Attn! Always use a VPN when RSSing!
Your IP adress is . Country:
Your ISP blocks content and issues fines based on your location. Hide your IP address with a VPN!
Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | .... | 13 | 14 | (Page 15) | 16 | 17 | .... | 57 | newer

    0 0


    1. The Laws Must Change 7:20
    2. Saw Mill Gulch Road 4:38
    3. I'm Gonna Fight for You J.B. 5:27
    4. So Hard to Share 7:01
    5. California 9:28
    6. Thoughts About Roxanne 7:59
    7. Room to Move 5:22
    8. Sleeping By Her Side 5:10
    9. Don't Waste My Time 4:54
    10. Can't Sleep This Night 6:19

    John Mayall - Guitar, Harmonica, Vocals
    John Almond - Flute, Sax (Alto), Sax (Tenor)
    Jon Mark - Guitar (Acoustic)
    Steve Thompson - Bass

    AMG:
    "This prophetically titled project represents yet another crossroad in John Mayall's ever evolving cast of prime British bluesmen. This album also signifies a distinct departure from the decibel drowning electrified offerings of his previous efforts, providing instead an exceedingly more folk and roots based confab. The 2001 'remastered & revisited' edition of The Turning Point boasts vastly improved audio - when compared to its previous CD counterparts - and a trio of three 'bonus tracks' from the same July 12, 1969 performance at Bill Graham's fabulous Fillmore East in New York City. The specific lineup featured here is conspicuous in its absence of a lead guitarist, primarily due to Mayall recommending himself out of his most recent string man. After the passing of Brian Jones, the Rolling Stones decided to tour and at the behest of Mick Jagger, Mayall suggested Mick Taylor - who had been with him since Crusade (1967). Mayall gave this potentially negative situation a positive outcome by retooling the combo into an acoustic quartet featuring old friends as well as some vital new sonic textures. Mayall (vocals/harmonica/slide guitar/telecaster six-string/hand & mouth percussion) joined forces with former associates Steve Thompson (bass) and Johnny Almond (tenor & alto sax/flute/mouth percussion), then added the talents of Jon Mark (acoustic finger-style guitar). It becomes readily apparent that Mark's precision and tasteful improvisational skills place this incarnation into heady spaces. The taut interaction and wafting solos punctuating 'So Hard to Share' exemplify the controlled intensity of Mayall's prior electrified outings. Likewise, Mark's intricate acoustics pierce through the growl of Mayall's haunting slide guitar solos on 'Saw Mill Gulch Road.' The Turning Point also examines a shift in Mayall's writing. The politically charged 'Laws Must Change,' the personal 'I'm Gonna Fight for You J.B.' and the incomparable 'Room to Move' are tinged with Mayall's trademark sense of irony and aural imagery. As mentioned above, the supplementary sides 'Sleeping by Her Side,' 'Don't Waste My Time,' and 'Can't Sleep This Night' - which were left off of the original disc owing to the restrictions imposed upon the vinyl medium - are sourced from the same mid-July 1960 Fillmore East set as the main program."



    Turning Point

    or

    Turning Point


    0 0


    1. Nobody Knows You When You're Down and Out 5:36
    2. Good Morning Heartache 5:57
    3. If I Can't Sell It, I'll KeepSittin' on It 5:22
    4. 'Tain't Nobody's Bizness If I Do 9:18
    5. St. Louis Blues 9:32
    6. Am I Blue 5:53
    7. I'm Just a Lucky So and So 5:50
    8. I Don't Break Dance 5:19
    9. Come Sunday 5:25

    Ruth Brown - Vocals
    Red Holloway - Sax (Tenor)
    Hank Crawford - Sax (Alto)
    Spanky Davis - Trumpet
    Britt Woodman - Trombone
    Rodney Jones - Banjo, Guitar
    Bobby Forrester - Organ (Hammond), Piano
    Al McKibbon - Bass
    Grady Tate - Drums

    AMG:
    "Ruth Brown was starring on Broadway in Black and Blue when she recorded her second Fantasy set. The emphasis is on ancient standards (mostly from the 1920s) that predated Brown's rise as an R&B star in the '50s. Assisted by trumpeter Spanky Davis, tenorman Red Holloway, trombonist Britt Woodman, a rhythm section led by pianist/organist Bobby Forrester and (on three numbers) altoist Hank Crawford, Brown makes such songs as 'Nobody Knows You When You're Down and Out,' 'If I Can't Sell It, I'll Keep Sittin' on It' and 'Am I Blue' sound as if they were written for her."



    Blues on Broadway

    or

    Blues on Broadway


    0 0


    1. Mezzogiorno 8:10
    2. Positivo e. 9:37
    3. Sarabanda pt. 1 7:04
    4. Balòn 7:53
    5. Sarabanda pt. 2 7:05
    6. Calypso minestrone 4:32

    Luigi "Gigi" Venegoni - electric guitar and vocals
    Ludovico Einaudi - piano and synthesizer
    Paolo Franchini - bass
    Ciro Buttari - percussions and vocals
    Max Aimone - drums
    Silvano Borgatta - piano and synthesizer (1,4-6)
    Marco Astarita - percussions and vocals (1,4-6)
    Luigi Colarullo - drums (1,4-6)

    AMG:
    "Rumore Rosso Vivo [Live] culls live tracks from two different shows by Venegoni & Co., the group guitarist Gigi Venegoni formed after Arti & Mestieri disbanded in the mid-'70s. Taking the jazz-rock leanings of his former group further, Venegoni inserts in the music a big dose of quirky lines inspired by Frank Zappa, and the kind of powerful rhythmic complexity that will become a trademark of the zeulh movement - the fusion side of Magma is everywhere in 'Sarabanda: Pt. 1.' Tracks from 1978 feature a line-up of Max Aimone (drums), Ciro Buttari (percussion), Paolo Franchini (bass), Ludovico Einaudi (keys), and Venegoni. For the two cuts from 1979, Luigi Colarullo takes the drummer's seat, Marco Astarita is on percussion, and Silvano Borgatta is on keys. The repertoire consists of key pieces from Venegoni & Co.'s first two albums, Rumore Rosso Vivo (1977) and Sarabanda (1978), plus a variation on Arti & Mestieri's 'Positivo/Negativo.' Sound quality is not fantastic but sufficient enough not to be distracting, except in 'Calypso Minestrone,' where there's a lot of crackling and the right channel goes through some painful distortion. The performances make up for the lack of high fidelity. At that point in time, Venegoni stood very close to becoming Italy's answer to Frank Zappa. His solos are flashy but pertinent, and he leads his band with the kind of well-spirited humor that is instantly communicated to the listener."



    Rumore Rosso Vivo

    or

    Rumore Rosso Vivo


    0 0


    1. Sudden Samba 4:15
    2. Promenade 4:04
    3. Windsong 5:17
    4. Emerald City 3:55
    5. Jungle Fever 7:09
    6. Red Desert 3:22
    7. Last Tango In Paris 4:09
    8. From A Dream 4:09

    Neil Larsen - Keyboards
    Michael Brecker - Sax (Tenor)
    Larry Williams - - Flute (Alto), Sax (Alto)
    Jerry Hey - Flugelhorn, Trumpet
    Buzz Feiten - Guitar
    Willie Weeks - Bass
    Andy Newmark - Drums
    Ralph MacDonald - Percussion
    Tommy LiPuma - Producer

    discogs:
    "American multi-instrumentalist, born August 7, 1948 in Cleveland, Ohio. He plays piano, organ, keyboards, synthesizer and many other instruments. Larsen also works as arranger, composer and is a member of Larsen-Feiten Band and Orbit."



    Jungle Fever

    or

    Jungle Fever


    0 0


    1. I Took My Strength from You (I Had None) 3:53
    2. Futures 4:15
    3. Us 3:20
    4. Where Are You 5:02
    5. We Should Have Met Sooner 3:54
    6. No One Remembers My Name 3:26
    7. The Young Grow Younger Every Day 2:47
    8. Another Spring Will Rise 5:44
    9. Seconds 2:55
    10. When You Bring Your Sweet Love to Me 2:56
    11. Time and Tenderness 3:41

    Burt Bacharach - Keyboards
    David Sanborn - Saxophone
    George Young - Saxophone
    Marvin Stamm - Trumpet
    Joe Beck - Guitar
    Jay Berliner - Guitar
    Hiram Bullock - Guitar
    Richard Tee - Keyboards
    Tony Levin - Bass
    Grady Tate - Drums
    Ralph MacDonald - Percussion
    Peter Yarrow - Vocals
    Joshie Armstead - Vocals
    Patti Austin - Vocals
    and others...

    AMG:
    "As with 1973's Living Together album, Burt Bacharach was given a lot of latitude by A&M, and deservedly so. This album is even more deep and complex than Living Together; though commercially it has more to grab onto, it still lacks the immediate punch of his Reach Out album, Burt Bacharach Plays His Hits or even A Tribute to Burt Bacharach: Composer, Arranger, Conductor. This is a very musical episode with Burt Bacharach: Reach Out engineer Phil Ramone co-producing. When you've got Jamie Anders singing on 'When You Bring Your Sweet Love to Me,' Joshie Armstead contributing to four titles, and even Peter Yarrow helping out on 'The Young Grow Younger Every Day,' the result can be called 'underground adult contemporary.' It goes down smooth, and where there are no singers, like on 'Time and Tenderness,' sophisticated Muzak emerges. As negative as the term Muzak has become, that is a compliment. The audience that enjoys a 'Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head' are more apt to listen to this perfectly balanced array of performances and arrangements. Futures is a great title; it's a very futuristic middle of the road album, Bacharach looking like he stepped out of the gym riding in what looks like a ski lift on the cover. An Engelbert Humperdinck type relaxing, if you will. But the music inside is complex, and the project itself is as tremendous as Jethro Tull's A Passion Play. Unfortunately, it is also as difficult. With the legendary songwriter's many achievements it makes sense that A&M would allow him to go so far out on a limb. As Carole Bayer Sager's masterpiece Sometimes Late at Night mesmerizes - and keep in mind Burt Bacharach was a major contributor to that epic, Futures is not as easy to absorb. It is immediately accessible, but not as easy to contain or recall. On the back of the album the artist writes, 'My music came alive because of these people...,' and that pretty much says it all: a major composer and arranger bringing more of his individual music to life. It's a classy project that may find appreciation years after it was recorded, one that might have been overlooked because the composer's other work is so popular."



    Futures

    or

    Futures


    0 0


    1. Hüzzam Taksim (Sükrü Tunar)
    2. Neva Hicaz Gazel (Mahmut Celalettin)
    3. Çikar Yücelerden (Münir Nurettin Selçuk - S. Kaynak)
    4. Çifte Telli (Udi Hrant)
    5. Daktilo (Deniz Kizi - Kanuni Artaki)
    6. Raks Bedia (Kemani Haydar Tatliyay)
    7. Hicaz Taksim (Udi Hrant)
    8. Sevda Zinciri (Suzan Yakar)
    9. Yüzü Pembe (Mahmut Celalettin - Udi Marko)
    10. Suzinak Taksim (Sükrü Tunar)
    11. Karsilama (Sükrü Tunar)
    12. Neva Ussak Gazel (Mahmut Celalettin)
    13. Hüzzam Taksim (Udi Hrant)
    14. Leyla (Münir Nurettin Selçuk- S. Kaynak)
    15. Agladim Aci Çektim (Küçük Nezihe Hanim - Sükrü Tunar)
    16. Bahriye Çifte Telli (Kemani Nubar)
    17. Kürdili Hicazkâr Taksim (Udi Hrant)
    18. Arap Oyun Havasi (Kemani Haydar Tatliyay)
    19. Rast Neva Gazel (Mahmut Celalettin)
    20. Ne Bahar Kaldi Ne Gül (Perihan Altindag - R. Elkutlu)
    21. Kessik Kerem (Hanende Agyazar Efendi)
    22. Çifte Telli (Sükrü Tunar )

    traditionalcrossroads:

    "Album Profile: Istanbul 1925 presents a collection of legendary performers from one of the most exciting periods in Middle Eastern music. Belly dancing, folk music and classical styles were merged together creating a sound which became the rage of Istanbul - a city situated literally at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. The greatest cabaret singers, musicians, dancers and classical artists from various ethnic backgrounds - Turks, Armenians, Jews, Greeks and Gypsies lived in Istanbul, creating a musical style that dominated the city for more than half a century. Hundreds of recordings were made by His Master's Voice in Turkey and issued on 78 rpm records. Presented here are performances of Turkey's greatest artists recorded during that era, digitally remastered from the original metal parts, allowing the quality of the music to be heard for the first time without the additional distortion and surface noise of early 78 discs."



    Istanbul 1925

    or

    Istanbul 1925


    0 0


    1. La Legende d'Eer, for 8-channel tape 47:02


    1. Hibiki Hana Ma, for 8-channel tape 17:44
    2. Polytope de Cluny, for 8-channel tape 24:26

    Iannis Xenakis - Electronics

    AMG:
    "Iannis Xenakis, while known as a composer, worked in his early years in Paris as an engineer and design assistant to the renowned architect, Le Corbusier. Once his independent career was launched, by 1960, he continued to dabble in architectural design, most often in combination with multimedia presentations. The first took place in 1967 at the World Expo in Montreal, and the most ambitious 'spectacle' occurred in 1978 in celebration of the inauguration of the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris. For this occasion, Xenakis designed a large, tent-like structure, Le Diatope, which was installed on the court outside the imposing Centre Pompidou edifice. The shape, created with the aim of providing the largest possible interior space that would also be acoustically useful (the sphere, the obvious geometric solution, is not ideal for sounds, at least according to Xenakis), draws upon the same hyperbolic paraboloids Xenakis used in his design for the Philips Pavilion at the 1958 World Fair (carried out under the auspices of Le Corbusier).
    Unusually, the composer wrote a lengthy essay for the program book of La Légende d'Eer, and also included a set of texts he considered relevant to the music. While the piece is not intended to be programmatic, these texts complement the vast scope and sustained expressive intensity of the music. The excerpts are taken from sources ranging from Plato's Republic (where the title is taken from) to Pascal's Pensées to a description of a supernova in Scientific American. The cosmic significance of these words, most often describing the overwhelming awesomeness of the universe, or some aspect of it, complement the sounds very well.
    The music, which unfolds seamlessly over 45 minutes, begins with high, whistling sighs, evoking shooting stars, perhaps, but also resembling the nighttime shrilling of cicadas, so ubiquitous in the Mediterranean region where Xenakis has spent his summers. In its original form, La Légende d'Eer is a multi-channel work, with overlapping textures being diffused from different locations within the Diatope's architectural shell. The music proceeds through a sequence of textural 'zones,' with one type of sonority dominating in each, though always, after the opening, layered with a number of other textures, carrying on from the previous section or in preparation for the next. The density of these sounds is at times overwhelming, and the experience of listening to it, together with the flashing lights and laser designs that were unfolding at the same time, must have been memorable, even mind-blowing! The piece returns at the end to sounds reminiscent of the opening, the high, fluting tones fading off into the cosmos, echoing out toward the supernovas, no doubt. La Légende d'Eer is, without any doubt, an extraordinary, ambitious work, and it remains one of the masterpieces of the electroacoustic genre.
    The differences between Gerard Pape's 2004 remix of Iannis Xenakis' La Légende d'Eer (1977-1978) and the composer's own rendition are complicated and subtle, so a fair assessment requires a side-by-side comparison. Pape's remastered version is more penetrating and deeper in dimensions, and the conspicuous separation of tracks seems like an improvement; perhaps if this disc is played on high-end audio or DVD equipment, it might be more convincing, but on a standard CD player, the issue is almost moot. Once one is fully acclimatized to the electro-acoustic environment, though, and caught up in the churning soundscape and darting points of sound, Pape's refurbished surround-sound mix seems to lose points on artistic merit. While far less defined in track separation, Xenakis' stereo mix is correspondingly more mysterious and haunting in its slightly veiled timbres and indistinct edges. For example, the pure glassiness of Xenakis' opening, the delicacy of the reiterated pitches, and the apparent fragility of the textures are missing in Pape's boosted and brazen beginning. Pape reveals more of the latent harmonics and seems to have enriched the piece by drawing them out; but Xenakis shapes the sonorities to subtler, more poetic ends, and creates a truer sense of sculpted sound by leaving some things barely within hearing.

    In 1972, fresh from his success at the 1971 Shiraz Festival in Iran, where the multimedia presentation of Persepolis created a powerful impression, Iannis Xenakis was commissioned to produce another multimedia 'polytope,' as he termed his work. This one was also intended for an ancient site, this time in the heart of Paris. The Baths of Cluny, near the Sorbonne, were built by the Romans, and the palace above them has become a prime example of medieval architecture. The idea of installing lights and sounds right in the vaults of the baths was designed to help Parisians connect with their past, particularly in light of the violent rejection of the past as manifested in the student protests and other social upheavals in the period from 1968 on. This project succeeded beyond the organizers wildest dreams. The Polytope de Cluny opened in October 1972 as part of that year's Festival d'Automne. The 'spectacle' consisted of a 24-minute eight-channel tape containing electroacoustic music, several hundred flashbulbs placed on scaffolding throughout the underground chambers and able to be individually triggered to create vivid patterns of light, and three lasers of different colors that could be projected throughout the vault by means of a network of adjustable mirrors. The technical accomplishment of coordinating all of these elements was enormous, and Xenakis ended up using a computer (remember, this is 1972, and computers were not at all common or easy to program) to oversee all of the operations. After the premiere, the performances ran daily for a period of 16 months, and well over 200,000 people made the pilgrimage to the baths of Cluny to participate. While there may have been an experiential crossover with the psychedelic multimedia events of popular culture at that time, this was an event of an entirely different bent. The music, which is what we are primarily left with, is a 24-minute piece of layered electroacoustic sounds. The density of sound is slightly lower than others of Xenakis's electroacoustic pieces, such as Persepolis or Bohor, but there are still layers of rich, noisy sounds. Percussive sonorities are given prominence, notably a ceramic, wind-chime texture, and an African mbira, or thumb piano. Xenakis also included, for the first time, computer-generated sounds, which he created himself using probability functions. These sonorities are very noisy, and occasionally sound like brass instruments, though certainly not as played by humans. Late in the piece, there is a magical moment when the music suddenly thins out to leave just a repeated note being plucked on the mbira. Amidst the onslaught of dense visual and sonic events, this gesture gives the listener the opportunity to focus on the richness of an individual sound, to turn inward for a moment, after riding a long wave of overlapping layers of complex sonorities. Perhaps it is at that moment that one would recall the historic setting and tune in to the cultural resonances so characteristic of Paris, with its combination of the new and the old."



    Electronic Works 1 &nbsp Electronic Works 2

    or

    Electronic Works 1 &nbsp Electronic Works 2


    0 0


    1. Wayfaring Stranger 2:40
    2. Let's Get Together 4:39
    3. I've Been Wrong Before 2:49
    4. The Drifter 4:15
    5. That's the Bag I'm In 1:47
    6. The White Ship 6:37
    7. Country Boy and Bleeker Street 2:39
    8. The Time Machine 2:09
    9. That's How Much I Love You, Baby (More or Less) 3:59
    10. Gloria Patria 0:32

    11. Spin, Spin, Spin 3:23
    12. It's About Time 5:19
    13. Blue Jack of Diamonds 3:08
    14. Electrallentando 6:35
    15. At the Mountains of Madness 4:58
    16. Mobius Trip 2:44
    17. High Flying Bird 3:23
    18. Nothing's Boy 0:40
    19. Keeper of the Keys 3:08
    20. Any Way That You Want Me 2:42
    21. It's All Over for You 2:36

    George Edwards - vocals, guitar, guitarrón, bass
    Dave Michaels - vocals, organ, piano, harpsichord
    Tony Cavallari - lead guitar, vocals
    Tom Skidmore - bass
    Jerry McGeorge - bass, vocals
    Jeff Boyan - bass, vocals
    Michael Tegza - drums, percussion, timpani, vocals

    AMG:
    "Featuring two strong singers (who often sang dual leads), hauntingly hazy arrangements, and imaginative songwriting that drew from pop and folk influences, H.P. Lovecraft was one of the better psychedelic groups of the late '60s. The band was formed by ex-folky George Edwards in Chicago in 1967. Edwards and keyboardist Dave Michaels, a classically trained singer with a four-octave range, handled the vocals, which echoed Jefferson Airplane's in their depth and blend of high and low parts. Their self-titled 1967 LP was an impressive debut, featuring strong originals and covers of early compositions by Randy Newman and Fred Neil, as well as one of the first underground FM radio favorites, 'White Ship.' The band moved to California the following year; their second and last album, H.P. Lovecraft II, was a much more sprawling and unfocused work, despite some strong moments. A spin-off group, Lovecraft, released a couple LPs in the '70s that bore little relation to the first incarnation of the band."



    Two Classic Albums

    or

    Two Classic Albums


    0 0


    1. The Brook 14:35
    2. Green St. Rundown 28:47
    3. Lake Effect 18:58
    4. Well, You Needn't Monk 10:45

    Mark Whitecage - Clarinet (Bass), Sax (Alto), Sax (Soprano)
    Sabir Mateen - Clarinet, Flute, Sax (Alto), Sax (Tenor)
    Chris Dahlgren - Bass, Piano (Thumb)
    Jay Rosen - Drums, Percussion

    AMG:
    "Whitecage calls this his 'Other Other Quartet, ' alluding to the two other foursomes he recorded for the CIMP label (the last being called his 'Other Quartet'). This is his best so far, a far-reaching, slash-and-burn set that works well on every level. Joined by Sabir Mateen on alto and tenor saxophones, clarinet, and flute, Chris Dahlgren on bass and thumb piano (as close to a real piano as you will see on most CIMP releases), and drummer extraordinaire, Jay Rosen, Whitecage is deep into his element. This is a case of the group coming together incredibly well, sparks flying throughout, and the two reeds playing off one another with skill and precision. Producer Bob Rusch compares the saxophones to the famous Al Cohn/Zoot Sims collaboration, which although from a different era (and style), is surprisingly apt. Call this a free jazz jam, and you are as close to identifying what is to be found here. It is just that they do it so well: precisely and musically. And, this has got to be the wildest version of Monk's 'Well, You Needn't' on disc (or wax). A classic."



    Research on the Edge

    or

    Research on the Edge


    0 0


    1. Elettricità Atmosferiche Candite 1:22
    2. Carne Cruda Squarciata Dal Suono Di Sassofono 2:35
    3. Vivanda in Scodella 3:17
    4. Guerra in Letto 1:53
    5. Contorno Tattile (Per Russolo) 2:05
    6. I Rumori Nutrienti 4:29
    7. Garofani Allo Spiedo 2:59
    8. Aerovivanda 2:35
    9. Scoppioningola 3:02
    10. Latte Alla Luce Verde 3:28
    11. Bombe a Mano 4:00

    Mike Patton - Vocals
    John Zorn - Sax (Alto)
    Marc Ribot - Guitar
    Erik Friedlander - Cello
    William Winant - Percussion

    AMG:
    "Mike Patton's second solo album, Pranzo Oltranzista: Musica da Ravola per Cinque (Banquet Piece for Five Players), has some qualities similar to its predecessor (Adult Themes for Voice), except the major difference this time is that there are instruments present. Also, it marks Patton's debut as experimental composer, taking his inspiration for the album's music from Filippo Tommaso Marinetti's Futurist Cookbook (from back in 1932). The five players who perform on this piece are well known in the John Zorn musical circle - cellist Erik Friedlander, guitarist Marc Ribot, percussionist William Winant, and Zorn himself on alto saxophone. 'Elettricita Atmospheriche Candite' kicks the album off with a mixture of violin squeaks and noises and spacy echo guitar - when combined, they create a sound collage that would be the perfect soundtrack for a graveyard at night or a spooky haunted house. Another track, 'Aerovivanda,' contains free-form horn blowing and the sound of glass shattering, which builds up quite a bit of musical tension. Chalk up Pranzo Oltranzista as another challenging release from Patton."



    Pranzo Oltranzista

    or

    Pranzo Oltranzista


    0 0


    1. South 5:00
    2. Moses 4:45
    3. Mint Julep 4:01
    4. Hot Today 8:36
    5. Vomitation 2:35
    6. The Garden 4:16
    7. Looking For You 5:52
    8. New York 5:03
    9. Le Sud 4:37

    10. Alcina de Jesus 3:36
    11. Southern Feeling 3:20
    12. Daddy Tarzan 3:02
    13. Blues Des Chiens 4:39
    14. Chanson Pour Petit Bout 1:19
    15. Moon 4:57
    16. Papagayo Frog 3:15
    17. Les Morceaux De Fer 5:36
    18. Chanson Pour Nathalie 3:12

    Nino Ferrer - Guitar, Vocals
    Arthur Young - Trumpet
    Gerard Kawcsynski - Guitar
    Claude Engel - Guitar
    Frank Abel - Keyboards
    Michel Bernholc - Piano
    Lafayette Hudson - Bass
    Christian Padovan - Bass
    Andre Sitbon - Drums
    Danny Donath - Drums
    Marc Chantereau - Percussion
    Kino Speller - Percussion
    Radiah Frye - Vocals

    AMG:
    "Taking into account Nino Ferrer's personal view of his discography, the album Nino and Radiah should be perceived as his third album (although chronologically this was in fact number seven). It followed the prog rock approach of 1971's Métronomie and the rock & roll leanings of the Mickey Finn collaboration Nino Ferrer & Leggs from 1973. The album is partly named after Afro-American singer Radiah Frye, and her pinup presence flanking Ferrer substantially upgraded the original album cover. Accompanied by the Lafayette Afro Rock Band (aka Ice), Ferrer set out on yet another shape-shifting exercise. Building on the groovy vibe of Métronomie, the album ultimately steers toward majestically orchestrated, laid-back funk. Entirely different from his earlier take on Southern soul, the result requires several listenings before it gently entangles your subconscious and reveals its addictive qualities. Reminiscent of the New Orleans-inspired funk of Little Feat and California singer/songwriters from the same era, it's perfect company for driving the French countryside or West Coast highways. It was recorded in November 1973 and sung in English with one exception. Ferrer's longtime accomplice Bernard Estardy rearranged the track 'South,' adding some widescreen organ touches. The resulting 'Le Sud' had huge commercial appeal, much to the chagrin of Ferrer: he felt the artistic compromise of aiming at chart success had rendered everything else on the album pointless in a similar way to what had happened previously to Métronomie and its leadoff track, 'La Maison Près de la Fontaine.' However, the royalties did enable him to buy a 15th century fortress in the Quercy region, where he would retreat between albums and divide his time between his family and painting. 'Le Sud'/'South' refers to a Louisiana-style mansion situated in Italy: a pleasant and idyllic place where the moody Ferrer seeks refuge from his dark side. Both versions serve as bookends to the album, which works best as a whole. Still, standout tracks are the funky 'Mint Julep' (a relative of the Mojito cocktail) with its fuzzy guitar and the lengthy but mesmerizing 'Hot Toddy.' 'The Garden' with its lazy organ and the bongo-laden 'New York' sound fairly close to what the French band Air would build an entire career on. Remaining a relatively undiscovered gem, Nino and Radiah is in fact up there with classics like Melody Nelson and Polnareff's. (This CD release of the album adds the slightly disappointing, less coherent follow-up album Suite en Oeuf and unfortunately sports a different album cover)."



    Nino and Radiah et le sud/Suite en oeuf

    or

    Nino and Radiah et le sud/Suite en oeuf


    0 0


    1. Night and Day 5:47
    2. Gang of Five 6:39
    3. Softly, As in a Morning Sunrise 4:53
    4. 'Round About Midnight 7:08
    5. Almost Like Being in Love 7:19
    6. Balade du 10 Mars 3:18
    7. The Lady Is a Tramp 6:16
    8. My Old Flame 4:22
    9. The Newest Old Waltz 2:52

    Martial Solal - Piano
    Marc Johnson - Bass
    Paul Motian - Drums

    AMG:
    "Solal remains one of the most inventive, brilliant, and woefully underappreciated pianists in modern jazz. This CD should serve further notice as to his genius in completely reshaping and reinventing standards with the poetic fervor of a restless soul. Bassist Marc Johnson and drummer Paul Motian contribute mightily to Solal's raised temperature and metamorphosed rhythmic and harmonic notions, values he alone should be allowed to define. The proof is in the listening. Six of the nine pieces are standards, and if thought you'd never hear a fresh take of 'Round 'Bout Midnight,' here it is. Intentionally convoluted, more angular than Monk, Solal, completely off the cuff, molds this well-wrought melody in a 20th-century modernism that defies any standard nomenclature. It simply is its own perfectly pure interpretation. A reharmonized 'Night & Day' uses slashing chords to intro a scattered, quirky swing, again a la Monk with a twist of lemon. 'The Lady Is a Tramp' is treated like Swiss cheese; small holes of melody are gouged out while Johnson's bass hits on all eight. There's an off minor reset of 'Softly as in a Morning Sunrise,' a relatively standard-by-comparison take of 'Almost Like Being in Love,' with all loose ends tidied during 'My Old Flame' with some Oriental flourishes. The originals include Motian's free-jazz-based 'Gang of Five,' suggesting 'Out of This World' in a distant galaxy. Motian swings and gets into a dark groove at the end. The remainder are penned by Solal, the title track a spacy ballad with arco bass complement, 'The Newest Old Waltz' for solo piano, quietly rendered and peacefully thought-provoking. Because Solal's recorded output is smallish compared to Oscar Peterson, McCoy Tyner or Kenny Barron, that does not mean he can't rank in the upper echelon of great modern jazz pianists in the here and now. It makes each release that much more of an event, and this one is highly recommended."



    Balade du 10 Mars

    or

    Balade du 10 Mars


    0 0


    1. Delphi 7:28
    2. Fragments Of Biotope Suite-Firefly 13:54
    3. No Guarded City 6:14
    4. Overture-La :Nuova Citta: Di Atlantis 9:56
    5. La Villete 3:18
    6. Villa Dei Misteri 7:03

    Toshihiro Tanaka - guitars, keyboards, bass
    Mitsutaka Kaki - keyboards
    Yuji Ono - bass
    Taiqui Tomiie - drums

    AMG:
    "The roots of Belaphon date back to 1982 in Kyoto, Japan, when Taiqui Tomiie and Mitsutaka Kaki joined Starless. After six months the group broke up and Tomiie and Kaki hooked up with Toshihiro Tanaka and Isamu Kakitani to form Bellaphon. It was not long before Kakitani left the group. Taking his place was Yuji Ono. When Ono left in 1984, the group decided not to replace him. Instead, Tanaka and Kaki took up the missing bass, with Kaki playing synth bass and Tanaka adding bass work to his guitar chores. The group released a single called Labyrinth in 1985. Their CD, Firefly, was released in April of 1987. They did a tour for the album, but shortly afterwards went through a fairly dramatic personnel change. Out was Tanaka and in as his replacement was Toru Ota. The group broke up in 1988. However, 1995 saw the release of Delphi, a disc of Bellaphon rarities. The following year saw a reissue of Firefly on Musea Records. In 1997 Kaki and Tomiie began efforts to reunite Bellaphon, but Tanaka was unavailable due to personal reasons. They recruited Masahiro Torigaki to fill out the lineup. By 1998, Yozox Yamamoto was added to the group and they were once again a four-piece. However, Yamamoto did not stay with the group long and they went inactive until 1999. In that year, Kakuhiro Nishimura was added to the lineup as a second keyboardist."



    Delphi

    or

    Delphi


    0 0


    1. Wolf in Sheep's Clothing
    2. Wadmalaw Island
    3. Unscientific Americans
    4. Howard Beach Memoirs
    5. When We Go
    6. The President's Nap
    7. A Song Is Not Enough
    8. Blame and Shame
    9. Unchained Melody

    Bill Frisell - Guitar
    Melvin Gibbs - Bass
    Ronald Shannon Jackson - Drums

    AMG:
    "Power Tools was a one-off semi-supergroup that, if it didn't quite fulfill expectations, at least offered up this enjoyable album. It's an odd mixture; drummer Ronald Shannon Jackson was in the midst of his time with the free-metal-noise band Last Exit, bassist Melvin Gibbs was involved with various avant funk bands (including that of Arto Lindsay), and the pre-Naked City Bill Frisell was beginning to delve into that hazy area between country/Americana and jazz. Things don't gel so well when the band gets closer to free improv, as Frisell's inherent gauziness conflicts and deadens the impact of Jackson's more rambunctious approach. Things work better with the more song-oriented pieces, particularly those penned by Gibbs. His 'Wadmalaw Island' and 'Howard Beach Memoirs' both strike an appropriate balance, allowing Frisell to build on more solid structures while at the same time leaving room for Jackson to embroider freely. Much of the recording ping-pongs between these two poles: pleasant, if overly languid pastoral songs and higher-energy pieces that never quite rev up high enough. The closing rendition of 'Unchained Melody,' a song dear to Frisell's heart, is very effective. Strange Meeting, an apt title, is worth checking out for Frisell fans who only came to hear his work in the following years."



    Strange Meeting

    or

    Strange Meeting


    0 0


    1. Je suis snob 2:53
    2. Je bois 3:32
    3. Les joyeux bouchers 2:14
    4. La complainte du progrés 2:44
    5. Le déserteur 3:29
    6. Cinématographe 2:40
    7. La java des bombes atomiques 2:41
    8. Le petit commerce 3:07
    9. On n'est pas la pour se faire eng... 3:01
    10. Bourrée de complexes 2:14
    11. Le code de la route 22:58

    Wiki:
    "Boris Vian (10 March 1920 – 23 June 1959) was a French polymath: writer, poet, musician, singer, translator, critic, actor, inventor and engineer. He is best remembered today for his novels. Those published under the pseudonym Vernon Sullivan were bizarre parodies of criminal fiction, highly controversial at the time of their release. Vian's other fiction, published under his real name, featured a highly individual writing style with numerous made-up words, subtle wordplay and surrealistic plots. L'Écume des jours (Froth on the Daydream) is the best known of these works, and one of the few translated into English.
    Vian was also an important influence on the French jazz scene. He served as liaison for Hoagy Carmichael, Duke Ellington and Miles Davis in Paris, wrote for several French jazz-reviews (Le Jazz Hot, Paris Jazz) and published numerous articles dealing with jazz both in the United States and in France. His own music and songs enjoyed popularity during his lifetime, particularly the anti-war song 'Le Déserteur' (The Deserter)."



    11 titres chansons d'auteurs

    or

    11 titres chansons d'auteurs


    0 0


    1. Introduction 6:30
    2. Kiao. Sao. 1 7:41
    3. Kiao. Sao. 2 5:22
    4. The Folklore Story of Naang Tengoong 10:05
    5. San 5:45
    6. Tuei 5:29
    7. Epilogue at Dawn 15:04

    Wannaa Keaopidom - Mohlam
    Khamsaen Wongsimuang - Kaen

    stanford.edu:
    "Traditional songs of the Siiphandon area (prefecture of Champasak, Laos)"



    Mohlam of Siiphandon

    or

    Mohlam of Siiphandon


    0 0



    Music With Changing Parts 61:38

    Philip Glass - Organ
    Steve Chambers - Organ
    Jon Gibson - Flute, Organ, Sax (Soprano), Vocals
    Dickie Landry - Flute, Piccolo, Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor), Vocals, Voices
    Arthur Murphy - Piano (Electric)
    Robert Prado - Flute, Trumpet, Vocals, Voices
    Vincent McDermott - Violin (Electric), Vocals, Voices
    Barbara Benary - Violin (Electric), Vocals
    Kurt Munkasci - Electronics

    AMG:
    "Music With Changing Parts is one of the seminal works in Philip Glass' career, and a defining point for the genre known as minimalism. Recorded in 1971, five years before he would break through to the public consciousness with Einstein on the Beach (which, arguably, was the moment his music ceased to be minimalist in the strict sense of the term), it represents the genre in a very pure form. Over its hour-long course, it both maintains a steady-state of sameness while percolating with all manner of variations. In retrospect, it's easy to see the affinities to the contemporaneous work of Terry Riley (A Rainbow in Curved Air and In C) and Steve Reich (Drumming), though all would soon branch apart. Here, the electric keyboards provide a pulsating substructure over which the winds, violin, and voice cast long, sighing lines forming the essential tension between dreaminess and rigor. There's also a palpable sense of excitement in the performance, the musicians very aware that they're on to something new and wonderful. This is an aspect of Glass' work which would diminish over time as his compositions became increasingly rote and academic. Listeners who only know his music from the period after he had attained a degree of pop stardom should certainly hear his more vital, formative compositions including this one and Music in Similar Motion."


    Music with Changing Parts

    or

    Music with Changing Parts


    0 0


    1. Walk Away Renee 2:42
    2. I Haven't Got the Nerve 2:10
    3. Pretty Ballerina 2:35
    4. She May Call You Up Tonight 2:16
    5. I've Got Something on My Mind 2:47
    6. Barterers and Their Wives 3:18
    7. Let Go of You Girl 2:51
    8. What Do You Know? 3:02
    9. Evening Gown 1:46
    10. Lazy Day 2:23
    11. Shadows Breaking Over My Head 2:35
    12. Ivy Ivy 3:11
    13. Men Are Building Sand 2:19
    14. Desiree 2:42
    15. Dark Is the Bark 3:28
    16. My Friend Today 3:03
    17. Sing Little Bird Sing 3:09
    18. And Suddenly 2:05
    19. Goodbye Holly 2:56
    20. In the Morning Light 2:50
    21. Bryant Hotel 3:24
    22. Give the Man a Hand 2:33
    23. Nice to See You 2:41
    24. There's Gonna Be a Storm 4:16
    25. Pedestal 3:45
    26. Myrah 3:21

    Steve Martin-Caro - Vocals
    Rick Brand - Guitar
    Michael Brown - Keyboards
    Tom Finn - Bass, Guitar, Vocals
    George Cameron - Cowbell, Drums, Vocals

    AMG:
    "This New York group pioneered 'baroque & roll' in the '60s with its mix of pop/rock and grand, quasi-classical arrangements and melodies. Featuring teenage prodigy Michael Brown as keyboardist and chief songwriter, the group scored two quick hits with 'Walk Away Renee' (number five) and 'Pretty Ballerina' (number 15). Chamber-like string arrangements, Steve Martin's soaring, near-falsetto lead vocals, and tight harmonies that borrowed from British Invasion bands like the Beatles and the Zombies were also key elements of the Left Banke sound. Though their two hits are their only well-remembered efforts, their debut album (Walk Away Renee/Pretty Ballerina) was a strong, near-classic work that matched the quality of their hit singles in songwriting and production.
    the Left Banke's internal dynamic wasn't nearly as harmonious as their sound, and their history goes some way toward explaining their short career. Initially, the group made some recordings that were produced by Brown's father, Harry Lookofsky. When these recordings failed to interest companies in signing the band, the Left Banke broke up, Brown moving to California with the group's original drummer. A backing track for 'Walk Away Renee' had already been completed, and the other members overdubbed vocals in Brown's absence. The song was released on Smash and became a hit, and the musicians reunited to tour and continue recording.
    Unfortunately, the group, which showed such tremendous promise, was quickly torn asunder by dissension. Due to the nature of their music (which often employed session musicians), the Left Banke's sound was difficult to reproduce on the road, and one could sympathize with Brown's wishes to become a Brian Wilson-like figure, concentrating on writing and recording while the rest of the musicians took to the road. A variety of guitarists, as both session musicians and ostensible group members, flitted in and out of the lineup; Rick Brand, credited as the guitarist on the first LP, actually plays on only one of the album's songs. Adding fuel to the fire, Brown's bandmates wanted to oust Brown's father as the act's manager. In early 1967, Brown went as far as to record a Left Banke single without them, using vocalist Bert Sommer.
    The Left Banke Too
    That single ('And Suddenly') flopped, and for a brief time in September 1967 the original members were recording together again. After just one single ('Desiree'), though, Brown left for good. Most of the group's second and final album, The Left Banke Too, was recorded without him. While it still sported baroque arrangements and contained some fine moments, Brown's presence was sorely missed, and the record pales in comparison to their debut. Brown went on to form a Left Banke-styled group, Montage, which released a fine and underappreciated album in the late '60s. He later teamed up to form Stories with vocalist Ian Lloyd.
    There were some confusing son-of-Left Banke recordings over the next few years, although the band really came to a halt in 1969, after the second album. Brown, Martin, and unknown musicians made a few recordings in late 1969; then, oddly, the original group re-formed for a fine early-1971 single on Buddah ('Love Songs in the Night' b/w 'Two by Two'), although the record itself was credited to Steve Martin. And the original group, minus its key visionary Michael Brown, made an album's worth of ill-advised reunion recordings in 1978."



    There's Gonna Be a Storm

    or

    There's Gonna Be a Storm


    0 0


    1. The Opener Is Bizarre 9:51
    2. Blue For Two 6:09
    3. Two Little Animals 11:16
    4. Poschiavo 7:01
    5. A Liberate Proposal 4:56
    6. Haluk 13:58
    7. Perpetuum Mobile 10:21

    1. K Wie Ikeda 15:29
    2. His Majesty's Blues 5:45
    3. Lady Delay 9:45
    4. Polish Contrasts 7:34
    5. Innocence Of Clichés 8:32
    6. Charly's Trauma 2:36
    7. Blue Loop Play 8:08

    Mathias Rüegg - Leader
    Lauren Newton - Vocals
    Alexandra Naumann - Vocals
    Roman Schwaller - Sax (Tenor)
    Florian Bramböck - Reeds
    Klaus Dickbauer - Reeds
    Harry Sokal - Reeds
    Wolfgang Puschnig - Reeds
    Hannes Kottek - Trumpet
    Karl "Bumi" Fian - Trumpet
    Herbert Joos - Trumpet, Flugelhorn
    Gabriele Rosenberg - Trombone
    Joseph Bowie - Trombone
    Christian Radovan - Trombone
    Jon Sass - Tuba
    Rudi Berger - Violin
    Uli Scherer - Keyboards
    Heiri Känzig - Bass
    Thomas Alkier - Drums
    Wolfgang Reisinger - Drums

    Wiki:
    "Founded in 1977 by director and composer Mathias Rüegg, the band started out by performing Rüegg's distinctive postmodern compositions on stages throughout Europe. Among the founding musicians were saxophonists Wolfgang Puschnig and Harry Sokal, singer Lauren Newton, and tuba player Jon Sass. In 1980 the ensemble signed a recording contract with the Swiss hatART label, and in 1984 it toured the United States for the first time.
    The group essentially disbanded for a brief period at the end of the 1980s. In 1992 the VAO opened a new phase with a smaller complement of musicians. The band played fewer of Rüegg's compositions and concentrated on arrangements of works by Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus, and other noted American jazz composers, as well as music inspired by the classical music of Verdi, Wagner, Schubert, and Erik Satie.
    In 1997 the ensemble's personnel changed once again, increasing in size and adding younger musicians. New compositions by Rüegg became a regular feature of VAO concerts, which often included visual and dramatic elements.
    The Vienna Art Orchestra has performed more than 800 concerts and released more than 35 recordings. The film An Echo from Europe: Vienna Art Orchestra on Tour by Othmar Schmiderer was released in 1998.
    The ensemble was nominated for an Amadeus Austrian Music Award in 2001 for the album All That Strauss, and again in 2003 for Art and Fun.
    On July 10, 2010, Mathias Rüegg announced that the Vienna Art Orchestra had been disbanded for financial reasons."



    Highlights: Live in Vienna

    or

    Highlights: Live in Vienna


    0 0


    1. The Buffens 1:45
    2. Nuttmigs and Ginger 3:10
    3. Green Garters 2:39
    4. There were Three Ravens 7:45
    5. Howells Delight 4:04
    6. Goe from my Window 4:04
    7. Green Sleeves 5:13
    8. La Sampogna 2:03
    9. Unto the Prophet Jonas I Read 6:06
    10. The Carmans Whistle 4:52
    11. Galliard Can Shee Excuse 1:25
    12. Lachrimae Pavin 4:56
    13. The Quadro Pavin 2:18
    14. Singers Jig 0:26
    15. Grimstock 2:34
    16. De la Tromba Pavin 3:27
    17. Jewes Daunce 1:41
    18. Pavane Quadro and Galliard 2:40
    19. Joyne Hands 1:28
    20. Watkins Ale 7:01

    Custer LaRue - Soprano
    Ronn McFarlane - Lute
    Mary Anne Ballard - Tenor Violin, Treble Viol
    Mark Cudek - Bass Viol, Cittern
    Larry Lipkis - Bass Viol, Tenor Violin
    Ann Marie Morgan - Bass Viol
    Webb Wiggins - Muselar, Virginal
    +
    Howard Bass - Bandora, Lute

    AMG:
    "This charming collection Renaissance songs and dance tunes followed on the heels of a similar collection of Scottish music from the same period (On the Banks of Helicon), and was itself followed some years later by The Mad Buckgoat, which focused on early music in Ireland. Of the three albums, the Scottish one is the best, but Watkins Ale is a close second. The program draws on material both familiar ('There Were Three Ravens,' 'Green Sleeves') and obscure, and juxtaposes melancholy consort music by John Dowland and Thomas Morley with dances and bawdy tunes. The playing of the Baltimore Consort is exquisite, as always, with special recognition due to flutist Chris Norman and gamba player Mary Anne Ballard. While they spend most of their time playing gently and elegantly, this is a group that also knows how to rock out when the music calls for it. The music calls for it a bit less frequently on Watkins Ale than it did on Banks of Helicon, but the program includes a nicely varied array of moods and textures. Highly recommended."



    Watkins Ale

    or

    Watkins Ale


older | 1 | .... | 13 | 14 | (Page 15) | 16 | 17 | .... | 57 | newer