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FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | .... | 47 | 48 | (Page 49) | 50 | 51 | .... | 57 | newer

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    1. Jag Söker Efter Kärlek 2:31
    2. Långt Bort 5:10
    3. Vi Hör Ett Skrik 2:50
    4. Leka Med Ord 3:03
    5. Romantiken 2:32
    6. Fattig Man Söker Efter Mat 1:48
    7. Säg Vad Är Det? 2:39
    8. Oändlig 3:04
    9. My Third Eye 3:02
    10. Out Of The Body 1:57
    11. Miscalculation 1:13
    12. Lovedust 0:34
    13. X-1111 1:24
    14. Original Basic 3:09
    15. Ongoing 1:28


    AMG:
    "Hans Edler is a multi-talented Swedish singer, guitarist, and composer who is best known in his homeland as a pop singer, while internationally he's primarily known for his pioneering computer music album Elektron Kukéso (1971). Born on March 23, 1945, in the Björkhagen district of Stockholm, Sweden, he began his musical career in the late '60s as the singer of the Ghostriders, a pop band influenced by the Shadows. In 1969, however, his career took an odd twist when he began a three-year musical project at EMS (i.e., Elektroakustisk Musik i Sverige), a state-of-the-art studio in Stockholm with a room-size computer. Between 1969 and 1971, Edler painstakingly composed computerized pop music and released an album's worth of it, Elektron Kukéso (1971), on his own label, Marilla. Though far ahead of its time, the album proved unsuccessful from a commercial standpoint. Its rarity, not to mention its oddity, later made Elektron Kukéso a collector's item. The album was eventually reissued in 2004 on Boy Wonder Records with bonus material and deluxe packaging. After the release of Elektron Kukéso in 1971, Edler continued to release music on Marilla, beginning with another collectable album, Spökhistorier (1972), on which actor Stig Järrel reads a few horror stories (e.g., 'Det Skvallrande Hjärtat,' a Swedish adaptation of Edgar Allan Poe's The Tell-Tale Heart) over creepy electronic music composed by Edler. Other notable releases by Edler on Marilla during the 1970s include Space Vision (1979), a space disco album; Disco-Time (1979), a collection of disco covers; and Jukebox Graffiti, a multi-volume series of hit parade cover albums. In later years, Edler carved out a niche for himself as a 1960s revivalist. One of his most successful latter-day album releases was the Top Ten hit Remember the Sixties (2009), featuring him with a string orchestra."



    Elektron Kukeso

    or

    Elektron Kukeso


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    1. More Nipples 17:25
    2. Fiddle-Faddle 13:22
    3. Fat Man Walks (To Robert Wolfgang Schnell) 9:25

    Peter Brötzmann - Sax (Tenor)
    Evan Parker - Sax (Tenor)
    Derek Bailey - Guitar
    Fred Van Hove - Piano
    Buschi Niebergall - Bass
    Han Bennink - Drums

    AMG:
    "Vanguard saxophonist Peter Brötzmann has continually insisted that a 1969 session he recorded for FMP with Evan Parker (saxophones), Derek Bailey (guitar), Fred Van Hove (piano), Buschi Niebergall (bass), and Han Bennink (drums) yielded more material than was originally issued. A CD version of Nipples was re-released by Atavistic in its amazing Unheard Music Series in 2000. In 2002, FMP founder Jost Gebers did indeed come across a reel of material, recorded by both the quartet (without Bailey and Parker) and sextet incarnations, in the FMP archive. That material, three long tracks, is issued here for the first time ever. And like the original session, it is fiery, woolly, and an absolutely perfect example of free jazz at its finest. The opener is an alternate take of 'Nipples,' entitled 'More Nipples.' At over 17 minutes, it clocks in as the longest piece here and is the only sextet collaboration. What is most stunning is how much more prominent Bailey's guitar is in the mix; not only can it be heard better, but it stands as pivotal in the development of the improvisation. His angular turns and strangled phrases cut across both Parker's soprano and Brötzmann's tenor dueling, to provide a bridge for the rhythm section to engage them both. The two quartet pieces, 'Fiddle-Faddle' and 'Fat Man Walks,' are stunning examples of the kind of communication possibilities offered by free jazz in the 1960s. This is the kind of intensity one hears on John Coltrane's Meditations or Live in Seattle, or Pharoah Sanders' recordings with the Jazz Composer's Orchestra. And while Brötzmann is well-known for his brand of gut-blowing intensity, he has never sounded so urgent and so completely commanding as he does here; it was if the saxophone held no bounds for his voice. More Nipples is certainly as essential for free jazz fans as its predecessor."



    More Nipples

    or

    More Nipples


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    1. Introit (A Mass for the Harlequin) 3:09
    2. Love & Death 7:37
    3. One Step Home 7:32
    4. Space Cats 1:00
    5. Loss of a Friend 3:39
    6. A New Song 4:21
    7. Sky Caller 10:34

    Stubborn Puppet
    8. My Place 3:14
    9. Meantime 4:02
    10. Fabulous Angel 4:04
    11. Jeopardy 3:54


    Lyle Holdahl - bass guitar, acoustic and electric guitars, string ensemble, synthesizer, piano, organ, bass synthesizer, flute, percussion, lead and background vocals
    Nancy Deaver (Nancy Kaye) - lead vocals, background vocals, bass synthesizer
    John Reagan - drums, percussion, background vocals
    Jeff Pike - lead electric guitar, classical and acoustic guitars, piano, synthesizer, saxophone, clarinet, background vocals
    +
    Collin Heade - cello and 'special' guitar (3)
    Rob Metcalfe - synthesizer programming and special effects
    Mark Reagan - snare drum and 2nd hand cymbals (4)

    progarchives:
    "Formed in Portland, Oregon in the mid-seventies, Harlequin Mass was part of a brief and modest wave of bands coming from American Northwest in that decade (Heart, Nu Shooz, Quarterflash, The Wipers). Unlike most of their contemporaries though, Harlequin Mass were largely influenced by progressive bands such as the Moody Blues, Yes, and Genesis. The band has pointed to the release of 'Close to the Edge' as the pivotal moment in the maturation of their sound, and their sound has been compared to a folk-influenced version of Yes and ELP.
    Touring mostly in the upper Northwest, the band failed to gain much of a following, but did manage to release a single album, which unfortunately was released in late 1978 just in time to be swept under the carpet in light of the burgeoning punk and new-wave movements of the late seventies. The band disbanded a year later after a failed attempt to replant themselves in the Seattle area, but reformed with a more mainstream sound as Stubborn Puppet a year later. Several songs from that band appear on the reissued CD version of the lone Harlequin Mass album.
    Most of the members of the original band remain in the music industry, including drummer John Reagan who owns the progressive label Big Balloon Music and is a sometimes member of AUTOPHOBIA; guitarist Jeff Pike continues to perform as a solo artist and session musician on the West Coast; singer Nancy Kaye has performed with the prog folk band Talamasca (not to be confused with the French trance band of the same name); and bass player/keyboardist Lyle Hodahl has appeared as a member of the neo-progressive group Fire Monkey and the ambient Art & Science Projekt.
    Harlequin Mass deserve inclusion in the Archives for their brief but clearly progressive touring career, and for their subsequent carrying of the progressive torch in the Big Balloon label and spin-off projects."



    Harlequin Mass / Stubborn Puppet

    or

    Harlequin Mass / Stubborn Puppet


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    1. Flame Sky 16:32
    2. Let's Us Go Into The House Of The Lord 25:10
    3. The Life Divine 20:05
    4. A Love Supreme 19:39
    5. Follow Your Heart 29:09
    6. Naima 6:08


    Mahavishnu John Mclaughlin - Guitar
    Carlos Santana - Guitar
    Larry Young - Organ
    Doug Rauch - Bass
    Billy Cobham - Drums
    Armando Peraza - Percussion


    Wiki:
    "Both men were recent disciples of the guru Sri Chinmoy, and the title of the album echoes basic concepts of Chinmoy's philosophy, which focused on 'love, devotion and surrender'. Sri Chinmoy spoke about the album and the concept of surrender:
    Unfortunately, in the West surrender is misunderstood. We feel that if we surrender to someone, he will then lord it over us....But from the spiritual point of view...when the finite enters in the Infinite, it becomes the Infinite all at once. When a tiny drop enters into the ocean, we cannot trace the drop. It becomes the mighty ocean.
    Both men had recently become followers of Sri Chinmoy, and for both the album came at a transitional moment spiritually and musically: Love Devotion Surrender was a 'very public pursuit of their spiritual selves.' Carlos Santana was moving from blues toward jazz and fusion, experiencing a 'spiritual awakening,' while McLaughlin was about to experience the break-up of the Mahavishnu Orchestra after being criticized by other band members. Santana had been a fan of McLaughlin, and McLaughlin had introduced Santana to Sri Chinmoy in 1971, at which time the guru bestowed the name 'Devadip' on him, and the two had started playing and recording together in 1972. According to his biographer Marc Shapiro, Santana had much to learn from McLaughlin: 'He would sit for hours, enthralled at the new ways to play that McLaughlin was teaching him,' and his new spirituality had its effect on the music: 'the feeling was that Carlos's newfound faith was present in every groove'."



    Live In Chicago

    or

    Live In Chicago


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    1. Arcana, for orchestra 18:46

    Octandre, for flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, horn, trumpet, trombone, and double bass
    2. Assez lent 2:33
    3. Très vif et nerveaux 1:51
    4. Grave 2:24

    Offrandes, for soprano & chamber orchestra
    5. Chanson de là-haut 3:33
    6. La Croix du Sud 3:44

    7. Intégrales, for 11 winds & 4 percussionists 11:07

    Déserts for brass, percussion, piano & tape
    8. [Untitled] 3:57
    9. First Electronic Interpolation (beginning) 2:57
    10. First Electronic Interpolation (conclusion) 8:18
    11. Second Electronic Interpolation (beginning) 2:11
    12. Second Electronic Interpolation (conclusion) 1:53
    13. Third Electronic Interpolation (beginning) 4:11
    14. Third Electronic Interpolation (conclusion) 3:40


    Maryse Castets - Soprano (Vocal)
    Christopher Lyndon-Gee - Conductor
    Polish Radio and Television National Symphony Orchestra


    AMG:
    "Varèse's passionate views concerning composition and the physicality of sound are expressed coherently in Arcana. In this work, a kind of a freely extended passacaglia, a basic 11-note musical idea is subjected to all kinds of permutations and variations, eventually returning in an echo of its original shape just before a coda. The musical continuity provided by this scheme allowed Varèse great freedom in orchestration, enabling him to frequently change instrumental combinations without much fear of confusing the listener behind. The works repetetiveness, revealing certain obvious patterns, also allows the listeners to better appreciate the painstakingly chosen and constructed timbres. The orchestra required for Arcana is enormous: 120 players on a greater number of instruments, including 40 different percussions that are a constant presence in the overall sound. Disliking the lack of pitch-precision in the strings, Varèse uses the string section quite idiosyncratically. While Varèse described Arcana as a symphonic poem, his critics, perhaps more astutely, have relied on visual analogies to describe the work, evoking such objects as paintings and frescoes. The harmonic stasis of the piece and its emphasis on color - it is a kind of visualized music - do invite such analogies. In their efforts to describe the music vividness, writers have reached for extreme images. describig, for example, describing Arcana as Mount Etna blazing in the night. Not quite volcanic, however, Arcana is nevertheless something like a series of orchestral eruptions, as a result of melodic continuity, exciting rhythmic displacements, and novel coloristic choices. This is easily one of Varèse's most approachanble pieces. The title points to to the arcane writings of Paracelsus (1493 -1541). While Paracelsus didn't inspire Arcana, Varèse has compared his dream world to the mystical insights found in the works of Paracelsus. Thus, the symphonic poem is named Arcana not after Paracelsus, but in homage to him, of whom Varèse once remarked: 'You can count Paracelsus among my friends'.

    Varèse often insisted that music is both a science and an art. With his ingeniously inventive orchestration in mind, through which he put many sounds into the world that had never existed before, perhaps he should have summed it up as 'alchemy'; he certainly did love the symbolism of arcane religions. Octandre is a brilliant, purely technical study of the inexplicable abracadabra of sound that Carlos Chávez rightly called gold. With this accomplishment, Varèse moved significantly closer to his ideal of a purely material music of 'spatial projection.' But although Octandre could be by no other composer, it is unlike Varèse's other works in a couple of significant ways. The piece is in three movements, labeled according to tempo - Assez lent, Très vif et nerveux, Grave-Animé et jubilatoire. Each opens with a different instrument to announce its particular character - oboe, piccolo, and bassoon - and is essentially a revisitation of the same structural concepts from a unique angle. More significant, however, is the absence of percussion, which usually forms the very core of his sound. Anyone familiar with his other pieces so feels the absence that their ears prick up every couple of beats expecting percussion noise, as if the violent drums are only waiting in ambush. By the time of Octandre, 1923, he'd already composed several pieces - Amériques, Offrandes, Hyperprism - that extensively used percussion. Sonic researcher that he was, he perhaps wanted to test his ability to work without his favorite tools and so, deliberately limited himself. He knew such an exercise could only increase his knowledge and bring him that much closer to realizing the mysterious, unheard-of music of his waking visions. And so it did. Varèse did not, however, abandon his usual aesthetic in Octandre: the winds, brass, and double bass are conspicuously made to fill in, against their instrumental natures, for the absent percussion. They're often used only to articulate nervous rhythmic motifs that unexpectedly accumulate from solo passages into massive, weapon-like pounding in shattering, prismatic colors. Wherever somewhat extraneous melodic lines surface, usually in lonely solo passages, they get pureed before long in the blades of emphatic rhythm, especially in the clamor of the shimmering brass that comes in like the attacking sword of an imaginary sun god.

    The mesmerizing two-part Offrandes is possibly the most direct statement of his tormented inner world Edgard Varèse ever made. It's that tremor of personal pain pulsating through all the vividly colored din that Stravinsky was reacting to when he said that the first harp attack in part two nearly gives him a heart attack. He called it 'the most extraordinary noise in all of Varèse.' Offrandes is for soprano and a representative chamber orchestra, with harp and eight percussion instruments. These are used in ever-changing combinations (emphasizing percussion, winds, and brass) and with a constantly varied dynamic. Except for the vocal part, there's no melody as such. The accompaniment is all built on flinty little rhythmic gestures that sometimes mutate into a fragment of a tune. The stormy instrumental parts could almost make up a Varèse piece by themselves. They often go into a howl or die down to nervous mutterings of percussion - ominous rattles of snare drum, woodblocks, castanets - under the heavily chromatic vocal line. In part one, 'The Song From Above,' it seems as if he is suppressing a wish that the voice was a more flexible instrument, reaching so high he strains her range. In part two, 'The Southern Cross,' however, on a dreamlike, apocalyptic poem by José Tablada, he's in complete control and makes the precariousness of her top notes into a potent source of dramatic tension. The point, as in all of Varèse's mature music, is color, intensity, and instrumental attack, which here evoke a vivid, haunted internal world. As Tablada says in his Apocalyptic text: '...the murdered women are awakening.' Although listeners always feel that Varèse's music is poetically composed from his subjective center, his instrumental aesthetic is more mechanical (or machine-like) than organic. The lyricism that the soprano brings to Offrandes illuminates the organic/mechanic dialectic of struggle that powers Varèse's music: the diminishing scale of the human individual in relation to humanity's rigid bureaucracies and its machines. Varèse certainly looked forward to the future, especially the musical freedoms it would bring, but the tragic sense of humanity in retreat before the brutal steamroller of conformity was a source of great spiritual suffering to him, which he movingly expressed in Offrandes.

    Edgard Varèse completed Intégrales in 1925. It is scored for woodwinds, brass, and 17 different percussion instruments played by four percussionists. Varèse's term 'spatial music' was first applied to this work, which broadly denotes a concept that pertains to all of his surviving output. It was his way of depicting music as a collection of coexisting sound properties (melody, harmony, rhythm, etc.). Instruments are chosen for the specific aspect of music they do best (the composer preferred winds and percussion) and they appear in sonic groupings that occur in different temporal durations from one another. This was dubbed 'spatial' music because it is easier to describe it in terms of physical and temporal space; the durations among the different blocks of sound drift closer and further apart while appearing and reappearing in variations of themselves. Tensions vary in accordance the proximity of the sound blocks.
    Intégrales is dedicated to Juliana Force, and its title is not meant to denote an association with anything extra-musical. One of Varèse's former students pointed out that this work was written in spite of the limitations of conventional instruments and notation, that the world of sound contained in this piece is not about the instruments, but the distinction of the timbres between them. Instruments are intended to either blend or contrast with other instruments depending on whether or not they are in the same sound 'block.' Many listeners feel that this ambivalence to instruments made Varèse better suited to music that excludes them, such as tape music, which he eventually turned to. He said that the future of sounds required composers and electrical engineers to find the solution to the outdated means of generating notes. This geometric and abstract approach to music came to him while listening to the scherzo of Beethoven's Seventh Symphony, which inspired in him a sense of, in his own works, 'projection in space.' Intégrales lends itself to visual impressions of celestial bodies in motion. The composer said that mathematics and astronomy inspired him; the motion of planets revolving around a star is comparable to the blocks of sound heard in this piece.
    The premiere of Intégrales was peculiar because it was so well received by the general public. At the Aeolian Hall in New York, Leopold Stokowski conducted it on March 1, 1925 to an enthusiastic crowd. This was not a group of avant-garde enthusiasts, but a more or less traditional audience who enjoyed the work so much that Stokowski was obliged to perform it again that evening. However, other than a few admiring writers, the critics hated Intégrales and mocked the piece at length. It is possible that this work offended the sensibilities of a writing community that had spent years building a meaningful way of talking about new music. Varèse's output still eludes easy description and the vast majority of musical terms and ideas available to listeners and writers do not pertain to his style. His own descriptions of his works are often opaque. Listeners without an extended musical vocabulary have the advantage of not instinctually attempting to turn the experience of Intégrales into words.

    This powerfully moving work, created between 1950 and 1954, was the first piece for magnetic tape - two-tracks of 'organized sound' - and orchestra. Possibly first conceived when Varèse lived in the deserts of New Mexico in the mid-1930s, it was imagined to be a score to which a film would have been subsequently made - a film consisting of images of the deserts of Earth, of the sea (vast distances under the water), of outer space (galaxies, etc.), but above all, the deserts in the mind of humankind - especially a memory of the terrors and agonies from the world wars of the first half of the twentieth century, including concentration camps, atomic warfare, and their continuing resonances. The taped music (originally planned for an unrealized work called 'Trinum') primarily presents those images in three interpolations that separate the music for the acoustic orchestra - winds, brass, a resonant piano, and five groups of percussion. This orchestra part expresses the gradual advance of mankind toward spiritual sunlight. The orchestra music is built from intense aggregates of sound, rather than scales for melody, and rhythm is treated not as a continuous pulse, but as a support for the sound-form, rhythm as a vibration of intensity. Of course, this highly dramatic work, in touch with the deeper, repressed emotions of world society at the time it was created (and powerful still), caused protest and violent reactions in many concert halls. It is now recognized as an exceptional example of truly humanistic music."



    Arcana / Intégrales / Déserts

    or

    Arcana / Intégrales / Déserts


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    1. You Used to Think 3:17
    2. The Slippery Morning 3:48
    3. We Came Via 7:05
    4. The French Revolution 3:23
    5. Julius 4:44
    6. Burn Baby Burn 5:42
    7. Koanisphere 7:10
    8. Anything Goes 5:33
    9. To Leonard from Hospital 5:27


    Erica Pomerance - Vocals, Guitar, Handdrums
    D. Cooper Smith - Percussion
    Ron Price - Guitar
    Bill Mitchell - Guitar
    Dion Grody - Guitar
    Gail Pollard - Sitar, Chant, Flute
    Richard Heisler - Guitar, Chant
    Tom Moore - Flute
    Lanny Brooks - Bass
    Trevor Koehler - Sax (Alto)


    AMG:
    "Rhythm guitarist and vocalist Erica Pomerance was a singer/songwriter whose coming of age in the hippie flower power era is easily heard and deciphered on this recording. Her strained vocal style is not by any means pleasant, nor is it intended to be. In many instances sloppy rhythmically, idiot savant garage band amateurish, sophomoric, anxious by nature, and unpolished under any criteria, Pomerance and her band of ragtag players ramble through themes both existential and idealistic. They evince occasional oppression and rose-colored visions, and at times attempted improvisation, while lacking a sense of a jazz background suitable for effectively making things up on the spot. Yet there's something quite charming about this folkish, Neanderthal, Joan Baez-copped amalgam, as the group wends its way through whatever substance-induced haze it experienced, approaching a somewhat unique fusion of many American musics grounded in basic rock & roll. Pomerance overdubs her voice in middle altissimo and high winding (and whining) sonance during the title selection, which defines the loose rock, free love era, while multiple bled-over metaphysical phrases underlined by Trevor Koehler's fluttery alto sax identify 'Burn Baby Burn,' and wordless American/East Indian style chanting and tambourine, guitar, and soaring vocals bloom in 'Koanisphere.' The flutes of Gail Pollard and Tom Moore give the music an airy feeling, even though it is by nature quite dirty. 'We Came Via' exemplifies this dichotomy as Moore's musings and humming counteract a sped-up inconsistent rhythm in this clearly stoned music. Similarly, 'The Slippery Morning' has a heartfelt approach but a naïve result. 'The French Revolution' is a funkier protest story vs. song, again featuring Moore; 'Anything Goes' is indeed free prose in an atmospheric bubble with a ritual core; and Pollard plays sitar quite competently on three tracks, including the warbling 'To Leonard from Hospital' as Pomerance expresses an association to Grace Slick, but without the nuanced mystery. In many ways this music is annoying for its lack of sophistication or refinement, but at the very least is completely honest and real. Guitarist Richard Heisler's liner notes comment 'it is what it is not' says a lot. It is music that is not well played, but also not pretentious."



    You Used to Think

    or

    You Used to Think


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    1. Slavic Mood 7:50
    2. Got No money 5:50
    3. No Love Without Tears 6:46
    4. Old Fisherman's Daughter 3:21
    5. Kosmet 6:19
    6. East Of Montenegro 7:08
    7. Flying Rome 5:58


    Dusko Gojkovic – Trumpet
    Ben Thompson – Tenor Saxophone, Soprano Saxophone
    Vince Benedetti – Piano
    Joe Nay – Bass
    Andy Scherrer – Drums


    AMG:
    "An excellent bop-based soloist who has recorded rewarding sets for Enja, Dusko Goykovich played in Yugoslavia and Germany before visiting the U.S. for the first time with Marshall Brown's International Youth Band (playing at the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival). Goykovich attended Berklee (1961-1963) and played with the orchestras of Maynard Ferguson (1963-1964) and Woody Herman (1964-1966) before deciding to return to Germany, leading a group with Sal Nistico (1966). He was with the Kenny Clarke-Francy Boland Big Band (1968-73) and had a 12-piece band with Slide Hampton (1974-1975). Miles Davis is his main influence, but Dusko Goykovich (who has been quite active during the '80s and '90s in Europe) has his own extroverted style."



    Slavic Mood

    or

    Slavic Mood


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    1. Out Of Your Own Little World 3:45
    2. Niagara 4:32
    3. Wanna Be A Hero 3:43
    4. Fairy Tale Song 3:21
    5. Coo Cooki Choo 4:46
    6. Carry It On To The End 3:54
    7. Woman I'm Gonna Make You Mine 3:12
    8. Man In An Aeroplane 3:11
    9. Life Was Easy Yesterday 4:02
    10. Tomorrow Never Comes My Way 3:20


    John Lesley Humphreys - Vocals, Guitar
    Jimmy Bilsbury - Vocals, Keyboard

    and unknown others...

    The Tapestry Of Delights:
    "This album veers towards hard rock and is one of the rarest and most sought-after issued by Deram. It has some good guitar moments but is let down by some dreadful vocals."



    Megaton

    or

    Megaton


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    1. Mad Puppet's Laughs 0:21
    2. Profondo Rosso (Album version) 3:44
    3. School at Night (Lullaby - Music Box version) 2:51
    4. Death Dies (Album version) 4:43
    5. School at night 0:54
    6. School at Night (Lullaby - Child version) 2:19
    7. Mad Puppet 5:49
    8. School at Night 2:31
    9. School at Night (Lullaby - Instrumental version) 2:16
    10. Death Dies (Film Version - part 1) 2:45
    11. Profondo Rosso 1:01
    12. Gianna (Alternate version) 2:14
    13. Profondo Rosso 0:41
    14. School at Night (Lullaby - celesta version) 2:31
    15. Death Dies (Film version - part 2) 2:45
    16. Profondo Rosso 0:38
    17. Wild Session 5:00
    18. Profondo Rosso 0:46
    19. Deep Shadows (Film Version - Part 1) 1:56
    20. Deep Shadows (Film Version - Part 2) 1:49
    21. Deep Shadows (Film Version - Part 3) 0:35
    22. Death Dies (Film Version - part 3) 2:21
    23. Gianna (Album version) 1:52
    24. School at Night (Lullaby - Echo version) 2:27
    25. Deep Shadows (Album version) 5:48
    26. School at Night (Album version) 2:09
    27. Profondo Rosso (Re-mix version) (Bonus track) 5:14
    28. Profondo Rosso (Original Sound Effect) (Bonus track) 4:02


    Massimo Morante - guitars
    Maurizio Guarini - pianos, clavinet, pianet, Moog
    Claudio Simonetti - organ, piano, clavinet, Mini-Moog, strings
    Fabio Pignatelli - basses
    Agostino Marangolo - drums, percussion


    AMG:
    "This 1975 soundtrack made an impressive debut for Goblin, a legendary group of Italian soundtrack specialists. Originally known as 'the Cherry Five,' this quintet was commissioned by Italian director Dario Argento to create a soundtrack for his terrifying thriller Profondo Rosso. The resulting album took the group to the top of the Italian charts and helped it to build a worldwide cult reputation. Profondo Rosso is an ambitious affair that blends jazz, prog rock, and heavy metal into an effective and totally distinctive style. The title track is an impressive exercise in dynamics, building tension as it moves back and forth between a quiet, intricate riff doubled on acoustic guitar and keyboard and a full-blooded variation of that theme led by surging, gothic-sounding organ. Other highlights include 'Death Dies,' a frantic piece of jazz whose pounding piano riff was later sampled by Beck, and 'Mad Puppet,' an atmospheric excursion that slowly adds layers of keyboard to a hypnotic, serpentine bass riff. However, the cut that prog buffs will probably like most is 'Deep Shadows,' a frenetic slice of King Crimson-style jazz-rock that slows down midway for a dazzling midtempo section where a mesmerizing rolling piano line duels it out with snaky solos from the bass and electric guitar. All in all, Profondo Rosso is a powerful album that will appeal to both soundtrack fans and prog rock addicts. This Cinevox edition features an extensive number of versions and bonus tracks."



    Profondo Rosso

    or

    Profondo Rosso


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    1. Ride Riger to Mountain 1:35
    2. Wave Hands Like Clouds 6:14
    3. Snake Creeps Down 3:47
    4. Needle of Sea Bottom 7:40
    5. Stork Cools Its Wings 19:55


    Zusaan Kali Fasteau - Cello, Drums, Flute, Piano, Vocals
    Donald Rafael Garrett - Bass, Clarinet, Drums, Vocals


    AMG:
    "By the early '70s, the heyday of Bernard Stollman's estimable ESP-Disk label was ending. The New York free jazz scene that had first guided the label was dissolving, and the label's quirky rock acts - like the Fugs, Pearls Before Swine, and the Godz - were either jumping to larger labels or breaking up. New acts like Emerson's Old-Time Custard-Suckin' Band weren't picking up the slack, either, and so by 1974, ESP-Disk was mostly preoccupied with issuing old radio broadcasts and live tapes of Charlie Parker and Billie Holiday. The next-to-last new release on ESP-Disk before the label was shuttered in 1975, the Sea Ensemble's We Move Together, harkens back to the label's mid-'60s avant-garde heyday. The husband-and-wife duo of Donald Rafael Garrett and Zussan Kali Fasteau rattles, strums, and bangs a variety of mostly percussion instruments, with bass, cello, clarinet, and piano sharing space with then-novel Asian instruments like the nye, shakuhachi (a Japanese bamboo flute), and sheng (a Chinese free reed instrument roughly akin to a pan flute). The four shorter pieces on side one explore a variety of moods and sounds, but the 20-minute epic on side two, 'Stork Cools Its Wings,' builds to an almost violent climax before returning to its placid beginnings. Unlike many pieces of free music, it has an almost traditional structure to it, which makes We Move Together a good album for the curious novice."



    We Move Together

    or

    We Move Together


    0 0


    1. Hello New York 3:18
    2. More Than Your Mouth Can Hold 3:24
    3. Only You 4:13
    4. Bright Light 4:43
    5. Heavy Hammer 3:40
    6. Cartoon Princess 4:11
    7. Rock Out Claudette Rock Out 3:30
    8. This Ain't a Parody 3:21
    9. 16 and Savaged 4:21


    Michael Des Barres - Vocals
    Ian McDonald - Saxophone
    Robbie Blunt - Guitar
    Rod Davies - Guitar
    Rod Rook Davies - Guitar, Percussion
    John Rabbit Bundrick - Keyboards
    Nigel Harrison - Bass
    Peter Thompson - Drums


    AMG:
    "Silverhead's second record, 16 and Savaged, finds the unit much tighter, yet like any great rock & roll band, they maintained that all-important swagger. The addition of guitarist Robbie Blunt gives the group an added punch, and he and Rod Davies proved to be one of glam's best twin-guitar attacks. Vocalist Michael Des Barres steps up as well, and his Steve Marriott-bumping-into-Rod Stewart rasp never sounded better, before or since. The boys come out blazing on the groovy opener, 'Hello New York,' nailing the Bolan strut and swiping the 'Get It On' licks, while the gleefully sleazy 'More Than Your Mouth Can Hold' has a definite Faces vibe, an intro borrowed from 'Street Fighting Man,' and all the subtlety of a Gene Simmons lyric. In fact, the near-metal crunch of the album may have been an influence on the still developing Kiss sound. The lights lower for 'Only You,' and while Des Barres shines, the song ultimately misses the mark. The newfound intensity of the group is most evident on 'Bright Light,' a glam rock boogie monster that chugs along for a few minutes, before bursting at the seams for a photo finish that, paradoxically, sounds very much like a punk Led Zeppelin. The second half of the LP contains some fine and engaging rockers in 'Heavy Hammer,' 'Cartoon Princess,' and 'Rock Out Claudette Rock Out,' but is in desperate need of a ballad to help with the pacing - ideally one on par with Silverhead's 'Wounded Heart' or 'In Your Eyes.' Unfortunately, the weaker final numbers are made all the more obvious by this lacking element, keeping the disc a notch below their debut. 16 and Savaged turned out to be their final studio album, and Silverhead have all but been forgotten. Though not without its faults, the album is still one of the most exciting records from the glam period, and it, along with the group itself, should be remembered as one of the era's finest."



    16 and Savaged

    or

    16 and Savaged


    0 0


    1. Magical Dog 6:43
    2. One To One 3:32
    3. Evolve 4:45
    4. Oh, Yeah? 4:30
    5. Bamboo Forest 5:24
    6. Twenty One 5:05
    7. Let The Children Grow 4:50
    8. Red And Orange 6:44


    Jan Hammer - electric piano, synthesizers, timbales, vocals
    Steven Kindler - acoustic and electric violins, rhythm guitar
    Fernando Saunders - bass, piccolo bass, vocals
    Tony Smith - drums, lead vocals


    AMG:
    "This is an album of fusion at its best. 'Magical Dog' and 'Red & Orange' are definitive statements. This was the first exposure for violinist Steve Kindler. David Earle Johnson is on congas."



    Oh, Yeah?

    or

    Oh, Yeah?


    0 0


    1. Mururoa for Violin and Orchestra 23:38
    2. Tralada for Percussion Ensemble 7:33
    3. Trilude 15:32
    4. Illusions Allusions 7:20
    5. Skal Kayam for Guitar 10:33
    6. Varfloden for Piano 8: 44


    Nils-Erik Sparf - Violin
    Anette Stridh - Soprano
    Per Olov Sahl - Alto Guitar
    Marten Landstrom - Piano
    Kroumata Percussion Ensemble
    Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra
    Andre Chini - Conductor


    Wiki:
    "Swedish composer and conductor, member of the Royal Academy of Music."



    Mururoa

    or

    Mururoa


    0 0


    1. Viajero Del Espacio 2:42
    2. Nino (30 De Abril) 3:14
    3. Donde Esta El Amor 2:20
    4. Encuentro 2:54
    5. Adios 3:29
    6. Andromeda 2:15
    7. Mundo De Pena 3:20
    8. Nena Pide Todo 2:21
    9. Sin Tu Amor 3:49
    10. Fue Ayer 3:37


    Jorge Reyes - Flauta, Guitarra
    Edgar Daliri - Guitarra, Violín
    Mauricio Bieletto - Chelo
    Miguel Suárez - Batería


    amazon:
    "After the first dissolution of the group Nuevo Mexico, Reyes Jorge joined with two friends; Suárez Miguel (drums) and Edgar Daliri (guitar, violin). Jorge (flute, guitar) and received his Cuates Mauritius Bieletto (cello) and Armando Suárez (bass) and happy and together formed the universe, a group that combines rock with elements of classical music, jazz and blues, creating a progressive Mexican rock group."



    Viajero Del Espacio

    or

    Viajero Del Espacio


    0 0


    1. Don't Get Around Much Anymore 3:50
    2. Satin Doll 4:59
    3. Experiment 2:02
    4. Gee Baby, Ain't I Good to You 2:26
    5. Early in the Morning 2:35
    6. Nobody Knows the Way I Feel This Morning 3:05
    7. What a Diff'rence a Day Made 3:58
    8. Goin' to Chicago Blues 4:51
    9. Every Day I Have the Blues 4:38
    10. All Right, O.K., You Win 2:50
    11. Evenin' 5:50
    12. Roll 'Em Pete 2:52
    13. One O'Clock Jump 1:41


    Joe Williams - Vocals
    Zoot Sims - Sax (Tenor) (1-3)
    Clark Terry - Flugelhorn (1-3)
    Ellis Larkins - Piano (1-7)
    Major Holley - Bass (1-3)
    George Duvivier - Bass (4-7)
    J.C. Heard - Drums (1-3)
    Mickey Roker - Drums (4-7)
    Count Basie Orchestra - (8-13)


    AMG:
    "Having The Blues Under A European Sky is a collection of some very exciting live performances Williams gave in Europe in the early 70's-a decade after embarking on a solo career. Williams rose to fame as Count Basie's vocalist, and the first seven tracks (featuring small groups of varying personnel led by the wonderful pianist Ellis Larkins) show Williams' supreme artistry as a jazz singer. The arrangements are wide open and rich in vocal improvisation. Williams reunites with The Count Basie Orchestra on the last six tracks. These numbers find him in marvelous voice, at the top of his game, and still swinging his unique blend of sophisticated jazz blues at a time when most ears in the world were tuned to rock. If you're a Williams fan, you'll want to own these recordings."



    Having the Blues Under European Sky

    or

    Having the Blues Under European Sky


    0 0


    Les Espaces Inquiets (1983):
    1. Légendes: La Forêt Qui Avance (3:48)
    2. Cérémonie (9:08)
    3. Images D'Une Ville-Poussière: Errance (4:47)
    4. Images D'Une Ville-Poussière: Cortège Des Officiels (4:29)
    5. Images D'Une Ville-Poussière: Au-Delà Des Vallées (4:08)
    6. Migrations (13:08)
    7. Légendes: Le Bruit Du Fer (3:04)

    Phase IV (1982):
    8. État D'Urgence (14:38)
    9. Naufrage (6:41)
    10. Dernière Danse (4:33)
    11. Deux Préludes (2:05)
    12. La Musique D'Erich Faes (Collective Improvisation) (0:14)


    1. Et Avec Votre Esprit (5:14)
    2. Ballade (4:03)
    3. Chemins De Lumière (15:09)
    4. Du Sang Sur La Neige (4:16)
    5. Vue D'Un Manège (4:08)
    6. La Nuit (13:00)
    7. Les Larmes De Christina (3:44)

    Archives II (1987):
    8. Ex Tractu Do Inocauit (2:56)
    9. Le Combat Des Dragons: 1 (2:46)
    10. Le Combat Des Dragons: Final (1:52)
    11. Malbodium: Sommeil Du Noble (0:42)
    12. Malbodium: Entrée (1:33)
    13. Malbodium: Églises (1:18)
    14. Don Juan: Danse Macabre (1:23)
    15. Don Juan: Le Bain (1:39)
    16. Don Juan: La Sainte Famille (3:10)
    17. Un Jour Au Château: Le Parc (1:08)
    18. Un Jour Au Château: Le Matin (1:55)
    19. Un Jour Au Château: Le Secret (1:29)
    20. Don Juan: Le Bain (Final) (0:37)


    Gérard Hourbette - percussion, violin, keyboards, viola
    Thierry Zaboitzeff - guitar, bass, cello, keyboards, voices, tapes
    Patricia Dallio - piano
    Didier Pietton - percussion, sax
    Jean Pierre Soarez - percussion, trumpet, cornet
    Thierry Willems - piano

    AMG:
    "The French avant-prog unit (with no member actually named Art Zoyd) formed around the core of bassist Thierry Zaboitzeff, percussionist Jean-Pierre Soarez, and violin player Gerard Hourbette, with guitarist Rocco Fernandez, pianist Patricia Dallio, percussionist Daniel Denis (who later formed Univers Zero) and a changing lineup of half-a-dozen additional instrumentalists. The group's first album, Symphonie Pour le Jour Ou Bruleront les Cités, was self-released in 1976, followed by albums for Recommended and the French Atem label. The year 1982 brought their acknowledged masterpiece, the double-LP Phase IV. Two subsequent albums, Les Espaces Inquiets and Le Mariage Du Cial Et de L'Enfer, were followed by a Zaboitzeff solo album, Prométhée, in 1984. Zaboitzeff and Hourbette continued the group into the 1990s, composing the music for the Faust soundtrack album released in 1995 on Atonal. The Ubique live album followed in 2001, performed by a massive ensemble including Hourbette, Dallio, Denis, and Mirielle Bauer, a former member of Pierre Moerlen's Gong."



    Part 1 : Part 2

    or

    Part 1 : Part 2


    0 0


    1. Third Stone From The Sun 14:06
    2. Little Wing, for guitar 10:57
    3. 1983.... ( A Merman I Should Turn to Be) 15:20
    4. Drifting 6:04
    5. Fire 3:25
    6. Purple Haze 5:21


    Nigel Kennedy - Violin
    Dave Heath - Flute
    Kate St. John - Oboe
    Doug Boyle - Dobro, Guitar
    John Etheridge - Guitar
    Rory McFarlane - Bass
    Emma Black - Cello
    Gerri Sutyak - Cello


    AMG:
    "This disc goes places. Nominally it's a set of improvisations by Nigel Kennedy and friends based on Jimi Hendrix tunes, but what starts out in 'Third Stone from the Sun' as a Celtic-flavored 'unplugged' style jam session stretches a little further out in 'Little Wing' and '1983' and becomes transformed into something much more dynamic and unpredictable in 'Drifting,' 'Fire,' and 'Purple Haze,' the music-making turning into the kind of kaleidoscopic voyage of discovery for which Hendrix was famous. Amazingly, the 'Kennedy Experience,' two cellos, two guitars, oboe, flute and bass in addition to Nigel's fiddle, is an entirely acoustic group and only a minimum of electronic effects are used in the production. This is a trip animated entirely by the energy and commitment of the performers."



    The Kennedy Experience

    or

    The Kennedy Experience


    0 0


    1. Black Cherry 2:42
    2. Chatima 6:17
    3. Heavenly Walk 3:44
    4. Japeru 4:41
    5. Nur Al Anwar 3:56
    6. Piercing the Veil 2:50
    7. Loom Song 6:35
    8. Chauung Tzu's Dream 8:44
    9. Bodies Die/Spirits Live 4:26


    William Parker - Balafon, Bass, Bombard, Drums, Dumbek, Shakuhachi
    Hamid Drake - Bells, Drums, Frame Drum, Percussion, Tabla


    AMG:
    "This AUM Fidelity recording represents the pairing up of two icons of modern free jazz: bassist William Parker and percussionist Hamid Drake. This is the first time the duo formed and the forward-thinking title suggests more collaboration as a pair in the future. They first met in Peter Brötzmann's Die Like a Dog ensemble, and the same no-holds-barred approach to extemporaneous jazz can be heard here. Also represented are the stunning, unexpected twists of Byzantine rhythms one would expect from such a free thinking rhythm section without other instruments."



    Piercing the Veil

    or

    Piercing the Veil


    0 0


    1. Waren wir 4:53
    2. "Peter" 2:52
    3. Strohhalm 2:20
    4. Reqiem für einen Wicht 6:32
    5. Erwachen 4:20
    6. Wetterbericht 6:34
    7. Traum 7:20


    Nanny DeRuig - vocals
    Christoph Noppeney - violin, flute, piano
    Christian Grumbkow - guitar
    Joachim Grumbkow - cello, acoustic guitar, flute, keyboards, mellotron
    Peter Kaseberg - bass, acoustic guitar, vocals
    Michael Bruchmann - drums, percussion
    Peter Bursch - sitar (3)
    Mike Hellbach - tablas (3)
    Walter Westrupp - flute (5)


    AMG:
    "Hoelderlin is a German progressive rock band that was formed in 1970 as Hölderlin by Joachim and Christian von Grumbkow with Nanny de Ruig. They are influenced by rock, jazz, and folk music. They changed their name to Hoelderlin in 1973."



    Hölderlins Traum

    or

    Hölderlins Traum


    0 0


    1. Spanish Wave 4:42
    2. Ninth House 5:32
    3. Winter in Austria 4:49
    4. Seventh Heaven 4:31
    5. Chameleon 6:57
    6. You and Me 4:44
    7. Dancing Beauty 5:25

    8. Don't Leave Me 6:50
    9. Memories 5:37
    10. Paganini Caprice 5 2:03
    11. Conversation 5:15
    12. Walking in a Dream 5:50
    13. Illusion 7:43
    14. Tribute to Mani 2:27
    15. French Resolution 4:41


    L. Subramaniam - Viola, Violin
    Tom Scott - Flute, Sax (Soprano)
    Kim Menzer - Flute
    Larry Coryell - Guitar
    George Duke - Keyboards
    Gary Chang - Keyboards
    Eugenio Toussaint - Keyboards
    Jorge Strunz - Guitar
    Kevin Brandon - Bass
    Stanley Clarke - Bass
    Alphonso Johnson - Bass
    Ralph Humphrey - Drums
    Ron Wagner - Drums
    Alla Rakha - Tabla
    Emil Richards - Percussion

    L. Subramaniam - Viola, Violectra, Violin
    Stéphane Grappelli - Piano, Violin
    Frank Morgan - Sax (Alto)
    Anthony Hindson - Guitar
    Jorge Strunz - Guitar
    Manoochehr Sadeghi - Santoor
    Handel Manuel - Piano
    Mark Massey - Keyboards
    Joe Sample - Keyboards
    Jerry Watts - Bass
    Ron Wagner - Drums
    Frank Bennett - Percussion


    AMG:
    "The first of violinist L. Subramaniam's string of Milestone recordings (and one of the ones that have been reissued on CD), this fusion-oriented set has strong doses of world music. In addition to the leader, the key players include Tom Scott on lyricon, soprano and flute, and guitarists Jorge Strunz and Larry Coryell; other guests include keyboardist George Duke and bassist Stanley Clarke. The music is atmospheric, challenging and often quite accessible, certainly falling into a unique niche.

    Although fellow violinist Stephane Grappelli is billed as co-leader, this is very much L. Subramaniam's date. All eight compositions (except for Grappelli's solo piano rendition of his 'Tribute to Mani') are by Subramaniam, and the music (which utilizes electronics, modern rhythms, and the influence of Mani's Indian heritage) is quite unusual for a Grappelli session. Altoist Frank Morgan helps out on 'Memories,' and other sidemen include such notables as keyboardist Joe Sample and guitarist Jorge Strunz. The contrast between the two surprisingly complementary violinists is a strong reason to acquire this CD."



    Spanish Wave/Conversations

    or

    Spanish Wave/Conversations


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