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FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | .... | 51 | 52 | (Page 53) | 54 | 55 | .... | 57 | newer

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    1. Coltrane in Paradise 11:46
    2. The Prober 9:28
    3. Manhattan Egos 8:22
    4. Seven Dances of Salome 7:02
    5. Visions 6:08
    6. Beings of Light 13:08
    7. Purple Rays 12:36
    8. Divine Magnet 3:21
    9. The Beauty of Ibis 6:51

    Sonny Simmons - Sax (Alto), English Horn
    Barbara Donald - Trumpet
    Michael White - Violin (6-9)
    Kenny Jenkins – Bass (6-9)
    Paul Smith – Drums (1-5)
    Eddie Marshall – Drums (6-9)
    Voodoo Bembe – Congas (1-5)

    AMG:
    "Chris Strachwitz, the founder and producer of Arhoolie Records is well known for issuing blues, Cajun, Tex-Mex, Tejano, zydeco, Mexican folk, country, folk, and world musics of every kind. His musical appetite is restless and his vision relentless. He is not, however, a known fan of out jazz. These two dates featuring the great, underappreciated sax of Sonny Simmons are evidence to the contrary. Manhattan Egos features two sessions from February 1969 and a live date from October of 1970. The studio session was the original LP issue, and the live date, as raw as it is, is additional, previously unreleased material. The music on Simmons' two sets is deeply indebted to John Coltrane and Albert Ayler, but then almost everyone breaking new ground in jazz at the time - with the exception of Miles Davis, Ornette Coleman, and Cecil Taylor - owed it too. The Simmons band on the first five tracks is comprised of totally unknown musicians, with the possible exception of Barbara Donald, who played in the California free scene awhile before hooking up with Simmons, eventually marrying him and bearing him two children. The rest, Juma, Paul Smith, and 'Voodoo Bember,' who makes a conga appearance, were not players who had gigged with anyone before Simmons. It doesn't matter though, because Simmons and Donald - whose style is equal parts Don Ayler, Clifford Brown, and Maynard Ferguson - create a such a dominant frontline there is little else for the rhythm section to do but find a way to create rhythm and harmony from the interplay of the horns. On the title track, while Juma bows his bass aleatorically to create a harmonic wall of mode and timbre, Donald and Simmons trade lines almost instinctually, overlapping each other with ribbons of such mellifluous intensity it is actually possible to hear them singing to one another through the horns. The harmonic bridge created by Juma is an elastic one; Simmons is able to stretch both modes and intervals on a scalar level while engaging in a kind of chromatic exchange of pitches with Donald. Smith is keeping up, but barely, trying to continually double and triple time the band to make up for what he doesn't know, but the cracks show, making the date seem that much more organic. Listen to his interval crossovers in 'Coltrane in Paradise,' amid the long, slowly drawn out morphing of the improvisation as it changes meter three times in less than a minute, and you'll hear the evidence. The live session from late '70 is a different matter altogether because the band is stellar. Michael White, with his encyclopedic knowledge of counterpoint is a perfect foil for Simmons, who is primarily as player concerned with the development of thematic material based on harmonic exchange. On 'Beings of Light,' the frontline resembles something from the Jackie McLean/Tina Brooks band in the first six measures. When Simmons' alto moves into the solo, Kenny Jenkins' bass and Eddie Marshall's drumming follow him right to the overtonal edge and push him over. Simmons' playing here is less lyrical but far more confident and fiery. He reaches deep into the middle and lower registers of the horn for arpeggios that are slurred, bent, and angular rather than gliding or scalar. He sounds like a leader because he has a band that can take any of his ideas and extend them seemingly infinitely. When White solos, we can hear the entire history of the 20th century in his playing, from old-timey fiddle tunes to serialism and bebop. He constructs a contrapuntal system that moves against itself with drones and pitch shifting fluidity. When the two lay against each other, the dialogue is rooted to nothing but rhythm, there are no boundaries holding either to the melody, though it comes through anyway. By the time they reach the end of the set with 'The Beauty of Ibis,' it is as if a band had been formed, rehearsed and solidified in the course of the concert. If this is a finale there are no more beginnings. Things kick off with Simmons' solo moving ever outward from there. Each member of this quartet has the ability to take his desires to the limits of jazz expression with the confidence that everyone else covers his back. Simmons' solo is guttural, singing and centered on the overtonal possibilities inherent in atonal improvisation as it relates to mode and interval. White and Marshall play counterpoint to one another, slipping through the same patches at twice the time and trading eights on the dime. Jenkins refuses to anchor anything, he pushes the envelope far past the role of the bassist and into orbit forming a launching pad for everyone else's ideas and his own solo is as furious as fire on old wood. The piece ends with a lilting melodic modal exploration of D minor, and whispers to a close confusing everyone in the audience. No matter. They were present to history in the making. Thank God Chris Strachwitz had his tape recorder on."



    Manhattan Egos

    or

    Manhattan Egos


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    1. Autobiography 3:35
    2. Healing Of The Lunatic Owl 5:05
    3. Hide From The Dawn 6:50
    4. She's Learning 4:13
    5. A Time A Place 8:55
    6. Two Bad Days 3:55
    7. Sadness Of A Moment 4:08
    8. To B 3:52
    9. The Cage 3:00

    Brian Wilshaw - saxophone, flute
    Lloyd Williams - trumpet
    Bill Edwards - lead guitar, vocals
    Chris Jennings - organ, piano
    Harvey Coles - bass, vocals
    Dave Muller - drums

    othermusic:
    "This progressive rock septet came from Somerset, and recorded their sole album in London in March 1970. Produced by Lennie Wright (drummer with The Web and Samurai), it originally appeared that October, when it sank without trace. In recent years, however, it has been acclaimed as one of the best prog obscurities of its time, with its tight jamming and incisive brass arrangements earning favorable comparisons with Chicago and Blood, Sweat & Tears. It's presented here complete with a rare non-album bonus track."



    Healing Of The Lunatic Owl

    or

    Healing Of The Lunatic Owl


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    1. Aria 4:58
    2. Humpty Dumpty 2:32
    3. Planes 2:59
    4. Showbiz Suite 7:38
    5. Balek 4:20
    6. Only Nineteen 3:52
    7. Phalene 7:54
    8. Temse 3:46
    9. Stomp 7:36
    10. Polk 3:23
    11. N.W. 6:46
    12. Dag Madam Merci 3:08
    13. S.U.S. 4:22
    14. Plotseling 7:44
    15. Bosso 3:23

    John Dover - Flute, Clarinet (Bass), Sax (Baritone)
    Richard Rousselet - Flugelhorn
    Philip Catherine - Guitar
    Francis Weyer - Guitar
    Yvan DeSouter - Bass
    Garcia Morales - Percussion
    Marc Moulin - Keyboards

    AMG:
    "Belgian keyboardist Marc Moulin has been a jazz craftsman for more than three decades. A leader in the field of acid jazz, he began his career by playing the piano in the '60s throughout Europe. During the following decade, he established a band known as Placebo. By 1974, he had made a trio of albums, influenced by such masters of jazz as Miles Davis and Herbie Hancock. One of those early releases, Sam Suffy, has withstood the test of time and is still popular decades later with aficionados. Before the '70s had passed, Moulin switched gears; working with the band Telex, his style shifted to electro pop. With bandmates Michel Moers on vocals and Dan Lacksman on synthesizer, he put out five albums that spawned hit singles like 'Rock Around the Clock,' an electro pop version of the song originally made famous by Bill Haley & the Comets, and 'Moscow Diskow,' which won fans in discos as far away as Australia and Brazil. By 1992, Moulin again pulled a switch, this time turning to a sound that was more ambient with the release of Maessage. As the calendar flipped forward to a new millennium, Moulin flipped back in time to the place where he'd started: jazz. He signed with Blue Note, a label fond of pushing boundaries, which allowed him to freely combine his proclivity for the electronic sound with his jazz roots."



    Placebo Sessions

    or

    Placebo Sessions


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    1. Siren 8:51
    2. Still Waters 6:46
    3. Blade 10:21
    4. Wild Pilgrimage 8:19
    5. The Oracle 5:22
    6. City Of Gold 12:09

    Martin Robertson - Alto Saxophone (1)
    Charlie Siem - Violin (3)
    The City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra
    Lucie Svehlova - Concert-Master
    Paul Englishby - Orchestrator

    AMG:
    "Tony Banks is best known as one of the founders of Genesis, and he was responsible for writing most of the band's material. He developed a career in film scoring beginning in the 1970s, and after the turn of the century he also turned his attention to writing purely orchestral music. Six Pieces for Orchestra, released in 2012, is his second orchestral album, the first being Seven: A Suite for Orchestra, from 2004. Here Banks is joined by composer and conductor Paul Englishby, who contributed to the pieces' development and orchestrated them. Banks' evocatively titled works are melodic and warmly neo-Romantic, with a broad, cinematic sweep. Violinist Charlie Siem and alto sax player Martin Robertson each have a track on which they're featured soloists. Englishby conducts the City of Prague Philharmonic on this Naxos release."



    Six Pieces for Orchestra

    or

    Six Pieces for Orchestra


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    1. Bored to Be Wild 4:24
    2. Fryday 6:05
    3. Trottel Lustig 3:38
    4. Dunakorall 3:24
    5. Schöne Tiere 10:48
    6. Geobruckneo 0:52
    7. Heyday 6:27
    8. Einsame Ameisen 4:35
    9. Seekin Scapegoat 4:43
    10. Virus 5:36
    11. Georg Dudek Trifft Genau 8:24
    12. Volle Waschkraft 2:13

    Andreas Heidu
    - Zombie guitar,vocals (10,12),drum computer (2)
    Walter Hollinetz - Soprano saxophone (6,8,9,12),Tenor saxophone (1-5,7,10,12),sona (12),clarinet (11),vocals (10,12)
    Andreas Leikauf - violin,vocals (10,12)
    Lukas Ligeti - drums,vocals (10,12),whistling (10)
    Erwin Redl - electric guitar (1-9,11,12),bass guitar (1,4),keyboards (10),vocals (10,12),drum computer (11)

    AMG:
    "Hybrid Beat is the only full-length album the Austrian avant prog quintet Kombinat M left to posterity. The lineup of two guitars, violin, saxophone, bass, and drums was not very common back in the early '90s and helped give the group a fresh chamber rock sound, but in the following years better groups with similar instrumentation popped up (Boud Deun and Interférence Sardines are only two of them). Although resolutely rock, thanks to Lukas Ligeti's powerful drumming, the music sounds often overtly complex in terms of time signatures and structures, yet disarmingly hollow. Below the pyrotechnic riffs, the different sections of the longer pieces appear badly stitched together and the shorter tracks turn out repetitive. Walter Hollinetz is a good blower with a raspy sound; Andreas Heidu and Erwin Redl play mean guitars, often aiming at a Branca-esque wall of sound without the sloppiness - all good points that should account for a good album. Sadly, the writing is poor, especially when compared to similar groups like Doctor Nerve, Forever Einstein, or Henry Kaiser and Virgil Moorefield's rock bands. That said, there are redeeming moments - a guitar solo in 'Virus,''Trottel Lustig' - and avant prog collectors and fans of the label Cuneiform's sound should enjoy. But followers of the Siaseme Stepbrothers' drummer will find Hybrid Beat lacks bite and originality."



    Hybrid Beat

    or

    Hybrid Beat


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    1. La Tigra 6:26
    2. Spanish Night 6:47
    3. Speed Demon 6:07
    4. Doctor Rocker and Mr. Jive 6:29
    5. Bermuda High 5:44
    6. Mad Millie 8:31

    Ronnie Cuber - Sax (Baritone)
    David Matthews - Piano
    Richard Tee - Piano (Electric)
    Cliff Carter - Synthesizer
    Mark Egan - Bass
    Dave Weckl - Drums
    Sammy Figueroa - Percussion

    AMG:
    "Keyboardist David Matthews has been, among other things, a steady source of funk, whether drinking it in from the sweat of the rhythmically innovative soul godfather James Brown or attempting to pour it over the head of the somewhat wimpier Paul Simon. Trends for better or worse that Matthews has been associated with since the '70s also include the CTI sound, an exhaustive list of television soundtracks and commercial advertisements, and a series of critically praised releases by the Manhattan Jazz Orchestra. He should not be confused with the Dave Matthews of jam band fame, nor the earlier arranger and reed player from the big-band heyday, although both of them appear to have worked for Frank Sinatra at one time.
    A graduate of the University of Cincinnati with a bachelor's degree in composition, Matthews began his performing career as the leader of a dance band in the late '60s. This group toured extensively in several parts of Europe and Matthews also began establishing a presence on the Cincinnati jazz scene. The next move was a big one; in 1970 he began working as both an arranger and bandleader for James Brown, making it possible for him to relocate to New York City and utilize the Brown connection in order to garner steady freelance assignments. His clients included demanding performers such as drummer and bandleader Buddy Rich, singers Mark Murphy and Bonnie Raitt, and the Starland Vocal Band, among many others. In the mid-'70s he became staff arranger for the CTI label, resulting in a series of smooth productions that were loved by some jazz buffs and loathed by others. Matthews formed his own groups from this period on, including the Manhattan Jazz Quintet. He scored many films for Hollywood, such as The Parallax View, the first version of The Stepford Wives, and Night Moves. He also has had quite a high profile for his activities in Japan."



    Speed Demon

    or

    Speed Demon


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    1. Elements - Earth/Fire/Water/Air 8:06
    2. Ramblin 9:02
    3. Mountains 6:35
    4. Wanderland 5:02
    5. Last Night 3:26

    6. Wedding Song 4:50
    7. A Warm Trip With Taija 8:45
    8. Impressions of India 5:27
    9. Thinking Of You In The Moonshine 6:28
    10. Summer Games 5:25
    11. See You Missing My Crazy Baby 3:36

    Jukka Tolonen - guitars, keyboards
    Pekka Poyry - saxophone
    Jukka Gustavson - Lowrey organ
    Pekka Pohjola - bass
    Heikki Virtanen - bass
    Ronnie Osterberg - drums
    Reino Laine - percussion
    Erik Danholm - Flute (7)
    Paroni Paakkunainen - Flute (11,10,11)
    Jussi Aalto - Trombone (11,9,10,11)
    Erkki Koskimo - Trombone (7,8)
    Esko Rosnell - Drums, Percussion (11,8,9,10)

    jukkatolonen.com:
    "Jukka Tolonen is not only Finland's national guitar hero but also one of the world's most respected guitarists. For the past 4 decades, he has captivated audiences through Scandinavia and Europe with his powerful and passionate works. He remains of the the most diverse guitarists of today, being equally proficient in a blues, rock, or fusion jazz environment.
    Born in Helsinki in 1952, Tolonen first came to center stage in 1969 when a group of young Finnish musicians merged their collective talents to form the widely popular rock/jazz fusion band Tasavallan Presidentti, who were to record four critically acclaimed albums. During this time, Tolonen also recorded two albums with another well know band Wigwam. These recordings would establish Tolonen as a powerfully explosive and technically spectacular guitarist.
    However, it would be his soon coming solo recordings that would really turn the music world upon its collective ear. His self titled debut recording, followed by 'Summer Games', 'The Hook', and 'Hysterica' would set new standards for jazz fusion recordings and remain popular world wide even unto today.
    Throughout the years, Jukka Tolonen has added his unique wizardry to recordings by Bill's Boogie Band, Piirpauke, and most recently a live recording from Tasavallan Presidentti. He has also recorded jazz fusion albums as the Jukka Tolonen Band and a couple of outstanding fusion flavored rock albums as the Jukka Tolonen Trio. These recordings, though varying in style, consistently demonstrate Jukka Tolonen as one of the premier guitarists of this or any other generation.
    Now today, via the Internet, we are honored at long last to be privileged to bring you information, sound samples and sales links about the guitar genius that is Jukka Tolonen."



    Tolonen!/Summer Games

    or

    Tolonen!/Summer Games


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    1. N Da Da Uum Da 17:34
    2. Traktor Go Go Go 17:15

    Limpe and Paul Fuchs - All instruments, electronics and effects

    AMG:
    "Based around the married couple Paul and Limpe Fuchs, the group Anima, also known as Anima-Sound, was one of the most radically avant-garde and creative groups to emerge from the thriving Krautrock scene of Munich at the end of the 1960s. In fact, their improvised atonal sounds and unconventional instrumentation is much closer to the spirit of experimental free jazz than anything remotely close to rock music. The Fuchs began in the late '60s as part of the counterculture at the time. Adding to the conventional instruments such as drums, bass, and cornet, as well as wordless vocal yelps and screams, they created their own homemades, like the Fuchshorn, Fuchszither, and Fuchsbass to further enhance the strangeness of their structure-less music. A 1970 appearance of them in an X-rated exposé movie, Sex Freedom in Germany, finds Limpe, naked except for black body paint, banging away on drums and Paul on various inventions creating musical anarchy. Anima-Sound's first album, Stürmischer Himmel, was recorded in a 1,000-year-old cottage and released by Ohr Records in 1971. That summer, they also played the Ossiach, a three-day outdoor festival organized by famed Austrian classical/jazz pianist Friedrich Gulda that included Tangerine Dream and Pink Floyd. By then, Gulda had become close friends with the Fuchs and even joined them on their next few albums, including Anima released by the Pilz label and Musik für Alle, both of which came out in 1972. During the next few years, the Fuchs would often tour with Gulda and make guest appearances on his records as well. 'Anima' continued to release records of their eccentric music, from the double It's Up to You in 1974 to Monte Alto in 1977. Recorded between 1978 and 1982, the double LP Der Regt Mich Auf/A Controversy included new bandmember Zoro Fuchs, son of Paul and Limpe, on drums. This same lineup of the three Fuchs is also on the double album Bruchstucke für Ilona, recorded in the summer of 1985 and released later that year. By 1987's Via, Anima had become Limpe Fuchs' solo project. She continued this solo career after that with an album every several years in a similar vein to the Anima records, with a high emphasis on creativity."



    Musik für Alle

    or

    Musik für Alle


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    1. Mutrion/Bemsha Swing/Solidarity/Arabian Nightingale 15:13
    2. Roland Alphonso 3:14
    3. Makondi 3:45
    4. Street Dancing 2:18
    5. Short Stuff/El Corazón/Rhythm For Runner 7:24
    6. Near-in 6:39
    7. Voice of the Silence 5:33

    Don Cherry - Pocket Trumpet, Piano, Melodica, Doussn'gouni, Organ
    Ed Blackwell - Drums, Wood Drum, Cowbell

    AMG:
    "Trumpet and drum duets are not exactly commonplace, making this collaboration between Don Cherry and Ed Blackwell something special. The music is often quite sparse (Cherry also plays a little bit of piano, melodica and organ) and the colorful Blackwell often steals the show (although the trumpeter's unaccompanied 'Voice of the Silence' is a highpoint). The use of space is consistently impressive and those listeners with open ears will find this thoughtful date quite interesting."



    El Corazón

    or

    El Corazón


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    1. Questo Folle Sentimento 3:53
    2. Io Ritorno Solo 4:02
    3. Non è Francesca 3:32
    4. Nessuno Nessuno 4:53
    5. Il Vento 4.44
    6. La Folle Corsa parte 1 4:52
    7. Sole Giallo, Sole Nero 4:09
    8. Tu Sei Bianca, Sei Rosa, Mi Perderò 4:12
    9. Un Papavero 3:57
    10. Vendo Casa 2:479
    11. Mi Chiamo Antonio 5:50
    12. Sognando E Risognando 4:51

    1. Storia Di Un Uomo E Una Donna 4:39
    2. La Grande Casa 5:26
    3. Avevo Una Bambola 3:14
    4. Dies Irae 7:35
    5. Eppur Mi Son Scordato Di Te 3:34
    6. Nanananò 4:479
    7. Perché... Perché Ti Amo 6:00
    8. Se Non è Amore Cos'è 5:05
    9. Walk Away Renee 4:25
    10. Cara Giovanna 4:56
    11. Bambina Sbagliata 4:43
    12. La Ciliegia Non è Di Plastica 4:30

    Alberto Radius - Guitars, Bass, vocals
    Gabriele Lorenzi - Keyboards, Bass, Vocals
    Tony Ciccio - Drums, Percussion, Vocals

    italianprog.com:
    "One of the most popular bands in Italy at the beginning of the 70's, not only among rock fans because of their long collaboration with singer Lucio Battisti who took them to the newly formed Numero Uno label producing their first album.
    Dies irae, housed in a nice psych-inspired sleeve, introduced the typical Formula 3 sound, based on the guitar/organ interplay (the band used no bass, the bass parts being played by keyboard player Lorenzi), with the nice lead voice of drummer Cicco.
    Their sound was a blend of pop, prog and hard rock influences, that brought them to be the most important rock band before the Banco/PFM years. On the album are noteworthy the nice title track with a dark atmosphere (Dies Irae had originally been released on single in 1967 by Samurai, a group that included keyboardist Gabriele Lorenzi along with Area's Paolo Tofani), a cover of the Left Banke's Walk away Renee and one of their most important tracks and an Italian rock classic, Questo folle sentimento.
    Second album, simply entitled Formula 3, was entirely based on songs by Lucio Battisti with lyrics from his co-writer Mogol and contained two more classics, Eppur mi son scordato di te and the long Nessuno nessuno, also released as a single in shortened form. The rest of the album was on a minor level, and the group was too tied to the Battisti-Mogol production, but they were very successful and there is no one in Italy that still nowadays doesn't know some of their songs.
    In the third album, Sognando e risognando from 1972, the band included some original compositions, along with the usual Mogol-Battisti tracks, and the result is probably their best work ever. The best track here was a 10:30 minutes long version of the title track (a song already recorded by Lucio Battisti), but even the Aeternum suite is noteworthy.
    In the same year Formula Tre played the 'Festival Internacional da Canção 1972', an international pop festival in Brazil.
    Fourth and last album, La grande casa, saw the group's split from Lucio Battisti's production and compositions, the album being produced by lyric writer Mogol with original music by Alberto Radius. This is usually considered their lesser album, with large use of acoustic guitar and very different from the previous one.
    The band kept playing as Lucio Battisti's backing band but Formula 3 officially ceased to exist since late 1973.
    Gabriele Lorenzi and Alberto Radius joined the short-lived supergroup Il Volo while Tony Cicco started a solo career with the name of Cico.
    Radius, already an appreciated sessionman since the 60's, also released many solo albums starting with the now rare Radius in 1972, and up to the early 80's.
    The band reformed in 1990 with the same line-up and releasing three new albums among which King Kong, that also included reworkings of the old songs.
    A new album has been released in 2002, La folle corsa, containing once again re-recordings of the band's old hits with new keyboardist Maurizio Metalli replacing Lorenzi. Metalli has been replaced by Ciro Di Bitonto for 2006-07 concerts."



    I Grandi Successi Originali

    or

    I Grandi Successi Originali


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    1. Rotation 7:19
    2. Renee 6:23
    3. Soar 6:01
    4. Renee 3:26
    5. Nega 2:52
    6. Grape Woman 3:56
    7. Tomorrow 3:11
    8. Cachaca 2:48
    9. Generous 2:52
    10. Green Olives 2:42

    Claudio Medeiros - Keyboards, Vocal
    David Scott - Flute
    Don Rizzo - Sax (Soprano)
    Geoff Sharp - Trombone
    Otis Fuller - Guitar
    Rick Burnly - Bass
    Bob Brenner - Bass
    Victor M - Percussion, Drums, Vocal
    Bob Belanski - Drums
    Dave Johnson - Drums
    Kim Calkins - Drums
    Antonio Vasques - Congas

    http://collectorsfrenzy.com:
    "Killer Brazilian funky fusion set on an obscure little label out of San Francisco.
    Big tune on this is 'Soar' but rest is just as good with that lovely bubbling clavinet sound on most of the tunes.
    If you like early 70s Azymuth,Donato,Valle and the like you'll love this.
    A fantastic batch of jazzy grooves featuring Claudio Medeiros and Victor M of the group 'Made In Brasil', plus other associates from the Bay Area fusion scene of the 70s! The record's got a strong mix of mellow tunes and funkier ones with touches of Brazilian jazz and CTI fusion swirled together in a San Francisco sunny mode. The set includes the incredible groover 'Soar', which has nice moog bubbling through a jazzy midtempo groove and features many other great tunes like 'Cachaca', 'Generous', 'Green Olives', 'Grape Woman', and 'Rotation'."



    Rotation

    or

    Rotation


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    1. Requiem Aeternam 6:09
    2. Out Of The Deep 5:53
    3. Pie Jesu 4:10
    4. Sanctus 2:19
    5. Agnus Dei 6:06
    6. The Lord Is My Shepherd 5:10
    7. Lux Aeterna 7:15

    8. I Will Lift Up Mine Eyes for chorus & orchestra 7:20

    Caroline Ashton - Soprano (Vocal)
    Donna Deam - Soprano (Vocal)
    Quentin Poole - Oboe
    Stephen Orton - Cello
    Cambridge Singers
    City of London Sinfonia
    John Rutter - Conductor

    AMG:
    "Having recently prepared an edition of Fauré's Requiem restoring its small-scale scoring, John Rutter was naturally influenced by that tender, subtle, and comforting French work in writing his own Requiem in 1985. Many critics assailed Rutter's work for its old-fashioned tunefulness, its gentle harmonies, and its refusal to confront the darkness and violence of the twentieth century. Meanwhile, church and amateur choral societies, radio listeners, and CD buyers responded to the work with remarkable enthusiasm. Critical response has softened over the years, as it has become clear that Rutter was not cynically trying to write a commercial hit, but was employing his natural voice, a voice that resonates with many music lovers.
    Rutter composed his Requiem in response to the death of a parent. He has explained, 'The music is not a complete setting of the Missa pro defunctis as laid down in Catholic liturgy, but instead a meditation on themes of life and death using a personal compilation of texts. Like Fauré, I selected portions of the Requiem Mass, and like Britten, I wove other, English texts into them to form a counterpoint to the Latin....The result is a concert work rather than a liturgical Requiem.' Rutter creates a seven-movement arch. The first and last movements are prayers to God, drawn from the Latin format (Requiem aeternam and Lux aeterna, the latter including a passage in English from the Burial Sentences of the Book of Common Prayer). The second, 'Out of the Deep,' and sixth, 'The Lord Is My Shepherd,' are psalm settings (numbers 130 and 23, respectively); the former appropriately includes a double bass solo and the latter features the oboe, an instrument inextricably linked with English pastoralism. The third movement, Pie Jesu (from the standard Requiem sequence), and the fifth, Agnus Dei (the Requiem again, to which is appended a few words from the Book of Common Prayer), Rutter describes as 'personal prayers to Christ.' The central Sanctus, a standard mass text, is the briefest but most affirmative section, complete with celebratory bells. Short snatches of Gregorian chant find their way into the Agnus Dei and Lux aeterna, but the strongest influence here is surely Ralph Vaughan Williams, another composer well aware of the history of English hymnody and committed to imbuing his music with an identifiably English sound. Rutter's style, however, is more cinematic in its lush harmonies and occasionally syncopated melodies. The Requiem is available in two versions; in one, the chorus is accompanied by organ and six instruments, and in the other, by a small orchestra."



    Requiem

    or

    Requiem


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    1. Skin Deep 3:58
    2. Him 4:32
    3. Paper Woman 3:43
    4. Ride, Ride, Ride 4:08
    5. Sweet Home 2:50
    6. Amsterdam in My Living Room 3:01
    7. Near the Sun 2:42
    8. Pink Rose 2:49
    9. Sunflower 7:03
    10. Greengage Man 3:18
    11. On the Ground 2:41
    12. One of the Best 3:28
    13. Warmaker 3:32
    14. Near the Sun 2:52

    Kessy (Pierre-Alain Kessi) - Guitar, Vocals
    Fountain (Jean-Claude Fontana) - Bass
    Rod (Rodolphe Baumgartner) - Drums

    discogs:
    "A heavy progressive cum blues-rock band from Switzerland."



    Skin Deep

    or

    Skin Deep


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    1. Freedom Is Frightening 8:49
    2. Rolling Nuns 7:14
    3. Pine On The Horizon 11:48
    4. Wind Words 6:44

    Hisako Yamash'ta - violin
    Gary Boyle - guitars
    Brian Gascoigne - keyboards, synthesizers, vibraphone
    Hugh Hopper - bass guitar
    Stomu Yamash'ta - kit & percussion

    AMG:
    "For his 1973 debut album, the Far East's answer to Ginger Baker teamed with his violinist wife Hisako, ex-Soft Machine bassist Hugh Hopper, school friend keyboardist Brian Gasgoigne, and ex-Brian Auger Trinity's/contemporary Isotope guitarist Gary Boyle. Their debut album, Freedom Is Frightening is a panorama of extremes that gust across myriad genres. The title track is a master class in atmosphere and tension building, slowly expanding from the early long, sparse, foreboding electronica into progressive pyrotechnics. 'Wind Words' is serenity itself, but both 'Rolling Nuns' and 'Pine on the Horizon' are free-form jazz fusions, rolling in and out of funk, with the latter featuring scorching, Stax-styled horns courtesy of Sammi Abu. The album's intricate arrangements, stellar musicianship (particularly Boyle's lightening guitar on 'Nuns,' Hisako's emotive violin on 'Wind,' her husband's fireworks on 'Freedom,' and Hopper and Gascoigne's contributions throughout), astounded progressive and fusion fans alike, and still sound sensational today."



    Freedom Is Frightening

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    Freedom Is Frightening


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    1. Girl, You Won't Succeed 2:05
    2. I Wanna Go 2:18
    3. My Baby 2:28
    4. What A Life 2:38
    5. Let Me Try Again 1:54
    6. Don't Go Away 2:06
    7. Show Me The Way 1:43
    8. Tell Me Something New 1:48
    9. Empty Harem 1:56
    10. Make Up Your Mind 2:21
    11. You Got It 1:49
    12. Can't Be A Lie 2:16
    13. All The Time 2:27
    14. Sad 2:20
    15. Every Night 2:13
    16. It Was Me 2:19
    17. Paint It Black 3:30

    Jorge Fernandez – Vocals, Lead Guitar, Lute
    Polo Pereira – Vocals, Rhythm Guitar
    Esteban Hirschfeld – Harmonica, Piano, Claves, Organ
    Julio Montero – Vocals, Bass
    Beto Freigeda – Drums, Maracas, Tambourine

    AMG:
    "The best group that South America produced during the 1960s, and not merely a novelty item. Formed in Montevideo, Uruguay, in the mid-'60s, the group relocated to Argentina in 1966 after winning a contract with EMI Argentina. Their sole LP and a few singles show the group to possess an uncanny ability to imitate early Rolling Stones songs without being that obvious about it. Almost all of their material was original, sung in English by Polo Pereira, who (with a slight accent) emulates Mick Jagger's early snarl more accurately than anyone else from the time. You can detect apparent reference points to early Jagger/Richards tunes like 'Off the Hook,' and more sophisticated works like Aftermath ('Empty Harem' is complete with a 'Paint It Black'-like guitar). The original lineup of los Mockers disbanded in 1967, although other configurations using the name recorded a few more discs in the late '60s. In the '80s and '90s, los Mockers reached a much greater international audience than they did in their heyday via internationally distributed reissues of their mid-'60s work and are widely respected by collectors as one of the best '60s garage groups."



    Los Mockers

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    Los Mockers


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    1. Danza di cala luna 4:28
    2. El corazon a contraluz 6:31
    3. Cristalino 5:14
    4. La Preguntona 3:45
    5. El carnaval 6:51
    6. Fragmentos de un Seuño 3:51
    7. La Ciudad 4:17
    8. El mercado testaccio 4:17
    9. La Calahorra 4:45
    10. Danza 3:44
    11. En Libertad, sevillanas 6:20

    Horacio Salinas
    Renato Freyggang
    Max Berrú
    José Seves
    Jorge Coulón
    Marcelo Coulón
    Horacio Durán
    +
    John Williams (3)
    Paco Peña (7)

    AMG:
    "A collaboration between the Andean cultural troupe Inti-Illimani, classical guitarist John Williams, and flamenco guitarist Paco Pena spawned from a number of ad-lib performances between the various musicians in London. Those performances were essentially Inti-Illimani performing as usual, with guest solos by the guitarists. This album, however, was written specifically with the collaboration in mind. As such, there is a distinct weaving of styles. The flutes and small strings of Inti-Illimani are often backed rhythmically by some careful guitar plucking. Conversely, there are passages of classical guitar with punctuation provided by the Andean instruments. It's a decently soft affair either way, not necessarily making heavy use of the Andean motives, but incorporating the Andean style into the larger set of a hybridized music. The horns sometimes act as punctuation to short runs of Andean-based sound, and sometimes play in a largely classical context. The charangos and violins do much the same. The core instruments from both stylistic sides only make the crossing from time to time, usually playing in a normal manner and letting the context affect the manner in which they're heard. As such, it makes a nice twist on the usual classical guitar repertoire basically, but probably isn't really the right choice for those looking for a piece of world fusion. Interesting, but largely bland."



    Fragments Of A Dream

    or

    Fragments Of A Dream


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    1. Mu 4:30
    2. Lemuria 5:02
    3. Yucatan (Saturn version) 5:27
    4. Yucatan (Impulse version) 3:38
    5. Bimini 5:45
    6. Atlantis 21:51

    Danny Thompson - Flute, Sax (Alto)
    Marshall Allen - Flute, Oboe, Percussion, Sax (Alto)
    Pat Patrick - Flute, Percussion, Sax (Baritone)
    John Gilmore - Percussion, Sax (Tenor)
    Danny Davis - Sax (Alto)
    Chip Stephans - Horn
    Robert "Brother Ah" Northern - French Horn, Horn
    Ahk Tal Ebah - Trumpet
    Wayne Harris - Trumpet
    Ali Hassan - Trombone
    Charles Stephens - Trombone
    Robert Cummings - Clarinet (Bass)
    Sun Ra - Clavinet, Clavioline, Organ
    Bob Barry - Drums, Percussion
    James Jacson - Drums, Log Drums, Percussion
    Clifford Jarvis - Drums, Percussion

    AMG:
    "Featuring the Astro Infinity Arkestra, Atlantis reveals two very distinct sides of Sun Ra's music. The first consists of shorter works Ra presumably constructed for presentation on the Hohner clavinet. Not only is the electric keyboard dominantly featured, but also it presumably offered Ra somewhat of a novelty as it had only been on the market for less than a year. The second side consists of the epic 21-minute title track and features an additional seven-man augmentation to the brass/woodwind section of the Astro Infinity Arkestra. Tracks featuring the smaller combo reveal an almost introspective Arkestra. The stark contrast between the clavinet - which Ra dubbed the 'Solar Sound Instrument' - and the hand-held African congas on 'Mu' and 'Bimini' reveal polar opposite styles and emphasis. However, Ra enthusiasts should rarely be surprised at his experiments in divergence. 'Mu' is presented at a lethargic tempo snaking in and around solos from Ra and a raga-influenced tenor sax solo from John Gilmore. 'Bimini' is actually captured in progress. The first sound listeners hear is the positioning of the microphone as a conga fury commences in the background. Likewise, on 'Yucatan (Impulse Version)' a doorbell quickly impedes what might have been a more organic conclusion to the performance. The original issue of Atlantis was on the small independent Saturn label. Thus the composition titled 'Yucatan (Saturn Version)' appeared on that pressing. When the disc was reissued in 1973 on Impulse!, the track was replaced by a completely different composition - as opposed to an alternate performance of the same work. The second side contains one of Ra's most epic pieces, which is free or 'space' jazz at its most invigorating. While virtually indescribable, the sonic churnings and juxtaposed images reveal a brilliant display of textures and tonalities set against an ocean of occasional rhythms. Its diversity alone makes this is an essential entry in the voluminous Sun Ra catalog."



    Atlantis

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    Atlantis


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    1. Angel Dust 5:43
    2. Sally 4:34
    3. Church Yard 3:00
    4. You're Not There 3:44
    5. Got To Feel It 3:17
    6. Tied By A Rope 4:24
    7. Society's Child 5:02
    8. Denky's Boogie 4:43
    9. St. Elmo's Fire 3:04
    10. Come Back 3:29

    Louis Yovino – Vocals
    Fred Callan – Guitar
    Vincent E. Kusy – Keyboards
    Jay Sharkey – Drums

    Fuzz, Acid & Flowers:
    "This is a very rare psychedelic/progressive collectors' item, from a Brentwood, Long Island, New York group and certainly the recent repressing/CD issue is well worth seeking out. The album is of a pretty consistently high standard. There's lots of heavy psychedelic guitar, upfront keyboards and very expressive vocals. The stand-out tracks include Society's Child, Church Yard and Angel Dust (although this last one is partly marred by a rather boring drum solo).
    Michael Tschudin's composition You're Not There, was a reworked version of a track that appears on Listening's album. Original copies were issued in a plain white cover some of which were emblazoned with a title sticker reflecting the album title above. Most were in plain covers and this title does not appear on the record label."



    Setting Forth

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    Setting Forth


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    1. Rocks 7:01
    2. Humpty Dumpty 6:31
    3. The Fall 8:15
    4. Not Ethiopia 9:36
    5. New Boots 6:24
    6. Ana Maria 9:15
    7. Bathsheba 8:16

    Steve Tavaglione – saxophone, EWI
    Frank Gambale – guitar
    Allan Holdsworth – guitar, SynthAxe
    Freddy Ravel – keyboard
    Jimmy Earl – bass
    Tom Brechtlein – drums

    AMG:
    "MVP stands for the Mark Varney Project. He has been a longtime recruiter of guitar speed demons such as Yngwie Malmsteen and Tony Macalpine. Here he brings together accomplished and established players. It is a very intense fusion recording that can be an intimidating listen both in terms of technique and the consistent intensity maintained throughout. The metal-influenced Frank Gambale is one of the pioneers of the sweep-picking technique that allows him to generate mind-numbing speed. Allan Holdsworth proves a good counterpoint, as his unique approach also produces lightning-quick runs. Guitar fans, especially the younger crowd, will appreciate the extended solos and lack of any commercial hooks here. It is basically a blowing date; however, it pales in comparison to a jazz blowing date because the players quickly run out of ideas and continuously revert back to familiar territory. This is not to say that the musicians don't deserve credit for their playing - quite the contrary; it's just that the abundance of linear scales and repetitive patterns proves tiresome. Out of the two, Gambale seems a bit more inspired and more comfortable in this setting. Tommy Brechtlein turns in a fine performance on drums, especially when given some space on 'Bathsheba.' If taken in short doses, the impact of this recording is more effective. Recommended for fans ranging from fusion to progressive to metal."



    Truth In Shredding

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    Truth In Shredding


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    1. Raoul Pleskow: Piano Sonata No. 2 9:31
    2. Anthony Cornicello: Piano Sonata No. 2 16:58
    3. Matthew Greenbaum: Amulet 12:54
    4. James Boros: Mnem 10:07
    5. Rolv Yttrehus: Explorations 10:58

    David Holzman - Piano

    American Record Guide:
    "[The music] certainly makes punishing demands on the player, and David Holzman acquits himself with brilliance, He simply burns the keyboard up, producing vivid, often thunderous sonorities vividly captured by Centaur's realistic sound. These fierce, demanding works are well worth hearing, especially with such a splendid performance and recording."



    Explorations: New American Piano Music

    or

    Explorations: New American Piano Music


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