Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

(Page 1) | 2 | 3 | .... | 57 | newer

    0 0


    1. The Boy Beats The Rams (Kluk Tluce Berany 4:54
    2. Spring Any Day Now 3:04
    3. Don't cry For Me 3:28
    4. The Hands Of The Juggler 5:31
    5. Norrgarden Nyvla 2:54
    6. Year Of The Monkey 4:11
    7. What A Dilemma 3:11
    8. Crack In The Concrete 1:24
    9. Come Across 2:47
    10. Dancing In The Street/My Enemy Is A Bad Man 4:42
    11. Slap Dance 2:32
    12. A Career In Real Estate 4:42
    13. Dancing In Rockville Maryland 3:04

    Fred Frith - bass, guitar, violin, keyboards, drums, extra percussion
    Marc Hollander - alto, clarinet, bass clarinet, soprano

    Samla Mammas Manna (1-6):
    Eino Haapala - guitar, mandolin
    Lars Hollmer - piano, organ, accordion
    Hans Bruniusson - drums

    Muffins (7-13):
    Dave Newhouse - alto, organ
    Tom Scott - soprano
    Billy Swann - bass
    Paul Sears - drums
    +
    Olivia Bruynhooge - tap dancing, clapping
    Chris Cutler - snare drum, maraccas, clapping, drums
    Tina Curran - whirling, clapping, subliminal bass
    Frank Wuyts - whirling, clapping, recorders, drums, piano, synthesiser
    Michel Berckmans - clapping, oboe, bassoon; Etienne Conod clapping
    Denis Van Hecke - clapping, cello
    Veronique Vincent - clapping
    Asha Swanson - final comments

    AMG:
    "This one of the most important guitar-based, experimental guitar titles from the avant-guitarist and founding Henry Cow member Fred Frith. Gravity is the most lighthearted of Frith's solo output, actually. It is Frith's celebration of dance from all cultures. Perhaps it is the streak of dance-music appreciation that caused him to collaborate on the musical score to Sally Potter's The Tango Lesson. Percussion is light and largely marked with handclaps. The guitars sound twangy and bring folk-instrumentation to mind. Violins and horns add a jubilant feel to the music. Many musicians help vary the sound of each tracks and some of these guests are from Samla Mammas Manna, the Muffins, and Henry Cow. Gravity is an entertaining and multi-cultural pocket folk festival."



    Gravity
    Scans



    0 0


    1. Orange Drive 3:33
    2. O.D. 4:58
    3. Shoreline 3:58
    4. You're Still on My Mind 4:18
    5. Midnight Dancer 4:30
    6. Short Film for Nicki 4:15
    7. Sunshower 4:17
    8. Preview 6:29

    Joachim Kühn - Fender Rhodes, Keyboards
    Jan Akkerman - Guitar
    Ray Gomez - Guitar, Synthesizer
    Tony Newton - Bass
    Glenn Symmonds - Drums
    Willie Dee - Vocals

    AMG:
    "Perhaps nowhere is the directionless bankruptcy of late-'70s jazz-fusion more present than in Joachim Kühn's sterile Sunshower set recorded for Atlantic in 1978. Despite the presence of a killer band that included über-guitarists Jan Akkerman and Ray Gomez, bassist Tony Newton, and drummer Glenn Symmonds, nothing much happens for the entire 36-minute running time. The proceedings here never rise above tepid, the compositions are mostly pointlessly repetitive, and when they aren't they are replete with all sorts of unnecessary key changes and cluttered syncopations. Kühn had established a well-earned reputation as a top-flight jazz pianist and experimentalist for MPS in the late '60s and early '70s but had utterly lost his way by the time this disaster was released. The presence of awful milquetoast vocal tracks by Willie Dee only serves to underscore the lack of ideas here. Sure, Kühn's pianism is as elegant and sparkling as ever, but his compositions leave no room for anything remotely exciting to transpire; it's all studied, refined, and boring. It doesn't help that the only keys that matter are his use of a grand piano and a Fender Rhodes; his virtual array of Roland synths and string machines felt dated even at the time. This set, issued on CD by Wounded Bird in 2008, is one to be avoided at all costs."



    Sunshower
    Scans


    or

    Sunshower
    Scans


    0 0


    1. Sähkösoittimen Ääniä #4 2:36
    2. Sähkösoittimen Ääniä #1 2:50
    3. On/Off 12:47
    4. Hana 2:57
    5. Antropoidien Tanssi 4:41
    6. Improvisation 5:20
    7. Inventio/Outventio 3:50
    8. Preludi 6:36
    9. Nimetön 2:45
    10. Virsi 10:45
    11. Mix Master Universe 2 13:49

    AMG:
    "The Finnish composer Erkki Kurenniemi is one of those maverick figures of electronic music who always favored their public image of instrument builder and inventor instead of their musical side. Like Canadian keyboard inventor Hugh Le Caine, Kurenniemi has always argued that his compositions were nothing more than demonstration pieces for his unusual instruments (which include the four-in-one contraption 'electronic quartet' and the DIMI-O, which transformed video signals into electronic music). With the exception of his 'Antropoidien Tanssi' (or 'Dance of the Anthropoids') - included on a few compilation LPs and popularized when a snippet of it appeared on Wigwam's album Tombstone Valentime - Kurenniemi's music remained largely unheard. This collection rights a wrong, unveiling a profoundly odd oeuvre that ranges from tape collage to noise art and proto-electronica. One can hear in 'Sähkösoittimen Ääniä #1' (from 1971) the very conceptual birth of Pan Sonic. Recorded in 1963, 'On - Off' consists of 13 minutes of real-time tape manipulation in the electronic studio. A huge, loud drone engrossed by its own feedback, it needs to be put alongside Max Neuhaus' feedback realization of John Cage's 'Fontana Mix' (see Fontana Mix: Feed) and Robert Ashley's early feedback studies (see The Wolfman). 'Antropoidien Tanssi' and Bach's 'Invention,' despite their clear intention of reaching a larger public, are still much stranger (and interesting) than similar early Moog synthesizer recordings. The set ends on two tape collages: 'Virsi' is a bland half- personal diary, half-unfocused freak-out, but 'Mix Master Universe 2' offers a pleasingly strange suite of electronic improvisations shifting from sci-fi oddities to Stockhausen-inspired flights."



    Äänityksiä
    Scans

    or
    Scans



    0 0


    1. Omul Bun N-Are Noroc 4:09
    2. Rau E, Doamne, Bolnavioara 5:01
    3. Ma Gândesc, Neica, La Tine 4:48
    4. Hora Lautareasca 1:37
    5. Neicuta, Mi-Aduc Aminte 3:05
    6. Da, Mama, Cu Biciu-N Mine! 5:25
    7. Suparata Sunt Pe Lume 6:07
    8. Hora 2:01
    9. Azi E Nor, Mâine-I Senin 3:17
    10. Sus În Deal Pe Poienita 4:19
    11. Pomule, De Ce Te-Apleci 5:45

    Gabi Lunca - Vocals
    Ion Onoriu - Accordion
    The Unknown - Violin

    Wiki:
    "Gabi Luncă (born in 1938) is a Romani singer of urban lăutarească music from Romania, born in Vărbilău, Prahova County.
    Her father was also a lăutar, a violinist very respected among lăutari because he was a 'notist' (he knew to read music). Her mother died when she was little and this left a major impression on her life - many of her song deal with the 'mother' theme.
    She was a favorite of Romania's communist ruler Nicolae Ceauşescu and his wife Elena.
    In the later part of her life, Gabi Luncă converted to Pentecostalism and started singing exclusively religious music.
    She was married to the great accordionist Ion Stan-Onoriu."



    Sounds from a Bygone Age
    Scans



    0 0


    1. ... à La Duduki 19:04
    2. Trauerfarbenes Land 37:19

    Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra
    Dennis Russell Davies - Conductor

    AMG:
    "After the fall of the Soviet Union, Giya Kancheli (born 1935) emerged into international fame as one of the country's composers who resisted the official pressure to conform to an approved realist style. Georgia has its own unique religious, folk, and classical music traditions. Georgian composers, and those of other 'exotic' republics, were encouraged to add their regional traditions to the approved Russian style of classical music as a way of appealing to the nationalism of all major Soviet regions.
    Thus, Kancheli was able to study his musical roots as well as Western techniques when he entered the Tbilisi Conservatory in 1959. He studied composition with I. Tuskiya and remained there until 1963. After graduation, Kancheli began working as a freelance composer. He did not take an academic position or join a Soviet musical organization to support himself. He composed popular music in the Georgian folk style as well as a large amount of film music.
    Meanwhile, he developed his own classical and symphonic styles, working toward an ideal that combined avant-garde ideas with elements of the most ancient Georgian religious and folk music, though it should be noted that he never directly quotes material in his concert works.
    He wrote at least 38 film scores between 1964 and 1995 for Georgia-Film Studio and for Mos-Film, the main Russian studio. He found that Communist Party arts and music officials did not pay much attention to the style of film scores, and so he was frequently able to use some of his newest musical thought in these works. In addition, he wrote a considerable amount of incidental music for the director Robert Sturua and in 1971 became the music director of Sturua's own Rustavili Theater. His opera, Music for the Living (1984), was written in collaboration with Sturua.
    A look at Kancheli's catalogue shows a change in the character of the titles of his compositions. The period ending in 1982 shows abstract titles predominating. Kancheli had joined fellow Russian composers like Shostakovich, Gubaidulina, Schnittke, Pärt, and Artyomov in cloaking his agenda in musical symbolism. But as openness (glasnost) became a Soviet policy, the works gained more overt titles, such as Bright Sorrow and Life without Christmas. In 1990, the first significant Western recording of Kancheli works was released, including the Third Symphony and the Sixth Symphony, both of which were widely praised.
    There is a clear influence from Shostakovich in the opening ten minutes of the Third Symphony, including the parody a military march. The Sixth Symphony, which seems concerned with ominous, oppressive silence, had a clear relationship to the long, slow opening movement of Shostakovich's own Sixth. Yet, there was a striving for religious ecstasy that set Kancheli's music apart from Shostakovich's. In addition, there are elements drawn from indigenous and historic Georgian music, with trance-like drones and strange, otherworldly orchestration, often featuring the alto flute, an idea consciously borrowed from American jazz arranger Gil Evans. Kancheli's tendency toward even, treading motions is based on his great fondness for the conclusion of Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms, and orchestrational styles learned from film composers Michel Legrand and Nino Rota are also present in Kancheli's music.
    In 1991, following the collapse of the U.S.S.R., Kancheli left the political uncertainties of his homeland and settled for a few years in Berlin, and then moved on to Antwerp in 1995. Like his late colleague Schnittke, Kanchelli uses multiple styles that can often be unpredictable. Prominent performers, particularly Latvian violinist Gidon Kremer, frequently perform his music, and it has been frequently recorded."


    Trauerfarbenes Land
    Scans



    0 0


    1. You Never Had It Better 3:49
    2. I Had Too Much to Dream (Last Night) 3:19
    3. Try Me on for Size 9:33
    4. I Happen to Love You 4:05
    5. I Got My Mojo Working 6:42
    6. Long Day's Flight (Til Tomorrow) 3:35
    7. Smokestack Lightning 5:31
    8. Get Me to the World on Time 7:17

    James Lowe - Vocals
    Mark Tulin - Bass, Organ, Vocals
    Ken Williams - Guitar
    Mike Gannon - Guitar, Vocals
    Michael "Quint" Fortune - Drums

    AMG:
    "The Electric Prunes' December 14, 1967 show from the Concert Hall in Stockholm, originally taped for broadcast on Swedish radio, fully restored and properly remastered. The result is the finest record ever released by this band, and maybe the best live album of the psychedelic era. It was issued by a private label in England in a double-pocketed CD jacket with a beautifully illustrated booklet, complete with written reminiscences by the surviving members. The band's lineup is from their second album, Underground: James Lowe (lead vocals), Mark Tulin (bass, organ, vocals), Ken Williams (lead guitar), the late Mike Gannon (rhythm guitar, vocals), and Quint (drums). Calling them tight would be an understatement - the band does a 45-minute set, parts of which ('Try Me On For Size,' 'You Never Had It Better') display long instrumental passages showing off Williams' prowess on the fuzz-tone guitar and Quint's powerful drumming to great effect; 'I Had Too Much To Dream Tonight' is here, along with 'Long Day's Flight' and 'Get Me to the World On Time' and solid covers of 'Got My Mojo Workin'' and 'Smokestack Lightnin'.' This live show presents the group as much more of a garage-punk band than a psychedelic band, though they still traffic in the currency of the latter, including lots of distorted guitars and organ cadenzas - the snarl and energy keep things moving, however. Twice as valuable as their Edsel hits compilation."



    Stockholm 67
    Scans



    0 0


    1. Boa 7:16
    2. Rondo 6:47
    3. Ruis 11:31
    4. Rif 5:21
    5. De Yup 7:39
    6. Marre 7:39
    7. Dek 3:55
    8. Re-Mix 4:28

    Maarten Altena - Bass
    Peter Van Bergen - Clarinet (Bass), Sax (Tenor)
    Marc Charig - Horn (Alto), Trumpet
    Maartje ten Hoorn - Violin
    Guus Janssen - Piano, Synthesizer
    Michael Moore - Sax (Alto), Clarinet, Clarinet (Bass),
    Michael Vatcher - Percussion
    Wolter Wierbos - Trombone

    AMG:
    "When Rif was first issued on LP in 1987, it marked the first of numerous turning points for Dutch composer and bassist Maarten Altena. The ensemble for this date came from vastly different musical worlds such as pop, theater, improvisation, and post-bop jazz, among others. This assemblage, and this term is used in the sense of visual art, was for the express purpose of looking at what could be done within the limits of the octet structure. How big could you make it without overdubbing? How much could you throw at the wall and still make it stick? How many layers could be piled on top of one another before they all collapsed? Altena decided on a set that juxtaposed fixed compositions such as the noir-ish jazz of 'Boa,' with the minimal melodic framework of 'Rondo,' which then opened onto a vast improvisational field. Harmonic ranges were articulated on charts and time frames, other than that, only a skeletal, monody (all musicians playing along the same line contributing whatever they feel is necessary) was imposed. Otherwise, there are no rules. Altena also included the compositions of bandmates, pianist Guus Janssen's and violinist Maartje ten Hoorn's in his mix along with the closing piece, 'Re-Mix' (nearly a game) by classical composer Steve Maartland for dimension. Musically we cross over all genre lines, so much so that they cease to matter. What is left - and it is plenty - is the process of 'music-making,' the business of how to play together and still be true to the improvisational spirit a piece calls for. For an example of this, note the juxtaposition of the microtonal study of the ballad in 'Ruis,' and the conjecture that soling instruments need not have structural, timbral, or intervallic priorities in 'Rif.' The dynamics are radically different in each work as is their approach to restraint, but it is in the freedom of the latter that makes the discipline of the former possible. Tonality and its dissonances are only part and parcel of the individual voices that are 'consonant' with one another in both pre-composed and improvised works. That consonance or, unified willingness of purpose, creates the almost limitless possibilities for tonal and harmonic exploration. The elegance and playfulness of Rif is startling, given what Altena had accomplished on his previous recordings. If anything, Rif is what firmly established him not only as a composer but also as a bandleader, as later recordings would attest."



    Rif
    Scans


    or

    Rif
    Scans


    0 0


    1. Roadrunner 3:21
    2. Right Away 3:04
    3. Red Rooster 7:32
    4. Children of the Mist 3:30
    5. Question 3:00
    6. Tired and Blue Land Band 5:00
    7. In My Womean 2:45
    8. Circles 7:53

    Paul Frank - Guitar, Vocals
    Mike Urso - Bass, Vocals
    John Bredeau - Drums

    Fuzz Acid & Flowers:
    "A Michigan power trio whose album is powerful and inventive - one of the best hard rock albums on the label. Showcasing a line up consisting of drummer John Bredeau, singer/guitarst Paul Frank and singer/bassist Michael Urso, the band only managed to release one instantly obscure album, but what an LP! Produced by Dan Moore and Buzz Clifford, 1971's Head Over Heels is simply great. Loud, tough, yet surprisingly accessible, material such as Road Runner and In My Woman showcased the trio's knack for melodic, but crunching guitar rock. Frank and Urso had attractive voices and as we said before, they sure could generate some sound. Among the few missteps were some out of kilter harmony vocals (Question) and the bland power ballad Children Of The Mist (which was almost redeemed by Frank's nice guitar solo). Elsewhere, recorded at Detroit's Eastowne, an extended cover of Willie Dixon's Red Rooster and the Franks-penned Circles were in-concert efforts that aptly showcased the band's impressive live chops.
    Frank and Urso subsequently reappeared with the band Fresh Start. Urso was also a late-inning member of Detroit's Rare Earth (along with the Scorpion guitarist Ray Monette), playing on several of their albums in the mid-seventies."



    Head Over Heels
    Scans



    0 0


    1. Extravagances 6:03
    2. Symptones 5:50
    3. Quiproquos 9:17
    4. Escarmouches 4:47
    5. Touchstone 6:34
    6. Provocations 6:36

    Stan Getz - Sax (Tenor)
    Francy Boland - Keyboards
    Kenny Clarke - Drums
    Ronnie Scott - Sax (Tenor)
    Benny Bailey - Flugelhorn, Trumpet
    Art Farmer - Flugelhorn, Trumpet
    Manfred Schoof - Flugelhorn, Trumpet
    Ack Van Rooyen - Flugelhorn, Trumpet
    Albert Mangelsdorff - Trombone
    and others...

    AMG:
    "That this rare album, now on CD as part of Verve's Elite Editions series, was originally released only in Europe testifies to the dominance of jazz-rock in 1971 and not to the staggering quantity of imagination that one hears on the session today. Still co-leading his legendary European unit (this was their last recording), Francy Boland unleashed his classical training to produce dazzling, fantastically complex writing often loaded with dissonances, unusual groupings of instruments, freeform freakouts, alternating sections in 5/4/ and 4/4, loose-jointed structures, and firestorm endings. Then they tried to record these difficult charts in a Cologne, Germany studio in one day! Yet Getz's great ear picks everything up intuitively; his solos, though brief in playing time, are loaded with sometimes strident emotion and occasionally flirt with the outside. The Clarke/Boland band itself is in dynamic, bold and brassy form, playing the hell out of these tough pieces (dig the Kenton-ian buildup near the close of 'Provocations'). Within the band, Albert Mangelsdorff breathes fire on trombone, Herb Geller doubles - or quintuples - effectively on five instruments, including English horn, piccolo and oboe (along with tenor and alto), and Boland occasionally appears on ghostly organ and electric piano. Not only was this Getz's most adventurous session since Focus and the first few bossa nova records, it is very much out of character for Boland, who usually played it safer than this. Too bad this CD is destined to be a limited edition, for Getz's 1971 European adventure deserves to be circulated in more permanent form."



    Changes of Scenes
    Scans


    or

    Changes of Scenes
    Scans


    0 0


    1. Horizontal Hold (8:28)
    2. Not Waving (8:11)
    3. The Fall Of Saigon (6:08)
    4. Rimp Romp Ramp (6:43)
    5. Makeshift (6:18)
    6. Sitting (2:22)
    7. Basement Boy (2:16)
    8. Slither (2:16)

    Charles Bullen - guitar, clarinet, viola, voice, tapes
    Charles Hayward - percussion, keyboards, voice, tapes
    Gareth Williams - keyboards, guitar, bass, voice, tapes

    AMG:
    "This John Peel session by the quintessential avant rock trio of Charles Hayward, Charles Bullen, and Gareth Williams surfaced in 1996 - 19 years after the recording dates in the BBC studios. Fans of their indispensable self-titled debut will be floored, in that one could only wonder if the bracing energy of that album's opening cut, 'Horizontal Hold,' could actually be topped. In fact, The Peel Sessions almost surpasses the brilliance of their debut, and the deranged artistry of the second album, Deceit, is astonishing to hear arranged in a live setting, where the studio albums give the impression of being constructed as musique concrète in the studio. The shifting time signatures and looping grooves are produced with a tougher, harder electric sound than the studio works. One wonders how they did it simply with guitar, bass, drums, keyboards, and live tape machines as the battery. The Peel Sessions gives a great indication of This Heat's intensity as a live group and includes renditions that surpass the album versions in every sense as well as containing some of their most inspired improvisation on record."



    Made Available
    Scans



    0 0


    1. Billy's Saloon 5:45
    2. Ooh Babe 4:24
    3. The King 5:43
    4. Black Licorice 4:25
    5. Cabin #14 6:46
    6. Souvenirs 6:36
    7. Jungle Fever 5:12

    Bruce Brucato - guitar
    George Puleo - guitar
    Tom Reinhardt - bass
    Ted Reinhardt - drums
    Tom Schuman - piano (3, 6)

    Progarchives:
    "Gamalon started in Buffalo, New York during the 1960's, when drummer Ted Reinhardt and guitarist Bruce Brucato began playing music together at age 12. By the 70's they were joined by Ted's brother Tom and Rick McGirr to form Rodan, a prog-rock gem of the local music scene. During the Buffalo stop of their first tour of the USA in 1973, GENESIS were quite taken by their opening act, as Rodan was already covering their music at a time when GENESIS had not yet taken off in the States.
    Rodan folded as the members morphed into Gamalon during the mid 80's, adding George Puleo on lead guitar and Tom Schuman on piano. They joined forces with saxophonist Ernie Watts in 1989. Geoffrey Fitzhugh Perry played violin on one album. Tony Scozzaro replaced George Puleo for several years and in the summer of 2004, Nori Bucci stepped in to take his place.
    Their self-titled debut in 1987 was one of the finest examples of jazz rock fusion. 'Project: Activation Earth' with Ernie Watts followed in 1989. 'Aerial View' appeared in 1990, quickly followed by 'High Contrast' in 1991. Their latest studio album was 1996's 'Held To The Light', their most mature work to date.
    In 2007, Gamalon introduced a new lineup. Joining founding member Ted Reinhardt are Jim Wynne on bass, Bob Accurso on malletKAT, and Dave Schmeidler on guitar. Gamalon has recorded six albums, played shows with Vital Information, Niacin, Gongzilla, Brand X and many others."



    Gamalon
    Scans


    or

    Gamalon
    Scans


    0 0


    1. She
    2. Sweet, Soft 'N' Lazy
    3. Ain't Gonna Come
    4. Stories
    5. Put the Blame on Mame
    6. I Don't Wanna Love Again
    7. Pleurer des Rivieres
    8. Last Call for an Angel
    9. Backdoorman
    10. Loser
    11. Cano Rose
    12. Slow Motion

    Viktor Lazlo - Vocals
    G. Cadiere - Sax
    C. Bofane - Sax
    M. Delory - Guitar
    Genael - Keyboards
    F. Philipot - Bass
    Philar - Drums
    +
    Steve Houben - Sax (Alto)
    P. Lacirignola - Sax (Tenor)
    P. Van Den Driesche - Sax (Tenor), Sax (Alto)
    J.P. Onraedt - Drums, Percussions
    Danny Willems - Electric Violin

    AMG:
    "A stylish and sensual singer, Sonia Dronier became Viktor Lazlo when Belgian producer Francis Depryck discovered her and put together a package inspired by strong sexuality and black-and-white film. Born in Lorient, France, Dronier spent her college years studying and modeling in Brussels, Belgium. After she spent some time singing backup vocals in Depryck's band Lou & the Hollywood Bananas, the producer rounded up a set of nostalgic and noir-flavored songs and renamed her after a character in the Humphrey Bogart classic Casablanca. The stylish full-length She began her career in 1985 with a mix of songs sung in French, English, and Spanish. A French-language cover of Julie London's 'Cry Me a River' ('Pleurer des Rivières') became a big hit across Europe a year later. In 1987 she hosted the televised broadcast of the Eurovision contest, which was held in Belgium that year. That same year she had another Euro hit with 'Breathless,' a duet with American singer James Ingram. After a move back to France in 1989 she released a series of successful albums before the ambitious Verso appeared in 1996 with funk and dub influences and a guest appearance from the classic reggae rhythm section of Sly & Robbie. Critical response to the album was so overwhelmingly positive that Dronier claimed interviews promoting the release had focused on her music instead of her clothes for the first time in her career."



    She
    Scans



    0 0


    1. Taquirari De Jaiсa
    2. Nuca Llacta
    3. Pobre Recuerdo
    4. Predrecita en el Camino
    5. Tincu
    6. Suenos
    7. Nuca Shungo
    8. Baila Negra
    9. San Juan Traditional
    10. Iluman Tio

    Ruben Ortiz (Chile) - Sampona, Percusion
    José Arciniegas (Equador) - Charango, Guitar, Voice
    Mario Cajas (Equador) - Drums
    William Sepuldeva (Bolivia) - Quena, Sampona, Charango
    Chjochjo West (Canada) - Bass




    Viento De Los Andes
    Scans



    0 0


    1. In Re Don Giovanni 3:01
    2. Bird List 4:26
    3. The Queen of the Night 7:25
    4. Dipping 4:55
    5. Stroking 7:13
    6. The Slow 6:58
    7. The Faster 3:53
    8. The Faster Still 6:30
    9. The Concert Suite: To the Edge of the Earth 4:23
    10. The Concert Suite: The Promise/The Heart Asks Pleasure First 2:53
    11. The Concert Suite: Here to There 3:28
    12. The Concert Suite: Lost & Found 3:03
    13. The Concert Suite: The Embrace 3:06
    14. The Concert Suite: All ImperfectThings 4:21
    15. The Concert Suite: Dreams of a Journey 4:02
    16. The Concert Suite: Here Be There(Encore) 4:09

    Michael Nyman - Conductor, Piano
    Ahmed Mrabet - Clarinet
    Andrew Findon - Flute, Piccolo, Sax (Baritone)
    John Harle - Sax (Alto), Sax (Soprano)
    David Roach - Sax (Alto), Sax (Soprano)
    Driss Aaufi - Saxophone
    Nigel Barr - Euphonium, Trombone, Tuba
    Jelloul Najidi - Kanun
    Abdellah Chekara - Laud
    Nour-Din Aghbal - Violin
    Ahmed Taoud - Violin
    Kantcho Stefanov Kantchev - Violin
    Evelina Arabadjieva - Violin
    Gueorgui Stoianov Boiadjiev - Violin
    Jonathan Carney - Violin
    Bill Hawkes - Violin
    Nanko Milkov Dimitrov - Violin
    Jalla Chekara - Violin
    Abdessadak Chkara - Violin
    Stefan Todorov Jilkov - Viola
    Catherine Musker - Viola
    Abdesslam Beniisa - Cello
    Mohammed Chkara - Cello
    Tony Hinnigan - Cello
    Marieta Mihaylova Ivanova - Cello
    Martin Elliott - Bass
    Abdeloushid Elbazi - Drums
    Mohamed Achaalh - Tambourine

    AMG:
    "Celebrated for his modular, repetitive style, minimalist composer Michael Nyman was among experimental music's most high-profile proponents, best known in connection with his film scores for director Peter Greenaway. Born in London on March 23, 1944, he studied at the Royal Academy of Music and King's College, London, under communist composer Alan Bush and Thurston Dart, a musicologist specializing in the English Baroque. Under Dart's tutelage, Nyman was introduced to 16th- and 17th-century English rounds and canons, their repetitive, contrapuntal lines highly influencing his own later work; Dart also encouraged him to travel to Romania in the interest of seeking out the country's native folk music traditions. Upon graduating during the mid-'60s, Nyman found himself disconnected from both the pop music of the times and the school of modern composition heralded by Stockhausen; as a result, from 1964 to 1976, he worked not as a composer but as a music critic, writing for publications including The Listener, New Statesman, and The Spectator. In a review of British composer Cornelius Cardew, he first introduced the word 'minimalism' as a means of musical description.
    During this same period, Nyman did continue performing, appearing with artists ranging from the Scratch Orchestra and Portsmouth Sinfonia to Steve Reich and the Flying Lizards. In 1974, he wrote the influential book Experimental Music - Cage and Beyond, an exploration of the influence of John Cage on a generation of composers and performers. Perhaps its most profound impact was on Nyman himself, who through writing the book seemed to discover his own muse; in 1976 he accepted an invitation from Harrison Birtwistle, Director of Music at the National Theatre, to arrange a number of 18th-century Venetian popular songs for a production of Goldoni's Il Campiello. Nyman's arrangements consisted of medieval instruments - rebecs, sackbuts and shawms, bass drums, soprano saxophones, and the like - designed for maximum loudness to produce a distinctive instrumental color; when the production ended, he began composing original music merely to keep the same group of musicians together. Originally an acoustic unit, when rechristened the Michael Nyman Band in the early '80s, amplification became essential to their aesthetic.
    Nyman's first major success came in 1982 with the score to the Greenaway film The Draughtsman's Contract; his subsequent collaborations with Greenaway on pictures including 1988's Drowning By Numbers, 1989's The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover, and 1991's Prospero's Books remain among his most high-profile works, their notoriety coming at the risk of overshadowing his forays into opera, chamber music, vocal music, and dance scores. The signatures of Nyman's work include not only his use of propulsive repetition, but also a palette of idiosyncratic instrumental touches - thumping keyboards, 'rude' bass clarinets, and baritone saxophones, and extreme high and low octave doublings. Mozart was a central influence in much of his work, including 1976's In Re Don Giovanni and 1983's I'll Stake My Cremona to a Jew's Trump; Schumann, meanwhile, was the major inspiration behind the acclaimed 1986 chamber opera The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, while Bartok shades 1988's String Quartet No. 2, commissioned for the Indian dancer and choreographer Shobana Jeyasingh.
    In 1990, Nyman composed Six Celan Songs, a work based on the poems of Paul Celan, for the German cabaret singer Ute Lemper, with whom he first worked on the score for Prospero's Books. His most emotional compositions to date, they served as the clear impetus for his score to Jane Campion's 1992 film The Piano, easily Nyman's best-known work; like so many of his compositions, he obsessively reworked the music to The Piano time and time again, the haunting melodies reappearing arranged for standard piano concerto, for two pianos, for chamber ensemble, for soprano saxophone and strings (Lost and Found), and for soprano and string quartet (The Piano Sings). While 1992's The Upside-Down Violin reflected Nyman's continuing fascination with traditional ethnic musics, 1993's MGV, or Musique a Grande Vitesse, returned to the propulsive sounds of the Michael Nyman Band. Other major works include 1992's Time Will Pronounce, 1993's Yamamoto Perpetuo (a composition for unaccompanied violin written for Alexander Balanescu), 1994's solo harpsichord work Tango for Tim, and 1995's String Quartet No. 4. Among Nyman's film scores: 1995's Carrington and 1997's Gattaca."



    Live
    Scans


    0 0


    hearjapan.com:
    "Keitaro Ikuta is a Tokyo-based singer-songwriter who released his first folk recording in 1971. He remains musically active, frequently performing live in the Tokyo area."



    Best-Elec Years
    Scans



    0 0


    1. Little Fox Run 7:05
    2. Non-Cognitive Aspects of the City 14:06
    3. Adam's Rib 5:57
    4. Song For 13:39
    5. Little Fox Run 10:50

    Joseph Jarman - Sax (Alto), Voices
    Fred Anderson - Sax (Tenor)
    Billy Brimfield - Trumpet
    Christopher Gaddy - Marimba, Piano
    Charles Clark - Bass
    Thurman Barker - Drums
    Steve McCall - Drums

    AMG:
    "This was one of the early classics of the AACM. Altoist Joseph Jarman, who would become a permanent member of the Art Ensemble of Chicago shortly after this recording, is heard in a sextet with trumpeter William Brimfield, the legendary tenor Fred Anderson, pianist Christopher Gaddy, bassist Charles Clark, and either Steve McCall or Thurman Barker on drums. The four very diverse improvisations include one that showcases a Jarman recitation, a dirge, the intense 'Little Fox Run,' and the title cut, which contrasts sounds and a creative use of silence. Overall, this music was the next step in jazz after the high-energy passions of the earlier wave of the avant-garde started to run out of fresh ideas. It's recommended for open-eared listeners. The 1996 CD reissue adds an alternate take of 'Little Fox Run' to the original program."



    Song For
    Scans


    or

    Song For
    Scans


    0 0


    1. Changes 2:56
    2. Song for John 2:43
    3. Curry Land 4:38
    4. Joe Bean's Theme 2:52
    5. People Used To 4:09
    6. Celtic Rock 3:37
    7. Riki Tiki Tavi 2:55
    8. Clara Clairvoyant 2:57
    9. Roots of Oak 4:53
    10. Season of Farewell 3:25
    11. Poke at the Pope 2:47
    12. New Year's Resolution 5:09

    Donovan - Guitar, Harmonica, Harp, Vocals
    Mike O'Neil - Keyboards, Piano, Vocals
    Mike Thomson - Bass, Guitar, Vocals
    John Candy Carr - Drums, Vocals
    Candy John Carr - Percussion

    AMG:
    "Although it was a disappointing seller and signaled the start of Donovan's commercial decline, Open Road could have been a new beginning for the singer. Stripping down to a Celtic rock format that managed to be hard and direct, yet still folkish, Donovan turned out a series of excellent songs, notably the minor hit 'Riki Tiki Tavi,' that seemed to show him moving toward a roots-oriented sound of considerable appeal. Unfortunately, he was derailed by record company hassles and perhaps his own burnout, and Open Road turned out to be a sidestep rather than a step forward."



    Open Road
    Scans



    0 0


    1. Love Me or Leave Me 8:18
    2. I Can't Get Started 3:31
    3. Easy Living 4:13
    4. Two Degrees East, Three Degrees West 6:07
    5. Skylark 3:06
    6. Almost Like Being in Love 9:26

    Bill Perkins - Sax (Tenor)
    John Lewis - Piano
    Jim Hall - Guitar
    Percy Heath - Bass
    Chico Hamilton - Drums

    AMG:
    "Also reissued as 2 Degrees East, 3 Degrees West and occasionally listed under tenor saxophonist Bill Perkins' name, this classic session is the ultimate in cool jazz. Perkins' mellow tone matches quite well with the quiet but inwardly passionate playing of pianist John Lewis, guitarist Jim Hall, bassist Percy Heath, and drummer Chico Hamilton. Lewis is featured with the rhythm section on 'I Can't Get Started,' Hall is added for 'Skylark,' and the full group plays three standards plus Lewis' memorable (and atmospheric) '2 Degrees East, 3 Degrees West.'"



    Grand Encounter
    Scans


    or

    Grand Encounter
    Scans


    0 0


    1. Still Asleep 2:46
    2. The Same River 3:14
    3. Seven Devils 4:12
    4. Unquiet Days in Eden 6:24
    5. Housework 2:22
    6. Seven Veils 2:15
    7. Pharmikon 5:10
    8. Owls at Dusk 6:10
    9. Red, Black, Gold 3:36
    10. Seven Gates 3:54
    11. Another Life 2:20
    12. None are Disbarred 3:29
    13. Up to our Elbows 2:59

    Dagmar Krause - Vocals
    Alfred 23 Harth - Sax, clarinet
    Lutz Glandien - Guitar, Keyboards
    Fred Frith - Guitar, Bass
    Chris Cutler - Drums, Electronics

    AMG:
    "Alternately harrowing and slyly humorous, this collaboration between Chris Cutler and Lutz Glandien plays more like an Art Bears reunion featuring, Fred Frith on guitar and the irrepressible Dagmar Krause on vocals. What Glandien brings to these compositions is a modern manipulation of sound using digital and tape effects, creating rumbling beds of disturbance for the music to play against. The texts by Cutler take a look at the power relationships in marriage -- from a concerned Marxist, the outlook is pretty grim as one could imagine. But the accompanying music is fascinating, dramatic, theatrical, and strange."



    Domestic Stories
    Scans



    0 0


    1. Traneflight 2:51
    2. Ralbalder 8:15
    3. Esoteric Circle 5:22
    4. Vips 5:40
    5. Sas 644 8:49
    6. Nefertite 2:05
    7. Gee 1:10
    8. Karin's Mode 7:30
    9. Breeze Ending 3:39

    Jan Garbarek - Sax (Tenor)
    Terje Rypdal - Guitar
    Arild Andersen - Bass
    Jon Christensen - Drums

    AMG:
    "Jan Garbarek had studied with the great American composer George Russell, and had previously appeared on Russell's venture into jazz-rock, Electronic Sonata for Souls Loved By Nature. Whereas his teacher's usage of rock rhythms in an avant jazz context often came off as rather clunky, for Garbarek and his guitarist, Terje Rypdal, formerly a member of the popular Norwegian band the Vanguards, such a melding was more second nature. The Esoteric Circle, the first album by their band of the same name (hey, this was still the '60s after all), is a highly successful and enjoyable effort, one that can stand comfortably with work being done at that time by Tony Williams or John McLaughlin. Garbarek's compositions range from deeply felt homages to Coltrane ('Traneflight' and 'Nefertite') to rocking jams like 'Rabalder,' where Rypdal gets to showcase his considerable chops. In fact, some of these themes were used by Russell in his aforementioned work. Garbarek's own playing, here entirely on tenor, come largely out of Albert Ayler as well as Coltrane, and his general attack is much more raw and aggressive than the style for which he would eventually become more widely known through his recordings for ECM. Listeners who enjoy his first several albums for that label (from Afric Pepperbird to Witchi-Tai-To) will find much to savor here."



    Esoteric Circle
    Scans


    or

    Esoteric Circle
    Scans


(Page 1) | 2 | 3 | .... | 57 | newer