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FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | .... | 49 | 50 | (Page 51) | 52 | 53 | .... | 57 | newer

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    1. When I Was A Boy 2:45
    2. Amandote Esta Dios 5:07
    3. Waht's The Matter With You Jane 3:07
    4. I Am A Happy Man 4:48
    5. If You Want To Be Aliue 5:06
    6. One Day To The Week 3:27
    7. Down With The War 4:17
    8. This Natural Place 4:30
    9. Mundo 2:46
    10. Odelin 4:08
    11. Show Me 3:47

    Jesus Toro - vocals
    José Romero - guitar
    Luis Emilio Mauri - bass
    Raúl Rivas – drums

    clear-spot.nl:
    "It may be possible that, until this release, the 3 names do not sound familiar to fans of South American underground music, but for any fan of good Venezuelan Hard Psych Rock of the '60s-'70s, Bacro, Tsee Mud and LSD are really special bands and well known. Compared to the other great album from Venezuela, the s/t LP by Ladies WC, this release is as good and as important. The band has only released a couple of singles and played many impressive live concerts. The band(s) with José Romero on guitar changed names from LSD to TSEE MUD and then to BACRO. In-between those bands José lived in the USA and was a member of 'The Del-Vikings', whose career included a concert at the Madison Square Garden. José went back to Venezuela and continued playing with his band Bacro. All the tracks presented on this album here are extremely strong and heavily psychedelic with amazing fuzz guitar, intense vocals and lots of acidy moves. A really wild album all the way!"



    Tsee Mud - Bacro - LSD

    or

    Tsee Mud - Bacro - LSD


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    1. Sugar Loaf Express 6:14
    2. Morning Glory 6:25
    3. That's the Way of the World 5:31
    4. Slippin' in the Back Door 5:19
    5. Tomorrow 7:05
    6. Lady Soul 5:08

    Lee Ritenour - Guitar
    Eric Gale - Guitar
    Patrice Rushen - Piano
    Abraham Laboriel, Sr. - Bass
    Harvey Mason, Sr. - Drums
    Steve Forman - Percussion

    AMG:
    "In 1977-78, Lee Ritenour recorded three sets for the Japanese JVC label which have each been reissued on CDs. Although the liner notes say that, for contrast, the guitarist teamed up with some of the top East Coast studio players, the date was recorded in Burbank and most of the musicians would eventually move to L.A. With suitably funky playing by guitarist Eric Gale (who works well with Rit), keyboardist Patrice Rushen, bassist Abraham Laboriel, drummer Harvey Mason and percussionist Steve Forman, Ritenour performs six somewhat lightweight numbers, best-known of which is 'Sugar Loaf Express.' The musicians play well on this direct-to-disc session but show little individuality or willingness to take chances."



    Sugar Loaf Express

    or

    Sugar Loaf Express


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    1. Henryk Mikolaj Górecki: O Domina Nostra, for soprano voice & organ, Op.55 21:28
    2. Erik Satie: Messe des pauvres (Mass for the poor), for piano, chorus & organ 17:14
    3. Darius Milhaud: Prélude 1 2:11
    4. Darius Milhaud: Prélude 2 2:48
    5. Gavin Bryars: The Black River 18:34

    Chris Bowers Broadbent - Organ
    Sarah Leonard - Soprano

    AMG:
    "In the foreword to the score of O Domina Nostra, Henryk Górecki notes that the piece was written 'in gratitude for a 'dangerous journey' which had -- once more -- a happy ending.' This refers to a serious illness that plagued him throughout the early 1980s.
    Górecki, like many of his Polish compatriots, is a devout Catholic, and the dedication to the Blessed Mary is particularly strong in Poland, where 'Our Lady of Jasna Góra' is the patron saint of the nation. O Domina Nostra, as its subtitle indicates, is a meditation for soprano and organ, with the text consisting of fragments of prayers to 'Our Lord' and 'Our Lady.' Upon these few words the composer constructs a monumental musical meditation, lasting thirty-five minutes (though no recording comes near that duration).
    The score is pieced together from large blocks of distinct material, beginning with a lengthy organ solo. Over a D pedal, which continues throughout much of the piece, triadic progressions unfold, phrases repeating then leading on to something new. The pace is slow, but the dissonant relationship between these triads and the sustained pedal create a tension that isn't resolved until the end of the passage. At last, the soprano enters with a simple, modal melody over the pedal, which is repeated, and slightly expanded for several minutes. At that point, the voice shifts up to a higher range, the dynamics jump, the tempo speeds up, and the text shifts attention from 'Our Lord' to 'Our Lady.' Shortly thereafter, the dynamics are notched up even higher, the voice rises higher, and the organ finally moves off of the long-held pedal to join in on a thundering triadic progression supporting the melody. This outburst is heard once more, but separated by a rather dramatic passage for organ alone, another bitonal texture over a pedal on A flat (a tritone away from the original). The second occurrence of this solo carries on to eventually wind down, both in dynamics and tempo, breaking off for the first major pause of the piece. Górecki then returns to the 'O Domina' material, the slow, soft phrases over the sustained D. But this doesn't carry on for too long; the music shifts quite suddenly to something completely different. The final section leaves off the low pedal in the organ, at least for a while, and moves away from plain triads to extended harmonies reminiscent of Messiaen. The mood is gentle, with the vocal line very gradually opening out from a repeated single note intoning 'Sancta Maria, ora pro nobis.' As in the previous 'Our Lady' section, the organ plays an interlude before the voice is brought back, this time tying the two sources of invocation together by intoning 'O Domina' on phrases that carry on from the previous material. The organ closes the piece with a repeated, drawn-out two-note phrase over a sustained chord rooted on C sharp, a half step lower than the opening pedal. The score closes with several seconds of notated silence, no doubt to allow the music to resonate throughout the performance space (most likely a church) and die away (or ascend to the heavens, if you will).
    O Domina Nostra is a deeply-felt, powerful work. Górecki exhibits a careful sensitivity to the relationship between the voice and the organ, as well as his natural feel for musical architecture appropriate for a sacred setting. It is no coincidence that the immediate predecessors to this piece are Beatus Vir (1979) and Miserere (1981).

    Considering the life Erik Satie led, he could perhaps have dedicated the Messe des pauvres (Mass for the Poor) to himself; the composer lived in poverty and obscurity, his music known only to a few close friends during his lifetime. Darius Milhaud commented that 'our poor Satie, who died in poverty at the Hôpital St.-Joseph in Paris, could not have imagined the irradiation and diffusion of his work on the musical world of today.'
    Satie was not necessary a man of religious faith, but he did have loose affiliations with fin-de-siècle quasi-mystical cults. Immediately following his five-year appointment as the official musician of the confraternity Rose-Croix du Temple et du Graal (a splinter group of the Rosicrucian Order), which reinforced the influence of the symbolist writers, he became involved with a yet more unusual sect of his own creation. While living on the rue Cortot, in Montmartre, he founded the 'The Metropolitan Church of Jesus the Leader'; he is thought to have been its only member. Contamine de Latour described the seat of the new Church as a 'nondescript room, square and tile-floored, which was untimely crossed by the...ventilating pipe. No altar, no object which could be used for the cult, nothing that reminded one of a religious sanctuary: simply the unfinished furniture brought down from the attic where it had been rotting for months and which gave to the room an aspect both of a monk's cell and of an NCO's room.' Within this 'wretched' atmosphere, Satie composed his Messe des pauvres in 1895. This strange work for solo organ and unison voices is reminiscent of the Medieval chant and of the transcendental idealism with which the composer was fascinated. Like other works from the first phase of his career, the modal motifs of the composition were derived from plainchant and possibly from Eastern cantillation. Moving mainly stepwise or pentatonically, the hypnotic repeated slices of melody suggest devotional liturgy, and are placed alongside meandering, sensuous harmonies. The structured patterning of phrases follows a mathematical, geometric order. The work has been compared by Edgard Varèse to Dante's Inferno, and was unlike anything produced by his contemporaries, even those with similar styles such as Debussy, Massenet, Saint-Saëns, and Chausson. This disturbing, even slightly scary work takes its listeners deeper into the mind and philosophy of its composer, whose lifelong interest in the metaphysical was made manifest in his music.

    In 1932, Milhaud composed some incidental music for Claudel's mediaeval mystery play-like drama L'annonce faite à Marie (The Announcement Made to Mary). In 1941, a tour of the production was planned for South America. By this time, Milhaud was in California and unable to obtain his music from Nazi-occupied France, so he decided to write new music for the play. This second score was different from the first and quite austere in style. Unfortunately, this new music never reached the company in time. Overly suspicious censors, who were quite wary of the Latin texts used in the choral settings, held up the score. The composer was obviously fond enough of this score not to let it gather dust while waiting to see if it would be used for another production. In March 1942, he transcribed the Latin songs of Acts II and III for voice and organ and these became the Cinq Prières (Five Prayers). The instrumental interludes were happily transcribed for organ solo and are the Neuf préludes pour orgue, Milhaud's third opus for that instrument. As Paul Hindemith had done with the ballet Nobilissima visione, Milhaud, too, borrowed from the trouvère repertoire of the Middle Ages. Unlike Hindemith's score, which utilized but one trouvère melody, the second set of incidental music to L'annonce faite à Marie utilized quite a few of them. The Neuf préludes borrowed ten trouvère melodies, plus an old anonymous Provençal tune. The modes, meters, and rhythms of these pre-existent melodies formed a very important basis for the composition of the Neuf préludes. The Neuf préludes are like chorale preludes, especially in that for the most part, the entire melody is given out line for line (though, with the exception of 'Prélude VIII,' Milhaud does not repeat the first section of the tunes). These preludes attest to the composer's penchant for contrapuntal procedures of the Renaissance and Baroque periods, especially retrograde, augmentation, inversion, and mirroring. The modal character of the mediaeval melodies supports another, though not as prevalent, Milhaud trait: modal harmony. Harmonic idioms from the twentieth century are combined with this to create tone clusters, polychords, and polytonality. Texturally, the Neuf préludes are mostly rather spare and linear. Textures range from three independent lines to four/five-voiced parallel moving, organum-like chordal sections. Material in the manual clavier parts accompanying the ancient melodies varies from descant/countermelodies and filigree-like patterns to two-to-three voice block sonorities. Though definitely 'of the same cloth,' the nine preludes are each different enough to pleasurably be heard as a set. Along with the Pastorale, the Neuf préludes have consistently been the most performed and enjoyed of Milhaud's organ compositions."



    O Domina Nostra

    or

    O Domina Nostra


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    1. Hari Ini (Today) 2:28
    2. To the So-Called "the Guilties" 1:41
    3. Apa Sadja (Whatever) 2:00
    4. 3 Little Words 2:17
    5. Bintang Mars (Mars Star) 1:55
    6. Poor Clown 1:44
    7. Mengapa Hari Telah Gelap (Why Has the Day Become Dark) 2:46
    8. Untukmu (For You) 2:12
    9. Bunga Rindu (the Flower of Longing) 2:11
    10. Laguku Sendiri (My Song) 2:38
    11. Di Dalam 2:45
    12. Di Dalam Bui (In Jail) 2:11
    13. Voorman (Jailor) 2:06
    14. Balada Kamar 15 (the Ballad of Room 15) 2:11
    15. Lontjeng Jang Kentjil (Tiny Bell) 2:36
    16. Rasa Hatiku (the Feel of My Heart) 2:42
    17. Djadikan Aku Domba Mu (Make Me Your Sheep) 3:28
    18. Bidadari (the Fairy) 2:49
    19. Untuk Ajah Dan Ibu (Dear Mom and Dad) 2:30
    20. Aku Berdjandi (I Promise) 2:59
    21. The Land of Evergreen 2:04

    Koestono Koeswoyo - lead guitar
    Koesyono Koeswoyo - rhythm guitar, vocals
    Koesroyo Koeswoyo bass guitar, vocals
    Koesnomo Koeswoyo - drums

    AMG:
    "One doesn't hear much about British Invasion-style pop groups from Indonesia in the mid-'60s, and the story of Koes Bersaudara offers a good explanation why. Koes Bersaudara translates as 'The Koes Brothers,' and they indeed featured four brothers - Koestono Koeswoyo (nicknamed Tonny, lead guitar), Koesnomo Koeswoyo (nicknamed Nomo, drums), Koesyono Koeswoyo (nicknamed Yon, rhythm guitar and vocals), and Koesroyo Koeswoyo (nicknamed Yok, bass guitar and vocals). The brothers became rock & roll fans in the '50s when the music began to hit the Indonesian airwaves through Voice of America, and they and formed a vocal group in the style of the Everly Brothers. But even though the Koeswoyo Brothers were hardly the only kids in Jakarta who fell hard for the Beatles, letting folks know you were a Fab Four fan could be dangerous. Indonesian President Sukarno was openly hostile to the influence of Western pop culture and harbored a special hatred for the Beatles; when a high-ranking Naval officer hired the brothers to play his daughter's birthday, their version of 'I Saw Her Standing There' sparked a violent melee that led to them spending three months in jail. Given this, it's remarkable that Koes Bersaudara were able to cut two 10' albums for a major Indonesian label in 1967, and an even bigger surprise is how good they were. Sublime Frequencies have collected 21 Koes Bersaudara tracks on the album To the So Called 'The Guilties' (named for one of their original albums), and while the recording quality is sometimes primitive, the performances are splendid - Tonny was a fine lead guitarist, Yon and Yok's harmonies are excellent throughout, the band was tight and played Western-style rock with confidence and skill, and the songs, while in Indonesian, can often pass for lost gems of the Beat era. The album opens with material from Koes Bersaudara's second and more accomplished album, which is significantly more energetic and rocks harder; the earlier material shows more of a contemplative folk-rock bent, through the songs and performances are still quite impressive. Once you get past the language barrier, Koes Bersaudara sound significantly more 'Western' than most Asian rock groups of their era, but if these guys didn't work much of their nation's musical heritage into their rock & roll, they certainly let their experiences inform tunes like 'Poor Clown''Di Dalam Bui (In Jail),' and 'Balada Kamar 15 (The Ballad Of Room 15),' and this is music that speaks powerfully of its time and place while sounding very cool to boot."



    Koes Bersaudara 1967

    or

    Koes Bersaudara 1967


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    1. North Star - 5:54
    2. Rough Places Plsin - 3:14
    3. Sail - 4:32
    4. At the Hawk's Well - 3:09
    5. Children of God - 1:09
    6. Opening - 5:32
    7. Naiads - 2:02
    8. Shard/Spring Is Really Coming - 2:55
    9. Bell Spirit - :42
    10. Baku the Dream Eater - 4:22
    11. Silence of a Candle - 1:48
    12. Land of Heart's Desire - 3:21
    13. Swan - 3:51
    14. Touchstone - 5:55

    Paul McCandless - Horn (English), Oboe
    Ralph Towner - Guitar
    Glen Moore - Bass, Flute, Piano, Guitar (Bass)
    Collin Walcott - Percussion, Violin, Sitar, Tabla

    AMG:
    "Music of Another Present Era remains Oregon's most enduring masterwork. Achieving a perfect balance of musical traditions from the East and West, ancient to future, they set the stage not only for a new transculturalism in jazz, but also created a lasting template for the fusion of musics from world traditions that would flower over a decade later. The four participants in Oregon, oboist and pianist Paul McCandless, guitarist and pianist Ralph Towner, upright bassist and pianist Glen Moore, and the late multi-instrumentalist Collin Walcott, operated on the premise that melodic ideas and expansive harmonies all contributed to a music that didn't bridge cultures, but erased them and eradicated them. This is a place where the astute dynamics of classical music meet the freedom of post-bop jazz in an inquiry of world rhythms and harmonics. Standout tracks include 'North Star,' with its celebration of rural music and rhythmic invention; the up-tempo 'Sail,' which offers a killer trio of Walcott's sprinting tablas, Towner's frenetic 12-string playing, and Moore's inquiring bass; the intensely improvisatory 'Shard/Spring Is Really Coming'; and the lilting 'The Swan.' This is fusion music, to be sure, but it's the kind of fusion musicians have been trying unsuccessfully to emulate for decades. Music of Another Present Era is one of the most poetic and groundbreaking records to be released in the 1970s."



    Music Of Another Present Era

    or

    Music Of Another Present Era


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    1. Gravità 9,81 4:34
    2. Strips 4.26
    3. Corrosione 1:30
    4. Positivo/Negativo 3:40
    5. In Cammino 6:14
    6. Valzer per Domani 4:12
    7. Mirafiori 5:53
    8. Nove Lune Prima 0:56
    9. Mescali/Mescalero 2:36
    10. Nove Lune Dopo 1:06
    11. Aria Pesante 4:10
    12. Dimensione Terra 3:52
    13. Kawasaki 6:11
    14. Glory 2:44
    15. Marilyn 5:24
    16. Arcansiel 3:53
    17. Alba Mediterranea 4:37
    18. 2000 9:23

    Alfredo Ponissi - tenor-alto-baritone sax, flute
    Lautaro Acosta - violin
    Marco Roagna - electric & acoustic guitars
    Beppe Crovella - Hammond organ, Mellotron, synthesizers, piano
    Roberto Cassetta - electric bass, back vocals
    Furio Chirico - Drums, percussion
    Iano Nicolò - lead vocals, percussion

    allaboutjazz:
    "While the emergence of Punk and New Wave rang the death knell for most progressive rock acts that came to prominence in the 1970s, the ability to create global communities via the internet has led to a surprising resurgence of interest. Italian prog/fusion group Arti E Mestieri garnered considerable acclaim for its first two records—Tilt (Cramps, 1974) and Giro Di Valzer Per Domani (Barclay, 1975)—and then struggled against popular opinion through the 1980s before disbanding in 1988.
    Reformed in 1998 with founding drummer Furio Chirico, keyboardist Beppe Crovella and guitarist Gigi Venegoni, this largely instrumental outfit began to record and tour again, releasing four full-length CDs and one EP. Recorded in 2005, First Live in Japan is Arti E Mestieri's first album to receive significant North American distribution, and its energetic delivery of both retrospective and recent material makes it an excellent entry point for newcomers and a boon for existing fans.
    The 2005 version of Arti E Mestieri finds Venegoni replaced by Marco Roagna and, for the first time since Giro Di Valzer Per Domani, the group is a septet again with violin and woodwinds. Opening with the entire first side of Tilt, the group's power is immediately evident. 'Gravita 9, 81,' with Lautaro Acosta's violin and Roagna's overdriven guitar pushing the theme over a frenetic 5/4 rhythm from Chirico and bassist Roberto Cassetta, suggests an intriguing cross-pollination of vintage Mahavishnu Orchestra, contrapuntal Gentle Giant and symphonic King Crimson, with Crovella's mellotron a dominant voice.
    But Arti E Mestieri is equally informed by the music of its own culture, with pastoral hints of the Italian countryside and Mediterranean breezes imbuing the music as well. 'Kawasaki' features Crovella, who demonstrates a Keith Emerson-like classical pianism but without the navel-gazing self-indulgence. It's that overall lack of bombast, in fact, that makes Arti E Mestieri so appealing. All the texture, stylistic breadth, virtuosity and complexity of progressive rock is there, but equally the group can deliver a simple folk tune like 'Glory,' one of Iano Nicolo's few vocal tracks.
    A suite of six tunes from Giro Di Valzer Per Domani ranges from the lilting waltz of 'Valzer Per Domani' to the raucous 'Mirafiori,' featuring frenzied solos from Roagna and Acosta. While all the players are notable, Chirico and Crovella stand out. Chirico's a vibrant powerhouse who nevertheless knows when to pull back, while Crovella is a master of texture, melody and invention throughout.
    Despite revisiting old material, what makes First Live in Japan so strong is that the music doesn't feel retro at all. The more complex, idiosyncratic and episodic '2000' may signal where the group is heading, but the suites from its first two classic albums sound no less contemporary. Some bands reform to cash in on a revival of interest, but the vibrant Arti E Mestieri is clearly back to do more than merely regurgitate past successes. "



    First Live In Japan

    or

    First Live In Japan


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    1. 20 Jazz Funk Greats 2:51
    2. Beachy Head 3:42
    3. Still Walking 4:56
    4. Tanith 2:20
    5. Convincing People 4:54
    6. Exotica 2:53
    7. Hot on the Heels of Love 4:24
    8. Persuasion 6:36
    9. Walkabout 3:04
    10. What a Day 4:38
    11. Six Six Sixties 2:07

    Genesis P-Orridge - Bass guitar, violin, synthesizer, vibraphone, vocals
    Cosey Fanni Tutti - synthesizer, cornet, vocals
    Chris Carter - Synthesizer
    Peter Christopherson - tape, synthesizer, cornet, vibraphone

    AMG:
    "It's a break in the clouds from Throbbing Gristle's pummeling noise and a first glimpse at the continuing pop influence on the TG/PTV axis, but 20 Jazz Funk Greats still isn't best described by its title. If there is such a thing as a funky Throbbing Gristle LP, however, this could well be it. 'Hot on the Heels of Love,''Still Walking' and 'Six Six Sixties' add only occasional bits of distortion between the rigid sequencer lines. 20 Jazz Funk Greats is the best compromise between TG's early industrial aesthetic and the reams of industrial-dance and dark synth-pop groups that used the album as a stepping stone to crossover appeal."



    20 Jazz Funk Greats

    or

    20 Jazz Funk Greats


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    1. The Journey 55:04

    Paul Dunmall - Clarinet, Sax (Baritone), Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor)
    Keith Tippett - Piano
    Paul Rogers - Bass, Double Bass
    Tony Levin - Drums, Percussion

    AMG:
    "An aptly named CD, as the four British jazz musicians in this improvisational group offer one long, 55-minute piece in a live performance at the Bath Festival in Bristol, and they cover a great deal of musical ground in the process. The participants are not well known in the U.S. (in fact, British jazz is generally ignored in the U.S.), and that's a real shame, because they are all superb musicians who are functioning very nicely as a unit even at this early stage of their collective development. Paul Dunmall displays his woodwind mastery (as he does on later releases) by moving during the long performance from his opening clarinet solo to soprano saxophone and then to tenor and finally baritone. Dunmall's clarinet is initially lyrical and quite lovely, as is Keith Tippett's piano when he joins in, but when Dunmall returns on soprano sax, he begins to create some dynamic tension with rapid flurries of notes and a certain timbral urgency. Finally, about 12 minutes into the 'journey,' the electricity starts to build, and everyone shifts into ecstatic mode. The obvious influence at this point is the mid-period Coltrane quartet, with Dunmall keening on soprano sax and Tippett paying tribute to McCoy Tyner, spinning aggressive single-note runs with the right hand and crashing block chords with the left. After a thoughtful interlude, Dunmall returns again like a fury on tenor sax, with the powerful rhythm section of Paul Rogers on bass and Tony Levin on drums pulsating behind him and pushing him even further. The music continues to ebb and flow like some organic process. And while all members of Mujician are quite adept at 'outside' playing (multiphonics, extended techniques, etc.), their music expresses a wide range of emotions (even serenity and playfulness), which should make them attractive to listeners who are free jazz novices."



    The Journey

    or

    The Journey


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    1. At The Station 5:45
    2. For You 3:08
    3. Sunny Side Of The Day 2:48
    4. A New Day Has Arisen 8:22
    5. How Time Has Flown 5:56
    6. Lost In The World 2:26
    7. In The Heavens 4:06
    8. Awake 7:57

    Charlie Shannon - vocals
    Dave Bernard - guitar
    Chris Kellesis - organ
    James Kellesis - drums

    amazon:
    "Released in 1973 on the obscure Canadian Periwinkle label, Jackal's Awake album became a highly sought-after album by collectors of heavy psychedelic & progressive rock."



    Awake

    or

    Awake


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    1. Butterfly 7:55
    2. Shiftless Shuffle 7:10
    3. I Thought It Was You 15:30

    Bennie Maupin - Percussion, Soprano Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone
    Ray Obiedo - Guitar
    Herbie Hancock - Keyboards
    Webster Lewis - Synthesizer, Keyboards, Organ, Piano
    Byron Miller - Bass
    Paul Jackson - Bass
    Alphonse Mouzon - Drums
    Bill Summers - Percussion

    AMG:
    "For the rabid audiophiles in Japan, Herbie Hancock went to Tokyo to record a direct-to-disc LP that later became one of the world's earliest CD releases. Due perhaps to the arduous one-take-only nature of the direct-to-disc process, Hancock takes the rare step of using a second keyboardist, Webster Lewis, to handle the multiple electronic textures; the rest of the cast is a quorum of Headhunters (Bennie Maupin, reeds; Paul Jackson, bass; Bill Summers, percussion), plus guitarist Ray Obiedo and drummer Alphonse Mouzon. Understandably, the music sometimes sounds a bit inhibited and structured but there are some refreshingly jarring rhythmic disruptions in 'Butterfly,''Shiftless Shuffle' eventually develops a fine roadhouse groove, and the extended 'I Thought It Was You' cuts the original version on Sunlight. The excellent LP sound is superior to that of the CD - especially the rock-solid bass and drums."



    Directstep

    or

    Directstep


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    1. To the Edge of Dream, for guitar & orchestra 12:25

    Folios, for guitar
    2. No.1 3:02
    3. No.2 2:36
    4. No.3 2:41

    Toward the Sea I, for alto flute & guitar
    5. No 1 The Night 4:11
    6. No 2 Moby Dick 4:39
    7. No 3 Cape Cod 4:21

    8. Here, There & Everywhere 3:11
    9. What a Friend We have in Jesus 2:25
    10. Amours Perdues, for voice & piano 2:38
    11. Summertime, song (from Porgy and Bess, opera) 3:34

    12. Vers, l'arc-en-ciel, palma, for oboe d'amore, guitar & orchestra 14:39

    John Williams - Guitar
    Sebastian Bell - Flute (Alto)
    Gareth Hulse - Oboe d'amore
    London Sinfonietta
    Esa-Pekka Salonen - Conductor

    AMG:
    "John Williams, classical guitar virtuoso, is known for his wide-ranging approach to repertory, which includes appearances playing electric rock guitar and international music. John's father Leonard (Len) Williams was an accomplished guitarist who emigrated from Britain to Australia, married a Melbourne woman of Chinese-British descent, and was best known there for his jazz playing. As he taught John to play guitar, it soon became apparent that the boy was a gifted guitarist, and the family planned to move back to London so that he could pursue further studies. To afford the trip, Len Williams took an additional job as a hippo-keeper at the Melbourne Zoo.
    They eventually moved to London in 1952. John performed at Conway Hall in London in 1955, making enough of an impression that the famous guitarist Andrés Segovia invited John to study at his courses at the Accademia Chigiana in Siena, Italy. John accepted and became a student of the pioneering guitar soloist from 1957 to 1959.
    Williams made his official debut at London's Wigmore Hall in 1958, and received reviews that noted a strong, clean tone and a polished though undemonstrative technique. However, Williams does not give Segovia or his other official teachers a large share of the credit for his technique. He says that most of these teachers were too 'authoritarian' in their approach, not excluding Segovia who, he says, had a tendency to expect his pupils to adopt his interpretive 'mannerisms,' and would get quite angry when they didn't. The guitarist with whom he formed the closest association is Julian Bream, a fellow student of Segovia. Bream has often appeared in concert and on recordings as a guitar duo with Williams.
    Williams has toured throughout the world. He has performed and recorded nearly the entire standard guitar repertory, plus a large quantity of transcriptions. Several of these transcriptions are by his own hand. He was a professor of guitar at the Royal College of Music in London from 1960 to 1973. However, he also has a strong tendency to explore music outside the classical tradition. He does session work on film soundtracks, has arranged Beatles songs, and plays electric guitar in Sky, a classical-rock fusion band. He has also formed his own ensembles, John Williams and Friends and Attacca, to explore other music. On a CD release called The Guitarist, he uses Turkish and Greek rhythms and harmonies to support Medieval music. The 2002 album, The Magic Box, examines African music."



    Takemitsu played by John Williams

    or

    Takemitsu played by John Williams


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    1. Superlungs My Supergirl 2:42
    2. Silver White Light 2:55
    3. July 3:33
    4. Marking Time 3:47
    5. Stay With Me Baby 4:12
    6. Highway 61 Revisited/Friends 8:00
    7. May Fly 3:43
    8. Speak Now or Forever Hold Your Peace song review 4:25
    9. Rich Kid Blues 4:15
    10. Better by Far 3:30
    11. Fire's Alive 2:54

    Terry Reid - Vocals, Guitar
    Pete Solley - Keyboards
    Keith Webb - Drums

    AMG:
    "Reid's initial pair of albums are very similar, and it's really a toss-up as to which one is better. If either rates a slight edge, it would be Terry Reid, as it finds his songwriting skills slightly more developed. The Donovan influence is again apparent on the cover of the Scotsman's 'Superlungs My Supergirl,' and 'Stay with Me Baby' is another well-done blue-eyed soul showcase. As a songwriter, Reid still had a way to go, sounding better on the gentler, folkier numbers than the all-out power trio numbers. Such unfulfilled promise was understandable to a degree, as Reid was not yet 20 when this was released; unfortunately, he would never significantly expand on the promise of his first two LPs. The CD reissue on BGO adds four bonus cuts from the two rare non-LP singles he recorded in 1967 and 1968, prior to the issue of Bang, Bang You're Terry Reid."



    Terry Reid

    or

    Terry Reid


    0 0


    1. Restoration Ruin 2:22
    2. All Right 2:49
    3. For You and Me 2:42
    4. Have a Real Time 2:54
    5. Sioux City Sue New 2:51
    6. You're Fortunate 2:23
    7. Fire and Rain 2:53
    8. Now He Knows Better 4:00
    9. Wonders 4:01
    10. Where Are You Going? 4:28

    Keith Jarrett - Multi Instruments, Vocals

    AMG:
    "Restoration Ruin is a real oddity in the Jarrett catalog: a vocal album on which he plays all the instruments. And not a jazz vocal album, either, but a folk-rock one in which he alternates - quite literally, track to track - between sub-Dylan outings and more folk-Baroque ones that echo the late-'60s work of artists like Love and Tim Buckley. There's a certain amateurish appeal to the LP, in keeping with other crossover acid folk artists of the period. Yet the fact is that Jarrett is a major jazz musician, but a journeyman-at-best folk-rock singer (with a hoarse, wavering croon-whine), instrumentalist, and songwriter, with a bent for flaky wordplay that gives this a bit of a fried-psychedelic tinge. At times, to be harsh, it's less than journeyman, particularly on the Dylan-esque cuts, which have almost embarrassing wheezing son-of-Dylan harmonica and some downright embarrassing out-of-sync drums. Better are the daintier, more melodic tracks with trimmings of flute, strings, and flamenco-like guitar, like the title song, 'For You and Me,' and 'Sioux City Sue New,' with their bossa nova feel."


    11. Nfamoudou-Boudougou 4:15
    12. Immm 5:31
    13. Unanka 10:43
    14. Oouffnoon 3:25
    15. Ohnedaruth 15:00
    16. Odwalla 5:42

    Joseph Jarman - Flute, Sax (Alto), Sax (Baritone), Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor), Vocals
    Roscoe Mitchell - Clarinet, Sax (Alto), Sax (Baritone), Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor), Vocals
    Lester Bowie - Flugelhorn, Kelphorn, Trumpet, Vocals
    Malachi Favors - Bass, Composer, Drums, Gong, Percussion, Vocals
    Famoudou Don Moye - Percussion, Vocals

    AMG:
    "This was the Art Ensemble's breakthrough - however short-lived - onto a major U.S. label (Atlantic), as well as a document of the freewheeling band's first appearance at an American festival (the Ann Arbor Blues and Jazz Festival). With activist John Sinclair delivering the introduction, politics is in the air; the crowd is young and predisposed to radical ideas and the Art Ensemble holds back nothing in a chaotic, meandering, exasperating, outrageous - and, thus, always fascinating - performance. The band seems to be clearing its collective throat in the first half of the concert, opening with a battering all-percussion prelude. Roscoe Mitchell and Malachi Favors go at it at length in a staggered, honking tenor sax/bass duet on 'Unanka,' and Mitchell ratchets up the gears into screeching overdrive on 'Oouffnoon.' Finally, after a mocking intro by Lester Bowie, the 15-minute 'Ohnedaruth' puts the Art Ensemble on full, ultra-colorful, wailing, free-form display (complete with a few vocal obscenities) before signing off with the 'relatively' straight-ahead 'Odwalla.' It is interesting that Atlantic would lease these way-out recordings to Koch at a time (1998) when it was simultaneously putting out new, safer-sounding releases by the current Art Ensemble and its members."



    Restoration Ruin/Bap-Tizum

    or

    Restoration Ruin/Bap-Tizum


    0 0


    1. Eleanor Rigby 7:43
    2. Still Life 7:27
    3. Painted Lady 3:26
    4. Obsession 4:33
    5. The Rape 12:07
    6. Last Tango 3:29
    7. In Search Of A Dream 4:45
    8. Busy Doing Nothing 3:44

    Kim Moore - vocals
    Roger Meakin - vocals
    Raymond Vincent 1st violin
    Geoffrey Salmon - 2nd violin
    Timothy Kraemer - cello
    Bruno Libert - keyboards
    Gino Malisan - bass
    Tony Malisan - drums

    AMG:
    "Esperanto was a Belgo-English rock band which had a short career at the beginning of the 70s."



    Last tango

    or

    Last tango


    0 0


    1. Tram 7:05
    2. Non 'E Poi Tanto Male 3:37
    3. Ragazzo In Blue Jeans 5:27
    4. Per Amare Cosa Vuoi 3:34
    5. C'E Tutto Un Mondo Intorno 4:20
    6. Oggi Per Te 4:26
    7. Come Un Fiore 6:20
    8. Tutto Bene 4:06

    Antonella Ruggiero - Vocals
    Piero Cassano - vocals, rhythm guitar, keyboards
    Aldo Stellita - bass guitar
    Giancarlo Golzi - drums

    AMG:
    "Born from the ashes of the prog band Jet, whose sole album was 1972's Fede Speranza Carità, Matia Bazar formed in Genoa in 1975, with a line-up comprising Piero Cassano (keyboards), Aldo Stellita (bass), Carlo 'Bimbo' Marrale (guitar), Giancarlo Golzi (drums) and singer Antonella Ruggiero. The very first releases - e.g. the singles 'Stasera Che Sera', 'Cavallo Bianco', 'Per un'Ora d'Amore', 'Solo Tu' and 'Mister Mandarino' and the albums Matia Bazar (1976), Gran Bazar (1977) and the anthology L'Oro dei Matia Bazar - showcased the band's ability to build well-crafted and lush pop songs, made unique by the huge extension and versatility of Ruggiero's voice. In 1978 the song '… E Dirsi Ciao' (from Semplicità finished first at that year's edition of the Sanremo Music Festival. The live album Tournée and Il Tempo del Sole followed respectively in 1979 and 1980.
    With 1981's Berlino Parigi Londra Matia Bazar introduced strong electronic elements in its sound. Immediately after its release, Cassano quit the band to pursue a new career as a producer (he would later work with Eros Ramazzotti), replaced by Mauro Sabbione. 1983's Tango included one of Matia Bazar's most successful singles, 'Vacanze Romane', and was followed one year later by Aristocratica, in which debuted new keyboardist Sergio Cossu. In 1985 the band reached the top notches of the Italian charts for the last time with 'Ti Sento' (a.k.a. 'I Feel You', in its English translation), taken from the album Melanchòlia, the first recorded after the band quit ways with producer Roberto Colombo. After 1987's Melò and 1989's Red Corner Antonella Ruggiero quit the band in order to start a solo career, and was replaced by Laura Valente, whose voice can be heard on Anime Pigre (1991), Dove le Canzoni Si Avverano (1993, including the single 'Dedicato a Te') and, Radio Matia (1995, a collection of new versions of older songs) and Benvenuti a Sausalito (1997). In the meantime, Marrale too had quit the band. In 1998 founding member Aldo Stellita died of cancer.
    A new line-up of Matia Bazar including Golzi, the returning Cassano, Fabio Perversi on keyboards and singer Silvia Mezzanotte debuted in 2000 with Brivido Caldo. 2001's Dolce Canto and 2002's Messaggi dal Vivo followed - the latter, a live album, included the song 'Messaggi d'Amore', with which Matia Bazar won 2002's Sanremo Music Festival. Then, with new singer Roberta Faccani, the band released Profili Svelati (2005) and One1 Two2 Three3 Four4 (2007), a collection of hits from other Italian bands from the 60s on."



    Tournee

    or

    Tournee


    0 0


    1. Fattoria Degli Animali 9:34
    2. Parodia Della Festa 7:00
    3. Tubi Sonori In Scale 6:21
    4. Disturbi Di Violino 10:12
    5. Avantil Para Baba 3:24
    6. Babà-fui-pà 2:03
    7. Pugno Chiuso 12:05
    8. Conchiglia 12:55

    Enzo Gardenghi – Alto Saxophone
    Gustavo Bonora – Cello, Violin
    Davide Mosconi – Piano
    Marco Cristofolini – Drums

    Wayside Music:
    "The stable 'Quartetto' that pianist Davide Mosconi, saxophonist Enzo Gardenghi, percussionist Marco Cristofolini, and cellist and violinist Gustavo Bonora brought to life beginning in the late '60s constituted the core of what would, in the early years of the next decade, become the larger improvising ensemble NADMA. The group was also an elegant and accomplished expression of the musical objectives of its members. The rich yields that Davide Mosconi cultivated from his exploration of improvisation and the visionary creativity that revealed influences from parallel planes throughout his oeuvre originated in his formative years. In the life story of Mosconi before the formation of the 'Quartetto,' it emerges that his first musical affirmations arose as he was completing his studies as a photographer. Mosconi furthered his training as a photographer in New York from 1964-1968, including stints as assistant to Richard Avedon and Hiro. Prior to his definitive return to Italy, he spent 1968 in Mexico, a lengthy visit documented splendidly in his photographs. During his stay there, he may have been the first European musician to meet Conlon Nancarrow and encounter his music. From Nancarrow, Mosconi learned the workings of the Ampico player piano. Only much later indeed, in the early '80s, when György Ligeti championed his works, was this now-legendary American composer rediscovered internationally. The 'Quartetto' represented, at last, a solid foundation with which Davide Mosconi succeeded in realizing his own notion of improvisation, aided by musicians who shared his ideal of a continuous, fluid music and thus of a pliable expression that superseded the limits of existential consciousness. In 1968-1969, the group launched an uninterrupted series of private events, studio sessions and live concerts at venues that ranged from offhand happenings to alternative clubs to concert halls. This CD is included in a beautiful digipack full-color sleeve with photos and liner notes. Also included is a 12-page booklet with an essay titled 'Before NADMA: Davide Mosconi and the Quartetto' by Gabriele Bonomo as well as the testimonies by Enzo Gardenghi and Gustavo Bonora."



    Organic, Playco 1969

    or

    Organic, Playco 1969


    0 0


    1. The bandsman 4:25
    2. Laughter lane 4:11
    3. Loveless time 5:32
    4. Dawn 7:51
    5. Movin' on 22:23

    Roland Frei - lead vocals, acoustic guitar, Tenor saxophone
    Andreas Grieder - flutes, alto saxophone, backing vocals, tambourine
    Marco Cerletti - bass, bass pedals, acoustic guitar, backing vocals
    Fritz Hauser - drums, percussion, vibes

    amazon:
    "Coming from Switzerland, this unusual quartet of musicians has a strange line-up. Hauser is one of the better percussionists (still playing, but in jazz bands nowadays), and bassist Cerletti also plays acoustic guitar. The other two, Fri and Grieder, share the wind instruments with the vocals. That's it! No keyboards and almost no electric guitars, at least on the first two albums. This group is one of the real gems still unknown to most progheads, developing a fusion between classical and rock much like early MANEIGE did but also includes some influences from VDGG (mostly the sax but sometimes also the singing) and also KING CRIMSON to a lesser extent. While having some success locally, they only managed three studio albums. Of those two albums 'Movin' On', their second) is their best but their debut is also excellent. CIRCUS is certainly recommended to everyone who loves great interplay between musicians and to progheads not afraid of a little adventure in their musical endeavours."



    Movin' On

    or

    Movin' On


    0 0


    1. Samurai Hee-Haw 7:44
    2. Resolution 10:31
    3. Black Is the Color of My True Love's Hair 7:09
    4. Bass Desires 6:12
    5. A Wishing Doll 6:16
    6. Mojo Highway 8:44
    7. Thanks Again 7:15

    John Scofield - Guitar
    Bill Frisell - Guitar, Synthesizer
    Marc Johnson - Bass
    Peter Erskine - Drums

    AMG:
    "The pairing of electric guitarists Bill Frisell and John Scofield had to be one of the most auspicious since John McLaughlin and Carlos Santana. Acoustic bassist Marc Johnson's stroke of genius in bringing the two together on Bass Desires resulted in a sound that demonstrated both compatibility between the guitarists and the distinctiveness of the two when heard in combination. Add drummer Peter Erskine and you had a bona fide supergroup, albeit in retrospect a short-lived one, before Frisell and Scofield would establish their own substantial careers as leaders. The guitarists revealed symmetry, spaciousness, and a soaring stance, buoyed by the simplicity of their rhythm mates. This is immediately achieved on the introductory track, 'Samurai Hee-Haw,' as hummable, head-swimming, and memorable a melody as there ever has been, and a definite signature sound. A perfect country & eastern fusion, the guitarists lope along on wafting white clouds of resonant twang, singing to themselves while also playing stinging notes, supported by the insistent two-note funk of Johnson and the rolling thunder of Erskine. The title track is a one-note ostinato from the bassist with a popping, driven drum rhythm and the guitars more unified in their lines, but broadening their individualistic voices. The light reggae funk of 'Mojo Highway' sounds more conversational and jam-like, while 'Thanks Again' is a relaxed, unforced waltz, again eschewing Asian-Missouri folkloric alchemy fired by Frisell's wah-wah and Scofield's stairstep strums. Ethereal and effusive sky church inflections lead to loose associations, especially from Frisell's moon-walking guitar synthesizer on 'A Wishing Doll.' There are three covers: a take on Elmer Bernstein's 'A Wishing Doll;''Resolution,' the second movement from John Coltrane's A Love Supreme suite, with a more spiky bass and spacy lead melody played only once; and the standard 'Black Is the Color of My True Love's Hair,' floating and eerie, held together by silk and lace threads. One of two Bass Desires albums, this debut has stood the test of time - it is priceless, timeless, and still far from being dated."



    Bass Desires

    or

    Bass Desires


    0 0


    1. The Poet Acts 3:37
    2. Morning Passages 5:48
    3. Something She Has to Do 3:31
    4. "For Your Own Benefit" 1:55
    5. Vanessa and the Changelings 1:41
    6. "I'm Going to Make a Cake" 3:46
    7. An Unwelcome Friend 4:29
    8. Dead Things 4:19
    9. The Kiss 4:34
    10. "Why Does Someone Have to Die?" 3:41
    11. Tearing Herself Away 4:47
    12. Escape! 4:02
    13. Choosing Life 4:03
    14. The Hours 7:07

    Michael Riesman - Piano
    Dave Arch - Piano
    Rolf Wilson - Violin
    Nick Barr - Viola
    David Daniels - Cello
    Chris Laurence - Double Bass
    Nick Ingman - Conductor

    AMG:
    "There are movies where you notice the soundtrack, and others where you don't. The latter is usually considered ideal, and yet it's impossible to ignore Philip Glass' pervasive, all-encompassing soundtrack while watching Stephen Daldy's celebrated follow-up to Billy Elliot (the same could just as easily be said of Elmer Bernstein's majestic music for Far From Heaven). This isn't such a bad thing - far from it. The piano-dominated score, incorporating motifs from Glass' Satyagraha, Glassworks, and Solo Piano is, by turns, lush, sumptuous, and stirring. Michael Riesman is the pianist, the Lyric Quartet provides the strings, and Nick Ingman is the conductor. The fruits of their labor - and artistry - add depth to the action on screen without ever quite overwhelming it. The complicated storyline, based on Michael Cunningham's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel (which was, in turn, inspired by Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway) is inherently dramatic and emotionally compelling enough that it doesn't really 'need' music to get its message across. And the actors, including Nicole Kidman (Virginia Woolf), Julianne Moore (Laura Brown), and Meryl Streep (Clarissa Vaughn), breathe such life into these three distinct characters, living in three different time periods, that they don't need really need the music either. But it's always there, like a ghostly presence in each woman's life, helping to tie their divergent storylines together as much as the themes that are common to each. In the end, the score is as much a unifying force as Peter Boyle's deft editing and, most importantly, Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway, which was originally to be called The Hours. The CD booklet includes liner notes by Cunningham (focusing on his longtime admiration for Glass), excerpts about each character from his novel, and stills from the film."



    The Hours

    or

    The Hours


    0 0


    1. Primera Transmigración (Paraiso Remoto) 16:50
    a) Genesis
    b) Prana (Grito Primario)
    c) Primera Visión De Un Mundo Nuevo
    d) Himno A La Armonía Magistral Del Unverso
    e) Primeros Pasos En Un Mundo Nuevo
    f) Metamorfosis Extravagante

    2. Segunda Transmigración (Abismo Próximo) 16:45
    a) Narración Extravagante
    b) Primeras Preguntas En Un Mundo Nuevo
    c) Canto Al Niño Neurótico
    d) Himno Crítico A La Primera Adversidad
    e) Desfile Extravagante
    f) Proceso Alienatorio
    g) Serenata Extravagante

    3. Tercera Transmigración (El Entorno Futuro) 17:47
    a) Pequeño Concierto Extravagante
    b) Paginas De Plata De Un Diario Intimo
    c) Anti-Himno A La Programacion Cibernetica
    d) Monasterios
    e) Proceso Ciberetico
    f) Villancico Extravagante

    4. Cuarta Transmigración (El Eslabón Recobrado) 21:53
    a) Hibernus
    b) Crisis
    c) Ballet De Las Sombras
    d) Himno A La Armonía Implacable Del Fin
    e) Vanessa (El Aliento De La Osamenta)
    f) Nirvana Extravagante
    g) Diálogos A Alto Nivel
    h) Hiperdestrucción
    i) Apocalipsis

    Antonio Garcia de Diego - guitar, acoustic guitar, vibraphone, voice
    Mathias Sanvellian - electric piano, Hammond, acoustic piano, violin
    Teddy Bautista - keyboards, synthesizers, voice
    Christian Mellies - bass, synthesizer
    Alain Richard - drums, percussion
    Rudmini Sukmawati - voice
    Alfredo Carrion - choral arrangement and conducting

    AMG:
    "One of the best albums of the prog rock genre. Ciclos is an adaptation of Vivaldi's 'Four Seasons.' They don't make a note-by-note interpretation, but they add some typical prog rock elements, such as the use of Mellotrons and Moog synthesizers, played with virtuosity. This recording is a more accurate interpretation of a classical piece than 'Pictures at an Exhibition' by Emerson Lake & Palmer. There's a lot of color in this recording, with vocals in English, Spanish, and Latin, plus the presence of opera singers, electric guitars, and electronic keyboards. This one has been long out of print, but it's worth it for fans of progressive rock. It's an underground classic of the genre."



    Ciclos

    or

    Ciclos


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