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FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | .... | 41 | 42 | (Page 43) | 44 | 45 | .... | 57 | newer

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    1 Sun Love 17:45
    2 Yaad 5:20
    3 Brigach and Ganges 14:32

    Barney Wilen - Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor)
    Manfred Schoof - Cornet, Trumpet
    Dewan Motihar Trio:
    Dewan Motihar - Sitar, Vocals
    Kusum Thakur - Tambura
    Keshav Sathe - Tabla
    Irène Schweizer Trio:
    Irène Schweizer - Piano
    Uli Trepte - Bass
    Mani Neumeier - Drums

    AMG:
    "Pianist Irène Schweizer performed and recorded with leading European improvisers and free jazz musicians since the 1960s, including female improvising groups starting in the late '70s. One of the initial organizers of the Taktlos and Canaille music festivals, she is also a founding member of the Intakt label. Born in Schaffhausen, Switzerland, in 1941, Schweizer grew up hearing dance bands in her father's restaurant. When she was about 12 years old, she started playing on the piano, and a couple of years later picked up the drums as well. At the age of 17, Schweizer's interest moved away from early jazz styles toward modern jazz, leading to her entry in a Zurich amateur festival in 1960. From 1961 to 1962, the aspiring pianist lived in England, working as an au pair, and taking piano lessons primarily with Eddie Thompson, who taught her stride, bebop, and more. When Schweizer returned to Switzerland, she was playing soul-jazz and hard bop, and started up a trio with drummer Mani Neumeier and Uli Trepte. Her playing was soon influenced by the South African players she heard at Zurich's African Jazz Cafe. Her exposure to Johnny Dyani, Dollar Brand, and others also came around the same time Schweizer heard Ornette Coleman's Free Jazz. In addition to these influences, Schweizer was heavily affected by the recordings of Cecil Taylor. Her trio became known outside of Switzerland, and was invited to play the Frankfurt Jazz Festival in 1966. While there, Schweizer heard such German improvisers as saxophonist Peter Brotzmann and bassist Peter Kowald. The same year, she finally heard Cecil Taylor live, and as sometimes happens when musicians witness someone they revere, she considered giving up the piano as a result. Lucky for music fans, Schweizer instead turned to developing her individual style and technique. During the late '60s, she was active in a trio with Kowald and Pierre Favre which Evan Parker eventually joined. This group disbanded a few years before her collaborations with Rüdiger Carl began in 1973 (Schweizer and Carl continued to work together off and on throughout their careers). Schweizer began giving solo performances starting in 1976, at the Willisau Jazz Festival. Schweizer also became involved in the Feminist Improvising Group, joining Maggie Nichols, Lindsay Cooper, and more. The group changed its name in 1983 to one with less political connotations: the European Women's Improvising Group. Out of this large group arose an intermittent trio of Schwiezer, Nichols, and Joëlle Léandre, called Les Diaboliques, formed in the early '90s. Schweizer has recorded with amazing musicians from around the world, including pianist Marilyn Crispell, and leading percussionists Han Bennink, Andrew Cyrille, Günter Sommer, and more."



    Jazz Meets India

    or

    Jazz Meets India


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    1. Moon Watching 2:36
    2. Please Don't Bother Me Anymore 3:31
    3. The Man Who Must Leave 7:45
    4. The Sun 6:51
    5. I Don't Like 3:11
    6. Please Wait 3:20
    7. Spring Rain 5:40
    8. Tomorrow 3:47
    9. "J" Blues 72 15:01
    10. Pushing Through the Fog 3:32
    11. I've Got Nothing to Say 2:25
    12. Why That Person? 2:50
    13. Sunset 5:38
    14. Beautiful Rivers and Mountains 10:04

    Shin Joong Hyun - Guitar
    Lee Jung Hwa
    Jang Hyun
    Kim Jung Mi
    Park In Soo
    Kim Sun
    Bunny Girls
    Golden Grapes
    The Men
    Spring Variety Band

    AMG:
    "Guitarist, producer, and songwriter Shin Joong Hyun's music was seldom heard outside his native South Korea. Save for the recordings purchased by returning American GIs or in the collections of migrating South Koreans, it seldom entered the West and was only discovered by rabid vinyl collectors in the 21st century. His story is a long, often tragic one, though it's full of redemption and is ongoing: Shin resumed making music at the turn of the century. Also, he recently received one of popular music's greatest honors: Fender created his own Custom Shop Tribute Series guitar. Shin is only the sixth player ever to receive such an honor. The others' last names are Clapton, Beck, Hendrix, Van Halen, and Vaughan. The intrepid Light in the Attic imprint decided to tell Shin's story through Beautiful Rivers and Mountains: The Psychedelic Rock Sound of South Korea's Shin Joong Hyun 1958-1974, his first ever anthology. In addition to collecting 14 tracks, it also offers a lengthy biographical essay - with interview - by Kevin Howes. Musically, Shin was deeply influenced by American and British rock and pop styles of all stripes, but also by his own country's folk and pop traditions. Incidentally, they came together inseparably in his music. While 'Moon Watching' from Shin's debut solo album, Hiky Shin, owes greatly to Johnny & the Hurricanes-styled instrumental rock and surf music, the very next cut, 'Please Don't Bother Me Anymore,' from Shin Joong Hyun & the Golden Grapes' self-titled album of 1972, is pure choogling psych-pop informed equally by Hendrix's wah-wah soloing, the Jefferson Airplane, and the Mamas & the Papas! 'I Don't Like,' cut in 1970 by female vocalist Lee Jung Hwa backed by Shin & the Donkeys, was a pure Motown rip. 'Spring Rain,' cut the same year by male singer Park In Soo, is a take on deep psychedelic soul backed by Shin and his band the Questions. ''J' Blues 72' is Shin & the Golden Grapes playing an instrumental influenced by Hendrix and B.B. King, but showcases his own mighty and unusual playing style the best. The ten-plus-minute title track that closes the set is a labyrinthine folk-psych, acid-drenched masterpiece by Shin & the Men from 1972. It's an epic worthy of Morricone's spaghetti Western scores - had Morricone been born a guitarist. Ultimately, Beautiful Rivers and Mountains is more than a mere curiosity piece; for all its easy-to-recognize styles, Shin's way of enmeshing them into something original underscores rather than erases their strangeness and splendor - even to widely exposed Western ears - making this is an excellent introduction to his work."



    Beautiful Rivers & Mountains

    or

    Beautiful Rivers & Mountains


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    1. Oh Baby I Dont’t Love You Anymore (Dauner) 04:22
    2. Take Off Your Clothes To Feel The Setting Sun (Dauner) 04:02
    3. My Man's Gone Now (Gershwin) 03:29
    4. Come On In On In (Dauner) 03:35
    5. Dig My Girl (Dauner) 07:30
    6. Greensleeves (traditional) 03:54
    7. Uwiii (Dauner) 02:58
    8. A Day In The Life (Lennon/McCartney) 02:59

    Wolfgang Dauner - Organ, Piano, Vocals
    Pierre Cavalli - Guitar
    Siegfried Schwab - Guitar, Sitar
    Eberhard Weber - Bass, Cello, Vocals
    Roland Wittich - Drums, Vocals

    longhairmusic.de:
    "Wolfgang Dauner, one of the few internationally renowned German jazz musicians, was born in Stuttgart on Dec. 30, 1935. Oddly enough, having learnt to play the piano as a child, he eventually graduated from the conservatory in Stuttgart with a major in 'trumpet'. Yet, it is the piano that remains his great love. He fancied contemporary jazz and, in 1963, founded his first own band: The Wolfgang Dauner Trio, with Eberhard Weber playing the bass and Fred Braceful on the drums. He would continue playing with these musicians well into the 1970ies. Dauner is extremely important with regard to modern jazz and jazz rock in Germany, and his efforts can be compared to the spade work Miles Davis did for jazz and jazz rock in the USA.
    Having participated in various jazz bands in the early 1960ies, Dauner was already a jazz veteran before he founded his own band. His first albums belong to the genre of experimental modern jazz, influenced by Bill Evans, Steve Lacy, Sun Ra etc. The albums he published until 1969 will primarily appeal to 'pure' jazz fans.
    The acme of psychedelic music in 1968/69 created new possibilities. Dauner and several other excellent young jazz musicians were sick of the jazz of the time turning increasingly cliché, and decided to disregard all existing rules. They did to jazz what Faust was going to do to rock music a couple of years later. A first result was the extraordinary album FÜR, released in the summer of 1969, which can hardly be called jazz, but is much rather an experiment aimed at overcoming limitations. Musical revolution for its own sake. This was also expressed in the cover notes, where the musicians explained what the album was about, e.g. the record had to be played inside out and was going to destroy itself when played.
    The Oimels, the album the Wolfgang Dauner Quintet presented to their fans in early 1970, was even more radical than the previous productions. Here, Wolfgang Dauner and his band surprised as a psychedelic-jazz-pop-band. To top it all, the album con-tained a version of the Beatles’ title 'A Day in The Life' of the Sgt. Pepper’s album, along with several other more or less 'weird' songs that remind one of pop or beat with a pinch of jazz and ethnic sounds. Apart from the distorted guitar, sitar sounds and other freak-outs so beloved by fans of psychedelic music, the five musicians really pulled out all the stops in order to demonstrate their idea of what psychedelic pop had to sound like. An extraordinary album in every respect. 1969 and 1970 were a musical Fountain of Youth for Wolfgang Dauner and his alternating band members. They published eight albums on different labels and under various band names (Wolfgang Dauner Quintet, Wolfgang Dauner or Et Cetera). For progressive rock enthusiasts we particularly recommend the albums RISCHKAS’S SOUL (recorded in 1969, published on Brain in 1972), and ET CETERA (1971 on Global). Fans of progressive rock will also love the LP KNIRSCH (with participation of Jon Hise-mann and Larry Coryell) published on BASF/MPS in 1972, and the 1973 live double album also published on BASF/MPS under the band name ET CETERA. Readers of the Sounds magazine voted Dauner musician of the year 1972. In 1971 he had won the 'star of the year' award by the Münchner Abendzeitung, and before that, in 1969, he had been appointed head of the radio-jazz-group Stuttgart. It is not an exaggeration to call Dauner one of the most productive and versatile musicians, particularly with regard to the subsequent years. During the 1970ies and 1980ies he was involved in innumerable projects, both his own and as guest musician (between 1970 and 1990 he participated in no less than 49 record productions). Apart from the above mentioned productions he was keyboarder with the 'New Violin Summit', played with the United Jazz and Rock Ensemble, worked with Dieter Süverkrüp and Konstantin Wecker, whose producer and musical director he became in 1986, the Kolbe-Illenberger duo, Charlie Mariano, Albert Mangelsdorff and many others. His discography is so vast it would go beyond the scope of this booklet. In 1977 he co-founded Mood records, and recently, in 2001, was responsible for three record productions. In addition to this he did commissioned compositions for various symphony orchestras, composed the chamber opera 'Die verwachsene Froschhaut' for the State Theatre Stuttgart, created the laser show music for Germany’s cultural contribution to the Olympics in Barcelona in 1992, as well as the world championship fanfare and a composition for the awards ceremony of the athletics world championship in Stuttgart in 1993. In 1999 he toured Chicago, New Orleans and the Bahamas with the German Allstars-Old-Friends (K. Doldinger, A. Mangelsdorff, M. Schoof, W. Haffner and E. Weber). In 2004 the tour was continued with concerts in Southern America. A typical feature of Wolfgang Dauner’s musical production is that he doesn’t make a distinction between serious and light music. Although always open for any kind of musical influence, he nonetheless kept his distinctive Wolfgang-Dauner style, which can be easily spotted in the many soundtracks he composed in the course of his creative work. His compositions for TV- and film adorned Courths-Mahler productions, the TV series about defence lawyer Abel and even a production by the animal film maker Horst Stern (Remarks on butterflies), etc."



    The Oimels

    or

    The Oimels


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    1. Aïs, for amplified baritone, solo percussion & orchestra 17:40
    2. Tracées, for 94 musicians 5:22
    3. Empreintes, for 85 musicians 10:39
    4. Noomena, for 103 musicians 12:45
    5. Roáï, for 90 musicians 12:36

    Béatrice Daudin - Percussion
    Arturo Tamayo - Conductor
    Orchestre Philharmonique du Luxembourg

    AMG:
    "Arturo Tamayo's recordings of the works of Iannis Xenakis on the Timpani label are among the finest available, for they are finely interpreted, expertly performed, and brilliantly recorded. Xenakis' music is always different from piece to piece, because the composer never wanted to repeat himself, and his works always present unique challenges, depending on the nature of his evolving techniques and changing expressions. Whether it is in the stark text and extreme vocalizations of Aïs (1980), or the densely dissonant aggregations of Tracées (1987), Empreintes (1975), Noomena (1974), and Roáï (1991), Tamayo keeps the energy levels high and shapes the sound to have a sharp edge and forceful impact. The committed performances of baritone Spyros Sakkas and percussionist Béatrice Daudin make Aïs a challenging opener, while the Luxembourg Philharmonic Orchestra gives a full sound and diverse timbres to the four purely orchestral works. The sound quality is slightly variable, but overall the dynamic range is wide and the depth of the orchestral mass translates well in the stereo mix. Adventurous listeners with a taste for the avant-garde will find a great deal to enjoy in this first volume, but they should also explore the four excellent CDs that followed it in the series."



    Orchestral Works

    or

    Orchestral Works


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    1. Roman Summer Nights 2:47
    2. Lost Lonely 4:18
    3. Blud 3:52
    4. Castles In The Sky 3:52
    5. Dream 3:45
    6. Tingle 3:58
    7. Evil Woman 2:44
    8. Age Of Chivalry 4:24
    9. Making Time 10:18

    Peter Illingworth - lead guitar, vocals
    Frank Newbold - bass, vocals
    Paul Varley - drums

    Wiki:
    "Little Free Rock was an English late 1960s psychedelic hard rock trio from Preston in Lancashire, England. It featured Peter Illingworth (lead guitar and vocals) (formerly with David John and the Mood who recorded with Joe Meek), Paul Varley (drums) (later with Arrows) and Frank Newbold (bass and vocals). They began performing covers of The Who, The Creation ('Makin' Time' appeared on their album) and Tomorrow, but were soon doing mainly their own compositions.
    The band performed regularly at the Roundhouse Sunday Night Implosion events and had numerous residencies at the Marquee Club. As well as performing all over Belgium, continental trips included the Star-Club in Hamburg, the Essen Jazz and Blues Festival, and festivals in Frankfurt, San Tropez and Santa Margarita de la Costa in Italy.
    They changed their name from Purple Haze to avoid confusion with the Jimi Hendrix single.
    Peter Green (Fleetwood Mac) joined the band for a short period, but the recordings were never released."



    Little Free Rock

    or

    Little Free Rock


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    Il Maestro Muratore:
    1. Il Maestro Muratore 7:16
    2. Squilli Di Morte 2:54
    3. Corbù 2:12
    4. Merù lo Snob 9:59
    5. l'Arte Mistica del Vasaio 2:18
    6. Il Maestro Muratore (Ripresa) 1:32
    Skies of Europe:
    7. Du du Duchamp 11:10
    8. Quand Duchamp Joue du Marteau 2:51
    9. Il Suono Giallo 5:22
    10. Marlene E Gli Ospiti Misteriosi 5:21
    11. Satie Satin 2:52
    12. Masse d'Urto 3:30
    13. Fellini Song 4:43

    Carlo Actis Dato - Clarinet (Bass), Sax (Baritone), Sax (Tenor)
    Gianluigi Trovesi - Clarinet, Clarinet (Alto), Clarinet (Bass), Piccolo, Sax (Alto)
    Renato Geremia - Flute, Sax (Alto), Sax (Soprano), Violin
    Daniele Cavallanti - Sax (Baritone), Sax (Tenor)
    Eugenio Colombo - Flute, Sax (Alto), Sax (Soprano)
    Mario Schiano - Sax (Alto), Sax (Soprano), Vocals
    Alberto Mandarini - Trumpet
    Guido Mazzon - Trumpet
    Enrico Rava - Trumpet
    Martin Mayes - Flugelhorn, French Horn, Mellophone, Mellophonium
    Pino Minafra - Flugelhorn, Megaphone, Trumpet
    Sebi Tramontana - Trombone
    Lauro Rossi - Trombone
    Giancarlo Schiaffini - Trombone, Tuba
    Giorgio Gaslini - Anvil, Piano
    Umberto Petrin - Piano
    Paolo Damiani - Cello, Double Bass
    Bruno Tommaso - Bass, Double Bass
    Vincenzo Mazzone - Drums, Gong, Percussion, Timbales, Timpani
    Tiziano Tononi - Drums, Percussion

    AMG:
    "For its second release, this fascinating ensemble chose to record two extended suites by band members Bruno Tommaso and Giorgio Gaslini. Tommaso's 'Il Maestro Muratore' (The Master Mason), inspired by the Sardinian sculptor Constantino Nivola, begins superbly with a spirited romp based on a Sardinian folk dance and featuring high-wire soloing by trumpeter (and founder) Pino Minafra and Carlo Actis Dato on bass clarinet. The remainder of the piece meanders a bit, genre-hopping in postmodern fashion but doing so with perhaps less grace than one would wish. The suite ends with a reprise of the opening theme, and one only wishes the same verve and vigor could have been sustained throughout the composition. Gaslini's title piece is similarly wide ranging, though with a early 20th century European cosmopolitan feel befitting several of its dedicatees from art, music, and film. While the thematic material might have echoes of parlor music and cabarets, the solos are firmly in the avant-garde tradition, forming a counterpoint that is initially beguiling but grows a bit thin with repetition. Still, there are jewels within, such as the lovely miniature tribute, 'Satie Satin,' and the closing homage to Fellini with its luxuriant nods to Nino Rota. At this point in the Italian Instabile Orchestra's journey, the listener still has the impression that the best of this band had not yet been captured on disc, but there are enough high points herein to make it well worth a listen."



    Skies of Europe

    or

    Skies of Europe


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    1. Image
    2. Cube-Man
    3. Thorn-Woman
    4. Welcome On Board
    5. Happy End I. (Night Flight)
    6. Fans
    7. Inside The Bermudas Triangle
    8. Balloon-Man
    9. Miss Peahen
    10. Minimal Mood I
    11. Minimal Mood II
    12. Jazzy Mood
    13. Nerves
    14. She
    15. Graffiti
    16. Love Song I
    17. Love Song II
    18. Together
    19. Take-Off From The Score
    20. Laughter
    21. Fasten Your Seat Belt
    22. Happy Piano
    23. Happy End II. (Fancy)

    Zdenêk Zdenêk - Keyboards

    discogs:
    "Czech pianist, keyboardist, composer, band leader. Born January 17, 1960 in Karlovy Vary (former Czechoslovakia). Member of Orchestr Československé Televize 1983–1985."



    Music For Theatre Image

    or

    Music For Theatre Image


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    1. Witchfinder General
    2. Massacre Of St. Valentine
    3. Roof Of Your Home
    4. California Freeway
    5. Marigold
    6. Finger Boy Joe
    7. Ghost Of Emile Zola

    Peter Langford – Vocals, Whistle
    Trevor Chapman – Guitar, Bongos
    Roger Macer – Bass

    The Tapestry of Delights:
    "An extremely rare privately-pressed album, although this one was pressed in relatively large quantities (2,000) and most were accompanied by a lyric sheet. It was another hippie-type commune project similar to Everyone Involved, but the folk material on the album owed as much to Bob Dylan as to The Incredible String Band. It included the 17-minute epic, 'Ghost Of Emile Zola'."



    Red Television

    or

    Red Television


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    1. Trance 6:03
    2. A Change Of Face 5:03
    3. Squirt 3:06
    4. The Sandhouse 3:53
    5. Something Everywhere 7:53
    6. Silver 2:58
    7. The Young Blade 6:21
    8. Life's Backward Glance 3:09

    Steve Kuhn - Piano
    Steve Swallow - Bass
    Jack DeJohnette - Drums
    Sue Evans - Percussion

    AMG:
    "Trance, Steve Kuhn's second recording for ECM, was actually recorded a mere ten days after Ecstasy, his solo piano debut for the label. Trance features Kuhn playing both electric and acoustic piano, bassist Steve Swallow, drummer Jack DeJohnette, and percussionist Sue Evans. Two of the album's compositions, 'Silver' and 'Life's Backward Glance,' are re-recordings of tunes appearing on Ecstasy. Adventurous and wide open, Trance is a mixed bag full of knots, twists, and turns. While firmly in the jazz idiom, Kuhn also draws on classical sources (check his solo in 'Squirt'), drawing on Luciano Berio and Olivier Messiaen as well as Cecil Taylor. Performed on electric piano, 'Silver' is a chugging, repetitive riff with a Latin rhythm, and Kuhn swings it like mad as Swallow's bass pops and spits along the melodic line as well as the rhythmic undertone. This is jazz that touches on fusion, modal, and the new spirit of the music as ECM came into the 1970s as a player. There is restlessness and calm, tempestuousness and serenity, conflict and resolution, and - above all - creativity and vision."



    Trance

    or

    Trance


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    1. Arc en ciel 3:56
    2. 2000 7:36
    3. Astortango 4:21
    4. No fly zone 4:44
    5. Nove luna prima - Zoetrope - Bonaventura moon 5:41
    6. Alba mediterranea 6:31
    7. Ambaradan 3:12
    8. Tera incognita 5:52
    9. Ali 2:03
    10. Quarto di luna 4:24
    11. Sun 5:13
    12. Strade 4:44
    13. Gravità 9'81 4:13

    Corrado Trabuio - acoustic & electric violins
    Gigi Venegoni - acoustic & electric guitars
    Marco Cimino - keyboards
    Beppe Crovella - keyboards, harmonica
    Marco Gallesi - bass
    Furio Chirico - drums, percussion

    AMG:
    "The sextet Arti & Mestieri was formed in 1974 in Torino, Italy, by drummer Furio Chirico, following his departure from the Trip. Drawing membership from the cream of the local jazz rock scene, Arti & Mestieri frequently found themselves sharing a bill with Area, the long-running kings of that particular arena. However, their renown was such that they also opened for a number of visiting acts, most notably Gentle Giant.
    Arti & Mestieri's debut album in 1974, Tilt, received a lot of attention but only hinted at the group's true capabilities - a live album from this period appeared on the Vinyl Magic label in 1990 and, despite poor sound quality, offers a far more captivating portrait of the group in full flow. It was the following year's Giro Di Valzer Per Domani that established Arti & Mestieri as a force to be reckoned with, all the more so since the recruitment of former Procession vocalist Gianfranco Gaza. Two vocal tracks on the band's debut had proven among the weakest songs in sight; Gaza brought a new and welcome dimension to the sound, so much so that the band's label, Cramps, even released a single from the album, 'Saper Sentire', backed by the instrumental &'Valzer per Domani'.
    Despite this breakthrough, it would be another four years before a new Arti & Mestieri album appeared. 1979's Quinto Stato, while featuring many of the same players as its predecessor, was nevertheless a disappointment, a very pedestrian jazz-rock excursion that preceded the band's break-up.
    Chirico released two further albums under the Arti & Mestieri banner, 1983's Acquario and Childrens' Blues two years later, before he turned his attention to teaching, and building his reputation as one of Italy's foremost drummers - he is the only Italian ever to appear at the American Modern Drummer Festival, in 2002. He has also released a handful of solo albums. Of his bandmates, guitarist Gigi Venegoni also launched a solo career, cutting at least two albums under the name $Venegoni & Co). Arti & Mestieri reformed in 2001, around Chirico, Venegoni and fellow founders, keyboard player Beppe Crovella and bassist Marco Gallesi. Accompanied by Quarto Stato-era keyboard player Marco Cimino and violinist Corrado Trabuio, the reformed band released a new album, Murales in 2001."



    Murales

    or

    Murales


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    1. Landscape 1:43
    2. Ye Who Read 4:23
    3. Shall I Speak Of Me 1:25
    4. 2 Dollar 2:06
    5. I My Sea Voyage 1:33
    6. The Year Has Been A Year Of Terror 4:33
    7. The Stars Are Cold Signposts 2:41
    8. Over Some Flasks 4:21
    9. From An Unknown Catastrophe 2:29
    10. A Dead Weight 2:59
    11. Yet We Laughed 5:07
    12. No Arrival No Parking 1:18
    13. Or The Hapless Landing 2:21
    14. And lo 6:10
    15. In The Back The Swine 1:54
    16. And Then Did We 4:50

    Sussan Deyhim - Vocals
    Christos Govetas - Clarinet, Chumbush, Gardon
    René Lussier - Guitar
    Heiner Goebbels - Accordion, Keyboards, Programming
    Charles Hayward - Drums, Hand Percussion, Timpani

    AMG:
    "Heiner Goebbels doesn't shy away from the unusual conception. In SHADOW/Landscape with Argonauts he uses two texts, one by Edgar Allan Poe, the other by his frequent collaborator, the German playwright Heiner Muller. The former is sung, quite beautifully, by Sussan Deihim and backed by a band including Canadian avant guitarist Rene Lussier and noise drummer Charles Hayward. The Muller text, a surreal combination of quasi-Homeric myth and contemporary political screed, is giving multiple readings by passers-by on the street in Boston. These readings are often rather humorous, as the pedestrians grapple with difficult pronunciations, bizarre imagery and offensive content. When one gentleman comes across the line 'My grandfather was an idiot in Boeotia', he doesn't get far enough to mangle the last word, but instead says, 'No, I can't say that. I love my grandfather!' The stumbling readings, overlaid by passing car engines and sirens, are interwoven with the more strictly musical content, generally separate but sometimes overlapping. It's an interesting idea and succeeds to a point, but one might have wished for a more thorough (and hence chaotic) integration of the two worlds. As is, it's worth a listen for fans of experimental spoken word-music projects."



    Shadow-Landscape with Argonauts

    or

    Shadow-Landscape with Argonauts


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    1. I Laughed at Love 4:16
    2. My Foolish Heart 4:44
    3. I May Be Wrong (But I Think You're Wonderful) 4:31
    4. I Want a Little Boy 4:27
    5. Don't Worry 'Bout Me 4:37
    6. Orange Colored Sky 3:56
    7. Fine and Mellow 7:21
    8. Save Your Love for Me 5:03
    9. The One I Love (Bleongs to Somebody Else) 3:07
    10. Gerogia on My Mind 4:34
    11. My Man 4:02
    12. The Man That Got Away 5:53
    13. Let's Beat out Some Love 4:53
    14. Stardust 4:28
    15. East of the Sun (And West of the Moon) 3:31

    Etta Jones - Vocals
    Houston Person - Sax (Tenor)
    George Devens - Vibraphone
    Stan Hope - Piano
    Cedar Walton - Piano
    George Duvivier - Bass
    Peter Weiss - Bass, Vocals
    Cecil Brooks III - Drums
    Frankie Jones - Drums
    Ralph Dorsey - Percussion

    AMG:
    "An excellent singer who is always worth hearing, Etta Jones grew up in New York and at 16, toured with Buddy Johnson. She debuted on record with Barney Bigard's pickup band (1944) for Black & White, singing four Leonard Feather songs, three of which (including 'Evil Gal Blues') were hits for Dinah Washington. She recorded other songs during 1946-1947 for RCA and worked with Earl Hines (1949-1952). Jones' version of 'Don't Go to Strangers' (1960) was a hit and she made many albums for Prestige during 1960-1965. Jones toured Japan with Art Blakey (1970), but was largely off record during 1966-1975. However, starting in 1976, Etta Jones (an appealing interpreter of standards, ballads, and blues) began recording regularly for Muse, often with the fine tenor saxophonist Houston Person. She died from complications of cancer on October 16, 2001, the day her last album, Etta Jones Sings Lady Day, was released."



    Fine and Mellow/Save Your Love For Me

    or

    Fine and Mellow/Save Your Love For Me


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    1. Pipe Dream 2:27
    2. There's a Chance We Can Make It 2:16
    3. Life is Just a Cher O'Bowlies 2:36
    4. Gloria 6:04
    5. Intermission 1:09
    6. Albert Common is Dead 1:52
    7. Summer is the Man 3:02
    8. Baby, I Want You 2:45
    9. Let's Get Together 3:09
    10. Take My Love 1:53
    11. Rush Hour 2:37
    12. That's All Folks 0:08

    Mike Esposito - Guitar
    Emil Thielhelm - Guitar (Rhythm)
    Ralph Scala - Organ, Vocals
    Ronnie Gilbert - Bass
    Geoff Daking - Drums

    AMG:
    "The Blues Magoos' first album, Psychedelic Lollipop, earned the band a major hit single, '(We Ain't Got) Nothin' Yet,' and in the grand tradition of striking while the iron was hot, the New York-based quintet were back with their second LP, 1967's Electric Comic Book, less than five months later. The sophomore effort is a noticeably more ambitious piece of work than the Magoos' debut, and while psychedelia was a catchphrase more than anything else on the first record, Electric Comic Book sounds trippier and a bit more expansive by comparison (the goofy 'Intermission' tosses in some fairly obvious marijuana and cocaine references which would have been almost unthinkable in 1966, and the drug angle in 'Pipe Dream' isn't exactly subtle). In addition, a few months of playing live had tightened up a combo who already sounded pretty good together, as well as bolstering the confidence in Ralph Scala's vocals and keyboard work and the fuzzy interplay of guitarists Mike Esposito and Emil 'Peppy' Thielhelm. However, the blues and R&B elements that were a large part of Psychedelic Lollipop's strength have faded into the background here (except for a overdone cover of Jimmy Reed's 'Let's Get Together'), and though the band could come up with a respectable pop tune, 'Baby, I Want You' and 'Take My Love' sound like throw-aways that were tossed together quickly to fill out a record not quite 30 minutes long (though 'Take My Love' does have the very memorable line 'Take my love and shove it up your heart'). Psychedelic Lollipop is well short of a classic, but overall it's a stronger and more coherent set of songs than Electric Comic Book, which sounds like the quickly recorded follow-up that it truly was, though it does have moments that suggest the band could have made another album as good as the debut with a bit more time and attention."



    Electric Comic Book

    or

    Electric Comic Book


    0 0


    1. Mare Nostrum 5:56
    2. Principessa 4:37
    3. Eu Nao Existe Sem Voce 2:59
    4. The Seagull 3:20
    5. Que Reste-T Il de Nos Amours? 4:33
    6. Years Ahead 5:07
    7. Sonia's Nightmare 4:05
    8. Chat Pitre 3:02
    9. Valzer del Ritorno 4:26
    10. Open Your Mind 4:07
    11. Liberty Waltz 4:12
    12. Mio Mehmet, Forse il Destino M'Impedirà di Rivederti 4:31
    13. Ma Mère l'Oye 4:30
    14. Para Jobim 3:59
    15. Varvindar Friska 3:11

    Paolo Fresu - Flugelhorn, Trumpet
    Richard Galliano - Accordion, Bandoneon
    Jan Lundgren - Piano

    AMG:
    "Mare Nostrum's biggest surprise isn't its instrumentation - a trio of accordion, trumpet and piano - but how natural the combination sounds in its execution. Of course, Italian trumpeter Paolo Fresu, French accordion player Richard Galliano (who is of Italian offspring), and Swedish pianist Jan Lundgren are well-known, critically praised jazz musicians who have all been known to eschew musical boundaries and defy genre limitations, so the music on Mare Nostrum - an album co-led by all three - shouldn't come as a surprise, nor should its quality, and yet not everybody would have expected such marvelous results. The 15 compositions on the album include originals by all three musicians and several covers, touching upon jazz, tango, classical music, and folk, reinterpreting Charles Trénet ('Que Reste-T-Il de Nos Amours?'), encompassing Antonio Carlos Jobim ('Eu Nao Existo Sem Voce'), and Maurice Ravel ('Ma Mère L'Oye'). There is an almost delightful sense of trust and ease among the three performers, who never take away their bandmates' spotlights, and who find a balance between playfulness and restraint throughout the album. The music is evocative, as if it was the soundtrack to a missing Louis Malle movie, and much of it creates a warm feeling of gentle nostalgia, even on the more up-tempo tracks. Let's hope these musicians meet again to record more music - Mare Nostrum is a precious gem."



    Mare Nostrum

    or

    Mare Nostrum


    0 0


    1. Jour Apres Jour 2:43
    2. Le Roi des Fourmis 3:08
    3. Rosee d'Amour N'A Pas Vu Jour, Rosee d'Amour N'A Pas Eu d'Am 3:08
    4. Ta-Ta-Ta-Ta 2:25
    5. Mes Regrets 3:30
    6. Les Grands Sentiments Humains 2:05
    7. Pipelette 2:49
    8. Ame Caline 3:00
    9. Y'a Qu'un Ch'veu 2:54
    10. Le Bal des Laze 4:56
    11. Oh! Louis 2:30

    AMG:

    "Known for his eccentric nature, French pop songwriter Michel Polnareff created a buzz for himself in the early to mid-'60s when his debut single, 'La Poupée Qui Fait Non,' rocketed to the top of the French charts, but it was his early-'70s release, Polnareff's, that cemented him a place as a legend in French pop. Polnareff was raised in Paris somewhat as a child of the arts, his mother, Simone Lane, being a dancer and his father, Leib Polnareff, a musician who played sideman to many, including Edith Piaf under the name Léo Poll. The two surrounded young Polnareff with music, shaping his ambitions, so it is no surprise that he had learned piano by only five years of age and was writing music by the age of 11.
    After a short stint in the French Army and a few menial jobs, Polnareff embraced his passions and busked the city streets with his guitar to moderate success. In 1965, he refused a recording contract with Barclay, a prize that he won in a songwriting contest, in one of his earliest displays of his now-famous aversion to conformity, but eventually signed to AZ under the direction of his new manager and Radio 1 musical director, Lucien Morisse. 'La Poupée Qui Fait Non' was released in the summer of 1966 and rocketed him up the charts not only in France, but in Germany, Britain, and Spain. The song was the first of a string of hits for Polnareff, but before long, the French press focused almost entirely on his garish stage presence. Being under the scrutiny of the conservative press didn't seem to stop the hits, however, and Polnareff garnered praise from celebrities such as Charles Trenet, but the consistency of attacks began to weigh heavily on him.
    By 1970, his stage costumes had become more flamboyant. The French press began questioning his sexuality, and the constant controversy around the singer came to a head when he was physically assaulted while performing. Not surprisingly, Polnareff canceled the rest of his tour, and shortly after checked into a hospital for depression when he learned that Morisse, his manager, had committed suicide. After five months of treatment, Polnareff bounced back and resumed his hectic recording and touring schedule, but scandal soon followed when he ended up in court due to a campaign for his 1972 tour that was centered around publicity posters bearing Polnareff's naked behind. Polnareff was found guilty of gross indecency and charged 60,000 francs.
    The touring continued through mid-1973 with stops in Polynesia and North America, but upon his return to France, Polnareff found his bank account had been drained by his financial advisor. Polnareff's debt to the French government was over one million francs in unpaid taxes, and with little money in his name, he fled from France to the United States. Unknown in a new country, Polnareff was safely out of the limelight and the reach of the French authorities. He spent more than a decade in the United States before he cleared up his monetary issues with the French government, while in the meantime he recorded for Atlantic and composed movie scores.
    Despite his absence from France, Polnareff's new music remained present in French popular culture and continued to chart through the mid-'80s, until he removed himself entirely from the public eye and quietly returned to France to work on a new album. Kama Sutra finally appeared in the summer of 1990, and the album garnered three French hits. Polnareff remained in France for five more years before returning to the U.S. to perform at the Roxy in Los Angeles. Through the '90s and into the 2000s, he continued to release new material and play occasional shows while residing in the United States."



    Le bal des Laze

    or

    Le bal des Laze


    0 0


    1. Já 5:40
    2. Setkání 5:26
    3. Kdo jsem? 4:09
    4. Svět dzungle 7:45
    5. Zákon 5:08
    6. Opičí národ 1:17
    7. Strach 7:29
    8. Ztracený ráj 4:41
    9. Muz, který se podobá odvrácené straně měsíce 6:46
    10. Neznámé nevpoustěj dál 4:43
    11. V ráji století 5:25
    12. Reklamní suita 2:14
    13. S maskou a bez masky 5:00
    14. To já se vracím 4:40
    15. Ozvěny 2:30
    16. Čím je svět můj 8:42

    Milos Morávek - guitar
    Roman Dragoun - keyboards, vocals
    Pavel Pelc - bass, keyboards, vocals
    Zdeněk Kluka - drums, vocals

    Wiki:
    "Progres 2 is an art-rock band from Brno, the Czech republic. It was established in 1968, known as Progress Organization, by Zdeněk Kluka, Pavel Váně, Jan Sochor and Emanuel Sideridis. Most important album in Czech context was the project of rock opera Dialog s vesmírem (Dialog with The Universe) in 1978, only a year after transformation of the band called Bardonaj to the new band Progres 2. The public presentation of this rock opera was the first audiovisual program of rock music in Czechoslovakia, inspired by the British rock group Pink Floyd. Because this rock band played in the totalitarian state, they had a few troubles with officials. The best known problem was the one with lyrics of one song from the album Dialog s vesmírem. The song was called 'Planeta Hieronyma Bosche' (The Planet of Hieronymus Bosch) where band sings about life on heroin. Censors forbade this song and band solved it out by using only vowels from lyrics. On concerts they of course played whole original lyrics."



    Treti Kniha Dzungli

    or

    Treti Kniha Dzungli


    0 0


    1. White Night 5:00
    2. Garden of Love Light 4:49
    3. Delightful 4:52
    4. First Love 5:51
    5. Meditation 1:42
    6. The Sun Is Dancing 9:33
    7. You Got the Soul 3:17
    8. Saint and the Rascal 4:32
    9. You Are Love 3:11

    Norma Jean Bell - Saxophone, Vocals
    Premik Russell Tubbs - Saxophone
    Bob Knapp - Horn
    Louis Colin - Harp
    Carlos Santana - Guitar
    Jeff Beck - Guitar
    Ray Gomez - Guitar
    Icarus Johnson - Guitar
    Don Mero - Synthesizer
    David Sancious - Keyboards, Sitar (Electric)
    Cisco Houston - Bass, Vocals
    Narada Michael Walden - Drums, Percussion, Keyboards, Vocals
    Sammy Figueroa - Congas, Percussion
    Will Lee - Bass, Vocals
    Patti Scialfa - Vocals
    Carol Shive - Vocals
    Tanima Cynthia Weiss - Vocals

    Wiki:
    "Narada Michael Walden (born Michael Walden on April 23, 1952 in Kalamazoo, Michigan) is an American producer, drummer, singer, and songwriter. He was given the name Narada by guru Sri Chinmoy in the early 1970s and his musical career spans three decades, in which he was awarded several gold, platinum and multi-platinum awards. Walden has also owned and operated Tarpan Studios, a well-known recording studio in San Rafael, California, since the mid-1980s.
    His stage career included appearances with John McLaughlin and the Mahavishnu Orchestra (where he replaced legendary drummer Billy Cobham),[1] Jeff Beck (on Beck's album Wired) and Tommy Bolin Band.
    His first album, Garden of Love Light, was released in 1976 and included the track 'Delightful', song from Tommy Bolin Band setlist. The lone single released from the album, it charted at #81 on the R&B charts in the spring of 1977.
    His 1979 album Awakening peaked at #15 on the R&B charts, spawning a Top 10 hit with 'I Don't Want Nobody Else (To Dance With You)'. Later that year, his album The Dance of Life yielded the Top 5 single 'I Shoulda Loved Ya', which also made the UK Top 10 in 1980. 'Gimme Gimme Gimme', his 1985 duet with Patti Austin, reached #1 in Sweden. In 1988, he scored another UK top 10 hit and a #1 US Dance hit, with 'Divine Emotions' under the name Narada."



    Garden Of Love Light

    or

    Garden Of Love Light


    0 0


    1. Extrait N° 1
    2. Extrait N° 2
    3. Extrait N° 3
    4. Extrait N° 4
    5. Extrait N° 5
    6. Extrait N° 6
    7. Extrait N° 7
    8. Extrait N° 8
    9. Extrait N° 9
    10. Extrait N° 10
    11. Extrait N° 11
    12. Extrait N° 12
    13. Extrait N° 13
    14. Extrait N° 14
    15. Charles De Gaulle

    Dominique Grimaud - synthesisers, guitar, alto saxophone
    Jacky Dupety - tenor saxophone, percussion, vocals
    Jean-Luc Dupety - drums, tuba, trombone, trumpet
    Françoise Crublé - alto saxophone, guitar
    Catherine Lienhart - violin
    Christian Chanet - vocals

    AMG:
    "The French avant-rock Camizole were active for most of the '70s and toured often, and though they were associated with more well known groups like Etron Fou Leloublan and Lard Free, were never able to release an album. The CD consists of tracks recorded live at various dates in 1977, some of which were going to be released by Tapioca before that company folded. Camizole create an improvised form of rock that is very unstructured and free form, and often quite noisy. At times it sounds a bit like Jean Francois Pauvros and Gaby Bizien's No Man's Land, with similar blistering guitar and percussion freak-outs, while other times the group grooves out on rough-hewn rhythms that are no less freaky. Though closer to rock than jazz, the group, who on most tracks are a quartet, throws saxophone, tuba, and flute and some other odd instruments into the mix with the guitars, drums, and synths, and what they lack in chops they more than make up for with energy and creativity. The few vocals mostly consist of percussionist Jacky Dupety yelling off mic barely heard over the din, though 'Charles de Gaulle,' the only piece with a proper title, has some weird singing from Etron Fou sax player Chris Chanet. The 13th cut really stands out, as Camizole veer easily from melodic jazz to total percussion freak-out, to a humorous oompah bit while the crowd cheers ecstatically throughout. The other tracks are slightly less distinct, but certainly there's some amazing stuff here, and it's a very good thing this thing has now been released rather than to be lost in the vaults somewhere forgotten."



    Camizole

    or

    Camizole


    0 0


    1. Szeptember 4:04
    2. New York, New York 4:28
    3. Miért Múlik 4:25
    4. Titkos Szerelem 5:05
    5. A Tegnapi Lány 4:28
    6. Illúziók Nélkül 5:36
    7. Az Utolsó Dominó 3:40
    8. A Küszöbön Túl 4:23
    9. Végállomás 4:46
    10. Take It Easy 5:13
    11. Túl Késő 4:02
    12. A Bulinak Vége 4:50
    13. Várlak Még (Bonus Live Recording) 5:40
    14. Hello Barátom (Bonus Live Recording) 10:05

    Horváth Charlie – Vocals
    Tátrai Tibor – Guitar
    Pálvölgyi Géza – Keyboards
    Kovács Tamás – Bass Guitar
    Papp Tamás – Drums
    Solti János – Drums, Percussion




    New York, New York

    or

    New York, New York


    0 0


    1. Intron 11:23
    2. Som 11:45
    3. Exon 10:49
    4. Ribo 16:24

    Boris Hauf - Saxophones, Synth, Computer
    Billy Roisz - Computer
    Martin Siewert - Electronics, Guitar, Lap Steel Guitar
    Burkhard Stangl - Guitar, Electronics
    Dieb13 - Computer, Turntables

    AMG:
    "Hailing from Vienna, Austria, the electro-acoustic free improv group Efzeg appeared in 1999, just as the avant-garde scene there was taking a most interesting turn. Together with Dachte Musik and Polwechsel it proposed a new approach to live improv based on silence and the blurring of identities in favor of an organic but highly abstract group sound. The group's manifesto states that 'Efzeg does not guarantee that its music will be a source of ‘intense pleasure' to listeners.' Maybe not, but it sure tickles your brain cells (or torture, depending on your relationship with experimental music). Right from the start, Efzeg has been at the cutting-edge of the European avant-garde music.
    Formed by Viennese saxophonist Boris Hauf, Efzeg takes its name from an album he released in 1998 on Extraplatte. But that trio (with Franz Hautzinger and Bertl Mütter) has very little to do in terms of style with the quartet he put together in 1999. He recruited guitarists Martin Siewert (with whom he played in Pull My Daisy) and Burkhard Stangl of the minimalist new music group Polwechsel. Turntablist Dieb 13 (Dieter Kovacic) completed the formation that made its debut in October 1999, recording the music for its first album Grain, released in February 2000 on Durian, the label of Polwechsel's Werner Dafeldecker. Video artist Billy 'Gnu' Roisz joined the group and live performances began to take place around Austria. In June 2001, a concert in Vienna saw the group expand for the occasion to include guests Dafeldecker, Martin Zrost, John Norman, and Joe Williamson. Performances at the Batofar in Paris and the Podewil in Berlin boosted interest in the group. All members are busy with different projects (that often include other musicians from the group), but a second album, Boogie, finally came out in July 2002 on the German label Grob. Its release was followed by a European tour."



    Krom

    or

    Krom


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