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FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | (Page 2) | 3 | 4 | .... | 57 | newer

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    1. Les Cloches de la Tour Nord
    2. Le Bourdon
    3. Te Deum
    4. O Filii et Filiae
    5. Prose de Paques
    6. Magnificat
    7. O Jesu Christe
    8. Prose de la Dedicace
    9. Sancta et Immaculata
    10. Tantum Ergo
    11. Prose de la Pentecote
    12. De Profundis Parisien
    13. Sicut Cervus
    14. Alleluia
    15. Le Carillon des Heures

    Le Choeurs De La Cathedrale
    L'Ensemble Vocal Conterpoint
    Jehan Revert - Direction
    Pierre Cochereau - Aux Grandes Orgues
    Leon Sourbebielle - A L'Orgue De Cheur
    Jaques Marichal - A L'Orgue De Cheur




    Grandes Heures Liturgiques
    Scans



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    1. Shenandoah 2:53
    2. Deep River 2:16
    3. Go Down Moses 1:56
    4. On Mah Journey 1:26
    5. Water Boy 2:47
    6. The Minstrel Boy 1:47
    7. Londonderry Air (Danny Boy) 2:47
    8. Loch Lomond 2:06
    9. Joshua Fit de Battle of Jericho 1:26
    10. Get on Board, Little Children 1:15
    11. Scandalize My Name 1:46
    12. Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child 2:49
    13. An Eriskay Love Lilt 2:37
    14. Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal 2:06
    15. Mexican Lullaby 2:18
    16. All Through the Night 2:03
    17. Jerusalem Parry 2:00
    18. Drink to Me Only With Thine Eyes 3:01
    19. The Four Rivers 2:43
    20. John Brown's Body 2:46
    21. The House I Live In 2:24
    22. Ballad for Americans 10:08

    Paul Robeson - Vocals
    Alan Booth - Piano
    Harriet Wingreen - Piano
    Victor Symphony Orchestra
    Milt Okum - Conductor

    AMG:
    "In the absence of a multi-label Paul Robeson box, this 22-song CD is a superb account of the singer's late career, with one major work from his pre-blacklist years represented as well. In the late '50s, Robeson, like the Weavers - who also were persona non grata at the major labels due to their leftist political views - began recording for Vanguard Records, a New York-based independent label that wasn't afraid of controversial artists. These sides captured his last great years as an artist and reminded the public that the singer had not been silenced, despite his decade in the artistic wilderness. The material ranges from spirituals ('Deep River,' 'Go Down, Moses'), work songs ('Water Boy'), sea shanties ('Shenandoah'), classical compositions ('Jerusalem'), and traditional Irish and English folk songs ('Londonderry Air') to once-topical (and still relevant) songs such as Earl Robinson's 'The House I Live In' (made famous in the mid-40s by Lauritz Melchior, Josh White, and Frank Sinatra). Robeson's voice is rougher and harder than it was in his prime, but he makes up for his lack of range with outstanding enunciation and projection, and he is equally impressive on the numbers done with solo piano accompaniment and those arranged for orchestra and chorus by Robert Decormier. The highlight of this collection, however, is the title track, 'Ballad for Americans,' which Vanguard can justifiably be said to have rescued from oblivion in the RCA-Victor catalog. Clocking in at ten minutes, the 1939 recording is a fascinating, still somewhat compelling concept work authored by Earl Robinson and John LaTouche, in which Robeson represents the entire country, all of 'the people,' in this grand musical canvas, supported by a chorus and a full orchestra. His voice is richer on this cut than on any of the other material here, understandable since it was recorded nearly two decades earlier, and the only drawback is that this piece - by its nature as an overtly political, patriotic leftist work - is as much acted as sung. One needed a larger-than-life vocal presence such as Robeson to pull this off. One can only be grateful for Vanguard's foresight in acquiring the quarter-century-old recording for this compilation in its original double-LP format, and to RCA-Victor (who were likely only too happy to let it go for whatever money they could get, at the time) for permitting its use; the song, although somewhat arch and pretentious at times, is a vivid reminder of the era in which Robeson made his name, and great battles for the hearts and minds of audiences were being fought daily. The sound on the Vanguard original recordings is excellent, despite this being one of the earlier LP-to-CD conversions from the catalog; 'Ballad for Americans,' a much older work recorded during the 78 rpm era, has some noise from its non-tape original source, and more limited audio range than the rest of the material, but is still eminently listenable and, at times, most striking in its structure and sensibilities."



    Ballad for Americans
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    1. Symphony No. 2 ("Christmas Symphony") 34:56
    2. Te Deum, for 4 soloists, 2 choruses & orchestra 38:25

    1. Lacrimosa, for soprano, chorus & orchestra 5:11
    2. Magnificat, for bass, 7 men's voices, boys' chorus, chorus & orchestra 45:26
    3. Canon for 52 strings & tape delay 9:37

    Krzysztof Penderecki - Conductor
    Ewa Podles - Mezzo-Soprano (Vocal)
    Jadwiga Gadulanka - Soprano (Vocal)
    Wieslaw Ochman - Tenor (Vocal)
    Andrzej Hiolski - Baritone (Vocal)
    Peter Lagger - Bass (Vocal)
    Stanislaw Krawczynski - Choir Master
    Tadeusz Dobranski - Choir Master
    Adam Palka - Choir Master
    Bronislawa Wietrzny - Children's Choirmaster
    Krakow Philharmonic Choir
    Polish Radio & TV Symphony Orchestra of Krakow
    Polish Radio and Television Choir of Krakow

    AMG:
    "An internationally known composer and conductor, Krzysztof Penderecki is best known for his 1965 composition 'St. Luke's Passion.' His style reflects the changes in music from the '60s to the present day. He has played with and conducted several orchestras and has won numerous awards for his composition and conducting.
    Born in Debica, Poland, in 1933, Krzysztof Penderecki graduated from the Krakow High School of Music and quickly became an accomplished composer in Poland. He won all three prizes at the 1959 contest sponsored by the Polish Composer's Association. Penderecki's early works, such as 'Emanations,' 'Strophes' and 'Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima,' reflect his early avant-garde style, in which he combined sound with social issues of the time.
    With inspiration from the Orthodox liturgy, Penderecki composed several religious choral works. The most famous, 'St. Luke's Passion,' was completed in 1965 and in 1966 was played by Penderecki at Minster Cathedral. This was followed by 'Utrenia' in 1971, a work that recounts the events that took place after the Crucifixion, and 'Magnificat' in 1974. During the time he was making a name for himself as an excellent composer, he held several prestigious positions. From 1972 to 1979 he was music director at the Krakow High School of Music and taught at Yale University from 1973 to 1978. After his debut in the liturgical field of music, he began to restructure his music, changing his style to reflect contemporary neo-Romanticism. In 1977 he wrote Violin Concerto for Isaac Stern. His 'Te Deum,' written in 1980, was dedicated to Pope John Paul II.
    Aside from being a noted composer, Krzysztof Penderecki also established himself as a musical dramatist during the late '60s and '70s.His first opera was The Devils of Loudon, followed by the 1978 premiere in Chicago of Paradise Lost. The Black Mask, his third opera received rousing acclaim at the Salzburg Festival in 1986. During the '80s, his compositions began to reflect both sounds of his first period and romantic gestures of the second. His works during this period included 'Cello Concerto No. 2' and the 'Viola Concerto.' The 'Polish Requiem,' written in 1984, reflects the his view of his native land in their struggle for freedom. Since 1988, he has produced a number of symphonies and concertos, including 'The Flute Concerto,' written for Jean-Pierre Rampal. 'Per Slava,' a noted chamber work, was written for Mstislav Rostropovich. Two of his works, 'Violin Concerto No. 2' and 'Symphony No. 3,' premiered at Carnegie Hall in 1996.
    Like many other composers of the 20th century, was also known for his conducting. He has conducted the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra and orchestras in France, England, Italy, Austria, Sweden and Switzerland. In America he has performed with the New York Philharmonic and the Philadelphia Orchestra. Along with his tours, recitals and composing music, he holds two permanent positions: the guest conductor of the NDR Orchestra in Hamburg and the music director of the Casals Festival in Puerto Rico.
    For his compositions and conducting talents, Krzysztof Penderecki has been awarded with the UNESCO Award, the Great Art Award of North Rhine-Westphalia, the Prix Italia, the Prix Artur Honegger, the Sibelius Prize, the Premio Lorenzo Magnifico and the Grawemeyer Award for Music Composition. He received two Emmy nominations for the broadcasts from the Casals Festival. Several universities have honored him with honorary doctorates."



    Symphony Nr.2-Sacred Works
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    1. Introduction 2:00
    2. In the Open 3:02
    3. Tall Cool One 2:23
    4. Goin' Back to Granny's 2:12
    5. Busy Body 2:28
    6. Night Train 2:05
    7. Number X 0:32
    8. Introduction 0:29
    9. Tough Walk 2:24
    10. Have Love, Will Travel 3:03
    11. Oo Poo Pah Doo 3:29
    12. Hitch Hike 2:41
    13. Busy Body 2:33
    14. The Witch 2:41
    15. KTNT Radio Spot 0:21

    Rob Lind - Saxophone
    Larry Parypa - Guitar
    Gerry Roslie - Keyboards, Vocals
    Andy Parypa - Bass
    Bob Bennett - Drums

    AMG:
    "Given the many stories of their crazed on-stage prowess and the frantic drive of their classic studio sides, fans of real-deal garage rock have often wished that someone had the presence of mind to make a decent-sounding live recording of Tacoma, WA, madmen the Sonics in their glory days. And, as it happened, someone did - a radio station in Tacoma, KTNT-AM, used to have a regular Friday night feature called Teen Time, in which they broadcast a live spot from one of the area's teen clubs. A guy in Seattle named Doug Patterson owned an Ampex reel-to-reel tape machine and frequently taped the Teen Time shows to collect songs for his own teenage band to cover, and two surviving tapes featuring the Sonics in action have been collected on Busy Body!!! Live in Tacoma 1964. Since these two shows (lasting less than 33 minutes combined, including patter from the announcer) predated the release of their debut single, 'The Witch,' and the epochal album Here Are the Sonics, the emphasis is on covers and instrumentals, and while the audio is quite good for AM radio broadcasts more then four decades old, the mix is a bit sloppy and Gerry Roslie's vocals are barely audible, with Rob Lind's sax and Larry Parypa's sax way up front. Still, if this isn't the ideal document of the Sonics on-stage, it's a whole lot of fun; these tapes show they were admirably tight and full of fire when playing for their fans, and having a wild good time cranking out 'Ooh Poo Pah Doo,' 'Goin' Back to Granny's,' 'Night Train,' and 'Have Love, Will Travel' with all kinds of attitude. And while they didn't deign to play 'Psycho' while Patterson was rolling his tapes, there's a wicked early version of 'The Witch' that points to things to come. Busy Body!!! captures the Sonics in a transitional phase, when they were still minding the template of Northwest heroes the Wailers but developing an overdriven personality of their own, and it's loud-and-proud teenage fun."



    Busy Body
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    1. Nitchino Satchimo 9:42
    2. Hunnahahna-Bushi 7:13
    3. Itai-Itai 2:02
    4. Mooko No Ohkami (A MongolianWolf) 5:21
    5. Ryoshi Ga Kita (A Hunter Is Coming) 14:59

    Akira Sakata - Clarinet, Sax (Alto), Voices
    Bill Laswell - Bass, Violin
    Ronald Shannon Jackson - Drums, Percussion
    +
    Kiyohiko Semba - Percussion

    AMG:
    "Mooko was the working title for a short-lived trio comprising Japanese free reed player Akira Sakata, peripatetic bassist Bill Laswell and drummer Ronald Shannon Jackson. Sakata had performed with Laswell's Last Exit quartet and the music here draws somewhat from that ethos albeit without the rockish overtones derived from Sonny Sharrock's guitar. Still, for all the free jazz inspired caterwauling from Sakata, who's a capable if monochromatic player, Laswell takes many opportunities to lay down thick, funky basslines jauntily matched by Jackson. The pieces are somewhat more composed than those with Last Exit, presumably by Sakata (though, typically for a Celluloid release, no information is provided) but they still manage to meander a bit. Those that work best, however, are the less thematically oriented ones which give Sakata a chance to let loose and, at the same time, don't allow the rhythm team to fall into predictable patterns. Constrained by melodies, he appears about as comfortable as Peter Brotzmann would be in similar circumstances. Combined with his non-varying approach, this makes for a set that begins fresh but grows increasingly tiring as it goes on. There's some nice enough individual playing here (and Sakata's rough singing on the final cut is pretty impressive), but the group aspect degenerates too often into a lazy kind of jam to make it recommendable to all but completists."



    Japan Concerts
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    Japan Concerts
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    1. Ain't Got My Music 3:44
    2. Northern Winds 4:22
    3. Helicopters 4:02
    4. Garage 3:04
    5. Refill 3:19
    6. Life 5:40
    7. I'm Just a Singer 3:32
    8. Crazy, Crazy, Crazy 4:40
    9. Newyorkicity 4:01
    10. Freeze Everybody 2:50
    11. Brave Gun 3:16
    12. Fixin' 6:35
    13. Aggression 3:46

    John Porter - Guitar, Vocals
    Aleksander Mrożek - Guitar
    Kazimierz Cwynar - Bass
    Leszek Chalimoniuk - Drums

    Wiki:
    "John Porter (born 15 August 1950 in Lichfield) is an English-born musician, composer and songwriter, living in Poland since 1976.
    Originally from Lichfield, after studying political science in Sussex and spending time in Berlin, Porter moved to Poland in the mid-1970s.
    He performs with his life partner Anita Lipnicka. In 2006, their daughter Pola was born."



    Helicopters
    Scans



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    1. Lullaby for Dewi 9:42
    2. Mirror of Your Mind 7:37
    3. Blue Stone 18:27
    4. Traditional South Indian Kirtanam 6:32
    5. Lassana Lamaya (Beautiful Child) 11:31

    Charlie Mariano - Flute, Sax (Alto), Sax (Soprano)
    Chris Hinze - Flute, Piano
    Wym Stolwyk - Piano
    Roger Cooke - Bass
    Jimm Chaaperoe - Drums

    AMG:
    "Charlie Mariano, who gained his initial fame for playing bop and cool jazz in the 1950s, by the early '70s was exploring a mixture of world music and funk/R&B. This interesting but now somewhat dated CD reissue finds Mariano switching between alto, soprano, flute and the nagasuram in a quintet with flutist Chris Hinze and a European rhythm section that explores three Mariano originals (including the previously unreleased 18½-minute 'Blue Stone'), a piece by Hinze and a traditional South Indian folk song. The moody music contains plenty of intriguing colors and some surprising moments."



    Blue Stone
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    Blue Stone
    Scans


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    1. First Movement:
    She look he spit 2:42
    Ereia, in no mood 3:15
    Tearing his head 2:23
    Flesh comes out 2:34

    2. Second Movement: For being nice to the wrong people 20:14
    3. Third Movement:
    Far Away Scares Him 6:36
    He Shares A Little Knife With His Sister 3:34
    The Thorn Piercing His Coat 9:49
    At Last The Hand, Shifting 3:47

    Nick Didkovsky - Electric Guitar
    Yves Duboin - Soprano Saxophone, Flute
    Rob Henke - Trumpet
    Michael Lytle - Bass Clarinet
    Kathleen Supové - Keyboards
    Greg Anderson - Bass
    Leo Ciesa - Drums
    +
    Joyce Hammann - Violin
    Mary Whitaker - Violin
    Ron Lawrence - Viola
    Tomas Ulrich - Cello
    Todd Reynolds - Violin (2)
    Liz Knowles - Violin (2)
    Mary Wooten - Cello (2)

    AMG:
    "Guitarist Nick Didkovsky and his Doctor Nerve septet are joined by the Sirius String Quartet on the CD Ereia. An ambitious and largely successful undertaking, 'Ereia' is presented as a single work, yet Didkovsky's composition is perhaps best considered as three separate pieces given the general lack of continuity among the movements. The brief first movement is performed by string quartet alone (with a bit of hand clapping during the initial, folk-influenced segment 'She Look He Spit'). Much of the first movement is performed in the fortissimo range (this is a Doctor Nerve CD after all!), although quieter, surprisingly lyrical moments contrast beautifully with the expected passages of agitated counterpoint and escalating tension. Recorded live in 1997 at the annual new music festival in Victoriaville, Quebec, the 20-minute second movement 'For Being Nice to the Wrong People' is performed by Doctor Nerve and the Sirius String Quartet together. The transition from the first movement's comparatively mild string quartet to the full ensemble is abrupt and jarring to say the least. The aural space sometimes clears enough to provide room for small groupings or individual musicians to make effective statements. 'Ereia''s cacophonous second movement ends as abruptly as it began, and the transition between movements is again striking. The final movement, filled with sharp rhythms, bold counterpoint, and impassioned soloing, is a worthy coup de grâce. Amidst the highly scored complexities, trumpeter Rob Henke and violinist Joyce Hammann are provided opportunities to display their soloing prowess over tense, fractured vamps. The solo spot is finally handed over to Didkovsky on guitar and he goes to town with white-hot abandon. Ereia ends with a coda featuring wonderful trumpet from Henke and a dramatic ensemble buildup of almost orchestral proportions. Like many of the passages in Ereia, the finale demonstrates that Didkovsky is a man with serious artistic ambitions. But the guitarist/composer's full-throttle soloing suggests that he remains a rocker at heart. Even the presence of a string quartet does not constrain his warp-speed avant metal sensibilities."



    Ereia
    Scans



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    1. Freedom Jazz Dance 10:53
    2. Mountain in the Clouds 1:50
    3. When Face Gets Pale 7:00
    4. Infinite Search 6:47
    5. I Will Tell Him on You 11:00
    6. Epilogue 7:03

    Joe Henderson - Saxophone
    John McLaughlin - Guitar
    Herbie Hancock - Keyboards
    Miroslav Vitous - Bass
    Joe Chambers - Drums
    Jack DeJohnette - Drums
    Herbie Mann - Producer

    AMG:
    "With John McLaughlin, Herbie Hancock, Joe Henderson, and Jack DeJohnette, this group rivaled the best fusion bands of the day. It must have been an intimidating challenge for a young Czech bassist to lead such a group on his debut album as a frontman, especially since he composed five of the six tracks. Recorded a year after the historic Bitches Brew and the year before Vitous began a stint with the innovative Weather Report, this was trend-setting fusion. It's produced by Herbie Mann, for whom Vitous played on such albums as Memphis Underground and Stone Flute."



    Infinite Search
    Scans


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    Infinite Search
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    1. Todas as Teclas/Inocência 6:25
    2. Serra da Boa Esperança 4:24
    3. Aquarela Do Brasil 5:24
    4. Curumim 3:52
    5. Cravo E Canela 5:10
    6. Pavana 5:52
    7. Asa Branca/Paraíba/Norte 4:38
    8. Isn't She Lovely 4:54

    César Camargo Mariano - Keyboards
    Wagner Tiso - Keyboards

    AMG:
    "Wagner Tiso is an internationally renowned musician whose achievements include a having a solid impact on the rise of major singer Milton Nascimento, an extensive set of composed soundtracks for movies, a solo discography comprising 28 albums, and performances with jazz giants such as Edison Machado, Paulo Moura, Ron Carter, Johnny Alf, and many others. He frequently played in the best European jazz festivals such as Montreux, Berlin, Montmartre (Denmark), and Nice and the main concert halls in Greece, Italy, France, Austria, and Germany. Tiso was a self-taught musician in his small town, lost behind the mountains of Minas Gerais. He soon formed a group that played in little neighborhood parties, later playing in local nightclubs. They went by Luar de Prata and later as the W's Boys, from 1958 to 1961.
    As his lifelong partner and friend, Milton Nascimento accounts about his own first public appearance, at 14. 'I was a neighbor of Tiso's and we used to perform together. Because we were underage, when the inspectors came, we used to run for the kitchen, where we would drink guaraná and eat chips.' Moving to Belo Horizonte, from 1962 to 1964 he performed with the Berimbau Trio. In 1964, he moved to Rio, joining the Sambacana group, recording for them for the first time through Odeon. From 1964 to 1965, he was the pianist for the legendary Edison Machado Quartet. With the renowned clarinetist/conductor Paulo Moura, he worked from 1965 to 1967 in a profitable association where he learned that music could also be instrumentally played without vocal support. In 1967, he wrote the musical arrangement for the opening of the major Carioca showroom Canecão, for a Maysa Matarazzo show directed by Paulo Moura. As an accompanist, he worked in this period for several top singers, such as Cauby Peixoto and Marcos Valle. In 1969, he joined the Som Imaginário, a group dedicated to accompany Milton Nascimento in recording sessions and live performances. In that year, he performed extensively abroad, in Athens, Greece, and Montreux, Switzerland. In the U.S., he performed with Ron Carter, Flora Purim, and Airto Moreira, along with his shows with Milton.
    In 1969, he also composed the soundtrack for Ruy Guerra's movie Os Deuses e os Mortos. In 1970, the Som Imaginário recorded their first LP for Odeon. In that year, with Milagres dos Peixes Ao Vivo, Tiso started his career as a conductor in a duet with Milton Nascimento. He was awarded as Best Arranger by the São Paulo Art Critics Association and Best Arranger by the Folha de São Paulo, Jornal do Brasil and O Globo newspapers. The next year, they recorded the Som Imaginário II for the same label. In 1972, they recorded the Cabeça de Porco album, awarded as Best Record by the São Paulo Art Critics Association and as Best Record by the Jornal do Brasil newspaper. In 1974, he worked on the LPs Flora Purim in Montreux and Wayne Shorter's Native Dancer. In 1975, Tiso was awarded as Best Arranger for Milton/Fafá de Belém/Gal Costa's recordings. In 1977, he wrote the soundtrack for Lyra dos Deuses, Walter Lima, Jr.'s movie. In 1978, he released the solo LP Wagner Tiso, through Odeon, and was awarded for Best Record by the São Paulo Critics Association. The specialized press also voted him as one of the all-time best of Brazilian music. In the next year, he released Assim Seja, also through Odeon. In 1980, he wrote the soundtrack for Ferreira Gullar's play Poema Sujo, and recorded Trem Mineiro for Odeon, which was awarded as Best Record and Best Show by the Jornal do Brasil newspaper in 1981. Also in 1981, he wrote the soundtrack for Walter Lima, Jr.'s movie Inocência (awarded as Best Musical Direction in the Brasília Film Festival of 1983), was awarded as Best Arranger by the Brazilian Records Association for his work on Milton's Sentinela, and recorded Toca Brasil (Ariola/Barclay). For the same label, he recorded in the next year Wagner Tiso ao Vivo na Europa and in 1983, Todas as Teclas, with César Camargo Mariano, was awarded as Best Instrumental Record by the following magazines and newspapers: Isto É, Domingo, Veja, Playboy, Jornal do Brasil, O Globo, Folha de São Paulo, O Estado de São Paulo, and was also one of the best-selling instrumental records in Brazil. Tiso was also awarded as Best Arranger and Best Keyboardist (Playboy, 1983) for the album. In 1984, he wrote the soundtrack for Walter Lima, Jr.'s movie Chico Rei (awarded as Best Soundtrack at the Colombia Film Festival of 1987) and Silvio Tendler's documentary Jango, which was awarded as Best Soundtrack at the Gramado Film Festival. The next year, he recorded two albums, Coração de Estudante (Barclay) and Os Pássaros (Odeon). Coração de Estudante was awarded as Best Show and Best Record by the press of Rio de Janeiro and Best Music, Best Musician, and Best Record by Rádio Tupi (1985). In 1986, he wrote the soundtrack for Ramalho Júnior's movie Besame Mucho and soap opera Dona Beija. In that year, he recorded two albums, Branco & Preto - Preto & Branco (awarded as Best Arranger Villa-Lobos Award - A.B.P.D., 1987, and as Best Orchestrator: Villa-Lobos Award A.B.P.D. 1987), and Giselle, both through Polygram.
    With João Carlos Assis Brasil and Ney Matogrosso, he recorded A Floresta Amazônica with music by Villa-Lobos, in 1987. In 1988, he wrote the soundtracks to both Osvaldo Caldeira's movie O Grande Mentacapto and the Primo Basílio TV series. Also in 1988, he recorded Manu-çaruê (Polygram) and Coração Imprevisto, and with Eugênia Melo e Castro, he recorded through the Portuguese label Valentim de Carvalho. In 1989, he was commissioned by Portugal's education cabinet to write the soundtrack for six documentaries and released a compilation, Cine Brasil (Polygram), and Só Louco (with Nana Caymmi, for EMI). He also wrote several other soundtracks for documentaries in that period. In 1990, he recorded Baobab for Polygram. In 1992, Tiso recorded Wagner Tiso - Profissão: Música, also for Polygram.
    For the label Trem Mineiro, he recorded O Livro de Jó in 1993. In 1995, he recorded the live album Wagner Tiso ao vivo com Rio Cello Ensemble (BMG). Tom Brasil's series Brasil Musical brought 1995's Wagner Tiso e Orquestra de Cordas Brasileiras. The same series brought Wagner Tiso e Paulo Moura (1996). In 1997, Tiso recorded Brazilian Scenes for the French label Kardum/Iris Musique. In 1997, Tiso recorded the CD A Ostra e o Vento for Rob Digital, and in 1999, Debussy e Fauré Encontram Milton e Tiso, for Visom.

    One of Brazil's top arrangers, producers, and pianists, César Camargo Mariano has had extensive work in the most important arenas of the world. He has had musicians like Abe Laboriel, Alex Acuña, Mitch Holder, Paulinho da Costa, Jerry Hey, Bill Rickenbach, Ernie Watts, Hélio Delmiro, Wagner Tiso, Nelson Ayres, Crispin DelCistia, Azael Rodrigues, João Parahyba, among many others, participating on his solo albums. Mariano also co-produced, arranged, played the piano, and/or did the artistic direction for several shows and albums of Brazil's most important contemporary artists like Elis Regina, Nana Caymmi, Gal Costa, Maria Betânia, Simone, Rita Lee, Elba Ramalho, Ney Matogrosso, João Bosco, Leny Andrade, Leila Pinheiro, Beth Carvalho, Emilio Santiago, Ivan Lins, Ivete Sangalo, and others. Among his many awards are the eight Clio's and several São Paulo's Association of Art Critics (APCA) awards as musician, composer, arranger, and producer of records and shows. Over the past two decades, Mariano has produced, directed, and headed various TV programs. Mariano also wrote soundtracks for films, plays, and prime time nationwide soap operas (like Mandala).
    Mariano started playing the piano by ear at 13, never having studied music before. Nine months later he played with Melba Liston (June 1957) in her concert in Rio. In the '60s, Mariano was hired by the William Furneaux Orchestra, playing dances. He also formed a quartet at that time with Theo de Barros (bass), Flavio Abattipietro (trumpet), and José Luis Schiavo (drums). Invited by Simonetti, Mariano put together a larger group, Três Américas, to cover some of Simonetti's gigs. In the A Baiúca nightclub (São Paulo) in 1962, Mariano participated in the Sabá Quartet with Sabá Oliveira (bass), Hamilton Pitorre (drums), and Theo de Barros (guitar). In the same year, Mariano produced and arranged Claudete Soares' Claudete é Dona da Bossa. In 1963 Mariano recorded his first album, Quarteto Sabá. Together with Airto Moreira and Humberto Clayber, Mariano formed the Sambalanço Trio (1964). With the American choreographer, dancer, and singer Lennie Dale, Mariano staged a bossa nova show that was a success, yielding the album Lennie Dale & Sambalanço Trio No Zum-Zum, which received two prizes from the newspaper Jornal do Brasil. From 1965 to 1971, Mariano led the Som Três trio. In 1967, Mariano wrote 12 arrangements for singer Marisa Gata Mansa. In 1968, Mariano became Wilson Simonal's producer, arranger, and musical director. In 1969, Mariano participated in the Festival of Black Arts in Senegal, Africa, with the singer Elizeth Cardoso and the Som Três trio. In 1971, Mariano was invited by Elis Regina to direct, produce, and arrange her new show at the Teatro da Praia in Rio and her new album for PolyGram, Elis. He put together a new quartet with Luisão Maia (bass), Helio Delmiro (guitar), and Paulinho Braga (drums). This would be the first of a series of 13 albums with Elis Regina. Mariano's first instrumental solo work was the show São Paulo Brasil (1978). In 1980, Mariano wrote and recorded the soundtrack for Arnaldo Jabor's Eu Te Amo. Two years later he wrote the soundtrack for Bruno Barreto's Além da Paixão. In 1988, Mariano performed another instrumental music show with Dino Vicente (keyboards), Luisão Maia, and Pedro Ivo (bass), Azael Rodrigues and João Parahyba (percussion), Ulisses Rocha (guitar), and Pique Riverte (saxes and flute). The show, called Ponte das Estrelas, was recorded live and toured all over Brazil and Latin America. In 1989, at the Montreaux Jazz Festival, Mariano performed as a duet with João Bosco. Putting together an acoustic trio with Hélio Delmiro on guitar and Paulo Moura on clarinet, they traveled to Spain for a ten-concert tour. In 1990 Mariano composed the soundtrack for another film, Paixão Cigana (Flávia Moraes), and the score for the play Luar em Preto e Branco. In 1994, Mariano moved to the United States. In that year he met Sadao Watanabe, who invited him to produce and arrange Watanabe's album In Tempo. Sadao Watanabe would bring Mariano again to produce and arrange his album Viajando. In that first period, Mariano played a piano concert at the Blue Note club in New York and traveled to Japan for various appearances with Watanabe and his group. In Chile, Mariano performed a four-handed piano concert with Michel Petrucciani. He also participated in Armando Manzanero's album El Piano - Manzanero y Sus Amigos. In New York in 1996, Mariano gave a solo concert at the Ballroom, along with John Patittucci's group. With Romero Lubambo (guitar), Leo Traversa (bass), and Mark Walker (drums), Mariano performed a tribute to Elis Regina at the Montreaux Jazz Festival with special guest Milton Nascimento. At the end of the year, Mariano directed a Brazilian music show at the Lincoln Center. In 1997, along with his quartet, he performed with Michael Brecker and Dianne Reeves at the Heineken Festival in São Paulo and Porto Alegre, Brazil. In Mexico, Mariano produced an album for PolyGram Latino with 12 Latin American singers (Tania Libertad, Vikky Car, Emmanuel, Maria Conchita Alonso, among others) backed only by piano and keyboards, Piano, Voz y Sentimento. In October, maestro and producer Ettore Stratta invited Mariano to join him in putting on the All Jobim concert at Carnegie Hall in New York. Acting as musical director and arranger for the concert, Mariano also performed alongside Ivan Lins, Leila Pinheiro, Dori Caymmi, Joe Lovano, Sharon Isbin, Eugene Maslov, and Al Jarreau. In April, invited by Ivan Lins, Mariano put together a duet program with Romero Lubambo on guitar for a series of concerts in the Brasil Musical (Musical Brasil) project in Rio de Janeiro. Followed another tour to Japan for various concerts alongside Sadao Watanabe, joined by Paulo Braga (drums), Marcelo Mariano (bass), Romero Lubambo (guitar), and Café (percussion). With guitar player Romero Lubambo, Mariano performed at Birdland in New York and at the Jazz Showcase in Chicago. In May 1999, invited by maestro Gil Jardim, Mariano participated in the Café Com Leite, a spectacle with the Brazilian Philharmonic Orchestra, followed by a a solo tour through Brazil. In September, Mariano was again invited by maestro Ettore Stratta to direct the All Jobim show at Carnegie Hall in New York. This time participants included João Bosco, James Ingram, Simone, Michael Brecker, the New York Voices, Paula Robinson, and the duo formed by Mariano and Romero Lubambo. In October and November, Mariano wrote the string arrangements for Blossom Dearie's album Blossom's Planet (Daffodil Records) and the arrangements for Romero Lubambo's album Love Dance (Aosis/JVC Japan)."



    Todas As Teclas
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    1. The National Anthem
    2. A Farewell Song
    3. Green Field
    4. A Long Way
    5. The Light Far Away
    6. Wandering
    7. A Farewell Song (Instrumental)
    8. Where Shall I Go
    9. The Way To Sampo
    10. What Is Love
    11. The National Anthem (Orchestra)

    Amazon:
    "Kim Young-Dong is one of the greatest composers and instrumentalists of Korean traditional music today."



    The National Anthem
    Scans



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    1. Rothko Chapel for soprano, alto, chorus, celeste, viola & percussion 24:07
    2. Why Patterns?, for flute, percussion & piano 29:29

    Deborah Dietrich - Soprano (Vocal)
    David Abel - Viola
    Karen Rosenak - Celeste
    William Winant - Percussion
    California EAR Unit
    University of California Berkeley Chamber Chorus
    Philip Brett - Director

    AMG:
    "This CD presents two of Morton Feldman's most fascinating compositions, and both are given fine performances. In its tableau structure and austere treatment of melody, harmony, and color, Rothko Chapel is a musical analog of the paintings of Mark Rothko, displayed in the Houston chapel where this piece was premiered. Feldman's sonorities are soft and frequently recede into silences that are carefully spaced throughout. The music is often sparse, especially in the unaccompanied phrases for the viola and the isolated passages in the percussion. Yet when Feldman's harmony is at its densest, as in the choir's sustained block chords, the effect is mysteriously shimmering and not at all harsh. Somber and reflective, Rothko Chapel is best heard in a quiet room without distractions. Why Patterns? is less dependent on stillness for appreciation, though the intricately woven lines of flute, piano, and glockenspiel may induce a similarly contemplative feeling. The independence of the parts leads not to chaos, but instead creates constantly shifting textures and relationships, freely recycling the patterns without recourse to an externally imposed method. Feldman's intuitive approach to pitch structures and linear flow lets the music pursue its course naturally, without the mannered gestures of serialism or the accidents of improvisation."



    Rothko Chapel/Why Patterns?
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    1. Soldier Boy
    2. Street Walker
    3. Brother
    4. Social World
    5. Good Old Days
    6. Guitar Intro / Outro
    7. Introduction (Bass Solo)
    8. Traffic Island Jam (Drum Solo)
    9. One Sole Survivor

    Gary Pickford-Hopkins - Vocals
    Bernie Marsden - Guitar
    Mick Dyche - Guitar
    Steve Gurl - Keyboards
    Glenn Cornick - Bass
    Kevin Currie - Drums

    freakemporium:
    "Recorded live at the Marquee on 24 June 1974, this was indeed the last performance of the ex Jethro Tull bassist Glen Cornick's band. In front of an enthusiastic audience, the band blast though their set of blistering rock music, most of the incendiary fireworks provided by the guitar of Bernie Marsden. In the tradition of live recordings, it's a bit rough around the edges in places, but nonetheless is a fine historical document for any fan of this band."



    Final Performance
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    1. Nefertiti 19:14
    2. Song for the Newborn 6:57
    3. Duet 10:31
    4. Lookout Farm/73 Degrees Kelvin [Variation 3] 16:06

    1. Toy Room/Q & A 24:41
    2. No Greater Love 17:37

    Anthony Braxton - Percussion, Reeds
    Chick Corea - Piano
    Dave Holland - Bass (Upright), Cello
    Barry Altschul - Drums, Percussion

    AMG:
    "During their short time together (1970-1971), Circle was a virtual supergroup of '70s free jazz, with the talents of Chick Corea on piano, Anthony Braxton on reeds and flute, Dave Holland on bass and cello, and Barry Altschul on drums. Circle came out of Corea and Holland's desire to do something less commercial than where they were heading with Miles Davis in the late '60s. Altschul had some previous avant-garde jazz experience from playing with Paul Bley, among others, and the three formed a trio which Anthony Braxton soon joined. Braxton had lately been making ends meet by playing chess in New York, and probably was drawn into the project not only by the quartet's rapport, but perhaps also by the possibility of relatively more commercial success on the kind of labels that would want Corea's new effort. And so the avant-garde jazz quartet Circle was born, resulting in six releases - some on ECM and Blue Note. Even though some of these recordings were taken from concert performances (including the best of the bunch, Paris-Concert), this is still quite an output for Circle's one year. They were an exciting, intense group whose sets included compositions by each of them, as well as some very fine group improvisations, long solo pieces, and the combinations in between. By 1971, Corea had decided that he was more interested in the kind of thing that Davis was doing after all, and went on to form his own, more accessible, fusion group Return to Forever. The other three continued in the free vein, sometimes together, as on Holland's stellar Conference of the Birds with Sam Rivers, recorded a year after Circle called it quits, and in the Braxton Quartet for the next several years."



    Paris-Concert
    Scans


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    Paris-Concert
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    1. Posso Perder Minha Mulher, Minha Mãe, Desde Que Eu Tenha O Rock And Roll
    2. Vida De Cachorro
    3. Dunne Buggy
    4. Cantor De Mambo
    5. Beijo Exagerado, Todo Mundo Pastou
    6. Balada Do Louco
    7. A Hora E A Vez Do Cabelo Nascer
    8. Rua Augusta
    9. Mutantes E Seus Cometas No País Do Baurets
    10. Todo Mundo Pastou II

    Rita Lee - vocals, Moog
    Arnaldo Dias Baptista - keyboards, vocals
    Sergio Dias Baptista - guitars, vocals, sitar
    Liminha - bass
    Dinho - drums

    AMG:
    "The fifth album from Os Mutantes was officially their last, although they would record another one in the same year, released as Rita Lee's solo album. There was little sound technology available, so they had to invent their own wah-wah, flanger, and phaser pedals, sound systems, and more. The second track is an acoustic ballad where the innocent voice of Rita Lee presents the love declaration of a bitch to her dog, backed by a bumbo leguero (typical instrument of South American countries and a trademark of protesters against dictatorship). It is no surprise that they were hated by the government: censorship delayed the release of the album, due to the title and the lyrics of 'Cabeludo Patriota' ('Hairy Patriot'). Os Mutantes changed it to 'A Hora E A Vez Do Cabelo Nascer' and added some noise over the censored lyrics. That leads you to think that their debauchery, irreverence, and utmost ignorance and alienation in relation to the grave happenings of the time produced some serious awareness. On the properly musical side, they show uncanny virtuosity in several different styles (rock, funk, ballad, jazz-rock) in tracks longer than the usual, filled with improvisation and beautiful and challenging solos. After so much effort to not be taken seriously, 'Balada Do Louco' ('Ballad of the Insane') may pass unperceived. Its deep existential meaning, dealing with the feeling of rejection by society for not conforming to its standards, is an important song that may provide with some understanding for Arnaldo's mysterious suicide attempt in the '80s, at the same time serving as the key for understanding their concept: 'I swear that it is better to not be the normal/If I can think that God is me'."



    Mutantes E Seus Cometas No País Do Baurets
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    1. Une Nuit au Violon 4:45
    2. Modo Azul 4:40
    3. Spanish Castles 3:41
    4. Sniffin' the Blues 3:30
    5. Postlude in C 3:22
    6. Au Privave 3:46
    7. Manoir de Mes Rêves 3:06
    8. Ytnop Blues 3:12
    9. I Want to Talk About You 3:50
    10. A Night in Tunisia 3:03
    11. Satin Doll 4:20

    Jean-Luc Ponty - Violin
    Michel Portal - Flute (2,6)
    Eddy Louiss - Organ, Piano
    Guy Pedersen - Bass (5,7,8,10)
    Gilbert Rovère - Bass (1-4,6,9)
    Daniel Humair - Drums

    AMG:
    "These 1964 sessions marked jazz violinist Jean-Luc Ponty's recording debut as a leader. In spite of his choice of instrument, he was mainly influenced by bop musicians (especially saxophonists and trumpeters) rather than fellow Frenchmen, swing violinist Stéphane Grappelli. At this stage in his career, he chose mostly compositions by European musicians of his generation, along with tunes American jazz compositions that had stood the test of time. His angular playing in Martial Solal's 'Une Nui Au Violon' contrasts with his later venture into jazz fusion, while his dash through Charlie Parker's 'Au Privave' is almost immediately halted to first showcase drummer Daniel Humair then flautist Michel Portal before he takes center-stage with a blazing solo. He also is quite comfortable in a ballad setting, with a warm treatment of Django Reinhardt's 'Manoir de Mes Reves,' though it is on his own turf, as it isn't played anything like Grappelli's recording with the legendary guitarist. The violinist's sole original is 'YTNOP Blues,' which opens with a pizzicato vamp then showcases bassist Guy Pedersen and pianist Eddy Louiss before Ponty finally opens things up with a slash-and-burn solo that evokes a bit of Stuff Smith influence for a moment. The only misfire is a dull treatment of 'I Want to Talk About You' which is plagued by Louiss' dated sounding organ. Reissued as a part of the Jazz in Paris series in 2000, this valuable introduction to Jean-Luc Ponty has already lapsed from print."



    Jazz Long Playing
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    Jazz Long Playing
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    1. No Mo Ippon 2:49
    2. Daikon Batake 2:09
    3. Ginger Tea 5:56
    4. Another June Sky 4:32
    5. Karucha Shokku 6:16
    6. January Sky 2:08
    7. Purple Smoke 4:01
    8. Tipps' 911 0:41
    9. Agent White Fox 3:12
    10. Chen's Gate 3:26
    11. Postcard 2:13
    12. Redskin 3:03
    13. Another Ginger Tea 5:56

    Emily Hay - voice, flute, piccolo
    Sanjay Kumar - keyboards
    Eric Johnson - bassoon
    James Grigsby - guitar, bass
    David Kerman - drums, percussion

    AMG:
    "Of all of James Grigsby's productions, whether it is with the Motor Totemist Guild or U Totem, Strange Attractors is the work he will be remembered for. This album, weaved on a complex story line jumping back and forth from 1957 to 1985 to 2012, contains some of the best music avant-prog had to offer in 1990s. The lineup for this album is mostly Sanjay Kumar (keyboards), David Kerman (drums), Eric Johnson (bassoon), Emily Hay (flute, singing), Steve Cade (guitar), and Grigsby (guitar, bass, computer, tapes), with a few guests. The music takes the complexity and symphonic side of Canterbury progressive rock and perverts it in a Henry Cow meets Art Zoyd kind of way, blending into it free improv and atonal classical music elements. Although very complex and hard to get into, Strange Attractors remains a rock record (unlike some of Motor Totemist Guild's later works). The playing is stellar, surprises abound, the more avant-gardist pieces ('Daikon Batake') being balanced by high-octane prog rock numbers ('No Mo Ippon'). 'Ginger Tea' and 'Another Ginger Tea' are two of the most accomplished pieces of progressive rock's most avant-gardist ensembles, turning this album into a classic."



    Strange Attractors
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    1. Future Primitive 6:57
    2. Thank You Mr. Edison 4:58
    3. The Strut 5:51
    4. Orion 3:51
    5. Blade 5:14
    6. The Adventures Of Hector & Jose 7:31
    7. Shadows Past 5:45
    8. Blues To Bappe II 5:50

    Dave Wilczewski - tenor, alto & soprano saxophones
    Dean Brown - guitars
    Eef Albers - guitars
    Tim Landers - bass
    Steve Smith - drums, piano, percussion

    AMG:
    "Again, a noticeable departure from his work as the timekeeper in Journey, Steve Smith's Vital Information project is straight-ahead, no-frills fusion from the '80s. Orion pretty much stays within the formula that made Vital Information's debut album so catchy and accessible: slick production and smooth musicianship atop a sheer layer of gloss for sonic measure. Smith holds it down in the background while the band plays through melodies that wouldn't be out of place on records à la their contemporaries. Not the band's strongest effort, but definitely not their weakest either."



    Orion
    Scans


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    Orion
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    1. Trouble Is a Man 2:37
    2. How About Me? 3:30
    3. What Was I Warned About 2:31
    4. I Got Lost in His Arms 3:26
    5. What'll I Do? 2:44
    6. Lonely Town 3:40
    7. Am I Blue 2:57
    8. Confession 1:59
    9. An Occasional Man 2:20
    10. A Ride on a Rainbow 3:38
    11. Where Have You Been? 3:16
    12. I'm One of God's Children (Who Hasn't Got Wings) 3:12

    AMG:
    "Judy Holliday was an actress, not a singer, but she recorded two albums of songs in 1958 and 1960. Her voice is just OK, so the stronger pieces on this offering are the ones where her sincerity wins out or she gets to show off her ability as a comedian while joined by an orchestra arranged by Glenn Osser. Fans of the actress will find this CD of interest, but most other listeners can safely pass this by."



    Trouble Is A Man
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    1. Garry Bell</b> - Churchill's mistake
    2. Aralica Vijislav, Dr Nelle Karajlic & Dejan Sparavalo - Bubamara
    3. Aralica Vijislav, Dr Nelle Karajlic & Dejan Sparavalo - Hunting
    4. Sondorgo - Makedonkdo oro
    5. Baptiste Bouquin - Nuit sans lune
    6. Jaromir Nohavica & Cechomor - Amerika
    7. Goran Bregovic - Mesecina (moonlight)
    8. Jasna Zalica - Iznad Tesnja zora svice
    9. Jasna Zalica - Guarda che luna
    10. Ghostland - She's beautiful
    11. Myhaly Vig - Over and done
    12. Adrian Simionescu et l'Orchestre Marin Ioan - Mama me
    13. Goran Bregovic - Ederlezi (Scena durdevdana na rijeci)
    14. Nicolai Ivanov - Part 3
    15. Vaklav Koubek Band - Nekdy_sometimes
    16. Mate Matisic - Finale
    17. Sunshine - Marginalan type
    18. Dzihan & Kamien - Homebase


    unknownpublic.com:
    "Many Eastern European films reflect historic and ongoing socio-political conflicts of identity and culture, the past returning to haunt the present as in Gori Vatra / Fuse by Pjer Zalica, or Beautiful People by Jasmin Dizdar, depicting painful, but also comical meetings between Serbs, Bosnians and everyone else. In Rok Dabla / Year of the Devil by Petr Zelenka, Czech folk-rock star Jaromir Nohavica plays himself and recent history is portrayed by ghosts; in Marsal / Marshal Tito’s Spirit by Navjveci Hrvatski, accompanied by the Croat group Mate Matisic, it takes a more tangible form. Ghosts visit the Albanian film Nata Pa Hene / The Moonless Night by Artan Minarolli, with ‘fanfares’ by young French composer Baptiste Bouquin. Emir Kusturica mixes image and sound to perfection: in Chat Noir, Chat Blanc / Black Cat, White Cat he wrote and recorded the score himself with his band The No Smoking Orchestra; he collaborated with the composer Goran Bregovic on Underground and the classic film Dom za vesanje / Time of the Gypsies, with the deeply moving song Ederlezi. Tzigane culture also figures in Gadjo Dilo / The Crazy Stranger by Tony Gatlif about the search for a singer, played by Rona Hartner. In the Hungarian film Vagabonds by Gyorgy Szomjas, music and dance allow a lost boy to find his place in society. Hungarian cinema is also represented by the enduring collaboration between innovative director Bela Tarr and composer Mihaly Vig in the film Damnation. Electronic music and hip-hop accompany films set in contemporary Serbia: the adventures of an Olympic athlete in Absolute 100 by Srdjan Golubovic and the story of a kidnap in Ljeto u Zlatnoj Dolini / Summer in the Golden Valley by Srdjan Vuletic."



    Eastern Europe
    Scans



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