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FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | .... | 28 | 29 | (Page 30) | 31 | 32 | .... | 57 | newer

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    1. Suzanne
    2. Oude Liefde Roest Niet
    3. Maandagmorgen 6:30
    4. Marjolein
    5. 'K Wil Niet Met Een Ander Dansen
    6. Engtevrees
    7. 17 Hoog
    8. Pas Goed Op
    9. Het Is Beter Zo
    10. 1983
    11. Berlijn
    12. Als Ze Lacht (Dan Lacht Ze Echt)

    Nol Havens – Vocals
    Ferd Berger – Guitar
    Ferdi Lancee – Guitar
    Ferdi Lancee – Synthesizer
    Frans Baudoin – Synthesizer
    Roel Jongenelen – Bass
    Jos V.D. Dries – Drums

    Wiki:
    "VOF de Kunst was a Dutch pop group from Tilburg founded in 1983. Their hit song was 'Suzanne' (Susanna) which reached #1 and #12 in the charts in the Netherlands and UK respectively. The lead singer of the band is Nol Havens, and they have also toured using the The Art Company name. This latter moniker was used for their only UK hit.
    The group has also produced albums of traditional festive songs and songs based on nursery rhymes. Since 1996 they are playing in theatre productions."



    Collection

    or

    Collection


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    Thanks to cos_music

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    1. Time Difference 6:19
    2. Time Out 6:39
    3. Time Travel 8:37
    4. Deep Into the Night 9:02
    5. Real Clock vs. Body Clock = Jet Lag 5:53
    6. Time and Space 7:56
    7. Time Control, or Controlled by Time 8:29
    8. Time Flies 8:01
    9. Time's Up 0:46

    Hiromi Uehara - keyboards
    David Fiuczynski - guitars
    Tony Grey - bass
    Martin Valihora - drums

    AMG:
    "Hiromi Uehara's version of jazz is unique without being willfully strange - clearly deeply rooted in the straight-ahead jazz verities, she nevertheless writes with a distinctly postmodern sensibility, gleefully juxtaposing wildly disparate musical elements and infusing everything with a joyful energy. In fact, joyful energy is probably the most significant hallmark of her music; on her latest album, even her attempt at a ballad eventually winds up in swinging uptempo territory, and just about everything else either rushes headlong or rocks out strongly in midtempo. This is actually something of a concept album centered on the idea of time, the control of time, and the effects of time on humans. It opens with the frantic but lovely 'Time Difference,' on which guest guitarist David 'Fuze' Fiuczynski is given ample room to rock out, and then lapses into the slower, funkier, but no less energetic 'Time Out' (an Uehara original, not the Dave Brubeck standard). 'Time Travel' starts out strong but runs out of gas about halfway through its eight and a half minute length, but 'Real Clock vs. Body Clock = Jet Lag' is a real hoot - a surf-rock theme that alternates with a barrelhouse barroom piano theme and then becomes an exercise in advanced guitar and synthesizer tonal insanity. One of the most interesting things about this album is the way that Fiuczynski's tonal experimentation draws out a similar adventurousness in Uehara, to the extent that it's sometimes hard to tell which of them is playing a solo. Several tracks on this album are several minutes too long, but overall it's a real treat. You'll be tired at the end, but it will be a good tired."



    Time Control

    or

    Time Control


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    1. Listen To Me People 3:21
    2. Strange Dream 5:11
    3. Life 3:18
    4. Down In Mexico 4:32
    5. Love The One 3:43
    6. A Dome Of Love 4:27
    7. I'm Dying 3:37
    8. Buried Alive 3:16
    9. The Gift/A New Man Is Born In Me 12:05

    Alfredo Diaz O. Borja - Guitarra, Vocal
    Rodolfo Valle - Guitarra
    Robert Gilles - Guitarra
    Alfonso Sanches Mejia - Bajo, Piano
    Eduardo Barcelo - Bateria
    Francisco Bareno - Guitarra, Flauta
    Hugo Goldy S. - Bateria (5)
    Manuel Goldy - Piaqno (5)
    Armando - Flauta (2)
    Francioli Vasquez - Bateria (4, 9)
    Sergio Moreno - Bajo (9)
    Victor Juarez - Armonica (3)
    Goofy - Flauta (4, 9)
    Martin Mayo - Piano (9)
    Diablo - Requinto (9)

    Dreams, Fantasies & Nightmares:
    "A legendary Mexican album whose repertoire spanned both progressive and psychedelic rock."



    Renaissance

    or

    Renaissance


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    1. Mindif 6:39
    2. Ishmael 2:34
    3. Tsakwe 5:36
    4. The Call 6:43
    5. Damara Blue 2:21
    6. The Wedding 4:53
    7. Blanton (Orchestra Only) 1:53
    8. Aspen (Piano Solo) 4:31
    9. Barakaat 4:54
    10. Tintinyana 5:54
    11. The Mountain of the Night 4:07

    Abdullah Ibrahim - Piano
    Charice Adriaansen - Double Bass
    Belden Bullock - Bass
    George Gray - Drums
    Lucy Waterhouse - Violin
    Enrico Alvares - Violin
    Ilona de Groot - Violin
    Simone Bertz - Violin
    Alan Brind - Violin
    Estelle Villotte - Viola
    Dahlia Adamopoulos - Viola
    Michelle Bruil - Viola
    Natalie Caron - Cello
    Youth Orchestra of the European Community

    AMG:
    "African Suite presents Abdullah Ibrahim's regular trio with bassist Belden Bullock and drummer George Gray along with a large string section drawn from the Youth Orchestra of the European Community. Daniel Schnyder crafted the arrangements, which are orchestral reworkings of some of Ibrahim's compositions roughly spanning a 25-year period. The strings serve to heighten the evocative globalism of Ibrahim's work, in which the pianist's South African origin, Islamic faith, longtime European residence, and jazz immersion are incorporated with a dazzling imaginative breadth.
    Here perhaps more than ever before, Ibrahim's piano is a subtle tool, coaxing the spare, singable melodies into being and generally hovering over the proceedings like a wise, almost detached presence. Both the pianist and the orchestra get a chance to shine alone, Ibrahim on 'Aspen' and the orchestra on 'Blanton.' The latter, dedicated to the late Ellington bassist Jimmy Blanton, sounds uncannily like a jazz bassist bowing an arco solo.
    The rhythm section gets a bit busier on the slow-grooving 'Ishmael,' the rollicking 'Tsakwe,' the 6/4 sketch 'Damara Blue,' and the brooding funk piece 'Tintinyana.' For sheer eclecticism and catchiness, nothing beats the 'All Blues'-style 'Barakaat' and the African-soul-jazz finale 'The Mountain of the Night.' But the strings are integrated more effectively on the calmer numbers, especially 'The Call' and an absolutely breathtaking arrangement of 'The Wedding.' One only wishes something could have been done about the audible hiss on parts of the recording."



    African Suite

    or

    African Suite


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    1-4. Illusions 5:52
    5-6. Two Intermissions 3:38
    7. Extensions 3 6:43
    8. Piano Piece 1955 2:17
    9. Piano Piece (To Philip Guston) 3:54
    10. Piano 26:33
    11. Palais de Mari 29:40

    Aki Takahashi - Piano

    AMG:
    "Pianist Aki Takahashi has long been recognized as one of the leading interpreters of the music of Morton Feldman. Here she plays a wide range of his compositions for solo piano, arranged chronologically, from the early 'Illusions' to the last piece he wrote for piano, the beautiful 'Palais de Mari.' Feldman's aesthetic evolution is fascinating to watch unfold. While the earlier works show the influence of serialism as well as the more freewheeling approach of his teacher Stefan Wolpe, the core, meditative aspect of his character was always present. Works like 'Piano Piece 1955,' with its calm demeanor and deceptively loose structure, exist in a universe unique to Feldman, seemingly isolated from the contemporary world. By the time listeners reach 'Palais de Mari,' the detachment is almost complete. His microscopic examination of adjacent sound blocks and incredibly subtle rhythmic juxtapositions, owing enormously to his obsession with Turkish carpets, take on a deep and resonant life of their own, floating into the ether. Takahashi, to whom a major piece herein was dedicated, plays with great love and care, though perhaps with a touch of dryness not found in the renditions by John Tilbury on his All Piano release of Feldman's works. Though the Tilbury album is the ne plus ultra of solo piano Feldman, this recording is a fine introduction to that facet of this wonderful composer's work."



    Aki Takahashi plays Morton Feldman

    or

    Aki Takahashi plays Morton Feldman


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    1-5. Atrées, for 10 instruments 18:00
    6. Morsima-Amorsima 11:55
    7. Nomos Alpha 17:55
    8. Herma 8:05

    1. ST/4 13:17
    2. Polla Ta Dhina, for children's choir and orchestra 7:39
    3. ST/10-1080262, for 10 instruments 12:15
    4. Akrata, for 16 wind instruments 13:56
    5. Achorripsis, for 21 instruments 5:18

    Jean-Claude Bernede - Violin
    Paul Boufil - Cello
    Pierre Penassou - Cello
    Jacques Cazauran - Double Bass
    Georges Pludermacher - Piano
    La Maitrise de Notre Dame - Choir/Chorus
    Abbé Revert - Chorus Master
    Quatuor Bernède
    Instrumental Ensemble of Contemporary Music, Paris
    Konstantin Simonovic - Conductor

    AMG:
    "In few years leading up to 1962, Iannis Xenakis was preoccupied with developing a formal theory of composition such that it could be implemented on a computer. Those were early days of the digital revolution, so there were few models to follow and little access to what was then extremely expensive hardware. So, he wrote the software himself, and, in 1962, he persuaded IBM in Paris to grant him some computer time to run his programs. The results are documented in a series of compositions collected under the 'ST' banner (ST being the programming-language shorthand for 'stochastic composition'). Xenakis called his approach stochastic because it involved the rigorous application of probability functions to as many of the decision-making processes involved in composition as possible.
    Of this set of pieces (ST/10, ST/4, ST/48, etc.), Atrées is the most accessible - less dry and arbitrary than its peers. For one thing, Xenakis ignored the computer output some of the time, and allowed his intuition more authority over the music. (Atrées came after the other pieces, so perhaps he was getting tired of transcribing computer data into musical scores! Though, to be fair, he would continue to use a computer as a compositional tool for much of the rest of his career.)
    In any case, this work, for a mixed ensemble of winds, percussion, and strings, includes sensuous passages of sustained pitches, colored by changing instrumentation, articulation, and dynamics. The 'statistical' character that dominated the other works of the set, with dissonant intervals, irregular rhythms, and pointillistic textures, is here set into a wider-ranging context, including passages of repetitive rhythms, quasi-consonant harmonies, and other elements of musical 'normalcy.'
    The five short movements can be played in any order, a fad that ran through the avant-garde circles at that time. Atrées is dedicated to the memory of Blaise Pascal, French philosopher and mathematician, who also happened to be one of the first thinkers to consider the problem of chance and probabilities. Xenakis was no doubt also inspired by Pascal's poetry.

    By 1966, over a decade into his compositional career, Iannis Xenakis had written only one solo work, Herma (for piano). Nomos Alpha was an important commission for German cellist Siegfried Palm, the foremost new music performer of his day. This piece was also important for being the first manifestation of a new approach to composition that Xenakis had been developing over several years. His efforts to create an algorithm for composing music on the basis of probability (stochastic) functions resulted in a family of computer-generated works in 1962-63, including ST/10, ST/4, ST/48, Atrées, and Morsima-Amorsima (as well as parts of Eonta). Perhaps in reaction to an element of arbitrariness inherent to that approach, Xenakis turned his attention to deterministic structures again adapted from mathematics, this time group theory. He was attempting to create successions or sequences of parametric values (such as pitch, duration, dynamic level, etc.), that would be linked to each other at certain points. In this way, sections of a piece could be created on the basis of particular sequences of individual musical elements, the whole piece being a sequence of such sections. Large scale structures and events would be reflected on the smaller scale, a fractal-like notion that was ahead of its time (no one was talking of fractals in 1966). One might also think of such a musical form as being a kind of kaleidoscope in which a collection of elements are continually recombined to form new patterns.
    Nomos Alpha, being for solo cello, seeks to match this concern for formal construction with the range of techniques available on the instrument. This is an uncompromising work, requiring the cellist to shift rapidly between different modes of bowing, plucking, tapping, and so on. The material is presented in kaleidoscopic fragments that atomize pretty much everything the cello is capable of. The non-linearity is striking and at approximately seventeen minutes in length, Nomos Alpha is not an easy listen. But, one might do well to note that the cello is in fact an instrument for which Xenakis has held a great deal of affection; his mother, who died when he was five, wanted him to play it. It is true that there is little nostalgia to be found in this piece, but there is an engagement with the possibilities of the instrument that is profound. For the few cellists who have attempted to perform it, the rewards have been great. For the rest of us, Nomos Alpha is remarkable for its originality of thought and for the expression of compositional ideas that lay the foundation for many of the works that follow it.

    In the works of Iannis Xenakis, terms like 'form' and 'structure' are not merely metaphors for comparing a time-based art (music) to a material-based one (sculpture, architecture, etc.). Trained as an architect as well as a composer, Xenakis thought of 'structure' in literal terms and many of his works are devised to manifest a mathematical idea rather than convey a mood (although, as he might argue, numbers made audible have their own potential for a special kind of expressivity). Reaching his maturity as a composer during the 1950s, Xenakis rejected both the imperceptibility of the processes at work in the serialist music of composers like Pierre Boulez and Milton Babbitt and the arbitrariness of John Cage's emerging aleatoricism. In his works from this period, Xenakis developed a number of methods for realizing numeric principles through musical forms. These principles can be seen at work in the piece under consideration here, ST/4, composed between 1955 and 1962. Scored for string quartet, ST/4 is one of a number of pieces in Xenakis''ST' series. The title given here is actually an abbreviation of the piece's full name: ST/4-1, 080262. The ST in the title stands for 'stochastic,' the term used to describe the probability formulas that generate the tone, timbre, and timing of each musical event. The subsequent numeral 4 indicates the number of performers involved and the numeral 1 indicates that this is the first piece to use a particular generative method. The string of numbers that follow give the date of the piece's completion (February 8, 1962). Other pieces in the 'ST' series include ST/10 and ST/48, also from 1962, as well as a handful of pieces that apply similar stochastic principles but forego the unwieldy utilitarian titles (such as Morsima-Amorsima from the same year).
    By the time Xenakis began composing ST/4, his generative formulas for creating structures had become complex enough and computers readily available enough that he delegated to a computer the generation of the specific note-to-note events within the larger stochastic structures delineated by his calculations. The composer thus identified the parameters within which probability calculations would be made for various musical aspects: instrumentation, pitch, note duration, timbre, attack, and others (And Xenakis was sure to make a wide variety of possibilities available, such as percussive sounds on the body of the instrument, intonational inflections, and other extended techniques). The computer was instructed to generate sound events within the parameters given; the music thus does not delineate a structure, per se, but rather laregely operates at random within a structure. The 'boundaries' of the form are not perceived, but rather are the 'space' the form contains. This seemingly mechanical process thus has a kind of organic quality in the same way that trees have a given general shape but are infinitely varied in their details of form.

    During the 1960s, Greek composer Iannis Xenakis underwent a couple of major shifts in compositional technique. First, he implemented an algorithm that in 1962 saw the light as a complete computer program for generating musical data; this approach was entirely based on 'stochastics,' or probabilities. In other words, even though completely notated, his music from that period falls into the realm of indeterministic music. Soon after, though, Xenakis developed another set of tools based entirely on deterministic principles. Akrata, which was completed in 1965, falls in between, and can be seen as a transitional work. The new approach utilizes sophisticated combinatorial techniques, combining various sets of musical elements into ordered sequences. This style is evident in Akrata right from the start: single repeated notes are passed around the brass instruments, all scored in the mid-range octaves. There are no recognizable rhythms, and the effect is rather like a kaleidoscope, with the timbre, or tonal color, being the main element by which the musical architecture is delineated.
    Akrata is a Greek term for 'pure,' and certainly this is unadorned music. There are no melodies to speak of, no catchy rhythmic patterns, no harmonic progressions in the usual sense. Instead, the piece proceeds on the basis of shifting densities, dynamics, and instrumental sonorities. If it is 'about' anything, Akrata is a study in building a musical structure based on ever-changing, but extremely limited, combinations of elements. The energy is created by the sharp articulations of the repeated notes as they are passed around the ensemble. The musical flow is faltering, though, as the sounds keep breaking off into silence.
    Akrata also showcases Xenakis' use of 'non-sound' as a structural component - the treatment of silence as an equal to sound rather than just as an articulator of structural units (i.e., marking the ends of phrases or sections). It has a strange, austere beauty that is exemplary of the minimalist element that gained artistic prominence in the 1960s."



    Chamber Music

    or

    Chamber Music


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    1. Gakuentengoku
    2. One Bad Apple
    3. Koi Shitano_I Think I Love You
    4. Young Love
    5. Koibito Bosyuutyuu_Does'nt Somebody Want To Be Wanted
    6. Koinodaiyaru6700
    7. Go Away Little Girl
    8. Asaga Nemuiyo_Day Dream Believer
    9. Sekaichizuha Kimino Iemadeno Michi_Breaking Up Is Hard To Do
    10. Sing
    11. Doukyuusei_I Woke Up In Love This Morning
    12. Steppin' Stone

    Kazuo Tamamoto
    Mitsuo Tamamoto
    Masao Tamamoto
    Akira Tamamoto
    Taeko Tamamoto

    AMG:
    "Dubbed 'the Japanese Jackson 5,' Finger 5 produced no Far Eastern Michael Jackson, but successfully replicated the concept of a sibling quintet performing Motown-styled soul and R&B hits (including Jackson 5 covers) on the J-pop scene. Finger 5 were a smash hit with the younger audiences in the mid-'70s, although their popularity only lasted a couple of years.
    The first incarnation of the group consisted of a trio of Okinawa kids, Kazuo, Mitsuo, and Masao (born 1955, 1957, and 1959, respectively), who performed as All Brothers at their father's bar, frequented by American soldiers from the local base. The boys had some success, won a talent contest, and decided to take on Tokyo in 1970, but their early releases on King Records (as Baby Brothers) went nowhere with the Japanese public, although they were welcome to play American military bases in the Tokyo region. In 1972, the band moved to Philips, added Akira (11 at the time) and sister Taeko (ten), and 're-debuted,' now as Finger 5. This time it worked: their appearance on TV generated a squall of requests, and the second single, 'Kojin Jugyo' (1973) sold nearly one and a half million copies. 'Koi no Dial 6700' (1973), their trademark song, and 'Gakuen Tengoku' (1974) were million-sellers as well, and Finger 5 became all the rage. Even Akira's oversized glasses came into fashion for a while.
    During their heyday in 1973-1975, Finger 5 continued to record singles, appeared in TV shows, and toured like their lives depended on it, performing with the Canadian teen idols the DeFranco Family in 1974. However, the J-pop working schedule, known to drain adult performers, was definitely too hard for a bunch of teens. During one show, Akira collapsed on-stage and had to be hospitalized; there were also nasty rumors about his management pushing him into taking female hormones to delay the change of appearance caused by puberty. In 1975, Kazuo quit, to be replaced by the bandmember's cousin Minoru Gushiken. Later the same year, Finger 5 quit the Japanese scene and moved to the U.S. to improve artistically, but when they returned in 1976 they discovered they were not needed anymore, and their singles stopped selling. In 1978 Finger 5 called it a day. The members launched new careers ranging from hairdressing to politics, and attempted six comebacks from the 1980s into the 2000s, most under slightly different names such as Fingers and Finger 5 Soul Band; however, only the celebration of the band's 30th anniversary in 2003 was something of a success."



    Second Album

    or

    Second Album


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    1. Gotham Lullaby 4:15
    2. Travelling 6:15
    3. The Tale 2:47
    4. Biography 9:24
    5. Dolmen Music 23:39

    Meredith Monk - Piano, Vocals
    Andrea Goodman - Vocals
    Steve Lockwood - Piano
    Robert Een - Cello, Vocals
    Collin Walcott - Percussion, Violin

    AMG:
    "Meredith Monk has such a wonderful and unique vocal style that she is able to sing in complete abstraction (no known words or language for much of the album) yet maintain a very emotional and even sentimental quality in these abstractions, at times. Listeners who can get past just how unique and abstract her approach is will find immense joy and sadness deep within her pieces. On Dolmen Music, Monk wavers from being sad to the point of being quite morose (such as the tracks 'Gotham Lullaby' and 'The Tale') to being happy to the point of hysteria (as on 'Traveling' and 'Biography') without skipping a beat. Most of the musical accompaniment is minimalist (mainly piano with occasional, sparse percussion, guest vocalists also being prominent on the final six-part track 'Dolmen Music'). This minimalist support only furthers Monk's vast vocal language as the prominent focus in the recordings. Listeners will also be very pleased to find that her wonderful voice is not crowded or overshadowed. A true original, Monk's work should be sought by anyone with an interest in vocal exploration."



    Dolmen Music

    or

    Dolmen Music


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    1. Dinah 3:00
    2. Shine 3:19
    3. I Heard 2:27
    4. How'm I Doin'? (Hey, Hey!) 2:29
    5. Rockin' Chair 3:12
    6. Chinatown, My Chinatown 2:37
    7. Sweet Sue, Just You 2:59
    8. St. Louis Blues 2:22
    9. Bugle Call Rag 2:01
    10. Dirt Dishing Daisy 3:16
    11. Diga Diga Doo 3:08
    12. Doin' the New Low Down 3:10
    13. Fiddlin' Joe 2:25
    14. Swing It, Sister 2:34
    15. Jungle Fever 3:10
    16. Put on Your Old Grey Bonnet 2:39
    17. Sleepy Head 3:03
    18. My Little Grass Shack in Kealakekua, Hawaii 2:35

    Donald Mills - Vocals
    Harry Mills - Baritone (Vocal)
    Herbert Mills - Tenor (Vocal)
    John Mills, Jr. - Tenor (Vocal)
    +
    Bing Crosby - Vocals
    Cab Calloway - Vocals
    Johnny Hodges - Clarinet, Sax (Alto), Sax (Soprano)
    Harry Carney - Clarinet, Sax (Baritone)
    Jimmy Dorsey - Clarinet
    Bunny Berigan - Trumpet
    Juan Tizol - Trombone (Valve)
    Duke Ellington & His Orchestra

    and others...

    AMG:
    "An astonishing vocal group that grew into one of the longest-lasting oldies acts in American popular music, the Mills Brothers quickly moved from novelty wonders to pop successes and continued amazing audiences for decades. Originally billed as 'Four Boys and a Guitar,' the group's early records came complete with a note assuring listeners that the only musical instrument they were hearing was a guitar. The caution was understandable, since the Mills Brothers were so proficient at re-creating trumpets, trombones, and saxophones with only their voices that early singles like 'Tiger Rag' and 'St. Louis Blues' sounded closer to a hot Dixieland combo than a vocal group. And even after the novelty wore off, the group's intricate harmonies continued charming audiences for decades.
    The four brothers were all born in Piqua, OH - John, Jr. in 1910, Herbert in 1912, Harry in 1913, and Donald in 1915. Their father owned a barber shop and founded a barbershop quartet as well, called the Four Kings of Harmony. His sons obviously learned their close harmonies first-hand, and began performing around the area. At one show, Harry Mills forgot his kazoo - the group's usual accompaniment - and ended up trying to emulate the instrument by cupping his hand over his mouth. The brothers were surprised to hear the sound of a trumpet proceeding from Harry's mouth, so they began to work the novelty into their act, with John taking tuba, Donald trombone, and Herbert a second trumpet. The act was perfect for vaudeville, and the Mills Brothers also began broadcasting over a Cincinnati radio station during the late '20s.
    After moving to New York, the group became a sensation and hit it big during 1931 and early 1932 with the singles 'Tiger Rag' and 'Dinah' (the latter a duet with Bing Crosby). Dumbfounded listeners hardly believed the notice accompanying the records: 'No musical instruments or mechanical devices used on this recording other than one guitar.' Though the primitive audio of the era lent them a bit of latitude, the Mills Brothers indeed sounded exactly like they'd been backed by a small studio band. (It was, in essence, the flipside of early material by Duke Ellington's Orchestra, on which the plunger mutes of Bubber Miley and Tricky Sam Nanton resulted in horns sounding exactly like voices.)
    The exposure continued during 1932, with appearances in the film The Big Broadcast and more hits including 'St. Louis Blues' and 'Bugle Call Rag.' John, Jr.'s sudden death in 1936 was a huge blow to the group, but father John, Sr. took over as bass singer and Bernard Addison became the group's guitarist. Still, the novelty appeared to wear off by the late '30s; despite duets with Ella Fitzgerald ('Dedicated to You') and Louis Armstrong ('Darling Nelly Gray'), the Mills Brothers' records weren't performing as well as they had earlier in the decade. All that changed in 1943 with the release of 'Paper Doll,' a sweet, intimate ballad that became one of the biggest hits of the decade - 12 weeks on the top of the charts, and six million records sold (plus sheet music). The group made appearances in several movies during the early '40s, and hit number one again in 1944 with 'You'll Always Hurt the One You Love.'
    The influence of middle of the road pop slowly crept into their material from the '40s; by the end of the decade, the Mills Brothers began recording with traditional orchestras (usually conducted by Sy Oliver, Hal McIntyre, or Sonny Burke). In 1952, 'The Glow Worm' became their last number one hit. The group soldiered on during the '50s, though John, Sr. semi-permanently retired from the group in 1956. A move from Decca to Dot brought a moderate 1958 hit, a cover of the Silhouettes''Get a Job' that made explicit the considerable influence on doo wop exerted by early Mills Brothers records. As a trio, Herbert, Harry and Donald continued performing on the oldies circuit until Harry's death in 1982, and Herbert's in 1988. The last surviving sibling, Donald, began performing with the third generation of the family - his son, John II - until his own death in 1999."



    Four Boys and a Guitar

    or

    Four Boys and a Guitar


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    1. Bacchanale (prepared piano)
    2. In a Landscape
    3. Daughter of the Lonesome Isle (prepared piano)
    4. The Seasons (Ballet in One Act): Prelude I
    5. The Seasons (Ballet in One Act): Winter
    6. The Seasons (Ballet in One Act): Prelude II
    7. The Seasons (Ballet in One Act): Spring
    8. The Seasons (Ballet in One Act): Prelude III
    9. The Seasons (Ballet in One Act): Summer
    10. The Seasons (Ballet in One Act): Prelude IV
    11. The Seasons (Ballet in One Act): Fall
    12. The Seasons (Ballet in One Act): Finale (Prelude I)
    13. Suite for Toy Piano: 1
    14. Suite for Toy Piano: 2
    15. Suite for Toy Piano: 3
    16. Suite for Toy Piano: 4
    17. Suite for Toy Piano: 5
    18. Ophelia
    19. In The Name Of The Holocaust: A (string piano)
    20. In The Name Of The Holocaust: B (string piano)
    21. Music for Piano #2 (bowed piano)

    Margaret Leng Tan - Piano, Prepared Piano, Toy Piano

    AMG:
    "Before Cage embarked on his great lifelong experiment with indeterminancy in music-a historic exploration in which he sought to create music through chance events rather than predetermining it through artistry and/or craft-he had already gained a reputation as a radical because of his creation and use of the prepared piano. This is a piano that has been set up before the concert with various devices attached to specific strings: nuts, bolts, wires, and the like that might dampen or alter the pitch or tone produced, which is unlikely to be the one normally associated with each key. The result is radical in effect but seems to have emerged from a practical problem: Cage had been engaged to provide music for modern dance and wanted to make percussion and rhythmic effects without engaging lots of percussion players and instruments. In effect, then, a 'prepared piano' is really just a box of percussion sounds. These sounds are not chancy at all: In his prepared piano pieces Cage meticulously prescribes just what piece of hardware goes where in the piano. Now, the key question: How does all this sound? Actually, the music is usually beguilingly exotic and pleasant to listen to. Daughters of the Lonesome Isle is a ten-minute, 1945 composition written for dancer Jean Erdman, and is one of the best and most famous of this entire genre of Cage's music. His efforts reached their compositional zenith a few years later with the marvelous Sonatas and Interludes for Prepared Piano)."



    Daughter of the Lonesome Isle

    or

    Daughter of the Lonesome Isle


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    1. Przygoda Bez Milosci 2:35
    2. Gdy Gasnie W Nas Plomien 2:27
    3. Matylda 2:22
    4. Plyn Pod Prad 3:14
    5. Snij O Mnie 3:11
    6. Sam Sobie Zeglarzem 3:37
    7. Wybij Sobie Z Glowy 3:53
    8. Testament 4:46
    9. Swiat Jaki Jest 4:12
    10. Zolw Na Galapagos 3:32
    11. Licz Na Siebie Sam 4:49
    12. Droga Przez Sen 3:50
    13. Po Horyzontu Kres 5:36
    14. Livin' In Sin 4:42
    15. Inna Jest Noc 3:17
    16. Zguba 3:13
    17. W Pogoni Dnia 4:32
    18. Nie Badz Taka Pewna Siebie 3:12
    19. Smoke On the Water 5:37

    Wojciech Gąssowski – śpiew
    Aleksander Michalski – saksofon tenorowy i barytonowy, flet
    Dariusz Kozakiewicz – gitara
    Krzysztof Sadowski – organy
    Andrzej Mikołajczak – organy
    Tadeusz Kłoczewiak – gitara basowa
    Bogdan Gorbaczyński – gitara basowa
    Henryk Tomala – perkusja
    Ryszard Gromek – perkusja

    discogs:
    "Polish band, a precursor of Polish hard rock. Formed in the spring of 1971 in Warsaw. The founders were: Wojciech Gąssowski, Andrzej Mikołajczak, Aleksander Michalski , Tomasz Dziubiński, Bogdan Gorbaczyński and Ryszard Gromek. Fall of 1976 the band played a farewell concert at the place of his debut, which is in the club Stodoła. Test reactivated in July 1991, on the occasion of the memorial concert in Sopot 'Three Decades of Rock in Poland. '
    One of the guitarists and composers was Dariusz Kozakiewicz."



    Przygoda Bez Milosci

    or

    Przygoda Bez Milosci


    0 0

    Thanks to ygnip

    0 0


    1. Ruika 20:35
    2. Toward The Night 14:37
    3. Homa 14:28

    Kyoko Sato – Soprano Vocals
    Masaharu Kanda – Cello
    Toshiyuki Uzuka – Conductor
    String Ensemble Endless

    discogs:
    "Somei Satoh was born in 1947 in Sendai (northern Honshu), Japan. He began his career in 1969 with 'Tone Field,' an experimental, mixed media group based in Tokyo. In 1972 he produced 'Global Vision,' a multimedia arts festival, that encompassed musical events, works by visual artists and improvisational performance groups. In one of his most interesting projects held at a hot springs resort in Tochigi Prefecture in 1981, Satoh places eight speakers approximately one kilometer apart on mountain tops overlooking a huge valley. As a man-made fog rose from below, the music from the speakers combined with laser beams and moved the clouds into various formations. Satoh has collaborated twice since 1985 with theater designer, Manuel Luetgenhorst in dramatic stagings of his music at The Arts at St. Ann's in Brooklyn, New York.
    Satoh was awarded the Japan Arts Festival prize in 1980 and received a visiting artist grant from the Asian Cultural Council in 1983, enabling him to spend one year in the United States.
    He has written more than thirty compositions, including works for piano, orchestra, chamber music, choral and electronic music, theater pieces and music for traditional Japanese instruments."



    Toward the Night

    or

    Toward the Night


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    1. Now's The Time 9:21
    2. Out Of Nowhere 7:54
    3. Take The A Train 9:33
    4. Here Is That Rainy Day 5:31
    5. Jeepers Creepers 5:07
    6. Struttin With Some Barbeque 6:42

    Arne Domnérus – Alto Saxophone, Clarinet
    Lars Erstrand – Vibraphone
    Bengt Hallberg – Piano
    Georg Riedel – Bass
    Egil Johansen – Drums

    Wiki:
    "Sven Arne Domnérus (20 December 1924 – 2 September 2008) was a Swedish jazz alto saxophonist and clarinetist, popularly nicknamed Dompan.
    He was best known for his recordings with visiting American players such as James Moody, Art Farmer and Clifford Brown. Domnérus also played with Charlie Parker when he made his tour of Sweden 1950. Domnérus worked with the Swedish Radio Big Band from 1956 to 1978, and wrote for television and films during the period. He also recorded extensively with Bengt Hallberg. Together with fellow Swedes Bengt-Arne Wallin, Rolf Ericson and Ake Persson (the latter two both former members of Duke Ellington's Orchestra), he participated at the Jazz Workshops, organised for the Ruhrfest in Recklinghausen by Hans Gertberg from the Hamburg radio station."



    Good Vibes Jazz At The Pawnshop 3

    or

    Good Vibes Jazz At The Pawnshop 3


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    1. Yo Soy El Tango
    2. Bajo Un Cielo De Estrellas
    3. Que Falta Que Me Haces
    4. Cantina
    5. Pedacito De Cielo
    6. Percal
    7. Como Le Digo A La Vieja
    8. Bazar De Los Juguetes Podesta
    9. Lejos De Buenos Aires
    10. Corazon No Le Hagas Caso
    11. Ya Sale El Tren
    12. Sans Souci
    13. Nada
    14. Saludos
    15. Margo
    16. Cimarron De Ausencia Larenza
    17. Una Tarde Cualquiera

    Miguel Caló - Bandoneon
    Domingo Federico - Bandoneon
    Carlos Lazzari - Bandoneon
    Armando Pontier - Bandoneon
    Eduardo Rovira - Bandoneon
    Enrique Francini - Violin
    Osmar Maderna - Piano
    Alberto Podesta - Cantan (1-8)
    Raul Beron - Cantan (9,10)
    Jorge Ortiz - Cantan (11)
    Raul Iriarte - Cantan (13,15)
    Roberto Arrieta - Cantan (16,17)

    todotango.com:
    "In the artistic history of maestro Miguel Caló we see two stages well differentiated that reveal his musical evolution and his gifts as great orchestra leader.
    Even though his most transcendental success is related to tango in the forties, his work starts in the late twenties and is consolidated during the thirties.
    His first stage began with the 1934 orchestra, in which we can appreciate a style familiar to Fresedo´s and a sound that reminds us of Di Sarli. Although he had put together other outfits before, these were reunited for certain occasions and were of little importance.
    The orchestra in 1934 had Miguel Nijensohn on piano, who was to leave an indelible impression on the style of it forever, even after the forties. This instrument will have the responsibility of linking the musical phrases, with a timing and an ideal beat for the dancers.
    During this time we can highlight the vocal participation of Carlos Dante, with whom he recorded 18 numbers of a noticeable beauty.
    Alberto Morel and his brother Roberto Caló were as well singers in this first part of his history that lasted until the year 1939.
    The forties reveal us the maturity of this great director, capable of assembling an outfit of young musicians of extraordinary capacity and professionalism, and all of them later organized their own groups..
    At this second stage, Caló carried out and developed a style that connects traditional tango with the innovations of the age, without stridence, with a highlighted presence of the violins, a rhythmic bandoneon section and a spectacular piano, played by Osmar Maderna the first year, who was later replaced by Miguel Nijensohn, on his comeback to the orchestra.
    Among the musicians that lined-up in his orchestra, the following stand out: Domingo Federico, Armando Pontier, Carlos Lazzari, Eduardo Rovira, Julián Plaza, José Cambareri (bandoneons), Enrique Francini, Antonio Rodio, Nito Farace (violins), Ariel Pedernera and Juan Fassio (double bass).
    Miguel Caló not only promoted great musicians, but also great singers that made their professional debut in his orchestra, for example the cases of Raúl Berón, Alberto Podestá and Raúl Iriarte.
    As for Berón we can say that he was discovered by Armando Pontier, who introduced him to the leader, and about this there is an interesting story. This singer together with his brother José was essentially devoted to folk music, furthermore Raúl Berón only knew a few lines of a tango. Because of that, maestro Caló took him to his cabaret 'Shangai' so as he got acquainted with the music of his orchestra.
    After outlining a repertory, the singer accompanied the maestro at the radio performances. But as the officials of the broadcasting did not like the singer they suggested Caló to dismiss him. With grief, Caló told him that at the end of the month they would end their relationship.
    In the meantime, the first disc recorded by Raúl Berón with the orchestra is issued, the tango 'Al compás del corazón' by Domingo Federico and Homero Expósito, which became an incredible boom that meant a success in records sold.
    The same officials who had negatively criticized the vocalist, congratulated maestro Caló for his choice and accepted their mistake. This made possible that one of the most important voices of our tango and, undoubtedly, the best the orchestra had, did not spoil his career.
    Miguel Caló was a musician formally trained, that studied violin and bandoneon.
    After 1926 he was in different orchestras of major importance, he was part of the bandoneon section in the orchestra of Osvaldo Fresedo. In 1927 he was admitted in the pianist and leader Francisco Pracánico´s orchestra.
    In 1929 he put together his first orchestra, which he disbanded to join the orchestra of the poet and pianist Cátulo Castillo on a tour of Spain. On that tour the brothers Malerba and the singer Roberto Maida were included as well.
    He returned to Buenos Aires and re-assembled his orchestra with Domingo Cuestas (bandoneon), Domingo Varela Conte, Hugo Gutiérrez and Enrique Valtri on violins, Enzo Ricci on double bass and the pianist Luis Brighenti.
    Once again he is required to travel abroad and in 1931 he went to the United States with the Osvaldo Fresedo orchestra.
    Already in 1932, again as conductor of his orchestra, he recorded for the first time, for the disappeared Splendid label the numbers: 'Milonga porteña' (tango by Caló himself, Luis Brighenti and lyrics by Mario César Gomila) and 'Amarguras' (waltz by Miguel Nijensohn and Jaime de los Hoyos). The singer was Román Prince.
    Miguel Caló was not a remarkable composer, but some of his works, in collaboration with Osmar Maderna (both also authors of the lyrics), are incredibly beautiful, such as 'Jamás retornarás' and 'Qué te importa que te llore', both committed to disc with Raúl Berón's voice. The tango 'Dos fracasos', with lyrics by Homero Expósito and the milonga 'Cobrate y dame el vuelto', lyrics by Enrique Dizeo, were also very popular.
    In 1961 with the bandoneonists Armando Pontier and Domingo Federico, the violinists Enrique Francini and Hugo Baralis, on piano Orlando Tripodi, and the singers Raúl Berón and Alberto Podestá, Caló re-assembled part of the line-up of the forties, with the name 'Miguel Caló y su orquesta de las estrellas'(M.C.and his all-stars orchestra). They played on Radio El Mundo with such success that they recorded on the Odeon label, 12 new numbers (between 16/4/1963 and 7/6/1963).
    The Miguel Caló orchestra will be remembered as the best tango performance, one that goes beyond its age and that today is recognized for its great artistic qualities and by a dancing group that permanently evokes it with the notes of 'Sans Souci' (by Enrique Delfino), maybe its emblematic interpretation."



    Yo Soy El Tango

    or

    Yo Soy El Tango


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    1. Last Kiss 4:04
    2. Sure Got the Power 4:17
    3. Mexico 5:52
    4. Hotel LaRue 5:16
    5. Feel the Pain 5:12
    6. Losin' Kind of Love 3:28
    7. City of Angels 7:09
    8. The Mill's on Fire 5:49
    9. I Keep Going/Hard Bargain 5:36

    Joe Lynn Turner - Guitar, Vocals
    Rick Blakemore - Guitar, Slide Guitar, Vocals
    Larry Dawson - Clavinet, Moog, Organ, Piano, Strings
    Denny LaRue - Organ, Piano, Vocals
    Bob Danyls - Bass, Vocals
    Lou Mondelli - Drums, Vocals
    Santos - Percussion
    Jimmy Hall - Harmonica (4), Vocal (2)

    AMG:
    "By the time Last Kiss rolled out a year after Fandango's eponymous debut, the group had added three more members to flesh out its sound. The results add a more jam-friendly dimension at times, especially during 'Hotel LaRue' and 'Mexico.' The songwriting and arrangements are tight and focused when compared to Fandango, and the band branches out into new creative territory and sound exploration while staying firmly entrenched in its rock & roll roots. There are also pauses for experimentation at times. The dreamy synth intro of 'Feel the Pain' seems as if Fandango took a wrong turn down the prog rock aisle of the rock & roll supermarket before recovering into a verse sounding somewhat similar to Fleetwood Mac's 'You Make Loving Fun.' The group also acknowledges the emerging influence of disco on popular culture with 'Losin' Kind of Love,' whose basslines shift between AOR and the pop snap of commercialized disco. Fandango definitely had a knack for trying adventurous things, something that so many of their contemporaries failed to do."



    Last Kiss

    or

    Last Kiss


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    String Quartet No. 1 ("Métamorphoses nocturnes")
    1. Allegro grazioso 1:32
    2. Vivace, capriccioso 1:58
    3. Adagio, mesto 2:08
    4. Presto 2:43
    5. Andante tranquillo 2:28
    6. Tempo di Valse, moderato, con eleganza, un poco capriccioso 2:18
    7. Allegretto, un poco gioviale 2:56
    8. Prestissimo 4:34

    String Quartet No. 2
    9. I. Allegro nervoso 4:45
    10. II. Sostenuto, molto calmo 4:32
    11. III. Come un meccanismo di precisione 3:04
    12. IV. Presto furioso, brutale, tumultuoso 2:02
    13. V. Allegro con delicatezza 5:36

    14. Hommage à Hilding Rosenberg, for violin & cello 1:09

    Ballade and Dance, for 2 violins
    15. Balada. Andante 1:53
    16. Joc. Allegro vivace 1:27

    Movements (2) for string quartet
    17. Andante cantabile 6:35
    18. Allegretto poco capriccioso 6:30

    Arditti Quartet:
    David Alberman - Violin
    Irvine Arditti - Violin
    Garth Knox - Viola
    Rohan de Saram - Cello

    AMG:
    "Ligeti's String Quartet No. 1 was written in Budapest in 1953-1954, but not premiered until May 8, 1958, by the Ramor Quartet in Vienna. By that time Ligeti had already left the Soviet-controlled Hungary for the West and had been introduced to music that had only barely penetrated the Eastern bloc; including the music of Stockhausen and Boulez, the advent of serialism, and the electronic music studios. Ligeti's own progress as a composer put him far beyond the influence of Kodály, Bartók, and the Hungarian nationalism that permeated most of his work in Budapest. He has returned to these influences more and more explicitly, for example in the Piano Études of the 1980s and 1990s. Bartók's influence on Ligeti's music is twofold, and includes his sophisticated sense of rhythm and motivic development, and also his lifelong use of folk song and folk-influenced musical materials. Ligeti's Musica ricercata for piano; their offspring, the Six Bagatelles for wind quintet; and the String Quartet No. 1 show these influences most clearly.
    Although the String Quartet No. 1 is ostensibly a one-movement work lasting over 20 minutes, this single movement makes up many sections of disparate character. The piece opens with a stepwise melody (G-A-G sharp-A sharp) accompanied by chromatic scales. A second theme is angular, staccato, and aggressive. Closer attention to these two apparently disparate sections, however, reveals similarities in their melodic contours, which are based on the relatively simple chromaticism of the opening motif. New ideas and textures succeed one another throughout the piece, typically in fast-slow-fast alternation (another Bartók technique), but the melodic characteristics of each section may be traced to the piece's opening. Variation of rhythm provides the piece with much of its sense of progression, with somewhat amorphous passages giving way to the quick irregular meters of a dance form; there are also other stylistic parodies of folk music. Use of biting dissonance (one of the reasons the composer's more advanced work was not officially supported) occurs throughout; the second section features passages of parallel minor seconds. Ligeti's ear for unusual timbral possibilities is already at work in this early piece. High harmonic glissandi near the end of the work may presage the distinctive sound of Apparitions and the later pieces for which Ligeti came to be known.

    Near the very end of György Ligeti's Second String Quartet, there's an uncanny moment - far too private to be the icon it should be - where the work's previous 20 minutes suddenly seem to vanish, and the spirit reveals itself. Four and a half movements of the most myriad variance have passed; all manner of texture and timbre, acrobatics, and still scenes have been put forth; and after a collective 'whisper' cadenza of extreme, suppressed virtuosity, comes this sad, hobbled musical sigh, rolling in and out like a Viennese fin de siècle tumbleweed. The moment, marked by such Sphinx-like tenderness, casts an equivocal light on all the Quartet's past mechanics, as if it were flowing silently underneath them like a grieving ghost, and only at this very instant allowed itself a fleeting incarnation. The whole incident happens in the wink of an ear, and soon enough this elusive work ushers itself out with not so much as a clipped breath.
    Upon hearing this episode, one might interpret Ligeti's Second Quartet as a strange set of transformations on something inexpressible in its original form. Perhaps it's a record of strategies for a nonexistent game; or an array of snapshots of an imaginary and highly mobile object; or possibly it's a collection of chemical changes and altered states in the life of a periodic element yet to be discovered (Ligetium 90?). Whatever the case, the sense looms that a secret moves with uneasy persistence through this music, and that its extraordinary differentiation is a kind of expert evasion of a simple but unapproachable truth - perhaps that sad, hobbled sigh which pokes in at the end. But for this moment, 'quality' is replaced by 'quantity': the object (melancholy, blue-ness, nostalgia) becomes the flow of numbers and forces (fast-faster, bright-dark, mechanized-organic). Indeed, one could argue that, save for this now-belabored 'sigh' incident near the work's end, this Quartet is the anti-object. Ligeti himself confessed a desire to create a music in which 'there is no longer any motivic writing...no contours, only sound textures, which are sometimes frayed and almost fluid...and at other times grainy and machine-like.' The composer continued 'how, I asked myself, can color replace contours, how can contrasting volumes and weights create form?'
    This quest - to eradicate the hard bit, to liquidate material into chemistry-at-work - arguably engendered some of Ligeti's greatest music; the Second Quartet has gone down as a classic of twentieth century chamber music, an anthem to its time. But to ask the question 'Why liquidate?' is a different breed of exploration, open only to hypothesis. If it's not too vulgar to venture, perhaps the making of a purely 'texturizing' music was a kind of era-therapy for the European mind, a deliberate blanching of recent ruins, a 'melting of solids into air.' A perfect inversion of Emily Dickinson's famous image - 'After great pain, a formal feeling comes - /The nerves sit ceremonious, like Tombs...' Here the nerves rise from their graves into ether; here great pain casts formality into a formula far more fluent."



    Streichquartette und Duette

    or

    Streichquartette und Duette


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    1. Long Ago 7:05
    2. Fable 1:01
    3. Once 6:14
    4. Chatterbox 1:18
    5. Calliope 8:35
    6. Twice Told Tales 7:39
    7. Three Wishes 0:51
    8. Always Known 7:11
    9. Again 0:38
    10. Telltale 6:16
    11. Tattletale 1:14
    12. Unbeknownst 5:11
    13. Hush-A-Bye 1:33

    Louis Belogenis - Saxophone
    Tony Malaby - Saxophone
    Trevor Dunn - Bass
    Ryan Sawyer - Drums

    dustedmagazine.com:
    "New York City is a big place. When you add in Brooklyn and the other boroughs it can be downright daunting in size. With so much acreage, and so many musicians falling under the seemingly ubiquitous ‘Downtown” designation, any head-scratching on the part of listeners toward tenor saxophonist Louie Belogenis seems at least in part forgivable. Given lengthy tenures in Tucson and his native Minneapolis, Tony Malaby’s horn is even lower profile. In sum, improvising saxophonists can appear a dime a dozen in the Big Apple.
    Twice Told Tales serves as a much needed shot in the arm to inoculate against such summary dismissals. Teaming Belogenis and Malaby with a crack rhythm core of Trevor Dunn on upright bass and Ryan Sawyer on traps, this Japanese bankrolled session delivers a baker’s dozen of reasons why obscurity hopefully isn’t a viable outcome for this quartet. On the endearing handwritten note that served as promo preamble for the disc, Belogenis maps out the band’s points of departure from the usual two tenor tandems that have long been a niche custom in jazz. He cites “empathic and poetic interplay” and “alchemical sensibility” among the decisive differentiating factors. Hell, it’s a well-written (if obviously biased) review in and of itself and his assessment seems spot on to my ears. And with the liner notes scribed in a combination kanji and hiragana, it also makes for some convenient context.
    But what of the music specifically? Long compositions vie with significantly shorter ones creating appearance of a suite-like structure with tangential interludes. The scripting is so seamless that it’s difficult at times to discern where premeditation ends and extemporization begins. Conversely, Malaby’s silver-lacquered tenor is easily distinguishable from Belogenis’ burnished brass counterpart. The latter’s sound is commonly dry, rasp-inflected and tightly wound, while the former favors a fatter, more girth-guided tone and smoother phrasing style. Though both men often adopt elements of each other’s styles and also turn to other horns including soprano and alto variants. Deferring amiably to the dark forceful drive of Dunn and Sawyer on the opener “Long Ago,” the horns eventually enter with Belogenis testing the terrain on a short melodic reconnaissance and Malaby soon treading the path broken. Near the track’s end, the rhythm section slips unobtrusively into silence leaving the tenors to bob and twine in powerful braiding lines accapella.
    Bass and drums achieve an equal footing alongside the frontline pair. Dunn demonstrates stunning facility with sharply bladed bow, scything harmonics from the crisp studio air as cunning counterpoint to the horns on pieces like the somber-patterned “Once.” Sawyer’s succinctly deployed cadences shape the action in staccato fashion on “Calliope,” tugging and pushing in tidal bursts amidst the renal overtone shrieks of the reeds. Captured in the immaculate sonics of Avatar Studios, every nuance, from the tensile twang of tautly snapped strings to the suspirating murmur of brushes on drum skin, is laid bare. The same holds fast for the exquisitely rendered horns, and the minute details of each saxophonist’s individual dialect make for some steadfastly entrancing listening.
    Free jazz need not only be about ear-rending howls and instrument-splintering dissonance. Belogenis and Malaby extol the virtues of this truism at length and as such their shared music with Dunn and Sawyer comes across as far more satisfying than the usual horns-bass-drums blowout. It’s this difference that will likely translate into higher visibility for their collective and individual talents on the hardscrabble proving ground that is the New York scene."



    Twice Told Tales

    or

    Twice Told Tales


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    1. Travelin' Man 5:09
    2. Song for My Mother 5:03
    3. You're Not the Same 5:16
    4. Workin' Together 5:35
    5. Golden Time of Day 5:35
    6. I Wish You Well 4:43
    7. I Need You 9:59

    Frankie Beverly - Guitar, Vocals
    Ronald Lowry - Congas, Vocals
    McKinley Williams - Percussion, Vocals
    +
    Wayne Thomas - Guitar
    Sam Porter - Keyboards
    Robin Duhe - Bass
    Joe Provost - Drums
    Ahaguna G. Sun - Drums

    AMG:
    "Maze and Frankie Beverly had a lot to live up to when the time came to record a second album, and while Golden Time of Day isn't quite as strong as their magnificent debut, it's nonetheless an excellent soul/funk offering. Disco was still incredibly popular in 1978, but it had little impact on Maze, which continued to avoid disco's hyper tendencies and favored a comfortable, more relaxed soul groove instead. The idealistic 'Workin' Together' (a call for unity) and the reflective title song were well received by black radio, and the poignant album track 'Song for My Mother' never became the hit single it should have been. On pop stations, Maze still couldn't get arrested. But a lack of pop support certainly didn't prevent Golden Time of Day from going gold."



    Golden Time Of Day

    or

    Golden Time Of Day


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