Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | .... | 42 | 43 | (Page 44) | 45 | 46 | .... | 57 | newer

    0 0


    1. Make Your Stash 4:11
    2. Fiddling Fool 12:30
    3. Superbody 9:15
    4. Drifitng 3:24
    5. Mumbles I Wonder Why 5:51
    6. Launching Place, Part I (Mono) 3:33
    7. I'll Be Gone (Mono single edit, Harvest Australian single) 3:31
    8. Launching Place, Part II (B-side of Harvest Australian mono single) 3:03
    9. I'll Be Gone (Full length stereo version, Harvest Germany single) 4:25
    10. Launching Place, Part II (Psycho-Psychedelic version, b-side of Harvest Germany single) 2:54
    11. I'll Be Gone (Original mono acetate demo 3:40
    12. You Just Can't Win (Original mono acetate demo 4:44

    Michael (Mike) Rudd - guitar, vocals
    Lee Neale - organ, piano, vocals
    Bill Putt - bass
    Mark Kennedy - drums, percussion
    +
    Christopher Rudd, child

    AMG:
    "When latter-'60s psychedelic rock became the progressive rock of the early '70s, Melbourne's Spectrum was at the forefront of the Australian response. The group was formed from the ashes of Party Machine, which split up when singer and songwriter Ross Wilson left to join former Australian group Procession in London. Bass player Mike Rudd switched to lead guitar, and continued Party Machine's leaning toward lyrical satire.
    EMI Australia added Spectrum to the company's global progressive Harvest label roster (Pink Floyd, Deep Purple etc.), and found amongst the group's experimental repertoire a melancholy, uncomplicated song called 'I'll Be Gone,' released as the group's first single. In May 1971, 'I'll Be Gone' reached number one nationally, changing the group's fortunes dramatically. Prior to its release, Spectrum had struggled for gigs (promoters found them 'too progressive') and the hot-shot young drummer Mark Kennedy, which was part of the band's live appeal, lost patience and left. Some observers thought the loss of the flashy and busily impressive drummer would be a blow and Spectrum wouldn't survive, but 'I'll Be Gone' ensured the group's survival. Kennedy was replaced by the less explosive, more sympathetic Ray Arnott. Mike Rudd, in the meantime, refused to allow 'I'll Be Gone' to be included on the album Spectrum Part One. It didn't fit with the innovative roaming style of the rest of the music on the album, more along the lines of progressive rock akin to post-Syd Barrett Pink Floyd and Traffic.
    Spectrum's follow-up single 'Trust Me' was an attempt to replicate their hit's commerciality, written and sung by the new drummer. But with the help of a second ambitious double album, Milesago, Spectrum had become one of Australia's first concert bands, preferring venues where they could use elaborate light shows. Step by step, Spectrum was becoming an event band. It became increasingly hard for them to present themselves at their optimum at the regular gigs, which were bread and butter for any working band in Australia in the '70s. To keep Spectrum's performances special, Mike Rudd invented an alter ego, Murtceps (Spectrum spelled backwards) with, apart from 'I'll Be Gone,' a repertoire all its own. Most important was the fact that the Indelible Murtceps was a stripped-back version of Spectrum, with no lightshows and a portable electric piano instead of the weighty Hammond organ allowing the band to play anywhere and often. Murtceps released its own singles and album.
    The difficulty facing Spectrum's music and lineup defections caused Rudd and bass player Bill Putt to decide it would be simpler to put an end to Spectrum/Murtceps altogether. They started again with a new group, a new set of songs, and a new name, Ariel. Spectrum's final performance on April 15, 1973, was recorded as the double album Terminal Buzz.
    The Rudd/Putt partnership endured through various bands and personal dilemmas until 1995 when they reinstated their Spectrum career with an independently released album, Living in a Volcano. They continue to perform under a variety of names but predominantly still call themselves Spectrum, although the most-recent version is more structured and song-oriented than the classic version of the group. Now 'I'll Be Gone' fits perfectly.
    'I'll Be Gone itself has become one of the classic Australian radio hits. There have been a number of cover versions. In 1974, Manfred Mann recorded a version for the rest of the world."



    Spectrum Part One

    or

    Spectrum Part One


    0 0


    1. Solar Winds 6:50
    2. Dancin' Feet 6:20
    3. Soliloquy (Blues for Dr. John) 9:13
    4. Night Child 11:35
    5. Charlie 3:09
    6. Teenager 5:47

    Oscar Peterson - Piano
    Joe Pass - Guitar
    Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen - Bass
    Louie Bellson - Drums
    Norman Granz - Producer

    AMG:
    "This is a most unusual album for Oscar Peterson because the pianist not only performs six of his own compositions but he plays the great majority of time on electric piano. With the assistance of guitarist Joe Pass, bassist Niels Pederson and drummer Louie Bellson, he keeps his own musical personality despite the change in 'axes' and, although the results are not essential, this setting does cast a fresh light on Peterson's creativity."



    Night Child

    or

    Night Child


    0 0



    0 0


    Francis Poulenc:
    1. Konzert fur Orgel, Streicher und Pauken 21:10

    Alfredo Casella:
    2. Concerto Romano fur Orgel und Orchester, Sinfonia 9:32
    3. Concerto Romano fur Orgel und Orchester, Largo 11:18
    4. Concerto Romano fur Orgel und Orchester, Cadenza e Toccata 12:04

    Martin Haselböck - Organ
    ORF Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra
    Leif Segerstam - Conductor

    AMG:
    "In reference to his nearly completed Concerto for organ, strings, and timpani (1938), Poulenc wrote that 'This is not the happy-go-lucky Poulenc who wrote the Concerto for two pianos, but a Poulenc en route to the cloister - a fifteenth century Poulenc, if you like.' Though not explicitly religious, the concerto follows a new development in the composer's style that led to the composition of numerous sacred works and several secular works distinct in their sense of gravity and deliberation.
    The concerto was commissioned by and dedicated to Princess Edmond de Polgnac. In essaying his first work for organ, Poulenc sought counsel from masters living and dead. Maurice Duruflé, who was the solost in the earliest performances, advised the composer on matters of the instrument's registration. Poulenc also studied the organ music of Buxtehude and Bach, whose influence is reflected in the work's neo-Baroque figuration and ornamentation and in its occasional harmonic anachronisms.
    The concerto is structured as a single continuous movement with the character of a fantasia. It begins with a dense chord in the organ, followed by a graceful unaccompanied melody in dotted rhythms. The slightly askew sonority of the next chord bumps the melody from its previously diatonic path. A duet follows between the organ, mysterious in its high range, and foreboding timpani. The opening material returns with a different 'wrong' chord, followed by a lushly harmonized string melody underpinned by timpani. The intensity increases with a low faint rumble in the timpani and organ pedal, which is suddenly punctuated with percussive exclamations.
    The long-building tension finds release in the subesquent Allegro section, in which the strings and organ alternately take the foreground with a nimble melody that makes its way through an ever-changing harmonic context. A new figure enters, characterized by of a series of repeated ascending tetrachords that outline a triumphant major seventh chord. The Andante section begins abruptly with a plaintive organ solo that eventually evokes a rich, lyrical response from the strings. This conversational passage is followed by a more somber mood, evoked by worrisome melodies and an unyielding pulse. Poulenc once again builds dramatic tension by thickening the harmonies, bringing the music to a peak with a series of stout, cathartic chords in the organ.
    A dreamy string interlude provides a transition to a brief Allegro section. A rhapsodic melody floats atop lucid, soothing harmonic progressions borne upon a gentle pulse. The organ emerges with ever-thickening harmonies to usher in the next section, a fast passage with thematic roots in the first Allegro. The organ introduction returns, followed by a reverent viola solo accompanied by delicately plucked strings. As the orchestra fades, the organ ends the concerto with a final emphatic proclamation."


    Organ Concerto

    or

    Organ Concerto


    0 0


    1. Beyond the Clouds 2:37
    2. Free from the City 2:18
    3. What Can the Matter Be? 2:16
    4. Which Way You Goin' Billy? 3:23
    5. Happy Island 2:53
    6. There's No Blood in Bone 3:01
    7. A Good Thing Lost 2:03
    8. You Took My Moonlight Away 2:43
    9. Shadows on My Wall 2:30
    10. That's Where I Went Wrong 2:32
    11. Where Evil Grows 2:51
    12. I Was Wondering 3:02
    13. Tryin' 3:02
    14. Winter Milk 3:24
    15. Good Friends 2:39
    16. I'll See You There 3:20
    17. You Don't Know What Love Is 2:49
    18. I Thought of You Again 2:27
    19. Another Year, Another Day 2:35
    20. Evil Overshadows Joe 2:29
    21. That's Where I Went Wrong 2:33

    Susan Jacks - vocals, percussion
    Terry Jacks - guitar
    Craig McCaw - guitar, sitar
    Satwant Singh - tablas, bongos, percussion

    AMG:
    "A Good Thing Lost: 1968-1973 is an excellent best-of collection from the Poppy Family, a great, if largely forgotten, late-'60s Canadian soft rock/psychedelic group. The meticulous songwriting, production, and arranging skills of guitarist/mastermind Terry Jacks (who later had a huge solo hit with the classic pop single 'Seasons in the Sun') lift these recordings above the work of many of the group's better-known contemporaries. Singer Susan Jacks has a beautiful voice that sometimes sounds like (but predates) Karen Carpenter, but is eminently more soulful. Although characterized in the liner notes as a 'soft pop' band, the Poppy Family was also capable of a somewhat tougher sound that sometimes recalled Surrealistic Pillow-era Jefferson Airplane and folkier material in the Kenny Rogers & the First Edition/Roger McGuinn vein. Throughout, Jacks frames the songs with creative, if often dated, arrangements that compare favorably to his obvious influences, the Beatles, the Beach Boys, and Phil Spector. In addition to 'Which Way You Goin' Billy,' the group's biggest hit (number two in 1970) and a generous helping of singles and high-quality album tracks, the disc includes an alternate, wildly psychedelic mix of 'There's No Blood in Bone' and two different versions of 'That's Where I Went Wrong' (the second of which features some cool country guitar leads). Overall, A Good Thing Lost: 1968-1973 is a fantastic find - one of those hidden gems that record fanatics always hope to discover."



    A Good Thing Lost

    or

    A Good Thing Lost


    0 0


    1. Flying with the Comet 5:47
    2. Barbara 6:12
    3. Song for a New Life 10:06
    4. Discoverers 6:14
    5. Birthright 14:24
    6. We Got Rhythm 5:38
    7. Jump at the Sun 10:10
    8. Two 6:21
    9. Don't Look Back 10:48

    Jeff Marx - Saxophones
    Dave Douglas - Trumpet
    John Esposito - Piano
    Allen Murphy - Bass
    Jeff Siegel - Drums
    Frederick Berryhill - Percussion

    allaboutjazz:
    "Some jazz fans have come to look down on the '80s as a lost decade. A band like Second Sight shows just how wrong they can be, with the reissued Flying with the Comet (1986) thrumming with intensity.
    The brainchild of pianist and composer John Esposito, the band refuses to choose between tradition and innovation. All the traces of the past greats who inspired this music show up clear and sharp as ever in the sound and spirit; that said, these guys let nothing hold them back.
    Esposito shows warmth and personality, throwing odd notes into familiar mixes with the cool confidence of a well-dressed mad scientist. There's joy in what he plays, tinged as it is with gospel and hard bop; but it's tailored for a man who wants his own sound heard. Dave Douglas, 23 years-old here, brings high heat with a master's control. Jeff Marx's sax sounds close to blasting at the seams, adding hints of Michael Brecker, Sam Rivers, and Joe Henderson to a breathless, high flying intensity. Drummer Jeff Siegel and bassist Allen Murphy keep it all together with an inspired flexibility and sensitive response.
    The opening title track rides a launching blast of free horns into a head that's recalls the great explorers of '60s Blue Note—Wayne Shorter, Herbie Hancock and Andrew Hill. It's appropriately intense, with Douglas spitting fire, cooling himself down, then working himself up again, while Esposito's piano matches streaks of beauty in the right hand with subtle dissonance from the left. And the music only gets tighter from there.
    'Barbara' is a pretty, atmospheric ballad—the horns playing around with its melody, though the really interesting stuff comes out of the piano keys. But 'Birthright' may be the highlight, a 14 minute-plus jam simmered in Afro-Latin percussion and groove. Marx reaches down for a little extra with a honking, out there solo, before passing the baton. Douglas in turn channels the energy into brilliantly lyrical work that gets Esposito and percussionist Berryhill echoing him. The pianist then sets up a conversation of his own, passing different lines back and forth between his hands.
    The previously unreleased material is just as good. 'We Got Rhythm' displays a take-no-prisoners intensity at high speed, setting squeals and squawks against lyrical post bop. 'Jump at the Sun' is the same deal, but draws out to a fever pitch with Marx's most ecstatic statement of the album. 'Two' also pushes the pace up, with great vocal exchanges from the two horns.
    'Don't Look Back'—so chill, bluesy, and swinging—is the perfect way to close things out. Marx shows his wide range of skills, Douglas spins a quote of 'Desafinado' into an awesome statement, and Esposito bobs easily along with just a few carefully dropped hints of darkness amidst the dancing of his keys. It's jazz that pushes off the timeline, sounding as fresh as ever"



    Flying with the Comet

    or

    Flying with the Comet


    0 0


    1. Countdown
    2. Schön ist ein Jugendtraum
    3. Sozialpartner Blues
    4. Kalte Wut
    5. Wenn ich einmal Reich bin
    6. Die Wirtschaft ist jetzt in Gefahr
    7. Der Imker
    8. Deine Freiheit
    9. Vergleiche
    10. Der Löwenthaler
    11. Was ein Kommunist trinken darf
    12. Wenn es brennt
    13. Freie Marktwirtschaft
    14. Für die Zukunft sehen wir rot
    15. Saurier
    16. Wir sind millionenmal so stark


    Gerd Wollschon - vocals, text
    Dieter Klemm - vocals, percussion
    Theo Konig - vocals, sax (tenor) clariner, flute
    Markus Schmidt - vocals, guitar, keyboards
    Dick Stadtler - bass, guitar, piano
    Hansi Frank - vocals, drums


    Wiki:
    "Floh de Cologne were a German band, active from 1966 to 1983, regarded as a pioneer of krautrock (Floh is German for 'flea'). After success at the beginning of the 70s, the band separated in 1983.
    The group was formed in 1966 by a group of anarchist students,[1] all from the University of Cologne. Their first album, Vietnam, released in 1968, is a fierce criticism of the war in Vietnam. The famous, but very controversial, Rolf Ulrich Kaiser, impressed by their music and especially their lyrics, decided to produce their next two albums: Rockoper Profitgeier (1971) and Lucky Streik (1972)."



    Lucky Streik

    or

    Lucky Streik


    0 0


    1. Satan Unser 2:52
    2. Engel 3:38
    3. Ampel Ne Steht Vorne Da 4:10
    4. Tanz Den Gummitwist 4:02
    5. Pizza 5:14
    6. Gimmi Ma Ne Maak 3:21
    7. Nimm Dich in Acht Vor Blonden Frauen 4:32
    8. An 1 Tag 3:48
    9. Gabi Uns Hans 4:36
    10. Du, Ich Will Dich 3:50
    11. Woodway of Love 17:57


    Moritz Reichelt
    Frank Fenstermacher
    Kurt Dahlke


    Wiki:
    "One of the founders of synth pop, Der Plan were mainstays of the music underground of Germany in the 1980s. Singing almost exclusively in German, they inspired a countless number of like-minded groups as part of the Neue Deutsche Welle (German New Wave) scene. Inspired by the synthetic beats of Kraftwerk and the quirky styles of the Residents, Der Plan created a unique blend of electronics, pop music, and surrealism.
    Kurt 'Pyrolator' Dahlke left D.A.F. after their first LP and formed Der Plan with Frank Fenstermacher and Moritz 'RRR' Reichelt. While many German underground acts were playing derivative Sex Pistols-inspired punk, Der Plan aligned themselves with predecessors such as Kraftwerk to focus on the use of electronics in pop music. In 1980, they released Geri Reig, a strong debut with an off-kilter pop sensibility and innovative use of electronics. Though never receiving much chart success, Der Plan developed a strong cult following. However, they did manage to crack the German Top 40 with their 1980 single Da Vorne Steht Ne Ampel. Der Plan continued to grow artistically by incorporating innovative rhythms into their songs with their second full-length Normalette Surprise.
    Der Plan continued to perform and release music throughout the 1980s and early '90s, though never equaling the strength of their early material. Their record label, Ata Tak, released some of the most innovative electronic music coming out of Germany during the 1980s and '90s. They were responsible for releases by artists such as D.A.F., Andreas Dorau, Holger Hiller, Oval, and Wirtschaftswunder. Der Plan called it quits in 1992, but Frank Fenstermacher and Kurt Dahlke formed A Certain Frank, releasing a full-length on Ata Tak in 1996."


    Live at the TIKI Ballroom

    or

    Live at the TIKI Ballroom


    0 0


    1. Introduction
    2. Congolese Sermon
    3. Cathy's Dilemma
    4. Blues For Ramona
    5. Weather Beat
    6. Scandalizing
    7. Appointment In Ghana
    8. Penny Blue
    9. Boopie


    Wayne Henderson - Trombone
    Wilton Felder - Saxophone
    Joe Sample - Keyboards
    Victor Gaskin - Bass
    Stix Hooper - Drums


    AMG:
    "The Crusaders are an American music group popular in the early 1970s known for their amalgamated jazz, pop, and soul sound. Since 1961, more than forty albums have been credited to the group (some live and compilations), 19 of which were recorded under the name 'The Jazz Crusaders' (1961–1970).
    In 1960, following the demise of a few short-lived Houston-based groups called The Swingsters and the Nite Hawks, Joe Sample (piano), Stix Hooper (drums), Wilton Felder (saxophone), and Wayne Henderson (trombone), relocated to Los Angeles, CA. After changing their name to 'The Jazz Crusaders,' the group signed with Pacific Jazz Records, where they would remain throughout the 1960s. Employing a two-manned front-line horn section (trombone and tenor saxophone), the group's sound was rooted in hard bop, with an emphasis on R&B and soul."


    At the Lighthouse

    or

    At the Lighthouse


    0 0


    1. El pirata 3:20
    2. Martha ya está 5:45
    3. Cambiemos ya 3:30
    4. Tempestad 3:20
    5. Tema para Lilus 4:45
    6. Tranquila reflexión 3:20
    7. Río tonto 4:22
    8. Tiempo en el sol 2:15


    Alex Nathanson - Vocals, Guitar
    Dario Gianella - Guitar
    Guillermo Van Lacke - Bass
    Walo Carrillo - Drums


    Dreams, Fantasies And Nightmares:
    "A Peruvian hard rock band whose album is very rare and sought-after, so its limited edition reissue by Background has brought it to a wider audience. Side two is the better by far of the two. Tama Para is notable for its melodramatic vocal style and Tranquila Reflexion is much mellower than the other material. One for fans of late sixties / early seventies hard rock. All lyrics are in Spanish."



    Tarkus

    or

    Tarkus


    0 0


    1. Speakeasy 4:07
    2. Tufty 1:30
    3. Lamanleman 3:06
    4. Heirs to the Throne 7:01
    5. The Grifter 3:21
    6. Taste Promise 5:01
    7. Brandy Snap 3:54
    8. Hard Rock Maple 3:46
    9. The Lizard Checker 5:46
    10. Souled Out 3:22
    11. The Clap 5:09

    Phil Wilkinson - Organ
    Dave Wilkinson - Guitar
    Caspar St. Charles - Drums

    discogs:
    "The mobile phone, the computer game, the digital camera, 'programmed' music... growing up in the 1980s, the Wilkinson brothers have seen such familiar friends bloom from humble beginnings, and its perhaps because of this that they look to earlier decades for something 'new' and inspirational. Fast 3 too started from humble beginnings.
    Phil and Dave’s early forays into improvisation took the form of organ and trumpet duos in the backroom of a two-bedroom house in Nottingham, England. As Dave moved to guitar, a need for rhythmic accompaniment became evident. Starting with loops, samples and breaks, the brothers formed Deville and played a storming set at Londons Jazz Cafe to a small, but delighted, audience. A few drummers were later tried out, a small unreleased E.P. with Nottingham mainstays Carl Bingham (Bass) and John Perry (Drums) under the name of Perringham Slimp and then a temporary split. Dave to Barcelona, Spain, and Phil to London.
    It didnt take long for a re-union to happen, and in September 2002 Dave took a trip to London to record with Phil and new-found drummer Andrea Trillo. This session, recorded under the name of Fast 3, resulted in a cd of Jazz/Groove covers and was host to 2 outstanding tracks: 'Kooki Kop' - an original from the Deville days -and a dazzling arrangement of The Human Leagues 'Don't You Want Me.' These two tracks were released in 2004 as a single on Butterfly Records (Spain). With only 333 copies made and with an rpm of 33, this vinyl gem continues to gain popularity amongst hardcore Jazz/Funk fans.
    Phil's decision to join Dave in Barcelona sparked a new energy in the brothers and in summer 2003 Andrea joined them in Barcelona to play a set of 3 dates with 60's Blue Note recording legend George Braith. English-born Caspar St. Charles then joined the group in early 2004, replacing Andrea on drums for geographical reasons, and another set of dates with George Braith took place, the boys delighted to be playing tunes originally recorded with George by such greats as Grant Green, John Patton and Ben Dixon.
    An unreleased CD of Jazz Standards with London-based Tenor player, Renato Daiello was recorded and then came the highlight of the bands recording career to-date - THE GRIFTER. 11 tracks of heavy Hammond groove were layed down during July 2004 in the bands own Pimpos Studios. Dave, Phil and Caspar are also well-respected musicians in their own right having played with Jazz, Blues and Soul names such as, Sharon Jones, Alvin 'Young Blood' Heart, Charlie Wood, Sheila Weaver (The Supremes), Ray Gelato, Damon Brown and Pete King... but it's in Fast 3 where they really get their kicks and this is quite apparent, both live and on record. Through a mutual love of groove and respect for each others music, Fast3 formed a tight friendship with the UK's funk monsters The New Mastersounds and through this relationship came their signing to One Note Records."



    The Grifter

    or

    The Grifter


    0 0


    1. Lepo Sumera: Symphôné for strings & percussion 8:22
    2. Peteris Vasks:I Moderato 6:22
    3. Peteris Vasks: II Allegro energico 5:17
    4. Peteris Vasks: III Adagio 8:25
    5. Peteris Vasks: IV Moderato 8:27
    6. Onuté Narbutaite: Sinfonia col triangolo, for string orchestra 23:09
    7. Erkki-Sven Tüür: Lighthouse, for string orchestra 14:15

    Ostrobothnian Chamber Orchestra
    Juha Kangas - Conductor

    Wiki/AMG:
    "Lepo Sumera (8 May 1950 – 2 June 2000) was an Estonian composer and teacher. Considered one of Estonia's most renowned composers along with Heino Eller, Eduard Tubin and Arvo Pärt, he was also his country's Minister of Culture from 1988 to 1992 during the days of the Singing Revolution.
    He was born in Tallinn and studied with Veljo Tormis in his teens, and from 1968, with Heino Eller at the Estonian Academy of Music and Theatre (then Tallinn State Conservatory). After Heino Eller's death in 1970, he studied with Heino Jürisalu, graduating in 1973. He then did postgraduate study at the Moscow Conservatory (1979–1982) with the Russian composer Roman Ledenev. Sumera first came to notice in 1972 with In Memoriam, an orchestral tribute to Eller. He went on to compose six symphonies and numerous chamber and vocal works which have been played by orchestras throughout North America and Europe as well as in Australia and Cuba.
    In the late 1980s, Sumera became increasingly interested in electro-acoustic music. He founded the Electronic Music Studio at the Estonian Academy of Music in 1995 and served as its Director until 1999. One of his best known works in this genre is the multi-media Heart Affairs (1999) which used human heart sounds that were electronically transformed during performance accompanied by echocardiograph images, some from his own heart.
    Lepo Sumera died of heart failure in Tallinn, aged 50. He was survived by his wife, the pianist Kersti Einasto whom he married in 1972, and three children.

    The music of Latvian composer Peteris Vasks is often associated with his country's struggle for independence. Indeed, one of his best-known works, the symphony Voices composed in 1990-1991, symbolically and historically reflects Latvia's final steps to freedom. Deeply rooted in the rich folk tradition of Latvia, Vasks' haunting composition invites the listener on a cyclical journey from the timeless beauty of nature's voices emerging from silence to the heartrending cacophony of despair and back to the tranquility of silence. Critics who discuss Vasks in the context of his Latvian inspiration and artistic debt to Witold Lutoslawski nevertheless acknowledge his originality, his characteristic soulfulness, and melodic subtlety, as well as a universality of expression that identifies Vasks as a major European composer. Born in 1946, Vasks, who studied the double bass at the Lithuanian State Conservatory from 1964 to 1970, worked as an orchestra musician in the 1960s and 1970s. Vasks studied composition with Valentinus Utkins, at the Latvian State Conservatory in Riga, graduating in 1978. Working as a composer since the late '70s, Vasks has forged an original musical style, which commentators have described as spiritual, powerfully evocative, and richly expressive. Vasks' entire oeuvre is informed by the tragic dichotomy between humanistic ideals, symbolized by the vastness of nature and the historical realities of violence and despair. Vasks teaches composition at the Emil Darzins Music School in Riga. His works include Cantabile (1979), Musica Dolorosa for string orchestra (1983), and Lauda (1986), for orchestra.

    Onuté Narbutaité has been among the leading Lithuanian composers since the 1980s, but only rose to international prominence around the turn of the 21st century. Her String Quartet No. 2, 'Open the Gates of Oblivion' (1980), and June Music, for violin and cello (1981), first gained her notice in Lithuania, but it was her 1997 oratorio Centones meae urbi (Patchwork for My City) that not only elevated her to the front ranks among composers at home, but launched her toward global renown. Often somber in character, Narbutaité's music is stylistically individual: many will discern mystical or religious aspects in it, and while it is far from avant-garde, it may come across as a bit challenging for less adventurous listeners, even some of her lighter chamber music. Narbutaité's works are available from several major labels, including Naxos, Finlandia, and Guild.
    Onuté Narbutaité was born in Vilnius, Lithuania, on June 12, 1956. She studied music at the Lithuanian State Conservatory, where her most important teacher was Julius Juzeliunas. Narbutaité graduated in 1979, and from that year until 1982, she taught music theory at the State Conservatory in Klaipeda. Thereafter, based in Vilnius, she freelanced as a composer.
    Narbutaité had some early success, typically in the chamber genre. Her 1991 chamber piece Mozartsommer, for flute, violin, viola and piano, was a light work that gained a measure of popularity. She would go on to turn out successful chamber works inspired by other well-known composers, like Winterserenade: Paraphrase of Schubert's Gute Nacht (1997), for flute, violin, and viola; and Autumn Ritornello - Homage a Fryderyk Chopin (1999), for piano quartet.
    From about the mid-'90s Narbutaité began to focus her compositional interests on larger-scale works, like the 1996 Sinfonia col triangolo for string orchestra.
    In 1997 Narbutaité was given the highest artistic honor when she was named recipient of the Lithuanian National Prize for the aforementioned Centones meae urbi. Further awards were bestowed upon her: in 2004 the Lithuanian Composers Union presented her with the prize for the year's best symphonic work for the 2002-2003 choral symphony Tres Dei Matris Symphoniae (Three Symphonies of the Mother of God). She received the same distinction in 2005 for La Barca. Among the more popular and acclaimed recordings of Narbutaité's works is the 2011 Naxos CD of Tres Dei Matris Symphoniae, played by the Lithuanian National Symphony Orchestra under Robertas Servenikas.

    In his early career, Estonian composer Erkki-Sven Tüür straddled the line between conservatory-based classical music studies and pop music. Tüür studied flute, music composition, and percussion instruments while attending Tallinn Conservatory, and from 1979 he led a rock group called In Spe, which incorporated elements of Renaissance and Baroque music. Along the way, Tüür also composed music for theatrical productions and took some electronic music courses in Darmstadt. In Spe disbanded in 1983 (although it reunited in 2009 for a final concert), and Tüür earned his diploma from Tallinn in 1984. Tüür composed music for chamber ensembles throughout the 1980s and only accepted a post at the Tallinn Conservatory in 1989. Starting in 1984, Tüür undertook a series of works entitled Architectonics, ultimately running to seven pieces, that are scored for a variety of chamber combinations and were commissioned by ensembles ranging from Estonia to Los Angeles. Tüür's String Quartet (1985) begins to demonstrate some elements of his mature approach, which is informed by the rhythmic propulsiveness of minimalism, yet incorporates harmonic gestures and effects from the avant-garde and other styles not readily associated with minimalist music.
    With Tüür's Requiem (1994) his reputation was made, and soon he became one of the most frequently performed composers in Estonia. Tüür was able to quit teaching and go into music composition on a full-time basis. From this time, increasingly more diatonic elements begin to appear in the works of Tüür, and in addition to this there is a shift of focus from chamber music to orchestral and large choral works. In 2002 he developed a method of composition he called 'vectoral writing,' a technique that yields harmonic variety through voice leading and the use of a numerical code. Tüür has written a Mass, an oratorio Ante Finum Saeculi, symphonies, concerti, several pieces for orchestra, and a wide variety of chamber works. Tüür's music has been performed by Isabelle van Keulen, Anu Tali, Tönu Kaljuste, David Geringas, Evelyn Glennie, Paavo Järvi, and the California EAR Unit; and has been recorded to a significant extent, particularly on the ECM label."



    Lighthouse

    or

    Lighthouse


    0 0


    1. Rescue Me 3:24
    2. I'm a Ram 3:30
    3. In the Beginning 2:26
    4. Cc Ryder 6:06
    5. Country Preacher 3:31
    6. You're Killing My Love 4:38
    7. She Can't Say No 5:33
    8. Wayfaring Pilgrim 5:08

    Roy Buchanan - Guitar
    Bill Sheffield - Vocals
    Mimi Castillo - Sax (Tenor)
    Lenny Pickett - Sax (Alto), Sax (Tenor)
    Stephen Kupka - Saxophone (Baritone)
    Mic Gillette - Trumpet, Trombone
    Greg Adams - Trumpet
    Jim Romeyn – Synthesizer
    Ed Freeman - Keyboards
    Neil Larsen - Keyboards
    Kenny Tibbetts - Bass
    Billy Stewart - Drums
    Armando Peraza – Congas

    AMG:
    "Ironically, In the Beginning (1974) was the final studio LP Roy Buchanan (guitar) cut during his four year (1970-1974) tenure on Polydor. While definitely mellower than his previous platter, That's What I Am Here For (1974), his fluid fretwork continues to capture and conjure a seemingly infinite number of moods and textures. Remaining at the center is Buchanan's respect of authentic R&B. His hearty solos are the unquestionable highlights on an effort that would perhaps otherwise be considered simply mediocre. The backing combo includes a core trio of Neil Larsen (keyboards), Kenny Tibbetts (bass), and Bill Stewart (drums), as well as a healthy sampling of the Tower of Power horns. Even with the intensity Buchanan brings to the cover of 'Rescue Me' - which had been a hit for Fontella Bass in 1965 - there is a not only a discernible disconnect between the guitarist and his instrumental support, but also with vocalist Billy Sheffield. Purportedly, in a move instigated by the record company to sell more 'product,' Buchanan was to incorporate a lead singer. Ed Freeman (producer) incongruously attempted to incorporate Sheffield's unaffected shouting style to decidedly mixed results. More satisfying is the slinky Memphis soul of Al Green's 'I'm a Ram' and the laid-back 'C.C. Ryder,' which commences with a lolloping lick reminiscent of Bob Dylan's 'It Takes a Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry.''Country Preacher' is recommended as it takes Cannonball Adderley's signature tune to a new strata during Buchanan's solos that make the strings alternately cry and sing with unfettered passion. Another zenith is the Nick Gravenites and Michael Bloomfield composition, 'You're Killing My Love,' which retains a great deal of the Muscle Shoals vibe on the Otis Rush original. Buchanan spins pure honey on the dark adaptation of 'Wayfaring Stranger' titled 'Wayfairing Pilgrim.' His uncanny ability to conjure almost inconceivably disparate emotions within just a few bars of each other is one definite reason that he is in a league unto himself. Potential enthusiasts should note that this material would be issued in Europe as Rescue Me (1975)."



    In The Beginning

    or

    In The Beginning


    0 0


    1. Beelzebub 3:22
    2. Back to the Beginning 7:25
    3. Seems Like a Lifetime Ago Pt. 1 2:31
    4. Seems Like a Lifetime Ago Pt. 2 4:29
    5. Sample and Hold 5:12
    6. Feels Good to Me 3:53
    7. Either End of August 5:24
    8. If You Can't Stand the Heat... 3:26
    9. Springtine in Siberia 2:44
    10. Adios a la Pasada Goodbye to the Past 8:41


    Bill Bruford - acoustic & electronic drums and percussion
    Dave Stewart - keyboards, synths
    Allan Holdsworth - electric guitar
    Annette Peacock - vocals
    Jeff Berlin - bass
    Kenny Wheeler - flugelhorn
    +
    John Goodsall - guitar (6)
    Neil Murray - bass


    AMG:
    "This is the first solo date by drummer Bill Bruford after the first demise of King Crimson. Feels Good to Me goes far beyond the usual prog rock conceits of its time, and enters fully into the compositional structures and improvisational dynamics of jazz. Here he surrounds himself with various mates from the Canterbury scene -- guitarists Allan Holdsworth (Soft Machine and Tony Williams' Lifetime) and John Goodsall (Brand X), bassist Jeff Berlin, keyboardist Dave Stewart, and ECM flügelhorn stalwart Kenny Wheeler. He also enlisted the enigmatic vocal prowess of poet, singer, and songwriter Annette Peacock.
    The opener, 'Beelzebub,' is a furious staccato workout. Holdsworth trades eights with Bruford and Berlin executes loping basslines as Stewart waxes painterly with both organ and synthesizer. It's knotty and stops on a dime before charging into a beautiful solo by Holdsworth and resolving itself with the ensemble restating the theme. 'Back to the Beginning' has one of four vocal performances by Peacock. It's a jazz tune -- funky, syncopated, and heavily and wildly lyrical both in groove and meter. It's a song about addictions and, given Peacock's sultry treatment, it's hard to tell if they are chemical, material, or sexual. The band works hard staying behind the singer but can't help but overshadow her.
    On the two-part 'Seems Like a Lifetime Ago,' musical schizophrenia sets in. After a colorful pastoral intro, Peacock glides beautifully through Bruford's lyric of forlorn reverie accompanied by a gorgeous Wheeler solo. Then 'Part Two' begins with her growling out the refrain and the band taking off for parts unknown. Hard funky rhythms call Holdsworth's lead guitar to move flat up against Bruford's frenetic drumming. They challenge each other dynamically as the rest of the rhythm section nervously dances around them. Holdsworth finally grabs the lead and plays a solo that is nothing short of breathtaking, giving way to a restatement of the theme and Bruford opening up the harmonic structure before bringing it to a transcendent close two minutes later. The album's six instrumentals are tight: they hold improvisational breaks to the limits of compositional dictation rather than vice versa. The most beautiful, 'Either End of August,' features Stewart and Wheeler playing unusual yet melodic solos that entwine with each other as the rest of the band struggles to keep the drama out of the music. They don't succeed entirely and the track is all the better for it.
    The set closes with 'Adios a la Pasada (Goodbye to the Past),' a collaboration between Peacock and Bruford. It's on Peacock's favorite theme: to emerge from love scraped and beaten, yet resolved to keep an open heart. The opening is spare and strange, coated with whispering keyboards and bass haunting the artist's every word. Then Bruford majestically leads the band, soaring into the heart of her lyric, 'What it is/Is this/Is what it is/Forgive yourselves/Release yourselves from the past.' The music opens up an entirely new sonic dimension, as if history, both musical and emotional, was being rewritten. And it was. Bruford has yet to issue a solo recording as powerful as Feels Good to Me."



    Feels Good To Me

    or

    Feels Good To Me


    0 0


    1. Walkin' Around The Stormy Bay 6:28
    2. Going Away 28:58
    3. Silver Rain 8:10
    4. Follow My Dream 26:56


    Józef Skrzek - keyboards, vocals
    Antymos Apostolis - guitar, buzuki, drums, percussion
    Jerzy Piotrowski - drums, percussion


    Wiki:
    "SBB (first known as Silesian Blues Band, later as Szukaj, Burz, Buduj – Polish for 'Search, Break up, Build') is a Polish progressive rock band formed in 1971 in Siemianowice, Upper Silesia by multi-instrumentalist and vocalist Józef Skrzek. It was one of the most popular super-groups in Poland in the 1970s; they also toured Czechoslovakia, East and West Germany, Bulgaria, Sweden, Denmark and the United States. The band split up in 1980 but was briefly re-activated in 1991, 1993, 1998 and finally in 2000."



    Freedom Live-Sopot '78

    or

    Freedom Live-Sopot '78


    0 0


    0 0


    1. Angel's Flight 4:00
    2. Vajra 4:20
    3. Wheel of Dreams 4:46
    4. Oriental Eyes 4:56
    5. Move the Clouds 3:08
    6. A Thousand Teardrops 4:15
    7. Ariki (Hummingbird Spirit) 3:10
    8. Marie 5:50


    G. E. Stinson - 12-string acoustic guitar, 6-string acoustic guitar, piano
    Chuck Greenberg - Lyricon, soprano saxophone
    Phil Maggini - bass
    Stuart Nevitt - drums, percussion


    AMG:
    "On its debut album, Shadowfax was a contemporary instrumental quartet led by guitarist G. E. Stinson and Lyricon/sax player Chuck Greenberg, its mostly calm pieces full of carefully placed riffs played by clearly delineated instruments. A true ensemble, Shadowfax can be listened to with pleasure for its individual players and its group sound on this and several subsequent Windham Hill albums."



    Shadowfax

    or

    Shadowfax


    0 0


    1. Action #II 7:24
    2. Action #III 7:25
    3. Action #IV 8:32
    4. Action #V 11:00
    5. Action #VI 11:39


    Steffen Andersen - Double Bass
    Hugh Steinmetz - Trumpet
    Franz Beckerlee - Sax (Alto)
    Bo Thrige Andersen - Drums
    Niels Harrit - Saw

    AMG:
    "How many musical saw players have there been in the history of jazz? To further narrow the scope, consider that same question limited to the 1960s; the number could be counted on one hand. Here is an album by the Contemporary Jazz Quintet, a group that indeed had a full-time musical saw player in its number, and as novel and downright goofy as the idea of 'jazz saw' sounds, nobody on this date is goofin'.
    The lone album released by the Quintet (Hugh Steinmetz on trumpet, Franz Beckerlee on alto sax, Steffen Andersen on bass, Bo Thrige Andersen on drums, and Niels Harrit on - yes - musical saw) was simply titled TCJQ. It was an early experiment in electric jazz in Europe and was released in 1968 on the Dutch Debut imprint. Its four long tracks were variations on a group composition titled 'Action' and each version got its own number; seven through ten ended up on the album. 'Action I' was recorded a few years earlier in 1964 by a smaller version of the group, the Contemporary Jazz Quartet, with Sunny Murray on drums and no musical saw in sight. So here for the first time are the missing 'Actions' numbered two through six as recorded by the Quintet in the mid-'60s. Unlike the TCJQ disc, the 'Actions' heard here were recorded acoustically, making it a much different listening experience. The music is stark and haunting, and its immediacy recalls both Albert Ayler and the New York Art Quartet. The sound of the saw provides much of the eerie atmosphere, but it is the dialog that Harrit creates with Steinmetz and Beckerlee that makes this band more than a novelty act. The acoustic properties of the saw make its presence faint at times, but it never completely disappears, keeping up quite well with Beckerlee's razor howls, and its near-vocal quality lends an otherworldly quality to the proceedings. Actions will likely slip under the radar, even that of jazz fanatics, but the quality of playing here makes this an album that is sure to gain admirers slowly and surely, like the true gem that it is."



    Actions 1966-67

    or

    Actions 1966-67


    0 0


    1. Living Dead 7:51
    2. Princess 6:02
    3. Jingoism 6:54
    4. Prelude 1:12
    5. The Monk Song 1 5:54
    6. The Monk Song 2 3:36
    7. Going Blind 10:31


    Ole Wedel - lead vocals
    Benny Stanley - electric guitar
    Tommy Hansen - organ, piano, vocals
    Knud Lindhard - bass, vocals
    John Lundvig - drums


    eocities.com/rainforest:
    "This group hailed from Jutland. They started in the end of 60-ties as Den Gamle Mand og Havet (Danish name of 'The Old Man And The Sea') playing cover versions of songs of The Nice, Procol Harum, The Cream etc. Later they changed the name for its English equivalent. In 1972 recorded one of the best albums in Denmark - symphonic progressive rock with strong organ and heavy rock tendencies. This album became soon a cult record. Unfortunately, the band, as many others, couldn't get the breakthrough and disbanded.
    In 1999 a white label album appeared without any information about the issue except the tracks titles. According to Ref. 2, it contains unreleased studio tracks (probably they were to appear on the second album) and live radio recordings - pretty interesting for the collectors but with not so good sound quality. Three tracks come from the first album (Living Dead/Princess and Going Blind) but in other version. Some compositions present good music level like on previous record."



    Old Man And The Sea

    or

    Old Man And The Sea


    0 0


    1. Prologo: l'Orfeo
    2. Sequenza prima
    3. Sequenza seconda
    4. Sequenza terza
    5. Sequenza quarta
    6. Epilogo
    7. Estramadure - part 1
    8. Estramadure - part 2
    9. Estramadure - part 3
    10. Montbeliard Trio
    11. Artefact - part 1
    12. Artefact - part 2
    13. Argentierra
    14. Charmediterraneen
    15. Argentierra

    Paolo Damiani - cello
    Anouar Brahem - oud
    Gianluigi Trovesi - piccolo clarinet, alto saxophone
    François Jeanneau - soprano sax, flute
    Thomas de Pourquery - soprano, alto and tenor saxophones
    Jean Marc Larché - soprano, alto and baritone saxophones
    Médéric Collignon - pocket trumpet, fluegelhorn, voice
    Alain Vankenhove - trumpet, fluegelhorn
    Gianluca Petrella - trombone
    Didier Havet - sousaphone
    Régis Huby - violin
    Olivier Benoit - guitar
    Paul Rogers - double-bass
    Christophe Marguet - drums

    AMG:
    "For the first time under the direction of a foreigner, Paolo Damiani, the French orchestra explores themes related to the Mediterranean area. With the help of special guests Anouar Brahem and Gianluigi Trovesi, the Italian musical director offers musical landscapes that encompass the various aspects of the region. The album opens with a suite penned by Trovesi, which digs deep into the Italian musical tradition, but also incorporates more recent influences from the Middle East and Africa. With the brass instruments in the forefront, it is definitely the most colorful and animated segment of the disc. François Jeanneau takes the relay with another suite that brings the music back into jazz territory while paying tribute to the long French tradition of jazz violin. The saxophonist successfully blends the saxophones with the string and brass sections, producing a unique and rich texture. Brahem's two-part composition 'Artefact' slows down the pace and sets a more reflective mood. Not surprisingly, the music has a strong Middle Eastern flavor. Ironically, the musical director's contributions featured at the end of the program pale in comparison and sound somewhat conventional. The pace is similar to Brahem's piece, which might suggest that the music could have been better sequenced. 'Argentiera' features some thoughtful playing, but the title track is lackluster save for a forceful solo by Trovesi. This is a disappointment for an otherwise very enjoyable outing adequately dominated by the voice of the soprano saxophone."



    Charmediterraneen

    or

    Charmediterraneen


older | 1 | .... | 42 | 43 | (Page 44) | 45 | 46 | .... | 57 | newer