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FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | .... | 55 | 56 | (Page 57)

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    1. Spanish Key 19:44
    2. All Blues 9:21
    3. Ife (Fast) 8:41
    4. In a Silent Way 2:33
    5. It's About That Time 10:00
    6. Jean Pierre 11:36

    1. So What 8:09
    2. Miles Runs the Voodoo Down 9:03
    3. Blue in Green 13:07
    4. Great Expectations 8:39
    5. Ife (Slow) 14:11
    6. Miles from India 6:53

    Gary Bartz - saxophones
    Dave Liebman - saxophones
    Rudresh Mahanthappa - saxophones
    John McLaughlin - guitars
    Mike Stern - guitars
    Pete Cosey - guitars
    Chick Corea - keyboards
    Adam Holzman - keyboards
    Robert Irving III - keyboards
    Louiz Banks - keyboards
    Ron Carter - bass
    Michael Henderson - bass
    Marcus Miller - bass
    Benny Rietveld - bass
    Jimmy Cobb - drums
    Leon 'Ndugu' Chancler - drums
    Lenny White - drums
    Vince Wilburn - drums
    Gino Banks - drums
    Ranjit Barot - drums
    Badal Roy - tabla
    Ravi Chari - sitar
    Vikku Vinayakram - ghatam
    V. Selvaganesh - khanjira
    U. Shrinivas - electric mandolin
    Brij Narain - sarod; Dilshad Khan - sarangi
    Sridhar Parthasarathy - mridangam
    Taufiq Qureshi - Indian percussion
    A. Sivamani - Indian percussion
    Kala Ramnath - Carnatic violin
    Rakesh Chaurasia - flute
    Shankar Mahadevan - Indian classical vocals
    Sikkil Gurucharan - Indian classical vocals

    AMG:
    "It was such a simple concept. Producer Bob Belden (who has directed the Miles Davis reissue series) was talking with Times Square label owner Yusuf Gandhi about Miles' use of Indian instrumentation during The Complete On the Corner Sessions and wondered aloud what it would sound like if Indian musicians played Miles' music. Gandhi replied 'Miles from India,' and nearly a year later Belden delivered this brilliant set that not only features a number of India's finest musicians but a veritable who's who of Miles' own sidemen. In perhaps the boldest move, Belden and the musicians looked well beyond Miles' 1972-1975 sessions with Indian instruments for inspiration, performing tracks from the '50s, '60s, '70s, and '80s (the same time span covered by Miles' associates on this album). Another fun thing about these performances is that some of Miles' sidemen play on songs they didn't originally play on - like the opener, 'Spanish Key,' featuring Mike Stern and Dave Liebman. But despite some additional Indian percussion and vocalizing, 'Spanish Key' doesn't vary much from the original. On the other hand, 'All Blues' is completely transformed, with Ravi Chary's sitar taking the place of Miles' trumpet. The Gary Bartz/Rudresh Mahanthappa sax duet on this is a real treat, as are the presence and playing of Jimmy Cobb, who also played on the original 1959 Kind of Blue session. The fast version of 'Ife' marks the entrance of monster bass player Michael Henderson and the wonderfully deranged guitar of Pete Cosey, who does not record nearly enough. After the lovely but relatively brief sarod-led 'In a Silent Way,' it's great to hear Cosey rip it up on 'It's About That Time.' He's nearly matched in intensity by Bartz's sax and Kala Ramnath's violin while Henderson does his thing with that killer Dave Holland bassline. Stern gets to reprise his role on the classic 'Jean Pierre,' paired with some great flute from Rakesh Chaurasia.
    Chick Corea appears only on 'So What,' but turns in a great piano solo with some tasty inside-the-piano work. Like 'All Blues,''So What' becomes something else again with the addition of a trio of Indian percussionists and a change in time signature. And while the bassline of 'Miles Runs the Voodoo Down' doesn't really lend itself to Henderson's signature propulsive style, the percussionists lock in with him, providing a platform for more sick playing from Cosey. 'Blue in Green' has Wallace Roney's trumpet singing with Shankar Mahadevan's voice and then sarangi in another sublime transformation. Here, Mike Stern's solo is as gentle as the one on 'Jean Pierre' was noisy. Henderson and drummer Vince Wilburn kick it on 'Great Expectations,' which segues briefly into the introspective 'Orange Lady' and back. Chary and Roney both contribute excellent solos and Cosey goes nuts (why doesn't he record more?). Fortunately, he gets plenty more space on the slow version of 'Ife,' both soloing and comping. The rhythm section of Henderson and Badal Roy on tabla is completely hypnotic here, providing a perfect base for languid solos from Dave Liebman and Gary Bartz and some nice spacy sounds from Cosey and Adam Holzman. The album closes with the only track Miles didn't record: 'Miles from India,' penned by John McLaughlin for this set. Scored for voice, piano, guitar, and the electric mandolin of U. Srinivas, it's a pensive and atmospheric track that nevertheless features some passionate soloing. And that's merely touching on some of the highlights. Folks like Ron Carter, Marcus Miller, Ndugu Chancler, and Lenny White haven't even been mentioned, let alone some of the great Indian musicians also present here.
    The essence of jazz is improvisation and expression, and Miles always sought out highly individual players. The beauty of Miles from India is how the players from different cultures and backgrounds meet on Miles' turf with their individual voices completely intact. Miles from India is not only an amazing celebration of the music of Miles Davis, it's also a tribute to the way Miles and Teo Macero changed the way jazz music can be made. Granted, it's the musicians involved who turn in these scorching performances, but this album was recorded in Mumbai, India, Chicago, New York, Los Angeles, and Saylorsburg, PA (!?), and would not have been possible without the studio techniques Macero pioneered with Miles. Perhaps, like Macero, Bob Belden will be remembered more for his production than his horn playing. Either way, with Miles from India, Belden has outdone himself and delivered a tribute that succeeds completely on every level. Kudos to all involved."



    Miles from India

    or

    Miles from India


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    1. Sonnenzeichen - Feuerzeichen 5:19
    2. Fur ein kleines Mädchen 5:23
    3. Nichts fur mich 6:33
    4. Nach diesem Tag 4:08
    5. La la 3:17
    6. Sonne 4:45
    7. Tanz und Tod 15:11

    Uwe Karpa - acoustic & electric guitars
    Matthias Ulmer - keyboards, vocals
    Harald Bareth - bass, lead vocals, voice
    Peter Schmidt - drums, percussion

    AMG:
    "Anyone's Daughter was a late-'70s, early-'80s symphonic prog rock band heavily influenced by Genesis as well as by German bands such as Elroy and Grobschnitt. After breaking up in the mid-'80s, the group reformed in 2000.
    Consisting of Uwe Karpa (guitars), Matthias Ulmer (keyboards, vocals), Harald Bareth (bass, lead vocals), and Kono Konopik (drums), Anyone's Daughter was formed in 1978. Their first record, Adonis (1979), featured English vocals, epic tracks with reflective and aggressive moments, and a prominent keyboard sound with heavy use of Moogs in particular. Anyone's Daughter (1980) found the band moving towards shorter material, but 1981's Piktors Verwandlungen, on which the band first sang in German, was their most experimental work. Recorded live, it is a concept album based around Hermann Hesse's novel Pictor's Metamorphoses and Other Fantasies and featured several sections with spoken word. Although it contained some references to past glories, In Blau (1982) reversed course once again, with the band moving towards a more straightforward approach that would be fully realized on Neue Sterne (1983). At this point, Konopik left and was replaced by Peter Schmidt who was featured on the next album, Live (1984). The band briefly reformed in 1986 with several new members. Then, after over a decade of silence, Anyone's Daughter reformed around Karpa and Ulmer, with three new members for the 2001 CD, Danger World."



    In Blau

    or

    In Blau


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    1. Aquarela Do Brasil 6:01
    2. Rio de Janeiro 6:27
    3. Tomarapeba 3:42
    4. Dancando 7:55
    5. Fogueira 5:52
    6. Bianca 6:41
    7. Don Quixote 7:41
    8. O Dia, À Noite 3:52

    Egberto Gismonti - Dilruba, Flute, Guitar, Performer, Piano, Vocals, Voices
    Naná Vasconcelos - Berimbau, Percussion, Vocals, Voices

    AMG:
    "'Aquarela do Brasil,' an unofficial anthem of Brazil, may have received literally thousands of different version and interpretations, but even then, Egberto and Brazilian percussionist Naná Vasconcelos (his sole accompanist here) were able to devise an extremely original version, which opens with an unassuming stylized samba introduction, slowly bringing elements which conduce the listener to the piece's identification. Egberto is very fond of percussive attacks and ethereal configurations, both acquiring superior importance in his music, not being necessarily attached to or supportive for a musical theme or melody. Therefore, the next defined melody presented (in the low strings of his 10 string violão) is at track six, 'Bianca,' which is a complex yet lyrical construction based in which seems a folkloric rhythm motif. Follows 'Dom Quixote,' another beautiful, lyrical, courageously simple theme delivered at the piano, with Naná's emulating of an African chant and his triangle playing in the forró tradition."



    Duas Vozes

    or

    Duas Vozes


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    1. Level One 3:21
    2. The Other Side 4:35
    3. Diedra 3:56
    4. Some Greasy Stuff 3:30
    5. NYCTOPHOBIA 4:03
    6. Suite 5:32
    a) Entrance
    b) Repose
    c) Exit
    7. Eyes Of Love 2:35
    8. Struttin`With Sunshine 3:20
    9. That`s The Joint 4:03

    Michael Lawrence - flugelhorn, trumpet
    Larry Coryell - guitar
    Mike Mandel - keyboards
    John Lee - bass
    Alphonse Mouzon - drums, percussion

    AMG:
    "This was the follow-up to the legendary Introducing the Eleventh House recording. While it never achieved the classic status of its predecessor, it is an excellent follow-up that captures the band at their creative and technical peak. From the whimsical 'Diedra' to the intense 'Nyctophobia,' Coryell leads his group with an understated refrain. He has always been at his best when acting as an equal within a group's space rather than as the centerpiece. His one indulgence here is the pretty, acoustic guitar solo 'Eyes of Love.' Of particular interest on this recording is the ferocious drumming of Alponse Mouzon, who displays a style of speed and power that rivals that of Billy Cobham. This is a forgotten gem from the fusion era."



    Level One

    or

    Level One


older | 1 | .... | 55 | 56 | (Page 57)