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FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | .... | 10 | 11 | (Page 12) | 13 | 14 | .... | 57 | newer

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    1. Banyana (The Children of Africa) 2:04
    2. Asr 8:17
    3. Ishmael 6:17
    4. The Honey Bird 6:25
    5. The Dream 6:45
    6. Yukio Khalifa 10:24
    7. Ishmael 12:59

    Abdullah Ibrahim - Piano, Sax (Soprano), Vocals
    Cecil McBee - Bass
    Roy Brooks - Drums

    AMG:
    "Abdullah Ibrahim sings and plays soprano on 'Ishmael' but otherwise sticks to piano on this trio set with bassist Cecil McBee and drummer Roy Brooks. As usual Ibrahim's folkish melodies (this CD has six of his originals plus a previously alternate take of 'Ishmael') pay tribute to his South African heritage and Islam religion without becoming esoteric or inaccessible. Some of the unpredictable music gets a bit intense (Ibrahim is in consistently adventurous form) but his flights always return back to earth and have an air of optimism. An above average effort from a true individualist."



    Banyana

    or

    Banyana


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    1. Tapu
    2. Har'ee'nee, Hashmee'ee'nee
    3. Al Mishkavi
    4. Min Ha'midbar
    5. Libavtini
    6. Pithi Li
    7. Patahti
    8. Ana Halah
    9. Ma Yafit
    10. Mayim Rabim

    Ayelet Rose Gottlieb - voice
    Michael Gottlieb - voice
    Michael Winograd - clarinet, bass clarinet
    Rufus Cappadocia - cello
    Anat Fort - piano
    Take Toriyama - drums, percussion
    Michal Cohen - background vocals
    Deanna Neil - background vocals
    +
    Galeet Dardashti - Persian trope

    allaboutjazz:
    "Mayim Rabim is replete with compositions that are able to stand on their own as superb improvisational vehicles for a fine eclectic group of musicians—Israeli-born vocalist Ayelet Rose Gottlieb, pianist Anat Fort, clarinetist Michael Winograd (whose development into a world class klezmer-jazz artist continues to impress), drummer Take Toriyama, cellist Rufus Cappadocia, and four additional vocalists—to deliver eleven sensual pieces. Lyrically, these works draw on material from the Bible's most erotic literature, Shir Hashirim, or Song of Songs, each song being a celebration of love with an emphasis on its passion.
    Like love itself, many emotions weave their way through these pieces. An initial wonderment turns to exhilaration, as beautifully stated on "Libavtini (Captivated my heart), where the clarinet joyously sings above a vocal chorus. Other emotional moments include the frank percussive sensuality of "Pithi Li (Open Up), the stark heartache portrayed by Gottlieb's textural vocals and Fort's piano on "Patahti (I Opened), and love's all-consuming enormity expressed by "Mayim Rabim (Great Waters).
    Singing primarily in Hebrew, Gottlieb both soars vocally and uses her voice as equal instrumental partner. She's most impressive, however, with her ability to convey a line with a devotion and phrasing that powerfully straddles jazz, cantorial music and the avant-garde. Her brother Michael contributes the perfect male vocal balance on selected cuts, the Persian trope chanting of Galeet Dardashti beautifully blends with the overall erotic exotica feel, and background vocalists Deanna Neil and Michael Cohen add to the powerful breadth of the sound. When viewed holistically, Mayim Rabim succeeds both musically and conceptually. One of this year's finest vocal releases."



    Mayim Rabim

    or

    Mayim Rabim


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    1. The Fury 0:51
    2. The Sons of Anu 7:09
    3. Nightmare Cinema 5:25
    4. Stony Days 6:16
    5. StarCycle 5:04
    6. Axis of Evil 6:09
    7. Gypsy Moth 1:59
    8. Sweet Lament 3:14
    9. Black Utopia 8:50

    Derek Sherinian - keyboards
    Jerry Goodman - violin (2,3,6,7,8,9)
    Yngwie Malmsteen - guitar (1,2,6)
    Al DiMeola - guitar (2,7)
    Zakk Wylde - guitar (3,6,9)
    Steve Lukather - guitar (4,5,8)
    Brian Tichy - additional guitars (2,3,6,9)
    Tony Franklin - bass (2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9)
    Billy Sheehan - bass (2,6,9)
    Simon Phillips - drums

    AMG:
    "Back with his fourth solo album in as many years, erstwhile Dream Theater keyboard player Derek Sherinian is once again pushing the prog metal/hard rock agenda with his ever intense, always impressive chops. But to his credit, Sherinian seems fully aware that his amazing keyboard skills can't carry the load of virtuoso performances on their own, and he calls in every favor to employ the assistance of an astounding group of shredders, including Zakk Wylde, Al DiMeola, Steve Lukather, and, perhaps most surprising of all, the notoriously arrogant Yngwie Malmsteen. Sure enough, the latter's involvement is likely to pose the greatest interest to guitar fanatics (who undoubtedly constitute a huge portion of the consumer base here), as Black Utopia offers a rare opportunity to hear the intractable guitarist performing in any way, shape, or form outside his regularly dazzling, lightning-fast, but ultimately repetitive Euro-metal template. Such stylistic digressions are minimal, to be sure, but it's still nice to hear his distinctly fluid and florid soloing in any other context nonetheless. As for the other six-stringers on hand, their contributions are also pretty much beyond reproach, jousting against and racing alongside Sherinian's remarkable keyboard runs throughout - a case in point being the seven-minute 'The Sons of Anu,' an absolutely frenzied Mahavishnu Orchestra-like workout climaxing in a breathtaking DiMeola solo on nylon-string guitar. The remaining all-instrumental material (highlighted by excellent cuts like 'Axis of Evil' and the title track) maintains the highest caliber of musicianship, if not always the most inventive and memorable songwriting, leaving the focus firmly cast upon the extended solo showcases. On an interesting side note, many of these tracks were co-written by sometime Ozzy Osbourne drummer Brian Tichy, who also contributes rhythm guitars. Oh, and the additional backing cast features bassists Billy Sheehan and Tony Franklin, violinist Jerry Goodman, and Simon Phillips on drums. Whatever else you might think about this music, Black Utopia is the stuff of noodling dreams."



    Black Utopia

    or

    Black Utopia


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    1. Se E Questao De Adeus Ate Logo
    2. Nao Tem Perdao
    3. Reflexos
    4. Gazela
    5. Mestre Bimba
    6. Ossaim
    7. Em Casa
    8. Pra Machucar Meu Coracao - Rosa Maria - Nao Tenho Lagrimas
    9. Quadros
    10. Nao Tem Nada Nao'
    11. O Homem
    12. Morada
    13. Amanhanga
    14. Infinito

    Luiz Eca - Teclados, Percussao, Vocal
    Bebeto - Baixo, Percussao, Vocal, Sax, Flutas
    Helcio Milito - Percussao, Vocal

    AMG:
    "Easily the most talented bossa nova group of the '60s, Tamba Trio perfected a breezy, swinging version of bossa vocal-pop that proved incredibly influential in Brazil and throughout the world. Comprising pianist Luizinho Eça, bassist Bebeto (born Adalberto Castilho), and drummer Helcio Milito, Tamba Trio not only played a wide range of instruments but also contributed incredibly close harmony vocals. (Most bossa nova groups specialized in either vocals or musicianship, but not both.) Taking their name from a type of drum used by Milito, the trio formed in the early '60s and rode a wave of bossa nova popularity through the rest of the decade. From their self-titled 1962 debut, 'O Barquinho' became a big hit in Brazil. One year later, their irresistibly swinging version of Jorge Ben's 'Mas Que Nada' (recorded for 1963's Avanço LP) became their best-known hit -- it was used most famously by Nike in a 1998 World Cup television commercial. Tamba Trio continued recording into the late '60s, and provided the backing for Edu Lobo's 1967 debut. In 1968, Eça and Bebeto re-formed the band (with Dorio Ferreira on bass and Ohana on drums) as Tamba 4. Though the group's two albums for Creed Taylor through CTI/A&M, We and the Sea and Samba Blim, were among the best work of their career, they failed commercially. Eça has also recorded several albums on his own."




    Tamba (Black Plis Blus)

    or

    Tamba (Black Plis Blus)

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    1. Da Man 7:16
    2. Early in the Morning 11:13
    3. Don't Care 12:32
    4. Toad 12:59
    5. Aiko Biaye 13:00
    6. Man of Constant Sorrow 3:50
    7. Do What You Like 11:47
    8. Doin' It 5:26

    Ginger Baker - Drums, Percussion, Tympani [Timpani]
    Graham Bond - Alto, Organ, Piano, Sax (Alto), Vocals
    Harold McNair - Flute, Flute (Alto), Sax (Alto), Sax (Tenor)
    Bud Beadle - Sax (Alto), Sax (Baritone), Sax (Soprano)
    Steve Gregory - Flute, Sax (Tenor)
    Chris Wood - Flute, Sax (Tenor)
    Steve Winwood - Guitar, Keyboards, Organ, Vocals
    Denny Laine - Guitar, Vocals
    Ken Craddock - Guitar, Organ, Piano, Vocals
    Jeanette Jacobs - Bass, Keyboards, Vocals
    Rick Grech - Bass, Violin
    Colin Gibson - Bass
    Neemoi Acquaye - Drums, Percussion
    Remi Kabaka - Drums, Percussion
    Phil Seaman - Drums, Percussion
    Kwasi "Rocky" Dzidzornu - Percussion
    Aliki Ashman - Vocals
    Catherine James - Vocals
    Diane Stewart - Vocals

    AMG:
    "For a change, the late 1960s yielded up a supergroup that lived up to its hype and then some. Ginger Baker's Air Force was recorded live at Royal Albert Hall in January of 1970 -- in fact, this may be the best-sounding live album ever to come out of that notoriously difficult venue -- at a show that must have been a wonder to watch, as the ten-piece band blazed away in sheets of sound, projected delicate flute parts behind multi-layered African percussion, or built their songs up Bolero-like, out of rhythms from a single instrument into huge jazz-cum-R&B crescendos. Considering that this was only their second gig, the group sounds astonishingly tight, which greatly reduces the level of self-indulgence that one would expect to find on an album where five of the eight tracks run in excess of ten minutes. There aren't too many wasted notes or phrases in the 78 minutes of music included here, and Steve Winwood's organ, Baker, Phil Seamen, and Remi Kabaka's drums, and the sax playing by Chris Wood, Graham Bond (on alto), and Harold McNair, all stand out, especially the sax trio's interwoven playing on 'Don't Care.' Additionally, Denny Laine plays louder, flashier, more virtuoso-level guitar than he ever got to turn in with the Moody Blues, bending notes in exquisite fashion in the opening of Air Force's rendition of the Cream standard 'Toad,' crunching away on rhythm elsewhere, and indulging in some more introspective blues for 'Man of Constant Sorrow.' The original CD reissue, which sounded pretty good, was deleted in the early '90s, but this album has been remastered again and repackaged as part of the Ginger Baker retrospective Do What You Like on Polygram's Chronicles series. It's a must-own for jazz-rock, Afro-fusion, blues-rock, or percussion fans."



    Ginger Baker's Air Force

    or

    Ginger Baker's Air Force


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    1. Oceanus 10:58
    2. Visitation 2:32
    3. Drifting Petals 6:56
    4. Nimbus 6:25
    5. Winter Solstice 3:58
    6. Piscean Dance 3:33
    7. Red And Black 1:12
    8. Sand 4:07

    Ralph Towner - Guitars, Piano
    Jan Garbarek - Saxophone, Flute
    Eberhard Weber - Bass, Cello
    Jon Christensen - Drums, Percussion

    AMG:
    "When Ralph Towner burst onto the contemporary jazz scene in the mid-70s, listeners were well aware of his awesome talent as a member of Oregon. But when Solstice was issued on the ECM label, it took the brilliant guitarist's caché to a much higher level, especially as a composer. With the otherworldly curved soprano sax and flute playing of Jan Garbarek, the precise drumming of Jon Christensen, and unique bass sounds of Eberhard Weber, the music on this album lifted the ECM/Euro-styled jazz and improvised music to a new realm of pure expressionism. Simply put -- this music is stunningly beautiful. The incredible 'Oceanus' begins with Towner's cascading guitar, followed by the swelling and symphonic bass of Weber, a swinging drum line by Christensen with Garbarek's atmospheric and dramatic curved soprano layering contrasting timbres, symmetry, and unusual colors. 'Nimbus' opens with some astounding technical harmonics from Towner, more so considering the acoustic nature of his instrument. A circular theme in implied 3/4 underneath 4/4 leads to overdubbed flutes from Garbarek, bowed bass, the curved soprano in 6/8 all identifying the pure ECM sound. 'Piscean Dance' is a funky workout between Towner and Christensen, the earthiest track on the date, and an exercise of intuitive confluence. Other portions of the disc are space oriented like the loose, free and haunting 'Red & Black,' 'Visitation' with multiple percussion sounds of flexatone and shakers under Weber's bowed bass and Garbarek's alien dragonfly flute, while Weber's 'Sand' has the musicians staring at the Crab Nebula while firmly rooted in a strut later in the piece. Towner's wondrous piano is heard on 'Drifting Petals,' a pretty and pensive waltz with unison lines alongside Garbarek's flute, then Towner switches to guitar in a deeper discourse with the quartet. As cold as the Norwegian studio (Oslo) they were recording in, 'Winter Solstice' is not so much profound as it is telepathic, as the players use stop-start techniques, again inserting a 3/4 rhythm into a 4/4 equation. Of the many excellent recordings he has offered, Solstice is Towner's crowning achievement as a leader fronting this definitive grouping of ECM stablemates who absolutely define the label's sound for the time frame, and for all time."



    Solstice

    or

    Solstice


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    1. Con
    2. Nunca Más
    3. Dios
    4. Buen Aniversario
    5. C'est Fini
    6. Te Amo
    7. Los Placeres Antiguos
    8. Quédate
    9. Idiota, Te Quiero
    10. Habrá Un Despertar
    11. Cuando No Pueda MásS
    12. Isabel




    Isabel

    or

    Isabel


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    1. Maunaleo 4:40
    2. Hanohano Ka Lei Pikake 3:13
    3. Lei Hali'a 3:33
    4. Ipo Lei Momi 2:41
    5. Ka Nohana Pili Kai 3:55
    6. He Lei No Kamaile 3:53
    7. Hanohano 'O Maui 4:14
    8. Mele a Ka Pu'uwai 4:21
    9. Ku'u Pua Mae 'Ole 5:36
    10. Toad Song 2:38
    11. Kawaipunahele 4:49
    12. Kaiona 3:38
    13. The Road That Never Ends 2:51

    1. Mele Inoa No Kawaipunaheleopaliku 1:58
    2. Maika'i Ka 'Oiwi O Ka'ala 3:48
    3. 'Audea Wale Ana 'Oe 1:14
    4. Ka 'Opihi O Kanapou 2:12
    5. No Ka Moku Kia Kahi Ke Aloha 3:19
    6. Pule Ha'ao 2:30
    7. Ka Mo'o Ku'auhau O Kamaile Puhi Kane 1:14
    8. He Lei No Kamaile 1:45
    9. Lei Hana I Ka Makani Ualau'awa 3:55
    10. Aia I Waiehu Pua Lokelani 1:16
    11. Ho'i au E Pili Me Ka'uiki 1:27



    1. E O Mai 4:36
    2. Pupu a 'O 'Ewa 2:42
    3. Kauanoeanuhea 4:53
    4. Pua Hinano 3:30
    5. 'Akaka Falls 3:52
    6. Kananaka 3:22
    7. Malie's Song/Hawaiian Lullaby 4:13
    8. E Ho'i I Ka Pili 4:15
    9. Nematoda 2:41
    10. In My Life 3:38
    11. Ka 'Ano'i Pua O Uka 4:26
    12. Melelana 3:28
    13. Pua Mikinolia 3:53
    14. Mele 'Ohana 3:36
    15. Wanting Memories 4:22

    AMG:
    "The most popular Hawaiian artist of the 1990s, Keali'i Reichel has artfully balanced obligatory concessions to American pop music with the heartfelt qualities of traditional Hawaiian chanting, a style that places tremendous importance on conveying intense emotion with the intricacies of the human voice. The first-born son of a German father and native Hawaiian mother, Reichel spent the first five years of his life living with grandparents (as is normal in Hawaii), learning the traditional values and ways of life.
    He began chanting at the age of 17, and after studying the native language at the University of Hawaii, he began formal training in chant. Despite singing at family get-togethers, he remained quite shy of performing in public and continued working full-time in cultural resources at a local museum. In 1994, Reichel recorded an album for friends; soon after its release, Kawaipunahele became a hit, eventually the best-selling recording in Hawaiian history with over 350,000 copies sold. Pressured by eager fans, he put together a backing band and played his first concert, in front of 10,000 people. Reichel swept the major categories at that year's Hoku Awards ceremonies, and Kawaipunahele spent several weeks at the top of the world music charts. When his second album, Lei Hali'a, was released in late 1995, it trumped the debut with well over half a million copies sold, and proved a world music chart-topper as well.
    Keali'i Reichel's tremendous success soon brought the mainland major labels beckoning; he eventually signed to Atlantic after the label promised to neither compromise his uniquely Hawaiian perspective nor keep his band away from the island for more than two weeks at a time. Atlantic reissued his first two LPs and then released 1997's E O Mai; Melelana followed two years later."



    Kamahiwa   Kamalei

    or

    Kamahiwa   Kamalei


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    1. Mission of Virgil, ballet in 7 parts 27:03
    2. The Great Procession, ballet 25:55
    3. The River of Light, ballet 18:58

    Rachel Rudich - Flute, Piccolo
    Stephen Taylor - Oboe
    Alan R. Kay - Clarinet, Clarinet (Bass)
    Michael Finn - Bassoon
    Curtis Macomber - Violin
    Paul Neubauer - Viola
    Fred Sherry - Cello
    Susan Jolles - Harp
    Phillip Bush - Celeste, Piano
    Richard Moredock - Piano
    Cameron Grant - Piano
    Christopher Oldfather - Piano
    Timothy Cobb - Double Bass
    Paul Carroll - Percussion
    Benjamin Ramirez - Percussion
    Thomas Kolor - Percussion
    Oliver Knussen - Conductor

    AMG:
    "The Dante Trilogy consists of three modernist ballets by Charles Wuorinen: The Mission of Virgil (1993), The Great Procession (1995), and The River of Light (1996), which correspond to the Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso of La Divina Commedia by Dante Alighieri. Without attempting to depict the poem's otherworldly narrative through scene painting, Wuorinen instead supplies stark tableaux and brooding atmospheres that suggest the action and allow the imagination to roam freely through Dante's cosmology. Pianists Richard Moredock and Cameron Grant present the first ballet in a reduced version for two pianos, and Oliver Knussen leads the Group for Contemporary Music in the chamber versions of the second and third ballets. All the musicians deliver the spiky, angular, intensely active, and frequently violent music with crisp rhythms, bright timbres, and forceful attacks, and the virtuoso performances are remarkably tight, with precise attacks and impressively brisk tempos. As usual, Naxos provides exceptionally clean and responsive recording, so the wide ranges of dynamics and pitches are captured with the presence and clarity of a live concert, and every note is audible, thanks to careful microphone placement, though a few extraneous background noises have been picked up as well."



    The Dante Trilogy

    or

    The Dante Trilogy


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    1. Shapes 4:30
    2. Midnight Juice 7:21
    3. Dream? 9:53
    4. Hellhound 3:44
    5. Earthlight 3:40
    6. Sweet Little Angel 8:05
    7. Listen to the Walls 6:50

    Jere Whitting - Harmonica, Vocals
    Dick Martin - Sax (Tenor), Percussion, Conga
    David Perry - Guitar, Vocals
    Paul Lenart - Guitar
    Larry Luddecke - Keyboards, Organ, Piano
    Sean Hutchinson - Bass
    Victor McGill - Drums, Percussion, Vibraphone

    AMG:
    "Sometimes hypes and supposed scenes turn up random work that gets lost in the flow of its time but which a later generation rediscovers and celebrates deservedly for qualities obscured at the time. Sometimes. Far Cry, though, won't get that nod, though it's not for lack of trying on the part of the Fallout label, who make a specialty of digging up random oddities. This one's just a bit too random, though: a late-'60s Boston band caught up in the monumental PR flop of the 'Bosstown Sound,' Far Cry made a debut and, in the end, what would be their sole album, which is exactly what one would expect from a group at that time and place operating on a limited budget. To the septet's credit, their songs are all originals as compared to so many of the covers that would pad out many albums at the time, while snagging a piece of classic Persian art for the cover made for a vivid visual impact. But the seven-song album sounds flat and distant even after a CD remaster, not bootleg-murky but not striking, either, while the band is simultaneously reasonably talented in a workmanlike way without bringing anything new to the table. Lead vocalist Jere Whiting's white blues wails are serviceable without being remarkable, while the group's jams and breakdowns totter between noodling and making something out of it all, not always successfully. Bassist Sean Hutchinson more often than not is trying to lay in at least a bit of funk, in a steady-as-she-goes way, but otherwise long songs like 'Dream?' and 'Sweet Little Angel' in particular just fill up the space or build to OK but not remarkable finishes. A little psych, a little blues, a little funk -- a little album, in the end."



    Far Cry

    or

    Far Cry


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    1. Sing/Song 7:52
    2. Cyp 7:16
    3. Stomp and the Far East Blues 5:17
    4. March (Composition 40 Q) 4:45
    5. Round 10:16
    6. Snurdy McGurdy and Her Dancin' Shoes 5:22

    Roscoe Mitchell - Clarinet, Flute, Flute (Wood), Sax (Alto), Sax (Bass), Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor)
    Hugh Ragin - Flugelhorn, Piccolo Trumpet, Trumpet
    A. Spencer Barefield - Guitar, Piano
    Jaribu Shahid - Bass, Cello, Percussion
    Tani Tabbal - Drums, Percussion

    AMG:
    "What an absolute joy this album is, surely Mitchell's most brilliant since his late-'60s masterpieces like Congliptious and Old Quartet. His Sound Ensemble, at the time comprised of four young and relatively unproven musicians, is the perfect foil for his compositions, able to handle the most abstract ideas as well as the down and dirty funky ones. The opening piece, 'Sing/Song,' is a perfect case in point, beginning with delicately lyrical, even pastoral flute work, seguing into a staccato quasi-march and from there into seemingly chaotic drones and welters, before ultimately emerging into the sunniest, most relaxed melody you can imagine, with trumpeter Hugh Ragin holding court. Two more thoroughly abstract numbers, 'CYP' and 'Round,' are explored with fine minimalist (in the Morton Feldman sense) approaches and an open idea of space that's quite appealing. 'Stomp and the Far East Blues' is by turns righteously funky and ethereally bluesy, with the leader's signature sour-apple alto doing its best to play into and against the melody rather than simply following it along. Throughout, guitarist Barefield supplies wonderful ringing chords of an almost sitar-like quality and the rhythm team of Shahid and Tabbal is rock-solid, hyper-imaginative, and telepathic. When the closing, irresistibly hummable title track is reached, the listener is utterly satiated, as if having finished a rich and complex dinner. Snurdy McGurdy belongs in the collection of any serious fan of late-20th century jazz. Very highly recommended."



    Snurdy McGurdy and her Dancin' Shoes

    or

    Snurdy McGurdy and her Dancin' Shoes


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    1. Missa Pro Defunctis: Antiphona ad Introitum-Requiem aeternam
    2. Missa Pro Defunctis: Kyrie
    3. Missa Pro Defunctis: Christe
    4. Missa Pro Defunctis: Kyrie
    5. Missa Pro Defunctis: Gradualia-Requiem aeternam
    6. Missa Pro Defunctis: Tractus-De profundis clamavi
    7. Missa Pro Defunctis: Ad Offertorium-Domine Jesu Christe
    8. Missa Pro Defunctis: Sanctus
    9. Missa Pro Defunctis: Benedictus
    10. Missa Pro Defunctis: Agnus Dei I
    11. Missa Pro Defunctis: Agnus Dei II
    12. Missa Pro Defunctis: Agnus Dei III
    13. Missa Pro Defunctis: Antiphona ad Communionem-Lux aeterna
    14. Domine quado veneris (prima pars)
    15. Commissa mea pavesco (secunda pars)
    16. Heu mihi Domine (prima pars)
    17. Anima mea turbata est (secunda pars)
    18. Super flumina Babylonis
    19. Ecce nunc benedicite
    20. Ad te levavi oculos meos (prima pars)
    21. Miserer nostri Domine (secunda pars)
    22. Ad Dominum cum tribularer (prima pars)
    23. Sagittae potentis acutate (secunda pars)
    24. Fundamenta ejus (prima pars)
    25. Numquid Sion (secunda pars)
    26. Quia vidisti me, Thoma
    27. Ego sum panis vivus
    28. Sicut cervus (prima pars)
    29. Sitivit anima mea (secunda pars)

    Ars Cantica
    Marco Berrini - Director

    AMG:
    "While it is usually quite difficult to assign even vague dates of composition to Palestrina's masses (we have dates of publication for about three-quarters of them, and precious little else), his sole entry in the Requiem Mass genre, the four-voice Missa pro defunctis-the title means nothing more esoteric than 'Mass for the Dead'-, is probably a very late work, and may actually have been written as music for the composer's own funeral. The Mass was published in 1591, having been added to a re-issue of a collection of masses, Palestrina's first such publication (hence its title, Liber primus, or 'first book'), originally issued in 1554; while it is possible that the work existed for some time before being added to the Liber primus, it seems far more likely to have been composed during or shortly before 1591. The Missa pro defunctis is among Palestrina's most invaluable additions to the literature, showcasing his extraordinary ability to adapt and paraphrase pre-existing plainsong melodies to better suit his own brilliant polyphonic needs.
    Palestrina composed polyphony for four sections of the mass for the dead-the Kyrie, Offertorium, Sanctus, and Agnus Dei-and it is up to the performers to supply, as chant, the remaining portions (namely the Requiem aeternam introit, and possibly a Gradual, Tract, and Communion).
    The Kyrie is in the traditional three-part form, consisting of a Kyrie eleison, a Christe eleison, and a second Kyrie eleison. The hypolydian mode is in effect here, but to modern ears the music sounds little different from F major. Both the first Kyrie eleison and the Christe eleison take a rising filled-in fourth motive as their initial, imitative starting point; it is fitting that the first tenor, who was last to join the texture in the opening (with an exact restatement of the cantus' first eighteen pitches), is allowed to begin the Christe. The second Kyrie begins with a point of imitation on a striking descending fifth (extracted right from the Kyrie plainsong).
    The Offertorium is on the text Domine Jesu Christe, beginning with a plea that the Lord 'deliver the souls of the faithful dead from the torments of hell'. The text is laid out in two sections of roughly equal musical length: the first portion deals with the first ten lines of text, the second with just the last six-clearly, Palestrina is putting great musical weight on the final supplication to the Lord to offer new life to the departed.
    At the beginning of the Sanctus, Palestrina shows how well he understands the maxim that 'less is more': by a simple, subtle alteration of the traditional Sanctus chant (the descending major second neighbor-note figure that begins the chant is changed to the more affected minor second, A-G sharp or, in the bass and alto, D-C sharp), both the expressive tone and the local tonal implications of the melody are changed. A substantial Benedictus is appended at the end of the Sanctus.
    There are, quite traditionally, three separate settings of the Agnus Dei text, each of which commences with a chromatic neighbor-note figure that probably has its origin back in the Sanctus. Agnus Dei I and II, though quite distinct from one another internally, both conclude in a manner that shows how close the ancient mixolydian mode could get to modern G major. The third Agnus Dei, to whose text is appended the word 'sempiternam', or 'eternal', gives us a more truly modal close, abandoning the chromatic F sharp in favor of F natural."



    Missa Pro Defunctis

    or

    Missa Pro Defunctis


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    1. Café y Petróleo
    2. Diré a Mi Gente
    3. Es Largo el Camino
    4. A Desalambrar
    5. A Veces Quisiera Ser Ciego
    6. Nina Nana
    7. Jerusalem
    8. Este Viento
    9. Hombre Formal
    10. Dispersos
    11. A Las Seis (Cuantos Momentos)
    12. Dale Tu Mano al Indio
    13. Ricardo Semillas

    forcedexposure:
    "Colombian youngsters Ana y Jaime were only 15 and 17 years old when recording most of the songs on this CD, in the very late sixties. You won't believe that when you hear the music. There's something for any '60s lover here - the psychedelic fuzz dancer 'Es largo el camino,' the protest folk of 'Dire a mi gente' or 'Ricardo Semillas,' orchestrated '60s pop on 'Este viento,' some cool organ-drenched '60s pop, more dirty fuzz on 'Nina Nana' and 'Jerusalem' - all in all a surprising and refreshing '60s nugget from South America which we're sure you will enjoy."



    Es Largo El Camino

    or

    Es Largo El Camino


    0 0


    1. Wolfgang Lauth Sextet: Intrada
    2. Hans Koller Ensemble: Mingus Privat
    3. Joe Haider Septet: Straight Out
    4. Hans Koller Ensemble: Casa Loma
    5. Joe Haider & His Orchestra: Hymnus for Che
    6. Wolfgang Dauner Trio: Freefall
    7. Rolf & Joachim Kuhn Quartet: Arabia Rock
    8. Ronnie Ross & His Band: Tranquology
    9. Hans Koller Ensemble: Saint John Perse
    10. Ronnie Ross & His Band: Last of the Wine
    11. Joe Nay & Fritz Pauner: Beta Draco
    12. Hans Koller Ensemble: Zoot
    13. Wolfgang Dauner Trio: Ten Notices
    14. Fritz Pauer Trio: Red Roof
    15. Hans Koller Ensemble: Call Me Eric
    16. Joe Haider Septet: Eternal Oil Lamp
    17. Hans Koller Ensemble: Lucky Tom

    sonarkollektiv:

    "The opening track is from the Wolfgang Lauth sextet with the fitting title of 'Intrada'. His composition from 1967 features, in addition to Emil Mangelsdorff on the flute, in particular the vibraphone player Fritz Hartschuh. Lauth was born in 1931. Since the mid-fifties he belonged to the leading jazz pianists in Germany. He regularly worked on productions for TV and radio, for cabaret, radio plays and the film industry. Due to his skills he was twice voted Germany's most popular jazz musician.
    The Austrian Hans Koller is one of the few musicians here, who already had an international reputation in the sixties and extensive artistic experience. Already since the fifties he had developed such a unique expressive playing style on the tenor saxophone, that jazz from the German-speaking world was often described as being from 'Koller-Land'. Hans Wewerka had a very long-lasting close friendship with Koller from the beginning of his career to the end. So it is no surprise that he described him as one of his driving forces in jazz and he was one of the first who produced him. This recording with Fritz Pauer, Hans Rettenbacher and Victor Plasil from 1962, possesses such a high standard that six tracks alone from this extraordinary session are included on this compilation. Each of Koller's compositions, such as the modern swing interpretations 'Mingus Privat', 'Call Me Eric' and 'Zoot', as well as his exploration of Bossa Nova in the pieces 'Casa Loma' and 'Lucky Tom' or the waltz 'Saint John Perse', represent timeless pieces of modern jazz.
    Another musician, who was a close friend of Hans Wewerka and who spent many hours in the studio with him, is the pianist Joe Haider. They often worked together because Haider had opened the jazz club 'Domicile' in Munich in the sixties and was the house pianist in this internationally renowned venue for many years. The two tracks 'Straight Out' and 'Eternal Oil Lamp' stem from numerous sessions with Haider. Haider's septet performed these with the exiled American Benny Bailey. Haider und Bailey often worked together in the years to come. Both of them later taught at the Swiss Jazz School in Bern, where Joe Haider was the director from 1984 to 1995. This was after Haider had founded his labels Ego Records und JHM (Joe Haider Music). In addition to the two septet pieces, this compilation also includes another, 'Hymnus For Che', a homage to the rebel Ché Guevara. Haider's septet was enlarged here to include a trombonist and a trumpet player.
    A musician of the same calibre is the pianist, Wolfgang Dauner. Born in Stuttgart in 1935, he formed his own trio in 1963 with the bassist Eberhard Weber and the American drummer Fred Braceful. Two of the trio's tracks 'Freefall' and 'Ten Notices' appear here. Dauner belonged to the avant-garde pianists in Germany. He is regarded as one of the most experimental pianists in the whole of Europe. Like many German musicians he released several recordings on the previously mentioned label MPS. In 1975, he set up his own band United Jazz Rock Ensemble and he ran his own record label Mood Records. The chosen recordings from this trio were originally released by CBS in 1964. Due to the long-lasting cooperation between Horst Lippman, Wolfgang Rau and Hans Wewerka, the recordings became part of the Wewerka archive.
    When writing about outstanding pianists, one name can obviously not be ignored, a name which, more than any other, helped German jazz to international recognition. Joachim Kühn, born in 1944 in Leipzig. He formed his first trio and later his first quartet with his older brother Rolf Kühn in 1966. Unfortunately only a very few recordings from this quartet, which played until 1969, exist. One of the first and only sessions by this unique formation which was made up of the bassist Günter Lenz and the drummer Ralph Hübner, took place in the winter of 1966. This historic quartet also represented a reunion for the two brothers, shortly after Joachim had followed Rolf to West Germany. 'Arabia Rock' is an impressive testament to how the quartet, very early on, set itself aside with a new sound and strived to achieve new forms of jazz expression. This approach to jazz is something, which both brothers in their long careers have consistently pursued.
    Another excellent pianist is the Vienna-born Fritz Pauer. After studying, he was member of Fatty George's band and the Hans Koller quartet until he founded his own trio in 1964. In 1966 he toured throughout Europe with this trio and was 'Winner of the International Competition of Modern Jazz' in Vienna. At the same time, Pauer worked as an arranger for the SFB Radio band and as a composer for theatrical plays. Later he was a member of and composer for the ORF Radio band. Fritz Pauer and Hans Wewerka also had a long friendship from which many productions resulted. The titles 'Beta Draco' und 'Red Roof' were chosen from two of these recording sessions in 1966. These are examples of the Pauer trio, which consisted of drummer Joe Nay and bassist Dieter Gützkow, at its best.
    Ronnie Ross, who unfortunately died in 1991, was possibly the leading European jazz baritone saxophonist of the sixties. He owed this to Don Rendell, as he persuaded him to change from the tenor saxophone to the unpopular baritone saxophone in the fifties. Initially, he played at the beginning of the sixties in small groups. He received further international recognition by working together with the Clarke Boland big band, and was a much sought-after side man. Without a doubt, Ronnie Ross, who was often a guest in Germany, was one of the main advertisements for British jazz. As was the case when Wewerka produced him and his band in Munich in 1965. Apart from Joe Haider, Don Menza, Rick Kiefer, Rudi Füssers und Cees See, one has to highlight Peter Trunk. This exceptional bassist tragically died in 1973 following a car crash. He added a few brilliant compositions to the sessions, from which 'Tranquology' as well as Ross' own composition 'Last Of The Wine' have been chosen.
    Albert Mangelsdorff was the first jazz musician to develop the multi-tone playing style. As early as the fifties, he was already ranked among the premiere league of European jazz musicians due to his unique style - a mixture of free and cool elements. He was introduced to jazz at the age of 12 by his brother Emil, who also appears on this compilation (see Wolfgang Lauth). It was only at the age of 19, that Albert Mangelsdorff settled for the trombone, the instrument that he would, a few years later, revolutionize with his multi-tone style of playing. One of his numerous tours was to Asia for the Goethe Institute in 1964. The result of the tour was a unique recording, a homage to the different Asian music cultures with the title 'Now Jazz Ramwong'. This album brought him international recognition and is one of the most important milestones of his long artistic career. 'Sakura Waltz' has been chosen from it for this compilation. Mangelsdorff established his quintet in 1961 and it was made up of Heinz Sauer (tenor), Günter Kronberg (alto), Günter Lenz (bass) und Ralf Hübner (drums). It was to last until 1971.
    This compilation can only provide a glimpse into the vaults of the Hans Wewerka archive. Nevertheless, the chosen tracks bear witness to a very important creative period in the West-German jazz-scene. Almost 40 years after being recorded, these tracks well deserve to be finally released."



    Modern Jazz From West Germany

    or

    Modern Jazz From West Germany


    0 0


    1. Pure Jam 4:30
    2. Neue Tranz 4:58
    3. Stairs 4:14
    4. Seoul Music 4:46
    5. Light in Darkness 3:40
    6. Taiso 4:21
    7. Gradated Grey 5:33
    8. Key 4:35
    9. Prologue 2:31
    10. Epilogue 4:21

    Ryuichi Sakamoto - Keyboards, Vocals
    Haruomi Hosono - Bass, Keyboards, Vocals
    Yukihiro Takahashi - Drums, Vocals

    AMG:
    "Widening their vision of synth-pop to include the darker strains of urban/R&B as well as a few vocals indebted to Roxy Music, 1981's Technodelic proved a high-quality album that showed Yellow Magic Orchestra had the talent and inspiration to grow beyond Kraftwerk-derived electronic pop heavy on the novelty but a bit light on bending genres. Though they aren't exactly melancholy, 'Neue Tanz' and 'Pure Jam' distinguish themselves through a clever use of synth and effects rather than through the simplistic melodies of previous work. There are some acknowledgements to acoustic music (such as the piano on 'Stairs'), but for the most part YMO pursues a new direction with the same synthesizers they'd been using previously."



    Technodelic

    or

    Technodelic


    0 0


    1. Memphis Underground 7:09
    2. New Orleans 2:07
    3. Hold on, I'm Comin' 8:57
    4. Chain of Fools 10:43
    5. Battle Hymn of the Republic 7:14

    Herbie Mann - Flute
    Roy Ayers - Vibraphone
    Larry Coryell - Guitar
    Sonny Sharrock - Guitar
    +
    Reggie Young - Guitar
    Bobby Emmons - Organ
    Bobby Wood - Piano
    Tommy Cogbill - Fender Bass
    Mike Leech - Fender Bass
    Gene Christman - Drums
    Miroslav Vitous - Fender Bass (3)

    AMG:
    "Herbie Mann has always been open to new trends in his music. For this 1969 studio session, he and three other top soloists (vibraphonist Roy Ayers and guitarists Larry Coryell and Sonny Sharrock) went down to Memphis and combined their talents with a topnotch local rhythm section. The music effectively mixes R&B and country rhythms with the lead jazz voices, although the material, which includes 'Memphis Underground,' 'Hold On! I'm Comin',' and 'Chain of Fools,' is rather weak."



    Memphis Underground

    or

    Memphis Underground


    0 0


    1. Let's Do It Again 4:53
    2. Funky Love 4:50
    3. A Whole Lot of Love 3:52
    4. New Orleans 4:26
    5. I Want to Thank You 5:22
    6. Big Mac 6:06
    7. After Sex 6:45
    8. Chase 4:16

    AMG:
    "As Stax neared bankruptcy, the Staples signed with Curtis Mayfield's Curtom label for this soundtrack album. The title track was a number-one hit and 'New Orleans' reached number 70, returning the Staples to the upper echelons of the charts for the last time."



    Let's Do It Again

    or

    Let's Do It Again


    0 0


    1. Vadhabi Ganapathim
    2. Nagumomu
    3. Needu Paadame
    4. Entharo
    5. Suttum Vizhi Sudarthan
    6. Samagana Lolame
    7. Kavadi Chinthu
    8. Thikku Theriyatha Kattil
    9. Murali Dhara Gopala

    Echampati Gayathri - Veena

    Wiki:
    "E.Gayathri was born on 9 November 1959 to Kamala Aswathama, a veteran veena vidushi and late G. Aswathama, a popular film music director in the Telugu film industry. Her father named her Gayathri Vasantha Shoba. Gayathri first trained under her parents and later on from Sangita Kalanidhi T.M.Thyagarajan who was a renowned Carnatic vocalist and composer.
    Gayathri began her career at the age of 9 when Sri Parthasarathy Swami Sabha, Triplicane invited her to perform in their Saint Thyagaraja Festival in the year 1968. Her performance was a success in front of an audience of musicologists and music experts. She was instantly hailed as a child prodigy by none other than the well known musicologist, P. Sambamoorthy. Gayathri went on to receive innumerable awards and titles from reputed organisations in India and abroad. Gayathri has released many albums as a popular veena artiste in the audio field.Appointed as Honorary Director of Tamilnadu Government Music Colleges (in Chennai, Thiruvaiyaru, Madurai and Coimbatore) by the Chief Minister of Tamilnadu, J.Jayalalithaa in the year 2011."



    Classical by Gayathri

    or

    Classical by Gayathri


    0 0


    1. Philip Glass - Violin Concerto 24:54
    2. Alfred Schnittke-Concerto Grosso No. 5, for violin, piano & orchestra 27:35

    Gidon Kremer - Violin
    Rainer Keuschnig - Piano
    Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
    Christoph von Dohnányi - Conductor

    AMG:
    "Although by the late 1980s Glass had established himself as a gifted and innovative composer of operas with such works as Einstein on the Beach (1975), Satyagraha (1980), and Akhnaten (1984), and had scored several theater pieces and films, he had written few purely orchestral concert works. The Violin Concerto (1987) thus represents the composer's first mature essay for a traditional concert-hall setting. This change from the usual venues for Glass' music is indeed more drastic than any stylistic change. Glass' music had never been subservient to storyline or drama, but rather composed in counterpoint to it. A comparable relationship may be found between soloist and orchestra in the Violin Concerto, making the familiar musical elements from Glass' stage and film works - triadic harmonies, insistent contrary arpeggios, intriguing metrical shifts - seem right at home in what were then new surroundings for the composer.
    Each of the concerto's three movements is simply headed by a metronome marking. The moderately fast first movement (quarter note = 104 - 120) begins with a short orchestral introduction before the soloist enters with a flurry of arpeggios that slowly extend to encompass the entire range of the violin. An added layer of rhythmic depth is provided by the entrance of the percussion. As in Glass' subsequent orchestral 'nature portrait' The Canyon (1988), the rhythmic role of the percussion - which is conspicuously absent from most of the composer's previous works - allows for both more textural freedom in the rest of the orchestra and for the violin to engage in unfettered lyricism. Throughout the movement, the soloist alternates between participation in the orchestra's rhythmic flow and floating above its texture with sustained melody.
    The long, subterranean bass line of the second movement (quarter note = 96) is separated from the soloist's lush melody by a throbbing web of inner voices. As the various sections join in with varying timbres and textures, the violin alternately resists and capitulates, again torn between serpentine figuration and sustained line. The movement ends with a gesture quite dramatic in its simplicity: As the orchestra fades out in piecemeal fashion, the soloist is left floating mournfully back and forth between two Gs an octave apart, never alighting on the tonic of C.
    In the final movement (quarter note = 150; Coda = 104) the percussion again provides rhythmic drive, while the violin undertakes a dizzying array of figural and rhythmic acrobatics. The division of the fast triple meter fluctuates frequently between three groups of two and two groups of three, which, combined with the galloping timpani and wood blocks, lends the movement a somewhat generic but nonetheless exciting Spanish flavor. This flurry eventually settles into a slow coda. As the woodwinds maintain a faint rhythmic hum, the violin ascends through a series of long, dramatic leaps into its upper range before disappearing altogether.

    Alfred Schnittke's Concerto Grosso No. 5 is completely different from the concerti grossi that preceded it. The first four made references to older composers or compositional styles; No. 5 is wholly characteristic of Schnittke. The first three involved a standard concerto grosso orchestra, with strings, soloists and continuo; the fifth uses the solo violin, an enormous symphonic orchestra, and a sort of 'modern continuo' of harp, harpsichord, celesta, and the titular invisible piano, which is actually a piano placed behind the stage and amplified. Regardless of its breaks with Schnittke's tradition, this concerto is a good example of his late compositional style. The first three movements all develop a rhythmic motive introduced at the very beginning of the first movement. The solo violin dominates the Allegretto first movement. Its lines contrast with wind solos and very lightly scored accompaniment. A dance-like variant of the first motive is developed in the second movement. The third movement, marked Allegro vivace, begins with a long cadenza from the solo violin, which articulates an agitated variation of the first motive. After some orchestral elaboration and a climax punctuated by the amplified piano, the concerto moves directly into the last movement, marked Lento. This is a more reflective movement than the first three, with typical long, sustained notes in the solo violin. Schnittke shows his mastery of instrumental color in a magical moment at the movement's end, when the invisible piano plays a slow, quiet scalar passage and a thread of tone from the solo violinist hangs in the background. After the piano drops out, the violin becomes even quieter and its melody slowly rises, until at the piece's very end it sounds almost as if the violin line has drifted away into the silent air. Although this piece is not what one expects from a Schnittke Concerto grosso, it is a fascinating piece in its own right."


    Philip Glass/Alfred Schnittke

    or

    Philip Glass/Alfred Schnittke


    0 0


    1. Si Supiera Esta Niña 3:10
    2. Buenos Aires Beat 3:06
    3. Proyectos de un Ladrón Prisionero 4:49
    4. Alza La Voz 2:29
    5. Usted Sabe Lo Que Es Fe? 3:07
    6. Otro Lugar, Cuál Puede Ser 2:57
    7. Ella, La Doncella 2:25
    8. El Divagante 3:14
    9. Beatnick Waltz 2:25
    10. El Gigante 2:58
    11. Viste? 7:56
    12. El Malecón 2:33
    13. Doña Lucía 1:52
    14. Un Diablito en El Cielo 1:48
    15. Navidad Especial 2:16
    16. El Pampero Libertad 3:10
    17. Copado y Colocado 2:24
    18. Presidente del País 2:55
    19. Hombre Sin Nombre 2:48

    Pajarito Zaguri - Vocals
    Nacho Smilari - Guitar
    Jorge 'Yoryo' Mercury - Organ
    Miguel Monti - Bass
    Quique Sapia - Drums

    Dreams, Fantasies and Nightmares:
    "A very rare Argentinian garage outfit with snaky fuzz guitar, wah-wah guitar and swirling farfisa organ but sung in native tongue. Some have compared it to British North American Act or New Dawn. The killer cut is the just under eight minute Viste, which reputedly contains some stunning acid guitar work. All eleven cuts were written by Zaguri (although some were co-written) and ranged from beat to psychedelia. His real name was Alberto Garcia and he'd previously recorded a very rare single as El Cuarto Pajarito, Navidad Espcial / Un Diablito En El Cielo (Microfón 3622) with assistance from Litto Nebbia and others."



    La Barra de Chocolate

    or

    La Barra de Chocolate


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