Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | .... | 4 | 5 | (Page 6) | 7 | 8 | .... | 57 | newer

    0 0


    1. Anonimo (Martim Codax): Ondas do mar
    2. Faidit, Gaucelm: Del gran golfe de mar
    3. Vidal, Peire: Pos tornatz sui en Proenca
    4. Bethune, Conon de-Vidal, Peire: Ab l'alen tir vas me l'aire
    5. Anonimo-Sordello di Mantova: Er, quan renovella e gensa
    6. Born, Bertrand de: Bel m'es quan vei chamjar lo senhoratge
    7. Anonimo-Comtessa de Dia: Ab joi et ab joven m'apais
    8. Kammen, Shira-Danca dels dos domnas (instrumental)
    9. Avignon, Raimon d': Sirvens sui avutz et arlotz
    10. Halle, Adam de la-Vaqueiras, Raimbault de: Dona, tant vos ai preiada
    11. Anonimo: Domna, pos vos ai chausida
    12. Anonimo-Guillaume IX de Poitiers: Ab la dolchor del temps novel
    13. Rogeret de Cambrai: Nouvele amor qui si m'agrée & Novel'amor que tant m'agreia
    14. Ventadorn, Bernard de: Lancan vei la folha
    15. Marcabru: Dirai vos senes duptansa
    16. Cardenal, Peire: Ar mi puesc ieu lauzar d'amor
    17. Fulton, Cheryl Ann: Lo freg temps
    18. Ventadorn, Bernard de-Riquier, Guiraut: Be'm degra de chantar tener
    19. Cardenal, Peire: Un sirventes novel vueill comensar
    20. Anonimo: O Maria Deu maire
    21. Anonimo (Martim Codax)-Autpol, Guillaume d': Esperanza de totz ferms esperans

    Joel Cohen - Cittern, Lute, Percussion, Vocals
    Francois Harismendy - Chant
    Jean-Luc Madier - Chant
    Anne Azema - Chant
    Cheryl Ann Fulton - Harp
    Shira Kammen - Harp, Rebec, Vielle




    Lo Gai Saber   Scans


    0 0


    1. L'Homme Au Tablier Vert (Fleurs Carnivores) 4:15
    2. Dans L'Enfer 4:32
    3. Comment Dire 4:02
    4. Il Va Loin Le Malheur 3:52
    5. Et Même 3:39
    6. Nomade 4:22
    7. J'Veux Pas M'En Mêler 4:10
    8. Opéra 4:05
    9. Râler 4:03
    10. Piège De Lumière 4:22
    11. Libido 3:37
    12. Encore 3:11
    13. Merci 4:28

    Guesch Patti - Vocals
    Jam'ba - Guitar, Keyboards
    Lucien Athanase - Keyboards
    Misko - Bass
    Yvo Abadi - Drums, Percussion

    Wiki:
    "Patti was born in Paris, France. She chose her artist name from the nickname she had as a child Guesch. Patti is a nickname for Patricia.
    Guesch Patti first started her career at dancing at age 9 when she performed in a ballet at the Opéra National de Paris, working with Roland Petit, then at contemporary dance with Carolyn Carlson and Pina Bausch, and finally at variety dance on television.
    After having accompanied the pianist Yves Gilbert, she decided to begin a singer career and recorded two discs in 1965 that passed unnoticed. In 1984, Patti participated in the trio named 'Dacapo', and had her first solo hit in 1987/1988 with 'Étienne', which was certified gold disc in France. This song sold more than half a million copies and was ranked #1 in several countries, including France and Italy. Labyrinthe, released a short time after, was also successful : in 1988, it won a Victoire de la Musique in the category 'Female révélation of the year', which is awarded to best new artists. Another single, 'Let Be Must the Queen', was a minor hit, peaking at #25 in France and #21 in Austria.
    Her second album, entitled Nomades, was released in January 1990. In spite of an European tour and concerts performed in the US and Canada, the album was less successful than the previous. 'L'Homme au tablier vert', 'Comment dire' and 'Nomades' were the three singles from the album, but were not charted.
    In 1992, Patti released her third album, Gobe, which was critically well-received, but considered a commercial failure.
    In 1995, her next album, Blonde, strongly marked a musical shift and a more electronic experimentation, with less commercial sounds and new collaborations with many artists including Étienne Daho (on the song 'Blonde') and Françoise Hardy ('Un peu, beaucoup'). There were three singles from this album : 'La Marquise', 'Blonde' and 'Amnésie'. In addition, the British filmmaker Peter Greenaway chose 'Blonde' for the soundtrack of his film The Pillow Book (1996).
    The fifth album, Dernières Nouvelles, released in 2000, highlighted a painful and romance-drama ambiance, strongly tinged with loneliness. A DVD released in March 2002 completed the album. With much musical innovation, this DVD presents a large part of the album, containing choreographed performances and a false interview dealing with existential problems and the condition of the artist. The same year, Patti recorded a duet with Gonzales for the single entitled 'Dans tes yeux'"



    Nomades   Scans


    0 0


    1. Tango Dada 4:12
    2. Dedication 8:54
    3. Iiro's Not So Good Polka 5:02
    4. Donna Lee 7:06
    5. Banana Republic 12:22
    6. Get a Life 6:55
    7. Jazzlantis 2:22
    8. Yatra Ta 6:56

    Iiro Rantala - Piano
    Eerik Siikasaari - Double bass
    Rami Eskelinen - Drums

    Wiki:
    "Trio Töykeät (founded in 1988) was a Finnish jazz trio. Their music ranges from humorous ragtimes to sentimental waltzes. Their playing style is often rhythmic, energetic and virtuosic. The group disbanded in 2008."



    Jazzlantis   Scans

    or

    Jazzlantis   Scans

    0 0


    1. Globus (Globe) 2:56
    2. In The Same Boat 2:06
    3. Schönes Babylon (Beautiful Babylon) 5:01
    4. I'll Be Your Singer, You'll Be My Song (Ich Bin Dein Sänger, Du Bist Mein Lied) 2:25
    5. Body 1:57
    6. A Book's Blues 1:39
    7. Als Hätt Ich Das Alles Schon Mal Gesehen (As If I Had Seen All This Before) 5:31
    8. Cosmic Vibrations 4:41
    9. Come On, People 2:53
    10. Wahrheit Und Wahrscheinlichkeit (Truth And Probability) 11:40
    11. Gute Reise 2:12
    12. Atmosphare 7:07
    13. Alles Inclusiv 10:31
    14. Erholung 6:55

    Achim Reichel - guitar, vocals
    Frank Dostal - lyrics
    Dicky Tarrach - drums
    Hans Lampe - percussion (2)

    AMG:
    "German singer, songwriter, musician, and producer Achim Reichel enjoyed a long and varied career that began during the beat boom of the '60s, when he founded the Rattles, and carried on well into the next millennium, by which time he was still recording albums and performing large-scale rock concerts. Born on January 28, 1944, in Wentorf bei Hamburg, Schleswig-Holstein, Reichel began his music career in 1960, when he, as a singer/guitarist, formed the Rattles with bassist Herbert Hildebrandt in Hamburg. The band, along with the Lords, proved one of Germany's leading beat bands of the day, for instance touring England with the Rolling Stones in 1963 and touring Germany with the Beatles in 1966. Reichel left the band in 1966 after several albums, including Twist im Star-Club Hamburg (1964), Liverpool Beat (1965), and Hurra! Die Rattles Kommen (1966), and subsequently entered the Bundeswehr (i.e., the German armed forces). Upon Reichel's departure from the military, he formed another band, Wonderland, whose debut single, 'Mocow' (1968), was a Top 15 hit. Next he formed the experimental solo project A.R. & Machines, which debuted with Die Grüne Reise (1971) and followed with a succession of Krautrock-fashioned albums: Echo (1972), 3 (1972), 4 (1973), and Autovision (1974).
    In 1975, Reichel released Dat Shanty Alb'm, a shockingly straightforward collection of sea shanties that was a 180 degree turn away from the experimentation of A.R. & Machines; also of note, the album was sung in German, unlike his previous releases, and was billed to himself rather than a group moniker, two characteristics that were common to his successive albums as well. Reichel's embrace of volksmusik, particularly of the north, continued in the few years that followed, with albums including Klabautermann (1977) and Regenballade (1978), the latter of which was critically praised. In the wake of Regenballade, Reichel, in conjunction with Frank Dostal, formed the label Ahorn in hopes of showcasing German-language rock bands of the day. Along with the advent of Ahorn, Heiße Scheibe (1979), a showcase for contemporary writers and Reichel himself, reflected his interest in moving out of the past and into the present. Also during the mid- to late '70s, Reichel labored as a producer, working with such bands as Novalis, Kiev Stingl, Neil Landon, and Emsland Hillbillies.
    During the early '80s, Reichel released a trio of straightforward rock albums that were sung in German and critically praised: Ungeschminkt (1980), Blues in Blond (1981), and Nachtexpress (1983). Reichel also toured for the first time in years, mounting supporting tours for both Blues in Blond and Nachtexpress in 1982 and 1984, respectively. In 1983, amid all of this activity, 'Der Spieler' (from Blues in Blond) became his first solo hit single, charting at number 27 and appearing on the ZDF-Hitparade. 'Boxer Kutte' (from Nachtexpress) also made the ZDF-Hitparade in 1983; Reichel himself made a total of three personal appearances on the TV show that year. In 1986 he acted as a bank robber, Paul, in the film Va Banque; released an album, Eine Ewigkeit Unterwegs; and appeared once again on the ZDF-Hitparade, this time in support of his hit 'Eine Ewigkeit Unterwegs.' After another tour, Reichel recorded a solo album, Fledermaus (1988), and reunited with the Rattles for Hot Wheels (1988), a reunion album; another solo album (Was Echtes) and Rattles reunion (Painted Warriors) followed in 1989 and 1990, respectively.
    The 1990s were another successful and productive decade for Reichel, as he continued releasing albums and touring, and began to chart with regularity. All-new studio albums included Melancholie und Sturmflut (1991), Wahre Liebe (1993), Oh Ha! (1996), and Entspann Dich (1999); hit singles from these albums included 'Aloha Heya He' (1991), 'Kuddel Daddel Du' (1992), 'Auf der Rolltreppe' (1992), 'Amazonen' (1993), and 'Wahre Liebe' (1993); there was also the live album Große Freiheit (1994), an accompanied TV concert special commemorating Reichel's 50th birthday, the solo best-of Herz Ist Trumpf (1997), and the A.R. & Machines best-of Echos aus Zeiten der Grünen Reise (1998). Reichel continued his activity in the ensuing decade, releasing Wilder Wassermann (2002), a return to volksmusik; 100% Leben (2004), a live CD/DVD commemorating his 60th birthday; and Volxlieder (2006) - all of which charted. Moreover, he published a songbook, 100% Leben, via Gorilla Musik-Verlag."


    Die Grune Reise , Erholung   Scans


    0 0


    1. Believin'
    2. The Statue Of Liberty
    3. Between The Sky And The Ground
    4. Blue Willow
    5. The Koya-Samba
    6. Field Athletor
    7. For My Love

    Kazuhiko Iwami - Guitar
    Makoto Aoyagi - Keyboards
    Kenji Nakamura - Keyboards
    Koh Shimizu - Bass
    Rikiya Higashihara - Drums
    +
    Tatsuhiko Arakawa - Saxophone
    Shigeo Fuchino - Saxophone
    Osamu Shiomura - Trombone
    Toshio Araki - Trumpet
    Hiroshi Okano - Trumpet
    Kiyoshi Kamada - Drums
    Shuhzoh Hirayama - Percussion
    Kunitsugu Hirayama - Percussion
    Shingo Kanno - Percussion
    Kazuhiro Mishima - Percussion
    Marlene - Vocals




    No Fuse   Scans

    or

    No Fuse   Scans

    0 0


    1. Red Zone
    2. Image
    3. DaiuchuhMugenryokushin
    4. Marshall Arts
    5. Spot
    6. Jerome
    7. 9th Mountain High -Live At Goppongi pit Outt-
    8. Dawn

    Makoto Aoyagi - Keyboards
    Kazuhiko Iwami - Guitar
    Kenji Nakamura - Keyboards
    Koh Shimizu - Bass
    Rikiya Higashihara - Drums

    naniwaexp.com:
    "Formed in 1977 by Ko(Bs), Kazuhiko(Gr), and Kenji(Key), the group did their first US tour in 1979. With Rikiya(dr) and Makoto(Sax/Key) later joining them in 1981, they signed the record deal with CBS Sony in 1982. Doing more than 160 shows a year nationwide, the group soon established thieir reputation as the best jazz/fusion band in Japan. Known for sharing the stage with a lot of artists including a major jazz trumpet artist, Terumasa Hino, with which they did a successful concert at Buddokan in 1984. Despite the fervent requests of the fans, the group decided to split in 1986 and each members pursued their solo careers.
    In 2000, 14 years after the split, the members got back together again for a limited reunion tour which led them to the release of their new album in 2003. While each of them continues on their solo careers, They are now officially back together, once again as the leading jazz/fusion group with their outstanding performance."



    DaiuchuhMugenryokushin   Scans

    or

    DaiuchuhMugenryokushin   Scans

    0 0


    1. Synopsis One: In the Ghetto/God Save the World 8:34
    2. Poverty's Paradise 12:40
    3. Brown-Baggin' 6:45
    4. Synopsis Two: Mother's Day 2:04
    5. Mother's Day 9:46
    6. Food Stamps 6:26
    7. Ghetto: Misfortune's Wealth 3:41
    8. 24 Carat Black Theme 7:17

    Dale Warren - Piano, Vibraphone
    Ricky Foster - Trumpet
    William Gentry - Trumpet
    Gregory Ingram - Sax (Alto)
    Jerome Derrickson - Sax (Tenor)
    William Talbert - Organ
    James Talbert - Electric Piano
    Ernest Latimore - Guitar, Vocals
    Larry Austin - Bass
    Tyrone Steels - Percussion, Vocals
    Princess Hearn - Vocals
    Kathleen Dent - Vocals
    Valerie Malone - Vocals

    AMG:
    "Classically trained Detroit arranger Dale Warren got his start with the famed Motown label and, from the late '60s throughout the early '70s, composed the majority of string scores for soul artists on Stax Records (arranging for such artists as Billy Eckstine, Eddie Floyd, Isaac Hayes, Albert King, and the Staple Singers, among others). During this time, Warren befriended an up-and-coming Cincinnati soul outfit called the Ditalians. After he convinced them to change their name to 24-Carat Black, he took them under his wing -- both composing and producing their lone album, 1973's Ghetto: Misfortune's Wealth, a conceptual work that focused on life in the inner city. The album went unnoticed and fell through the cracks shortly thereafter, as 24-Carat Black never issued any other recordings. But over the years, Ghetto: Misfortune's Wealth became a sort of cult classic among hip-hop artists, as such acts as Heal, Young Disciples, and Digable Planets used samples from the album for their own tracks. Long out of print, Ghetto: Misfortune's Wealth was finally issued on CD in 1995. The members of 24-Carat Black would later turn up in the group Shotgun."



    Ghetto-Misfortune's Wealth   Scans


    0 0


    1. AR Soudarded 3:20
    2. Kenavo Cill Airne 2:30
    3. Tri-Colored Ribbon 0:52
    4. Marv Pontkallec 3:22
    5. Suite Gavotte 3:05
    6. Al Labous Marv 3:29
    7. Brezhoneg 1:33
    8. Miss MacDermott 2:16
    9. Lonely Banna Strand 2:17
    10. Marche de Brian Boru 2:23
    11. Ul Lizher d'Eus Paris 3:15
    12. Pennherez Keroulaz 2:00
    13. Brezhoneg 1:33

    Soazig - Harpe celtique, Voix




    Chants Et Harpes Celtiques   Scans


    0 0


    Drumming, for 2 female voices, piccolo, 4 pairs of bongos, 3 marimbas & 3 glockenspiels

    1. Part 1 24:33
    2. Part 2 25:20

    3. Part 3 15:43
    4. Part 4 18:57

    Steve Reich - Glockenspiel, Marimba, Whistle (Human)
    Bob Becker - Drums, Glockenspiel, Marimba
    Cornelius Cardew - Glockenspiel, Marimba
    Steve Chambers - Drums, Marimba
    Timothy Ferchen - Drums, Marimba
    Ben Harms - Drums, Glockenspiel, Marimba
    Russ Hartenberger - Drums, Glockenspiel, Marimba
    James Preiss - Drums, Glockenspiel, Marimba
    Glen Velez - Drums, Glockenspiel, Marimba, Whistle (Human)
    Leslie Scott - Piccolo
    Jay Clayton - Voices
    Joan La Barbara - Voices

    Wiki:
    "Drumming is a piece by minimalist composer Steve Reich, dating from 1970-1971. Reich began composition of the work after a short visit to Africa and observing music and musical ensembles there, especially under the Anlo Ewe master drummer Gideon Alorwoyie in Ghana. His visit was cut short after contracting malaria.
    The piece employs Reich's trademark technique of phasing. Phasing is achieved when two players, or one player and a recording, are playing a single repeated pattern in unison, usually on the same kind of instrument. One player changes tempo slightly, while the other remains constant, and eventually the two players are one or several beats out of sync with each other. They may either stay there, or phase further, depending on the piece.
    Drumming was the last composition where Reich used this technique.
    K. Robert Schwarz has characterised Drumming as a 'transitional' piece between Reich's early, more austere compositions and his later works that use less strict forms and structure. Schwarz has also noted that Reich made use of three new techniques, for him, in this work:
    (1) 'the process of gradually substituting beats for rests (or rests for beats) within a constantly repeating rhythmic cycle', or 'rhythmic construction' and 'rhythmic reduction'
    (2) combination of instruments of different timbres at the same time
    (3) incorporation of human voices in imitation of the sounds of the percussion instruments in the ensemble, including whistling effects
    The instrumentation is as follows:
      8 small tuned bongo drums
      3 marimbas
      3 glockenspiels
      2 or 3 female voices
      1 whistler, doubling piccolo
    In total, the work requires 9 percussionists. With the additional players, the piece can be performed by 12 or 13 players.
    The work falls into four parts, with the following instrumentation used in each:
      Part One: 4 pairs of tuned bongo drums, played with double-ended wooden sticks
      Part Two: 3 marimbas, 2 or 3 female voices
      Part Three: 3 glockenspiels, whistler, and piccolo
      Part Four: complete ensemble
    The length of the piece can vary widely, as the number of repeats taken on any given measure is up to the performers. Recordings of the piece span between 55 and 84 minutes.
    The entire piece is structured around a single repeated rhythm, one measure of 12/8 long. This rhythm is built up note by note, in the 'substitution of beats for rests' technique found in other of Reich's works such as Music for Pieces of Wood, Octet, Music for 18 Musicians, and others. After the rhythm is completely built up, two of the players phase to where they are playing the same pattern one quarter-note apart from each other, and the other bongo players play resulting patterns that can be heard as a result of the combination of the phased patterns.
    The rest of the piece continues to use the techniques of beat/rest substitution, phasing, and resultant patterns through its four movements. The transitions consist as follows:
      Movement 2 begins by three marimba players playing exactly the same repeated pattern as the bongo players, fading in while the bongo players fade out.
      Movement 3 begins similarly; three glockenspiel players begin doubling the marimbas (which by now are playing in their upper ranges), fading in while the marimbas fade out.
      Movement 4 begins after movement 3 reduces its texture to one glockenspiel player, playing a single repeated note from the original pattern. Marimba and bongo players join, and build the pattern up again, note by note, until all nine percussionists are playing. The piece ends abruptly, on cue."



    Drumming   Scans


    0 0


    1. Flyin' High 1:43
    2. Suzie Baby 2:48
    3. Lonely Love 2:42
    4. Love Must Have Passed Me By 1:47
    5. It's Too Late 2:20
    6. Laurie 2:05
    7. Remember the Day 2:03
    8. That'll Be the Day 2:15
    9. Susie-Q 2:38
    10. White Silver Sands 2:28
    11. Butterfly 2:25
    12. Party Doll 2:13
    13. Bye Bye Love 2:20
    14. Wishing 2:05
    15. Leave Me Alone 2:17
    16. What'll I Do 1:57
    17. Toy Soldier 2:13
    18. Loco 2:18
    19. Card Shark 1:59
    20. Mindreader 2:08

    Bobby Vee - Guitar, Vocals
    Bill Velline - Guitar, Vocals
    Ken Harvey - Guitar, Vocals
    Bob Korum - Drums
    Vi Petty - Keyboards
    Leon Russell - Keyboards
    The Roses - Vocals (Background)

    AMG:
    "Bobby Vee was mostly defined for a lot of listeners by the cloying pop/rock of 'Take Good Care of My Baby' and related hits of the early '60s, but as his full recorded history reveals, he had a lot more strings to his bow - not just after that song, but long before, as listeners discover on this collection of mostly early sides recorded with his band the Shadows (no relation to the English group of that name). This side of Vee's output is usually acknowledged in terms of his obvious debt to Buddy Holly, and the lanky Texas legend's influence can be heard throughout. In that regard, it's all derivative rock & roll, but it's also nicely done and pretty solid material by what amounted to a talented second-tier (or third-tier) act of the late '50s who needed a break - and that break would come, though not on this material. It's still worth hearing in the same way that those innumerable Buffalo Bop compilations of late-'50s rock & roll and rockabilly sides are. The crudest stuff here, including 'Lonely Love' (which apparently only exists as an acetate), is the most interesting and exciting, but even the ballad sides like 'Love Must Have Passed Me By' - self-produced by Vee and the band in Minnesota - are worth a listen or two, not just for their unforced honesty, but also for what they reveal of what Vee brought to the table when he finally crossed paths with producer Snuff Garrett. One realizes that it was Vee who helped point Garrett in the direction that the producer later used to such startlingly good effect with a later artist, Gary Lewis. It's on these sides that the persona of the ur-nebbish - which Lewis became in a successful ride to the top of the charts - first really manifests itself within something close to Garrett's orbit. The sound is variable, in keeping with the rough sources for some of the material, but overall the package is a lot of fun and highly informative, and it's difficult to find anything to complain about in the addition of the better part of an hour of Vee's rock & roll rejoining the catalog."



    The Early Rockin' Years   Scans


    0 0


    1.Boskie Przeświadczenie
    2.Pierścień Geodety
    3.Ślinka W Kącikach Ust
    4.Języki Ognia
    5.I Tak, Gdy Spojrzeliśmy...
    6.Słodycz Beznadziejnych Dni
    7.Serdeczne Męki
    8.Boliwijski Gniot
    9.Smutna Kozica Górska-Obudźcie Się

    Jerzy Mazzoll - Clarinet, Bass Clarinet, Vocal
    Janusz Zdunek - Trumpet
    Sławomir Janicki - Bass
    Tomasz Gwinciński - Drums
    Jacek Majewski - Percussion

    culture.pl:
    "At the age of eight Mazzoll started studying music with professor Tadeusz Kamiński, and by the late 1980s he was performing in punk and alternative groups. He began adding elements of off-jazz to his music and became part of the 'yass' scene - an alternative musical movement that sprung up in opposition to the existing jazz establishment, combining rock, ethno and free improvisation. Mazzoll has performed in a number of bands - in general, every different combination of yass musicians is given a new name. These included Arhythmic Perfection, Knuth/Mazzoll, Miłość, Kazik i Mazzoll, Kury, Pieces of Brain and NRD, as well as Niebieski Lotnik, The Prozelits, Mazzoll & Arhythmic Memory, Mazzoll & Arhythmic Brain, Mazzoll & Diffusion Ensemble, Mazzoll & LooDzisco and Perpleks. He worked with musicians such as Django Bates, Peter Brotzmann, Jon Dobie, Alfred Harth, Kazik, Peter Kowald, Vytautas Labutis, Jeffrrey Morgan, Tony Oxley, Olga Szwajgier, Tomasz Stańko, Tymon Tymański and Olo Walicki.
    While he is known to be one of the most important musicians connected with the Bydgoszcz cult club Mózg and with the Trójmiasto (Tri-city - Gdańsk, Gdynia, Sopot) yass scene, he has also performed frequently in Warsaw. In 1991 Mazzoll came up with the musical idea of 'arhythmic perfection' for which he created improvised arhythmic compositions, sometimes using drawings instead of notes. He incorporates elements of classical jazz in his work, as well as folk (klezmer music from Amsterdam) and contemporary music. He was lauded by Jazz Forum as being one of the most interesting clarinet players in Poland.
    Mazzoll also creates multimedia installations, and has tried his hand at writing avant-garde films. In the early 1990's he was connected with the multimedia gallery Delikatesy-Avantgarde, which Polityka Magazine declared in 1994 to be one of the most interesting galleries in Poland."



    Out Out To Lunch   Scans

    or

    Out Out To Lunch   Scans

    0 0


    Michael Praetorius: 6 Dances from Terpsichore
    01. I Entrée-Courante
    02. II Gavotte
    03. III Spagnoletta
    04. IV La Bourée
    05. V Ballet
    06. VI Volte
    Erasmus Widmann: Danses and Galliards from Musikalischer Tugendspiegel
    07. Sophia (no.13)-Anna (no.4)
    08. Clara (no.6)
    09. Magdalena (no.3)
    10. Agatha (no.15)
    11. Regina (no.12)
    Johann Hermann Schein: Suite no.4 from Banchetto Musicale
    12. I Pavane
    13. II Gaillarde
    14. III Courante
    15. IV Allemande-Tripla
    Suite no.5 from Banchetto Musicale
    16. I Pavane
    17. II Gaillarde
    18. III Courante
    19. IV Allemande-Tripla
    Suite no.3 from Banchetto Musicale
    20. I Pavane
    21. II Gaillarde
    22. III Courante
    23. IV Tripla
    Anonymous
    24. Lamento di Tristano-Rotta
    25. Trotto
    26. Istampita Ghaetta
    27. Istampita Cominciamento di gioia
    28. Saltarello
    29. Gulielmus: Bassa Danze a 2
    30. Francisco de la Torre: Alta Danza a 3
    Anonymous
    31. Bassa Danza a 2
    32. Bassa Danza a 3
    33. Basse danse La brosse-Tripla-Tourdion
    34. Basse danse La gatta
    35. Basse danse La Magdalena

    01. Joan Ambrosio Dalzia: Calata ala Spagnola
    Hans Neusidler
    02. Der Judentanz
    03. Welscher Tanz-Wascha mesa-Hupfauff
    04. Luis der Milán: Pavana I, II
    05. Alonso Mudarra: Romanesca Guarda me las vacas
    Anonymous
    06. Passamezzo-Saltarello
    07. Branle de Bourgogne
    08. Englischer Tanz
    09. Tanz Du hast mich wollen nemmen
    10. Schiarazula Marazula
    11. Ungaresca-Saltarello
    12. Ronde
    13. Branle de Bourgogne
    14. Branle de Champagne
    15. Passamezzo d'Italye-Reprise-Gaillarde
    Giorgio Mainerio
    16. Schiarazula Marazula
    17. Tedesca-Saltarello
    18. Ungaresca-Saltarello
    19. Jean-Baptiste Besard: Branle-Branle gay
    20. Anonymous-Mascherade
    Simone Molinaro
    21. Saltarello
    22. Ballo detto 'Il Conte Orlando'-Saltarello
    23. Gesualdo da Venosa: Gagliarda del Principe di Venosa
    Mario Fabrizio Caroso
    24. Barriera
    25. Celeste Giglio
    Pierre Francisque Caroubel
    26. Pavana de Spaigne
    27. I Courante
    28. II Courante
    29. I Volte
    30. II Volte
    Anthony Holborne
    31. Pavan The Funerals
    32. Noel's Galliard
    33. Coranto. High Ho Holiday
    34. Kemp's Jig
    John Dowland
    35. Queen Elizabeth her Galliard
    36. Mrs. Winter's Jump
    37. Thomas Simpson: Alman
    38. Orlando Gibbons: Galliard
    Michael Praetorius
    39. Gaillarde de Monsieur Wustron
    40. Gaillarde de la guerre
    41. Reprinse
    Valentin Haussmann
    42. Tantz
    43. Paduan
    44. Galliard
    45. Catkanei




    Dances of the Renaissance   Scans


    0 0


    1. Reconfortame
    2. Señora Del Silencio
    3. Manos De Hobre
    4. Como Decirte Cuanto Te Amo
    5. Cumbia Cienaguera
    6. Sueñas, Quieres, Dices
    7. Vasija De Barro
    8. Don Simon
    9. Quiero Amarte

    Wiki:
    "Génesis was a Colombian folk-rock band, very popular during the 1970s. They are regarded as a significant part of the Colombian social progressive and hippy movements of the time. Génesis is considered a pioneer in fusing rock music with the native folk music of Colombia. Colombian icon Humberto Monroy of Los Speakers was a founding member and driving force behind the band."



    Genesis   Scans


    0 0


    1. La Rue 4:27
    2. Automne 2:39
    3. L' Enfant Samba 3:06
    4. Troupeau Bleu 5:03
    5. Prelude 4:00
    6. Go Round 1:23
    7. Chanson d'Un Jour d'Hiver 5:23
    8. Mary & Jeff 2:45
    9. 8-Oct-71 4:26
    10. Sabbat (Part 1) 1:01
    11. Sabbat (Part 2) 3:20
    12. Sabbat (Part 3) 0:31
    13. Madbass 2:53

    Mireille Dalbray - Vocals
    Alain Labib - Saxophone (Alto)
    Jean Claude D'Agostini - Guitar
    Alain Mion - Piano, Vocals
    Jean Grevet - Bass
    Alain Gandolfi - Drums, Vocals
    Jo Pucheu - Percussion

    allaboutjazz:
    "A legendary bit of funky fusion from the French scene of the 70s - the standout set from Cortex, a combo who's very heavy on the keyboards! The tunes have a feel that's quite different than American electric work of the time - funky, but also a bit breezy too - with a strong Brazilian influence in some of the rhythms, and hip use of female vocals alongside the Fender Rhodes - which makes for a double layer of sound that's totally great! There's a bit of alto sax in the instrumentation, but most of the sound comes from the interplay between keyboards, voice, bass, and drums - rolling along in a sound that's stunningly soulful, and which makes the record one of the hippest European dates from the decade."



    Troupeau Bleu   Scans

    or

    Troupeau Bleu   Scans

    0 0


    1. A Conjuration to Pan
    2. Flight from Morocco
    3. Dyonisus
    4. Tales of Joujouka
    5. Conjuration to Pan/Dirigatur
    6. Rolling to Venus Interlude
    7. Time to Cry
    8. Heaven Help Us All
    9. Soma
    10. Burnt Offering
    11. Pan's Sleep
    12. Sky Fire
    13. Pan's Return to the Mountains
    14. Finale - Conjuration to Pan

    William Nowik
    - Guitars, Flutes, Violin, Piano, Pump Organ, Bass, Kalimba
    Greg Walker - Guitar
    Warren Cooper - Sax
    Pete Genovese - Percussion

    AMG:
    "Pan Symphony in E Minor is the kind of album that hardcore vinyl collectors - especially those whose specialty is esoteric psych-prog relics of the ‘60s and ‘70s - talk about using terms like 'holy grail.' Such has been the rarity of the barely released 1974 recording that the few available copies floating around years later, after its legend had begun to grow, commanded high prices among serious record geeks. Fortunately, 36 years after its release, the music that upstate New Yorker William Nowik made during a brief recording session under spartan circumstances was made widely available on CD. Originally conceived as the possible soundtrack to a film whose projected theme was the Greek god Pan, the album was recorded mostly by multi-instrumentalist Nowik, who plays everything from guitar and violin to pump organ and kalimba, with some help from a cast of characters that includes Greg Walker (of AOR band Duke Jupiter) on guitar, Warren Cooper on sax, and Pete Genovese on percussion. An all-instrumental affair - except for some chanting - the album basically consists of two long suites, each of which is broken down into several smaller pieces that move through a dizzying array of sounds and styles. The first 'movement,' if you will, goes from meditative drones and spare, hypnotic guitar patterns to a driving, heavy psych-prog jam before ending on a blissed-out, spacy mood amid ambient tones and guitar harmonics. The second, considerably longer, is an even wilder ride that encompasses Eastern-sounding violin and acoustic guitar duets, Americana-sounding slide guitar, sax-led jazz-rock à la early King Crimson, gentle percussive moments with vibes and kalimba, some John Fahey-esque guitar excursions, and more. What the whole thing has to do with Greek mythology is tough to say, considering that the film part of the project seems to have never materialized, but this monument to one man's musical vision is a fascinating document regardless."



    Pan Symphony in E Minor   Scans


    0 0


    1. Illusion
    2. Rangoon Creeper
    3. Attila
    4. Spanish Sun
    5. Crunch Cake
    6. Mr. M's Picture
    7. Frog
    8. Attila
    9. Spanish Sun
    10. Lily Kong
    11. E. Dorian
    12. Golden Section
    13. Illusion

    Gary Boyle - guitars
    Laurence Scott - keyboards
    Hugh Hopper - bass
    Nigel Morris - drums

    AMG:
    "In their brief five years of their existence, Isotope carved a steely jazz-rock identity based on the individual sound of electric guitarist Gary Boyle, whose greatest quality was a fluid, loud, riff oriented style that was an extension of John McLaughlin, and a precursor to Allan Holdsworth. Sponsored financially by such disparate entities as British Lion Films and Motown Records, the band toured Europe extensively, and played major cities on a brief American tour, opening for acts like the Average White Band, Manu Dibango, the Allman Brothers, and Humble Pie among others. This CD of previously unreleased material centers on their most fruitful period of 1974 and 1975 near the end of the band's existence. When fuzz-electric bass guitarist Hugh Hopper left Soft Machine to team with Boyle, the excellent fusion drummer Nigel Morris, and dentist/keyboardist Laurence Scott, the band took off. You can hear the foursome clearly pushing and pulling on the hard-edged sound of Boyle into more funky music, which eventually was the cause for its demise, aside from their management pulling the plug, so to speak. Some heady music was made, a bit inconsistent and uneven at times, but refreshing and satisfying for those of you who still crave music from this era. The concert performances from Germany in 1975 show the band at a tipping point, using straight, tight knit jazz-rock with no frills as Boyle and Hopper sound united and lightning quick during the opener 'Illusion,' with Hopper's bass staring through thin prismatic colors. The quartet devolves to recurring funk strains and noodling for 'Rangoon Creeper.' There's a thin melody encased in a rock beat for 'Attila' which is reprised later on the CD, while 'Crunch Cake' is a more simplified funk, and 'Mr. M's Picture' goes to a darker, stealthy, and repetitive place. Two versions of 'Spanish Sun' really showcase the spontaneous direction that the band seemed to want to go, building Mediterranean or Middle Eastern motifs à la the Mahavishnu Orchestra in either no time or 3/4 ostinato. The remainder of the tracks were done while on their sole tour of the U.S. or back in London in the studio, and almost exclusively feature Hopper's compositions. They significantly represent the yin and yang aspect of the group's repertoire battles, as his tight, short themes as on 'Lily Kong,' 'Edorian,' and the title track range from a small funk dumpling, a wah-wah induced swollen melody, or the angular and sour 'Golden Section' theme that is as much a signature tune as any Isotope piece. Hopper waffled in his desire for a more R&B based music after leaving the Soft Machine, yet when given the opportunity to add that aspect to Isotope, was uncomfortable with the way the group approached it. After leaving Stomu Yamashta's East Wind, Hopper had hoped for a better result, achieving it on his landmark LP Hopper Tunity Box. Boyle and Morris are quite impressive musicians who fell off the face after the final version of the band broke up, while the virtuoso Hopper sustained a credible and satisfying career for decades onward. This time capsule document of Isotope, while rare, long overdue,and quite worthwhile, pays tribute to a group whose potential was never fully realized."



    Golden Section   Scans

    or

    Golden Section   Scans

    0 0


    1. En Fermant Les Yeux
    2. Les petits mickeys
    3. Harmoniques
    4. Sur les toits de Boston
    5. Madeleine
    6. Il n'y a de nouveau que c'qui est oublié
    7. A la claire fontaine
    8. Ode pour une île
    9. Si je fais l'artiste
    10. A l'ombre d'une bougie
    11. Take it Easy
    12. Pour un brin d'herbe
    13. Under the sun et sous les cocotiers
    14. Chez vous
    15. Madame avec vous
    16. Voyage pour l'immédiat
    17. Un pays quelque part
    18. e suis venu de loin
    19. Le Port du Salut

    http://airplaydirect.com:
    "For over 35 years Eric VINCENT, considered in many countries today as one of the best representatives of French song, has been making a good living by singing every year to thousands of people all around the globe. In the United States alone, his tour of some 30 concerts every fall draws an audience of over 20,000 people.
    This singer-songwriter has had an exceptional and singular career. He has appeared in over 140 countries where he returns regularly, singing entirely in French for audiences which are, on the whole, not French-speaking. He speaks several languages and is able to communicate with his audiences in their own language.
    One day, he headlines the program at the Hanoi Opera or the Manaus Opera in Brazil,on another he’s in front of 3,000 people at Ancol in Jakarta or, again, a crowd of several thousand fans who sang along with his refrains on the Place Toussaint-Louverture in Jacmel, Haiti, just a few weeks before the terrible earthquake there.
    Eric VINCENT is nourished by these multicolored successes. His songs are published in the U.S. in French textbooks used in high schools and colleges. The French publisher, Didier/Hachette, picked up the idea and published 'Si on chantait avec Eric Vincent', which has made its way around the world.
    VINCENT alternates his peregrinations with stays in France which he enjoys spending either in the province where he was born, La Mayenne, or on his barge docked right in the heart of Paris, at the Port de l’Arsenal at the Bastille.
    Ten songs, outside of norms and fashions, which confirm the remarkable qualities of the singer as an author and composer. After having conceived the arrangements and taking charge of the acoustic guitars, he gathered around him his faithful musician friends who, impressed to a man by his compositions, dove into the project with passion:
    the American soprano saxophonist, Billy DREWES (Village Vanguard Jazz Orchestra, Randy BRECKER...), Sylvin MARC, Tony RABESON, Pierre CHÉRÈZE, Christophe GUIOT, Jean-Philippe AUDIN, Roland ROMANELLI, Jérôme GUÉGUEN, Manu LACORDAIRE... each bringing, in addition to his talent, an energy that gives the album a really exceptional atmosphere.
    The alchemy took place with his ‘old’ partner and friend, Vincent BRULEY at the Piccolo Studio."



    Harmoniques   Scans


    0 0


    1. Jilala Wedding Procession
    2. Ouled Khalifa
    3. Darba Del Hamemi
    4. Gnaoui
    5. Ghiatta And Drums
    6. Jellaba Titara
    7. Yumala
    8. Neksma
    9. Baba Larabi

    gorhythm.com:
    "The Jilala brotherhood of Morocco is one of many sects of Sufi Islam. Originating in 12th century Baghdad, it still retains vestiges of pre-Islamic healing rituals and ecstatic dance. On these lovingly packaged raw field recordings from 1965, you can follow the members' journey to the ecstatic and feel the power of this primeval music.Sufi religious music has an intent similar to that of Native American drum circles, Tibetan chanting and qawwali singing-to create an atmosphere that transcends the mundane world, enabling the dancer to reach for the divine. Incense and special foods and drinks help establish the mood, while the shebaba (reed flute) states the theme. Bendir (hand drum) tempos rise and fall, as intricate percussion from double castanets, together with chanting and vocalizations, drives the dancers on."



    Sufi Trance Music From Morocco   Scans


    0 0


    1. Concerto for cello & orchestra No.2 39:22
    2. In Memoriam, for orchestra (orchestral version of the Piano Quintet) 25:30

    Mstislav Rostropovich - Cello
    Seiji Ozawa - Conductor
    London Symphony Orchestra

    AMG:
    "Alfred Schnittke's Second Cello Concerto is a leviathan of a work, in size, length, scope, and difficulty. This may reflect the work's occasion: it realizes Schnittke's 16-year ambition to write a work for the great Russian cellist Mstislav Rostropovich. This ambition was of course thwarted until 1986 by Rostropovich's exile from Soviet Russia; while the cellist was not allowed back in Russia, Schnittke was not allowed to travel to Rostropovich's West.
    Thus, the Second Cello Concerto represents a seal of friendship. However, it also carries the scar of political oppression, something Schnittke makes explicit in the work's massive fifth and final movement. This movement, a passacaglia (originally a Baroque form based on a repeating bass pattern), uses as its ground bass a theme from Schnittke's 1974 film score to Elim Klimov's Agony. Schnittke's description of the film is extremely telling: it 'portrays the final weeks of Russia which preceded the more than 70-year-long night in the country's history.'
    Perhaps this political 'sub-plot' begins to explain the Second Cello Concerto's epic stature, and the nature of its sobriety. The work is constructed in five large movements; the opening Moderato serves more as prelude to the storm, announcing the soloist with a desperate but regal twelve-tone line. As others have noted, the mirror-like contour of this melody invokes Alban Berg's 1935 Violin Concerto; both themes carry a sphinxian sense of opening and closing on themselves without letting up their mystery. Eventually the cello's line is attacked by snarling brass, and soon after the bizarre second movement begins.
    Intensely difficult, the large-scale Allegro forces the soloist through an unending serpentine line; the cellist's music is not lyrical, however, but angular and gnarled - less like melody than a perpetual thread of musical litanies. Amidst this painful contortionism, the huge orchestra splits into smaller groups of garish color and texture. They antagonize the soloist much like those nasty, lovingly crafted goblins in Bosch paintings; they are embodied here in the chromatic crunchings of a harpsichord, a quivering flexatone, and a spastic contra-bassoon. Three times the orchestra quashes the cello with apoplectic eruptions based on the soloist's opening mirror motive, articulating a sensation of individual and imposter, of false-doubles and the anxiety they enforce.
    This ineffable sense of catastrophe becomes more palpable in the slow third movement. This Lento moves with great lyrical introspection, its gaunt lines and ambivalent harmony lending a dark elegance to its sound. Yet musical mirrors and imposters abound; the soloist's line is consistently echoed in inversion by the orchestra, reflecting the cello's warm vocality in the steely blur of bells and glockenspiel. Likewise, the cello itself passes through reflective borders, from empty soloistic dimensions into a claustrophobic chamber of throbbing string quarter tones.
    A solo recitative leads into the brutal Allegretto vivo fourth movement, where the orchestra's rage is finally given full voice. A screeching climax leads into the extraordinary last movement, based on the Agony-score. Schnittke calls this music a 'sound-world,' implying less a musical movement than a ghostly process of inhabitance and gradual change. The cello spins a line of endless, merciless transformation, like a demented singer long having forgotten the actual melody; the orchestra all the while grows like a rich, terrifying infestation, and eventually crushes the soloists with supreme density. Amidst this hysterical proliferation of musical ideas, so evocative of paranoia and madness (and thus perhaps of Rasputin himself), the cello never ceases. Even in the concerto's smoldering last bars its sings into the void, 'the ever-darkening orchestral sound transforming the moment into an inaudible, eternal reverberation'.

    In Memoriam is actually an orchestral arrangement of Alfred Schnittke's Piano Quintet of 1976. The request to orchestrate this extraordinary chamber work came from Schnittke's close friend and staunch supporter, Russian conductor Gennadi Rozdestvensky. Rozdestvensky had moved mountains three years before to get Schnittke's First Symphony performed in the tiny town of Gorki - a watershed moment in the composer's career and in Russian music history; perhaps the import of this friendship propelled Schnittke to set the private quintet on the orchestra stage.
    The Piano Quintet itself is a dark, heavy planet of sorts. Even in the midst of Schnittke's bewilderingly prolific output, this extremely introspective work commands a massive gravity; it seems to orient, arrange, and set in motion so many of Schnittke's works, before and after. If one wants to locate the founding trauma for such a consistently agonizing body of artistic work, it is most likely the Piano Quintet.
    This centrality may owe much to the quintet's function, conceived as a memorial to the composer's mother, who died in September 1972 of a stroke. It is a work whose substance was drawn from a real event, entirely tangible and irrevocable - in many ways different from Schnittke's other, more brazenly public works of the time. This shift caused the composer tremendous difficulty. After finishing a first movement very quickly, Schnittke was paralyzed, 'unable to continue because I had to take what I wrote from an imaginary space defined in terms of sound and put it into the psychological space as defined by life, where excruciating pain seems almost unserious, and one must fight for the right to use dissonance, consonance, and assonance.' Hence the quintet was shelved, and not resumed until almost four years later.
    While it seems strange that Schnittke would have orchestrated such an intimate work, In Memoriam still carries a tremendous impact. The signature sound that Schnittke was perfected in the quintet - a dense, claustrophobic, pathetic web of chromatic clusters - is magnified in In Memoriam. Moreover, while an effective claustrophobia is lost with such large forces, a new expressivity arises from the orchestra's color and mass.
    Schnittke decided to treat the orchestra much as an expanded piano quintet, with the string section taking over the role of string quartet. The piano's music, however, is now expanded by the colors of the winds, brass, and a large percussion section. Most importantly, many piano passages are now performed by vibraphone; this glassy, hallucinatory sound is another Schnittke hallmark. Finally, certain crucial passages include the organ, whose weight and symbolism add much to the piece.
    The first two movements of In Memoriam do not differ substantially from the chamber version. The second movement spins out a wraith-like slow waltz on the name of B-A-C-H (H in German notation is B, B is B-flat), but constantly descends back into torturous clusters.
    The next two movements, however, are intensified in novel ways. Together they form the dark heart of the work, drawn from the composer's 'real experiences of grief which I would prefer not to comment on because they are of a very personal nature.' Extremely static in the chamber work, these movements attain a new action, reinforced by organ and bells at climaxes.
    After the cathartic crisis on a single repeated note, the fourth movement ebbs into the work's final bars, based on a fourteen-bar theme repeated fourteen times in the organ. Over this Schubert-like theme of studied peasantry, we hear blanched recollections of previous passages, materializing and liquefying, swept along by the organ's current of reconciliation."


    Cello Concerto No.2 / In Memoriam   Scans


    0 0


    1. Twenty Ten 2:42
    2. Marjorine 2:46
    3. The Worst That Could Happen 3:20
    4. In My Magic Garden 2:34
    5. Never My Love 2:46
    6. (You Keep Me) Hangin' On 6:03
    7. Lazy Day 2:58
    8. Every Minute Every Day 2:26
    9. Sheila's Back in Town 2:19
    10. Jeff's Boogie 1:36
    11. They Didn't Believe Me 2:12
    12. Whole World 3:05
    13. Happy 2:09
    14. I Should Have Known 2:35
    15. On the Other Hand 2:22
    16. Once Again 2:41
    17. Make Mine Music 2:03
    18. Enjoy It 2:19
    19. Walking My Baby 2:18
    20. Follow Me Follow 3:21
    21. Follow Me Follow (Demo) 3:23
    22. Good Day 2:51

    Stuar Atttride
    Dave Church
    Barry Creasey
    Steve Maher
    Chaz Wade
    Ged Wade

    AMG:
    "The name of the band and the naked nymph on the cover marshal an appetite for sounds far more psychedelic than you actually get on Tinkerbell's Fairydust's self-titled album (realized in test-pressing form only by Decca in 1969, though issued on CD in 1998). The leadoff cut, 'Twenty Ten,' is also deceptive - it's pretty respectable, atmospheric late-'60s British psych with a slightly classical feel and some cool wah-wah guitar and distorted organ. But not only does nothing else on the album match it, not much on the album even sounds like the work of the same band. Covers of the Brooklyn Bridge's 'The Worst That Could Happen,' the Association's 'Never My Love,' and Spanky & Our Gang's 'Lazy Day' are not only psychedelic, they're not very good, sounding like attempts to closely cover American hits for the British market. Other tracks sound like similar British equivalents to the Happenings and the Tokens - not exactly among the more exciting American '60s bands to begin with - but not even doing harmony pop/rock as well as those groups did. 'In My Garden' is a half-decent track a step above their other sunshine pop-oid songs. Yet it's not nearly enough to save a record that lurches to a close with a note-for-note cover of the Yardbirds' blues-rock instrumental 'Jeff's Boogie,' indicating that the group might have had some trouble deciding what kind of stuff they wanted to imitate."



    Tinkerbell's Fairydust   Scans


older | 1 | .... | 4 | 5 | (Page 6) | 7 | 8 | .... | 57 | newer