album (the album with the hit version of Also Sprach Zarathustra, the theme from 2001: A Space Odyssey) is covered here bringing with it, its sweet electric keys vibe.
    There are two Roberto Giordano originals El Ladron and Maranata - El Ladron is a laidback soulful funk groove and Maranata ends the disc with an extended 7 minute funky jam which is augmented by a lengthy accordion solo. Seems like it wouldn't work but it does, surprisingly, making this another highlight up there with the opening track.
    One of the cheesier tracks is a version of Ruben Rada's (the Uruguayan percussionist) Eloisa, thanks to its heavy use of cheesey 70s synths. Also, the cover of the Peter Cetera/Chicago tune If You Leave Me Now is cheese city. The worst has to be the out of tune cover of Henry Mancini's Angeles De Charlie (the Charlie's Angels theme song)."



    Maranata

    or

    Maranata


    0 0


    1. O Infante
    2. Mãe Preta
    3. Fado Português
    4. Gaivota
    5. Catedral De Lisboa
    6. Lela
    7. Meu Alentejo
    8. Senhora Do Almortão
    9. Verdes Anos
    10. Cantiga Da Terra
    11. Filho Azul
    12. Hora De Fechar
    13. Ferreiro
    14. A Ilha Do Meu Fado
    15. Porto

    Dulce Pontes - Vocals
    Carlos Núñez - Flute
    Pancho Alvarez - Bouzouki
    Leonardo Amuedo - Spanish Guitar
    Diego Bouzon - Spanish Guitar
    Luis Pontes - Guitar (Acoustic)
    Laura Quintillan - Violin
    Antonio Santos - Clarinet
    Cuco Pérez - Accordion
    Guilherme Ines - Keyboards, String Arrangements
    Yuri Daniel - Double Bass
    Joao Ferreira - Djembe, Percussion
    Xiradela - Tambourine, Vocals

    Wiki:
    "Pontes was born in 1969 in Montijo, a town in the District of Setúbal, near Lisbon. She trained as a pianist, and started a career in singing after entering a competition in her hometown at the age of 18. She soon became an actress on Portuguese television and theater. In 1991, she won the national music festival with her song 'Lusitana Paixão' (known in English as 'Tell Me'), which led her to represent Portugal at the Eurovision Song Contest. She finished 8th in the competition, which is to date the fourth-best finish for a Portuguese performer.
    'Canção do Mar' (Song of the Sea), one of her many international hits, was later recorded by Sarah Brightman, under the name 'Harem', and became a #1 Dance & Crossover hit in the US for Brightman.
    Pontes started her career as a mainstream pop artist, but over the years she has evolved to become a world music singer. She blends traditional fado with contemporary styles and searches out new forms of musical expression. She introduced musical traditions of the Iberian Peninsula in her work, rediscovered many long forgotten popular tunes and found use for obsolete musical instruments. Her work is inspired and influenced not only by Iberian musical tradition, but also Arabic, African, Brazilian and Bulgarian sounds. She sings mostly in her native Portuguese, as well as Spanish, Galician, Mirandese, Italian, English, Arabic and Greek.
    Dulce Pontes has collaborated with Cesária Évora, Caetano Veloso, Marisa Monte, Carlos Núñez, the Chieftains, Kepa Junkera, Eleftheria Arvanitaki, George Dalaras, Andrea Bocelli (O Mar e Tu, duet sung by Pontes in Portuguese and Bocelli in Neapolitan, for his 1999 album Sogno), and others. Her song 'Canção do Mar' appeared on the soundtrack of Hollywood film Primal Fear. A 30-second piece of that same song serves as the theme to the NBC police drama Southland. Her album Focus is the fruit of a collaboration with Italian composer Ennio Morricone with whom she has also performed live.
    In June 2006, Pontes prepared her double LP O Coração Tem Três Portas (The Heart Has Three Doors). It was recorded live without an audience in Convent of the Order of Christ in Tomar and St Mary Church in Óbidos. According to the artist, it is 'her most personal and intimate album.' It includes Portuguese folk music, mostly fado. '[1] It was released in December 2006.
    In 2009, Pontes released Momentos, a double disc collection that includes songs from her 20 year career as well as several previously unreleased tracks.[2] Currently, she is working on an album of all new songs which is titled Nudez."



    Caminhos

    or

    Caminhos


    0 0


    1. La Mariposa
    2. Awki Awki
    3. Diablada
    4. Mi Desventura
    5. Tres Bailecitos
    6. Nina Naira
    7. Grecos Criollos
    8. Coplas Para La Pascua
    9. Flor De Cana
    10. El Condor Pasa
    11. De La Espera
    12. Desde La Trindad
    13. El Arriero
    14. Tu Orgullo
    15. Achacachenita
    16. Leno Verde
    17. Bichito Del Flor

    Takaatsu Kinoshita - guitarra
    Fernando Jiménez - zampoña
    Antonio Pérez - charango
    Marcelo Peña - quena
    Wilson Molina - voz, guitarra
    Luis Guillén - percusión




    Luz del Ande

    or

    Luz del Ande


    0 0


    1. Midday Prayers, for clarinet, soprano & 19 players 23:42
    2. Caris Mere, for soprano & viola 7:55
    3. Rondeau, for trumpet & organ 22:33

    Maacha Deubner - Soprano (Vocal)
    Vasiko Tevdorashvili - Voices
    Jan Garbarek - Sax (Soprano)
    Eduard Brunner - Clarinet
    Kim Kashkashian - Viola
    Dennis Russell Davies - Conductor
    Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra

    ecmreviews:
    "The music of Giya Kancheli is firmly rooted in emptiness, in those silent spaces between musical gestures where the voice is born behind the words it sings. Kancheli seems also aware that silence can rarely be disconnected from violence, that in our configurations of human relations and conflict there are moments when one’s history ceases to exist in the utterable, moments that animate his musical frameworks with echoes of a distinct cultural memory. Such is the impetus for the composer’s Life Without Christmas cycle, which was begun on Abii ne viderem and is concluded with the present release.
    Midday Prayers (for solo clarinet, soprano, and chamber orchestra) opens the album’s trio of compositions with a protracted meditation on Passion texts. An airy wash of sustained tones and rich orchestral timbres is broken by intermittent declarations of hidden sentiment. A certain dis-ease informs the winds, even as strings paint the thinnest veneer of hope. The seasoned Kancheli listener will have come to expect the intense dynamic distance to be found here, the balance of which focuses our attention on the details of quietude and an outburst’s potential to enlighten. A piano gives us the briefest glimpse into a time before strife ravaged a onetime joy. The piece’s sparseness makes its fuller moments shout with the force of an ensemble twice their size.
    Caris Mere (for soprano and viola) moves with the same sense of unfolding as Midday Prayers, with the added hint of Medieval monophony. The title means “After the Wind” in Georgian and recalls that of his earlier piece, Vom Winde beweint (Mourned by the Wind). Where the latter expands with the looming presence of an entire orchestra, here we find that piece’s soloist with a voice that isn’t so much added as it is drawn from the viola’s heart. Kim Kashkashian and Maacha Deubner (previously heard to magical effect on Kancheli’s Exil) each carry their own weight, shedding it little by little as they scale new heights with every phrase. This music is arid but alive, the voice its only inhabitant, the lone survivor of a catastrophe immune to erasure.
    Kronos Quartet fans will recognize the final piece, Night Prayers, from their album of the same name. This extended version (for saxophone and string orchestra) begins with very deep voices, resounding from the liminal realm that is tape, accentuated by a knotty fringe of strings. As saxophonist Jan Garbarek pierces the gloom with his light, the piece flaps its thematic shutters like a quiet storm. Generally a very meditative journey, though not without its moments of rapture, Night Prayers is a captivating highpoint of Kancheli’s spiral of sound. Jan Garbarek gives due respect to the music at hand, and makes the most of a brief improvisational window in an otherwise precisely notated architecture.
    Kancheli’s music is a hall of mirrors, each one distorting us differently. Ruptures of energy inflict the pain of restriction upon a population that knows only freedom, and we become implicated among the oppressed. This is music that clearly delineates the boundary between the influence of tradition (such as it is conceived) and the power of hegemony."



    Caris Mere

    or

    Caris Mere


    0 0


    1. Loneliness 2:34
    2. Tonight I Need Your Lovin' 2:44
    3. It's Really Real 2:48
    4. Grand Hotel 3:54
    5. Crucifixion 7:30
    6. Changes 3:53
    7. Flower Lady 5:01
    8. About My Love 1:54
    9. Strangers in a Strange Land 2:31
    10. One Sure Thing 4:48
    11. Lay Down Your Weary Tune 3:36
    12. Topanga Road 2:50
    13. Success 2:24
    14. What's That Got to Do With Me? 3:13
    15. Get Out of My Mind 2:45
    16. Rhyths of Revolution/Interpolate: Hang on Sloopy/Like a Rolling Stone 6:58
    17. Hanoi Hoe-Down 2:11
    18. The Planet June 2:56
    19. Playground 2:37
    20. Time Goes Backwards 3:01
    21. Sweet Water 1:29
    22. Cross My Heart 2:07
    23. People World 2:22

    Al Kooper - Guitar, Harpsichord
    Bob Rose - Guitar
    Lance Wakely - Guitar
    Jim Glover - Guitar
    Paul Harris - Organ, Piano, Harpsichord, Vibraphone
    Bob Sylvester - Cello
    Harvey Brooks - Bass
    Joe Michaels - Drums
    Bobby Gregg - Drums
    Steve Booker - Drums
    Todd Sommer - Percussion

    AMG:
    "The husband-and-wife team of Jim Glover (guitar/vocals) and Jean Ray (vocals) came out of the mid-'60s folk-rock scene, sporting a collection of strong originals and well-suited covers on their three long-players. After releasing an eponymous effort on the Philips label in 1965, they signed with Verve's Forecast subsidiary for two additional platters, Changes (1966) and People World (1968). Even as they are undeniably grounded in the singer/songwriter style of notable duos such as Richard & Mimi Fariña and Ian & Sylvia Tyson, Jim & Jean drew equally from the burgeoning blend of amplified rock & roll with strains of mostly acoustic traditional folk. Changes combined Glover-written cuts such as 'Loneliness,' the poppish 'It's Really Real,' and the loose 'One Sure Thing' with similarly inspired interpretations of 'Tonight I Need Your Lovin'' from Eric Anderson and David Blue's 'Strangers in a Strange Land.' However, it is undoubtedly their reworking of Phil Ochs' epic 'Crucifixion' that gave Changes much of its power and poignancy. Ochs was also a supporter of the pair, going so far as to pen the original LP liner blurb. People World is a definite contrast, and was driven by a host of orchestral arrangers and musical directors, pulling Jim & Jean into a comparatively pop-oriented direction, although they counter with a timeless reading of Ochs' 'Ringing of Revolution,' incorporating distinct elements of 'Hang On Sloopy,' 'Like a Rolling Stone,' and 'Guantanamera.' One of their most powerful performances is another Ochs tune, 'Cross My Heart,' nothing short of a perfect vehicle for Jim & Jean's vocal delivery. Ray's 'Topanga Road' and Glover's 'What's That Got to Do With Me?' are likewise standouts, although it was the light and affective 'People World' that would become their only charting single (reaching number 94)."



    Changes/People World

    or

    Changes/People World


    0 0


    1. Papa's Got a Brand New Bag 4:40
    2. Smooth Operator 6:59
    3. Inflated Tear 7:24
    4. Da Butt 6:05
    5. God Bless the Child 14:59
    6. Don't Worry, Be Happy 6:32
    7. Strange Fruit 7:54

    Lester Bowie - Trumpet, Vocals (Background)
    Vincent Chancey - French Horn
    Stanton Davis, Jr. - Trumpet
    Gerald Brazel - Trumpet
    E.J. Allen - Trumpet
    Frank Lacy - Trombone, Vocals
    Steve Turre - Trombone
    Bob Stewart - Tuba
    Vinnie Johnson - Drums
    Ken Cruchfield - Drums
    Famoudou Don Moye - Percussion
    Zola Bowie - Vocals (Background)
    Sukari - Vocals (Background)

    AMG:
    "Lester Bowie's Brass Fantasy had one basic joke that was repeated over and over again: the idea that any pop tune, including contemporary ones, could be turned into jazz and interpreted by the unusual group. Serious Fun is one of the ensemble's earlier records and the material is better than usual, with two Billie Holiday songs (including a highly expressive 'Strange Fruit') and Rahsaan Roland Kirk's 'Inflated Tear' co-existing with such songs as 'Papa's Got a Brand New Bag,' 'Smooth Operator,' 'Don't Worry, Be Happy,' and Marcus Miller's 'Da Butt.' Brass Fantasy, comprised here of four trumpets, French horn, two trombones, tuba, two drums, and percussion, was always an intriguing concept, and on this particular project it is mostly quite successful and full of Lester Bowie's wit."



    Serious Fun

    or

    Serious Fun


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