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FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | .... | 37 | 38 | (Page 39) | 40 | 41 | .... | 57 | newer

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    AMG:
    "In 1944, producer Norman Granz organized a concert billed as 'Jazz at the Philharmonic' (also JATP) as a fundraiser in Los Angeles. The event, which was recorded, featured Illinois Jacquet, Jack McVea, J.J. Johnson, Shorty Sherock, and a rhythm section with Nat King Cole and Les Paul; Jacquet's playing in particular caused a bit of a sensation. After a few more similar events, Granz in 1946 began organizing extensive annual tours using classic swing and bop musicians in a jam-session setting. Although some critics often complained that these events encouraged grandstanding (R&B honking was getting popular during the era), a great deal of rewarding and exciting music resulted, and Granz recorded (and later released) much of it on his Verve label. He paid his musicians very well and did his best to fight racism every bit of the way. Among JATP's stars through the years were tenors Flip Phillips (whose solo on 'Perdido' became famous), Jacquet, Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young, Ben Webster, and Stan Getz; trumpeters Roy Eldridge, Charlie Shavers, Dizzy Gillespie, and Harry 'Sweets' Edison; trombonists Bill Harris and Tommy Turk; altoists Charlie Parker, Willie Smith, and Benny Carter; pianists Hank Jones and Oscar Peterson; a variety of bassists (often Ray Brown); and drummers Louie Bellson, Gene Krupa, and Buddy Rich. Ella Fitzgerald started touring with JATP early on, usually having her own separate set and joining in on a finale, and later tours often also included performances by regular groups such as the Oscar Peterson Trio, Gene Krupa's combo, Stuff Smith, or Lester Young. After 1957, the annual tours stopped, although there was an attempt to revive JATP in 1967; and Granz kept the spirit of Jazz at the Philharmonic alive on his many jam session-type records for Pablo in the 1970s."



    The First Ten Years 1-2-Scans : The First Ten Years 3-4

    or

    The First Ten Years 1-2-Scans : The First Ten Years 3-4


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    1. Mr. Wiggles 6:43
    2. Rumpofsteelskin 5:34
    3 .(You're a Fish and I'm A) Water Sign 4:41
    4 .Aqua Boogie (A Psychoalphadiscobetabioaquadoloop) 6:40
    5. One of Those Funk Things 3:45
    6. Liquid Sunshine 4:22
    7. The Motor-Booty Affair 5:14
    8. Deep 9:09

    George Clinton - Vocals
    Raymond Davis - Vocals
    Ron Ford - Vocals
    Richard "Kush" Griffith - Horn, Vocals
    Greg Black - Horn
    Benny Cowan - Horn
    Maceo Parker - Horn
    Rick Gardner - Horn
    Greg Thomas - Horn
    Phelps "Catfish" Collins - Guitar
    Garry Shider - Guitar, Vocals
    Michael Hampton - Guitar
    Bernie Worrell - Keyboards, Synthesizer, Vocals
    Bootsy Collins - Bass
    Rodney Curtis - Bass
    Cordell Mosson - Bass
    J.S. Theracon - Bass, Drums, Guitar, Keyboards, Synthesizer, Vocals
    Gary "Mudbone" Cooper - Drums, Vocals
    Tyrone Lampkin - Drums
    Larry Frantangelo - Percussion
    Lynn Mabry - Vocals (Background)
    Mike Payne - Vocals (Background)
    Dawn Silva - Vocals (Background)
    Linda Brown - Vocals (Background)
    Mallia Franklin - Vocals (Background)
    Shirley Hayden - Vocals (Background)
    Larry Heckstall - Vocals (Background)
    Cheryl James - Vocals (Background)
    Robert "P-Nut" Johnson - Vocals (Background)
    Jeanette "Baby" Washington - Vocals (Background)
    Debbie Wright - Vocals (Background)
    Joey Zalabok - Vocals (Background)

    AMG:
    "By this point Parliament was one of the most accomplished and intelligent bands in music. With albums like Mothership Connection and The Clones of Dr. Funkenstein, George Clinton's druggy and patently eccentric humor often obscured the enviable musicianship throughout. Motor Booty Affair is no doubt another classic album and the perfect follow-up to 1977's Funkentelechy Vs. the Placebo Syndrome. On Motor Booty Affair, Clinton decides to yuck it up more with a great underwater concept and a few of his stronger alter egos, including the rhythmically challenged Sir Nose D' Void of Funk and his friend Rumpofsteelskin. The deft and airy 'Mr. Wiggles' has Clinton taking on the persona of Wiggles, the 'DJ of the affair' as he says: 'Mr. Wiggles here on roller skates and a yo-yo/Acting a fool.' The hypnotic 'Rumpofsteelskin' has a great bassline and inventive and infectious background vocals. The closest thing to a ballad here is the astrologically savvy '(You're a Fish and I'm A) Water Sign.' The well-produced 'Aqua Boogie (A Psychoalphadiscobetabioaquadoloop)' with its handclaps and high-pitched basslines basically set the standards for the sound of R&B in the coming decade. The sleeper of the album, 'One of Those Funky Things,' is filled with timbales, congas, and Bernie Worrell's great synth signatures. The last track, 'Deep,' has great, understated riffs from the Horny Horns. Although many Parliament efforts can't be fully appreciated unless the whole catalogue is nearby, Motor Booty Affair stands on its own merits and sustains the laugh throughout."



    Motor Booty Affair

    or

    Motor Booty Affair


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    1 Fire Over Water 5:34
    2 Walk on Hell 8:05
    3 Bollo 3:15
    4 Caminando 6:00
    5 Mira Pa Ca 3:00
    6 Bembe 0:50
    7 Solid Karma 4:47
    8 Sacapa 1:16
    9 Chango 9:09

    George Tacktikes - Guitar, Vocals
    Thomas Alletto - Keyboards, Vocals
    Burlin Speakes - Bass, Vocals
    Pepe Gomez - Drums, Vocals
    Reinol Andino - Percussion, Vocals
    Michael Britton - Percussion

    AMG:
    "Of course, Chango's first LP is a rip-off of Santana's 1970s sound, and if you want to dismiss it on the count of lack of originality, go ahead. What should not be overlooked though is the fact that the group played some very hot salsa jazz-rock. They did not do it better, but they sure did it well. Although not Carlos Santana, George Tacktikos studied the guitarist's playing closely and performs a few strong solos, especially on 'Caminando' and 'Chango.' Thomas Alletto plays a mean organ, and singer Pepe Gomez matches any Santana singer. This first LP blends the raw energy of Abraxas and the subtleties of Caravanserail (maybe with something of Chicago's early pop sensibilities too), while delivering a more poppy and energy-driven charge than what Santana used to do. Side one contains the fiery 'Walk on Hell' and 'Caminando,' truly the group's finest moment. The five songs on side two segue, alternating fast-paced numbers and slow instrumentals in true Santana fashion. 'Solid Karma' stands out. This album was clearly well-produced and thought over, the song order being just right. One could do without the love-making sighs at the end of the last track. The god Chango, explain the liner notes, is 'the representative of unbridled sexuality' - the relentless rhythms of the previous 40 minutes were proof enough. Recommended to fans of early Santana who don't mind plagiarism."



    Chango

    or

    Chango


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    1. Aqualung 7:56
    2. Crosseyed Mary 4:34
    3. Cheap Day Return 1:43
    4. Mother Goose 5:39
    5. Wond'ring Aloud 2:00
    6. Up to Me 3:35
    7. My God 8:27
    8. Hymn 43 4:22
    9. Slipstream 0:59
    10. Locomotive Breath 5:19
    11. Wind-Up 6:40
    12. Riffs - Another Monkey 1:27
    13. Recording the Original 2:05
    14. Choosing My Words with Care 1:17
    15. Hummmmmm 43 0:35
    16. A Different Kettle of Very Different Fish 1:02
    17. But Is It Any Good? 1:42

    Ian Anderson - Flute, Guitar, Vocals
    Martin Barre - Guitar
    Andy Giddings - Keyboards, Organ, Piano
    Jonathan Noyce - Bass
    Doane Perry - Drums, Percussion

    AMG:
    "Each era of rock music has had its own craftily marketed phenomenon - it was the 'live album' in the '70s, 'unplugged' recordings in the '90s, and since the late '80s through the present day, the 'tribute album.' But the early 21st century saw another addition - veteran bands revisiting classic albums and performing them in their entirety. Jethro Tull's most enduring release is largely agreed to be 1971's classic Aqualung, and in late 2004 Ian Anderson, Martin Barre, and their latest Tull mates dusted off the album once more in front of a small audience for XM Radio's Then Again Live series. Since 33 years had passed between the original and the re-reading, the performances on Aqualung Live are slightly more restrained. And while some of Barre's mighty riffs can still be spotted blaring away - most notably the middle bit of 'My God' - other songs get an overhauling, such as the barely recognizable 'Hymn 43.' In addition to revisiting the full album, several interview segments are tacked on at the end of the disc, including some interesting bits about the original recording (it turns out that Led Zeppelin were also recording nearby) and the fact that, despite popular belief, Aqualung was not a concept album. Aqualung Live proves that Anderson and Barre are still at the top of their game, unlike some other 'classic rock' acts whose playing abilities have diminished over the years. Aqualung Live was distributed at shows for free during Tull's U.S. tour in the fall of 2005. Subsequently, it was made available as a special limited-edition release, with all artist and publishing royalties going to charities for the homeless."



    Aqualung Live

    or

    Aqualung Live


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    1. Trial 16:37
    2. Dr. U 12:14
    3. Twilight South West 12:18
    4. Blue Monk 9:02
    5. The Saphire Way 7:16

    Terumasa Hino - Trumpet
    Masabumi Kikuchi - Piano
    James Genus - Bass
    Masahiko Togashi - Percussion

    Wiki:
    "Terumasa Hino (born October 25, 1942 in Tokyo) is a Japanese jazz trumpeter. Currently based in New York, Hino is widely acknowledged as one of Japan's finest jazz musicians.[1] His instruments include the trumpet, cornet and flügelhorn.[2]
    Hino's exposure to music began at a young age, with his father, a step dancer and trumpeter, teaching him tap dancing when he was 4 years old.[2] He soon began performing with the trumpet when he was 9 years old.[2] In the 1950s, Hino began his career as a professional jazz musician; his music being inspired by Fumio Nanri and Hiroshi Sakaue.[3] In 1965, after working with several noted jazz artists, he joined Hideo Shiraki's Quintet, with whom he stayed till 1969, leaving to lead his own band full-time, which he had started in 1964. In 1969, Hino released the album Hi-nology, released to critical acclaim and success,[4] and soon after performed in several jazz festivals and clubs worldwide, such as the Berliner Jazztage in 1971[4] and Munich Jazzclub in 1973, and working with Masabumi Kikuchi in 1974,[2] before settling in New York in 1975.[2]
    Upon settling in New York, Hino worked with numerous artists in the following years, including Joachim Kuhn, Gil Evans, Jackie McLean, Ken McIntyre, Dave Liebman, Hal Galper, Carlos Garnett, Sam Jones and Elvin Jones, as well as leading his own group, which is credited by the jazz guitarist John Scofield for him turning from fusion to jazz. Beginning from the 1980s, Hino spent more time in Japan and helped incorporate several elements such as avant garde and fusion into his music. Since then, he has toured several countries and regions, including Europe in the 1990s. In 1996, he performed again with Masabumi Kikuchi, also performing the session with noted saxophonist Greg Osby."



    Triple Helix

    or

    Triple Helix


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    1. Des profondeurs de l'abîme je crie vers toi... 4:27
    2. Le Christ, ressuscité des morts, ne meurt plus... 6:13
    3. L'heure vient où les morts entendront la voix du Fils de Dieu... 5:03
    4. Ils ressusciteront, glorieux, avec un nom nouveau... 9:15
    5. Et j'entendis la voix d'une foule immense... 7:37
    6. Le tombeau resplendissant 18:13
    7. Hymne 15:02

    Lyon National Orchestra
    Jun Märkl - Conductor

    AMG:
    "Olivier Messiaen composed Et exspecto resurrectionem mortuorum (1964) as a memorial for the dead of the two world wars and imbued the work with feelings of vastness and isolation, fitting for such a profound meditation. Scored for winds and percussion, the piece is constructed in several slow sections, usually built on single lines of wide intervals played in unison, that present a stark vista of desolation that dominates the work. This prolonged mood of grief carries through to the end, in spite of episodes of activity for the gamelan-like percussion and dissonant wind textures that interrupt the sustained threnody. This funereal work is matched up with two earlier Messiaen pieces, Le tombeau resplendissant (1931) and Hymne (1932), both written for full orchestra, which are much more active and vigorous, in dramatic contrast to the main offering. These pieces are as vibrant and colorful as Et exspecto resurrectionem mortuorum is grim and monumental. Jun Märkl and the Orchestra National de Lyon give Et exspecto resurrectionem mortuorum a powerful and controlled reading, but it's evident that there is more for them to do in the filler pieces and more opportunity to display their skills. Newcomers to Messiaen's music may find Et exspecto resurrectionem mortuorum too severe a work to appreciate immediately, but Le tombeau resplendissant and Hymne are both approachable and quite easy to follow."



    Et Exspecto Resurrectionem Mortuorum

    or

    Et Exspecto Resurrectionem Mortuorum


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    1. Vrijeme gospodar 4:48
    2. Zivot nema pravila 3:47
    3. Potop 4:15
    4. Noc kradljivaca 4:12
    5. Zadnja avantura 6:37
    6. Ostavi trag 4:05
    7. Kanin 4:10

    Petar Ugrin - violin, trumpet, vocals
    Janez Boncina - vocals, guitars
    Tihomir Pop Asanovic - organ
    Charley Novak - bass, vocals
    Braco Doblekar - drums, percussion
    Ratko Divjak - drums

    progarchives:
    "September was formed in Ljubljana, Slovenia in 1975 by two veteran mambers of the super-group called Jugoslovenska Pop Selekcija, organist Tihomir Pop ASANOVIC and vocalist/guitar player Janez Boncina. They gathered excellent instrumentalists of the then Yugoslavian jazz and rock scene, Petar Ugrin-trumpet/violin, Ratko Divjak-drums, Karel Charlie Novak-bass and Braco Doblekar-saxophone/percussion, for the first album "Zadnja avantura". In the late 1977 the line-up changed when Ugrin, Novak and Divjak left to be replaced by Marjan Malikovic-guitar, Jadran Ogrin-bass and Nelfi Depanger-drums, who took part in the recording of the second album during their American visit in early 1978. In this period they enjoyed certain popularity due to a radio-friendly hit-singl with the title track of the second album "Domovina moja" (Eng. "My Homeland"). They broke-up in late 1979 and the final members, along with Asanovic, Boncina and Doblekar, included Ante Mazuran-guitar, Dani Ganchev-bass and Tone Dimnik-drums. Both Asanovic and Boncina led parallel solo careers.
    The style of September can be desribed as a mellow form of jazz-rock with accessible and relatively short songs, characterized by distinguished vocals of Boncina and excellent instrumental skills of the band. The first album is recommended to fusion fans, while the second was influenced by American AOR sound of the mid-1970s and is more mainstream oriented."



    Zadnja Avantura

    or

    Zadnja Avantura


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    1. Marcus Garvey 3:26
    2. Slavery Days 3:33
    3. The Invasion 3:19
    4. Live Good 3:12
    5. Give Me 3:09
    6. Old Marcus Garvey 4:01
    7. Tradition 3:30
    8. Jordon River 2:58
    9. Red, Gold and Green 3:12
    10. Resting Place 3:08

    Winston Rodney - lead vocals
    Delroy Hines - harmony vocals
    Rupert Willington - harmony vocals
    +
    Carlton "Sam" Samuels - flute
    Herman Marquis - alto saxophone
    Richard "Dirty Harry" Hall - tenor saxophone
    Bobby Ellis - trumpet
    Vincent "Trommie" Gordon - trombone, clavinet
    Earl "Chinna" Smith - lead guitar
    Valentine "Tony" Chin – rhythm guitar
    Tyrone "Organ D" Downie - piano, organ
    Bernard "Touter" Harvey - piano, organ, clavinet
    Robbie "Rabbi" Shakespeare - bass
    Aston "Family Man" Barrett - bass
    Leroy "Horsemouth" Wallace - drums

    AMG:
    "Marcus Garvey hit Jamaica like a force ten gale, its legacy so great that in later years many fans mistakenly came to believe it was Burning Spear's debut album (it wasn't, two earlier records were released by Studio One). It made an instant hero of Winston Rodney, and the album remains a cornerstone of the entire roots movement. Spear was accompanied by the Black Disciples, a baker's dozen of the island's best musicians, including bassists Robbie Shakespeare and Aston Barrett, guitarists Earl 'Chinna' Smith and Tony Chin, and drummer Leroy Wallace. The Disciples helped the vocal trio bring their vast potential and musical vision to vinyl, one they'd threatened with previous releases, but never quite attained. Producer Jack Ruby's was equally important to the album's sound, gracing it with a deep roots mix that accentuated the haunting atmospheres of the music. Unfortunately, the listener experiences only wisps of that here. The Island subsidiary Mango believed the production too threatening, or at least too commercially inviable, for white audiences, and thus remixed it into what they considered a more palatable form. However, Marcus Garvey is so powerful a record that, even in this diluted state, it remains a masterpiece. If the music itself defined and glorified the roots sound, it was Winston Rodney which gave the movement's philosophy voice. Rodney's vocal talent is actually fairly minimal, his delivery more a chant than actual singing, but his intense passion overcame any deficiencies, with Rupert Willington and Delroy Hinds dulcet backing vocals counterpointing Rodney's rougher tones. A fervid rastafarian, Rodney used Marcus Garvey as a shining torch to light the way to political and religious consciousness. The album's twinned themes of cultural concerns and religious devotion combined to create a powerfully intertwined message of faith and political radicalism. 'No-one remember old Marcus Garvey,' Spear sing at the beginning of 'Old Marcus Garvey'; by the time the song's over, it's unlikely anyone will forget again. These musical mnemonics of Jamaica's past heroes and history, which include the hit title track, of course, 'Slavery Days,' another Jamaican hit, and 'The Invasion' are amongst the album's strongest tracks, with the three devotional numbers equally inspiring. Oppression may be the fate of many Jamaicans, both past and present, but by giving voice to those trampled by poverty, slavery, or politics, Spear's underlying message remains one of hope."



    Marcus Garvey

    or

    Marcus Garvey


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    1. Every Tub 4:28
    2. Understanding Depression 6:10
    3. Black Bottom Stomp 2:35
    4. Transblucency 3:30
    5. Room 608 5:07
    6. Solar Complexes 4:21
    7. Very Early 6:47
    8. King Porter Stomp 3:10
    9. His Master's Voice 7:38
    10. Skipping Tune 6:45
    11. Stompin' at the Savoy 5:03
    12. Lady of the Lavender Mist 3:34
    13. Confirmation 3:27
    14. Blues for O.P. 6:33
    15. I Mean You 4:30
    16. Struttin' With Some Barbeque 2:23

    Dennis Anderson - Clarinet, Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor)
    Gregory Herbert - Sax (Alto), Sax (Soprano)
    Lawrence Feldman - Sax (Alto)
    Lee Konitz - Sax (Alto)
    Arnie Lawrence - Sax (Alto)
    Joe Romano - Sax (Tenor)
    Sal Nistico - Sax (Tenor)
    John Clark - French Horn
    Tom Harrell - Flugelhorn, Trumpet
    Kenny Berger - Trumpet
    Danny Hayes - Trumpet
    Mike Lawrence - Trumpet
    Tom Maxwell - Trumpet
    Gerry Chamberlain - Trombone
    Jimmy Knepper - Trombone
    Rod Levitt - Trombone
    Joe Randazzo - Trombone
    Steve Brown - Guitar
    Bill Evans - Piano
    Benny Aronov - Piano
    Chuck Israels - Bass
    Lisle Atkinson - Bass
    Steve Gilmore - Bass
    Bill Goodwin - Drums
    Gil Evans - Orchestration

    AMG:
    "Chuck Israels directs the National Jazz Ensemble on this collection of three fine LPs recorded in 1975 and 1976. The repertory ensemble plays 16 compositions that are a testament to the group's technical, creative, and orchestral excellence. Included are such classics as Count Basie's 'Every Tub,' which was written in 1938. The ensemble plays it as an archetypical riff arrangement, loosely structured and full of trademarks from the Basie band of the period. Also included is Jelly Roll Morton's 'Black Bottom Stomp,' written in 1926 and music that still expresses itself directly to the listener today. The National Jazz Ensemble undertakes everything from early Ellington through Bill Evans with the utmost sense of improvisational styles from earlier jazz periods, while employing solos and accompaniment that are more recent to ourselves. Horace Silver's 'Room 608' is driving and solidly structured, while 'Solar Complexes,' written by Chuck Israels, is based on the chord changes and some melodic ideas structured in alternating sections for soloist and ensemble. Overall, this is a tightly orchestrated version of some of America's most innovative music that has stood the test of time."



    The National Jazz Ensemble (1975-1976)

    or

    The National Jazz Ensemble (1975-1976)


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    1. O Berimbau 18:58
    2. Vozes (Saudades) 3:14
    3. Ondas (Na Ohlos de Petronila) 7:53
    4. Cego Aderaldo 10:32
    5. Dado 3:36

    Naná Vasconcelos - Berimbau, Gong, Percussion, Voices
    Radio Symphony Orchestra of Stuttgart
    Mladen Gutesha - Conductor
    Egberto Gismonti - Guitar (4)

    AMG:
    "This 1979 recording is probably Afro-experimentalist Vasconcelos' finest. It presents his various facets - berimbao playing, intricate overlain vocals, fine percussion, even gorgeous guitar - simply and almost overwhelmingly. This is one of those performances that remind one to never let natural dogmatism get too out of hand."



    Saudades

    or

    Saudades


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    1. Pensiero 3:43
    2. Un Caffè da Jennifer 4:17
    3. Tutto alle Tre 3:23
    4. Terra Desolata 2:35
    5. A un Minuto dall'Amore 3:54
    6. Tanta Voglia di Lei 4:16
    7. Che Favola Sei 2:53
    8. Il Primo e l'Ultimo Uomo 3:39
    9. Alle Nove in Centro 3:19
    10. Opera Prima 5:37

    Dody Battaglia - voce, chitarra
    Roby Facchinetti - voce, pianoforte, tastiera
    Riccardo Fogli - voce, basso
    Valerio Negrini - voce, batteria, percussioni

    progarchives:
    "I Pooh, or Pooh for short, are like the Rolling Stones of Italian popular music. One of music's longest continuously running acts, they formed in Bologna in 1964. Like other groups of the 'beat' generation their music consisted of American and English pop covers sung in Italian. The original band was composed of # Valerio Negrini (Drums)
    Bob Gillot (Keyboards), Gilberto Faggioli ( Bass Guitar ), Mario Goretti (Guitar), and Mauro Bertoli (Guitar). As the 60's wore down and the Italian music scene began to find it's own voice Pooh gravitated toward a more... melodic pop. The group had some line-up changes during these years with the the definitive Pooh line up taking form. Roby Facchinetti (voice and keyboards) joined in 1966 replacing Gillot. Red Canzian (voice and electric bass joined 1973 replacing Riccardo Fogli who had replaced Faggioli in 1966. In 1967 , Mauro Bertoli left the group. In September 1968, Dodi Battaglia (voice and guitars) joined the group, when Mario Goretti left the band. Finally in 1971, following Valerio's departure, the band recruited Stefano D'Orazio, the drummer of the Naufraghi. The line-up of Facchinetti, Battaglia, D'Orazio, and Canzianhas been together since 1973 with exception of some albums in the early to mid 70's staying in the vein of pop music.
    Much of the Pooh's music is not really of interest of proggresive rock fans. However there was a period when even the most successful of the purveyors of melodic pop where drawn in the progressive rock boom that swept all of Italy in the early 70's. The Pooh's detour into prog was brought on by the addition of Canzian who had a keen interest in progressive rock and had been guitarist of Capsicum Red before taking over the bass chair in Pooh. Pooh released a series of albums in the 70's that are of keen interest to those who have a deep interest in progressive rock. In fact.... some of their albums have been hailed as 'masterpieces' OF Italian progressive rock and for years were HIGHLY sought after by collectors of Italian progressive rock recordings of the 70's in the dark days before many of the albums were available again for us relatively easily. Albums such as Opera Prima, Parsifal, and Un po' del nostro tempo migliore are where the prog fan's should look first.
    The group well is recommended for completionsts of Italian progressive rock and those who like their prog on the .... melodic and orchestrated side. I have these albums and find them to be an interesting listen and are quite highly recommended."



    Opera Prima

    or

    Opera Prima


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    1. Introduction/Giant/Cogs in Cogs/Proclamation 9:31
    2. Funny Ways 8:47
    3. The Runaway/Keyboard Solo/Experience 10:40
    4. Knots/Guitar Acoustic Duet Solo/The Advent of Panurge/Recorder Quartet 13:59
    5. Nothing at All/Plain Truth 27:47

    Derek Shulman - vocals
    Gary Green - guitars
    Kerry Minnear- keyboards, vocals
    Ray Shulman - bass, guitars, vocals
    John Weathers- drums, vocals

    AMG:
    "No one will argue: The legendary progressive rock band Gentle Giant was at its best in 1974. Re-energized by the success of their latest LP The Power and the Glory, the band's live show took a new life. Recorded November 11, 1974, in Rome, Live Rome 1974 is an attempt at capturing this energy. This CD is an 'official bootleg.' Sound quality is average at best, very poor in the worst moments (the first track, 'Introduction/Giant/Cogs in Cogs/Proclamation,' is plagued with sound level variations, speed variations, and master tape alterations - and doesn't contain 'Giant'). Mixing is non-existent and some instruments come in tremendously loud while others are buried (getting to the acoustic guitar duet, you'll have the raise the volume). So it comes down to the performance, which is in the band's stronger-than-average range for that period. The set list shares similarities with Gentle Giant's 'real' live album Playing the Fool: the In a Glass House and Octopus medleys are quite the same, 'Funny Ways' is just another version of that tune. The most interesting part is the half-hour segment of 'Nothing at All' and 'Plain Truth,' which includes a drum solo and a violin solo. But let it be clear that because of its flawed sound Live Rome 1974 should only be considered by devoted fans. Others should start with Playing the Fool."



    Live Rome

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    Live Rome


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    1. Fata Morgana 4:48
    2. Magic Birds 4:52
    3. Body and Soul 7:09
    4. Heavy Skies 5:01
    5. Toward Higher Lights 4:31
    6. Elevation 3:58
    7. Combinations 6:04

    Roman Kunsman - Sax (Alto)
    Phil Clendeninn - Flute, Keyboards
    Alex Blake - Bass
    Gerry "The Gov" Brown - Drums
    Badal Roy - Tabla

    AMG:
    "In the new liner notes that he wrote for Heavy Skies in 2003, producer Hank O'Neal attributes the late Roman Kunsman's lack of commercial success to the fact that he 'was never in the right place at the right time.' O'Neal speaks the truth; although Kunsman was a talented alto saxophonist, flutist, and composer, he never received the sort of break that would have made him better known in the jazz world. Regrettably, Heavy Skies went unreleased for 24 years. O'Neal and George Avakian co-produced the album in 1979, and jazz critic Nat Hentoff was hired to write the liner notes. But for various reasons, Heavy Skies didn't come out until 2003 - the year after Kunsman's death. It isn't hard to see why O'Neal and Avakian believed in the Russian-Jewish improviser; Kunsman was an expressive soloist whose jazz playing was informed by the Euro-classical, Jewish, and folk traditions of Eastern Europe. Kunsman, in fact, was quite capable of playing traditional Jewish music, but he sticks to a jazz-oriented approach on this intriguing CD. Heavy Skies has one foot in advanced post-bop and the other in fusion; Kunsman draws on the '60s post-bop of Eric Dolphy, John Coltrane, and Rahsaan Roland Kirk as well as the electric fusion of Weather Report and post-1968 Miles Davis. And having all those post-bop influences makes perfect sense when you consider that traditional Jewish music involves modal playing - there are definite parallels between klezmer music and Coltrane's early-'60s explorations. Although Kunsman pieces like 'Elevation' and 'Magic Birds' tend to be cerebral and abstract, the musician's soulfulness comes through. Nonetheless, this is music that must be accepted on its own terms, and Heavy Skies offers rewards to those who aren't afraid of some abstraction."



    Heavy Skies

    or

    Heavy Skies


    0 0


    Trombone Concerto
    1. Movement 1 11:07
    2. Movement 2 7:07
    3. Movement 3 11:42

    Gorgon, for orchestra
    4. 1. Stheno 5:37
    5. 1. ...Perseus Spell 1 0:44
    6. 2. Euryale 4:58
    7. 2. ...Perseus Spell 2 0:47
    8. 3. Medusa 5:20

    9. Iscariot, for chamber orchestra 14:18

    Joseph Alessi - Trombone
    Marin Alsop - Conductor
    Colorado Symphony Orchestra

    AMG:
    "Among contemporary composers of orchestral music, Christopher Rouse is a prominent figure, noted for his extremely virtuosic scores as well as for his dark subject matter. Such fantastic - some might say nightmarish - pieces as the ultra-violent Gorgon (1984) and the enigmatic Iscariot (1989) are true to form in their evocation of mythology or religion, and even the elegiac Trombone Concerto (1991) has its suggestions of otherworldly things, particularly in its quotation of Leonard Bernstein's 'Kaddish' Symphony and the haunting, dirge-like adaptation of the folk song Tsintskaro at the opening of the third movement. Yet Rouse's music is much more than its allusions, however meaningful, and it's possible to enjoy these works for their raw power and ethereal beauty without knowing anything about their references. The Trombone Concerto is a tour de force for the instrument, particularly in the ferociously fast second movement, and Gorgon is relentless in its savage rhythms and terrifying drive; the outer movements of the concerto and Iscariot provide some of the most profound and moving music Rouse has ever produced. Trombonist Joseph Alessi and the Colorado Symphony Orchestra, directed by Marin Alsop, deliver exciting and technically impeccable performances on this 1997 release on RCA, and the sound quality is exceptionally clear and focused, even in passages where the music is soft and intentionally blurred for effect."



    Trombone Concerto/Gorgon/Iscariot

    or

    Trombone Concerto/Gorgon/Iscariot


    0 0


    1. I'm So Glad
    2. You Got Me Floating
    3. Sueno
    4. Sky Pilot
    5. Fire
    6. You Can't Win
    7. Virgin
    8. Tell The World I'm ALive
    9. Yellow Sea Days (March 7th, 8th, 9th)
    10. Jews Caboose
    11. A Place In Time _You And ME_
    12. Simple
    13. Meshkalina
    14. Last Song

    Jean Pierre Magnet - Tenor saxophone, flute, percussion
    Manuel Sanguinetti - lead singer, percussion
    Willy Barclay - lead & acoustic guitar, vocals
    Freddy Rizo Patron - rhythm guitar, vocals
    Willy Thorne - bass, organ, piano, vocals
    Luis Nevares - drums, vibraphone, percussion

    AMG:
    "A popular Peruvian rock group in the late 1960s and early 1970s, Traffic Sound had a very British-influenced early progressive rock sound along the lines of Traffic and (more distantly) Jethro Tull. These similarities were evident in the band's use of flute and saxes, all played by Jean Pierre Magnet, who could also play vibes and percussion. What is surprising is that Traffic Sound, unlike other South American groups of the period that only came to light in the Northern Hemisphere in the 1990s, do not sound exotic or primitive. They simply sound like an accomplished minor-league 1970 rock band with considerable progressive, psychedelic, and soul influences informing their original material. There's a Latin feel to some of the rhythmic percussive grooves, sure, but no more, really, than you would find in a cut like Traffic's 'Feelin' Alright.' They disbanded in 1972 after four albums; some of their material found US release in 1997."



    Traffic Sound 1968-1969

    or

    Traffic Sound 1968-1969


    0 0


    1. (Come on Baby) Let the Good Times Roll 2:37
    2. I Know You Rider 3:13
    3. Moanin' at Midnight 4:57
    4. Hey Baby 2:50
    5. Down on Me 2:45
    6. Whisperman 1:46
    7. Women Is Losers 3:48
    8. Blow My Mind 2:34
    9. Oh My Soul 2:34
    10. Ball and Chain 6:43
    11. Coo Coo 2:30
    12. Gutra's Garden 4:36
    13. Harry 0:37
    14. Hall of the Mountain King 6:51

    Janis Joplin - Vocals
    James Gurley - Guitar
    Sam Andrew - Guitar
    Peter Albin - Bass, Vocals
    David Getz - Drums

    AMG:
    "Recorded on July 28, 1966, before the band had cut any studio material, this performance was one of Janis Joplin's first gigs with Big Brother. The sound is decent, with several famous staples of their repertoire already in place: 'Down on Me,''Coo-Coo,' and 'Ball and Chain.' Yet, in comparison with their best studio and live recordings from 1967 and 1968, this is a bit limp. Big Brother was never noted for their polish, but made up for that with reckless bravado; however, that's largely missing at this juncture in their development, which finds them sounding somewhat tentative in their adaptation of R&B and garage band ethos to heavy guitar arrangements. Big Brother was never noted for their songwriting ability either, and this set is pretty reliant on R&B staples like 'Let the Good Times Roll' and 'I Know You Rider'; the unabashedly psychedelic workout 'Gutra's Garden' hasn't aged well at all. Joplin's vocals are fairly strong, but these early versions of 'Down on Me' and, especially, 'Ball and Chain' don't hold a candle to her performances of the same tunes at the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival. Other members of the band take the lead vocal on a few numbers, emphatically proving - as they always did when given a chance - that Joplin was necessary to put them on the map. This show is an interesting glimpse into the group's formative days, though, and features eight songs not on their late-'60s albums."



    Live In San Francisco

    or

    Live In San Francisco


    0 0


    1. In the Beginning 6:53
    2. Restoration 8:59
    3. Gymnopédie No. 1 3:55
    4. Come Ye Disconsolate 5:21
    5. Airegin 5:32
    6. Moment's Notice 6:56
    7. Reconciliation 10:08
    8. Mean Lene 15:28

    Hubert Laws - Flute
    Ronnie Laws - Sax (Tenor)
    Gene Bertoncini - Guitar
    David Friedman - Percussion, Vibraphone
    Richard Tee - Organ
    Rodgers Grant - Piano
    Hilary James - Piano
    Bob James - Piano
    Clare Fischer - Keyboards
    Ron Carter - Bass
    Steve Gadd - Drums
    Airto Moreira - Percussion
    Emanuel Vardi - Viola
    David Nadien - Violin
    George Ricci - Cello

    AMG:
    "This double album features flutist Hubert Laws at his finest. The music ranges from classical-oriented pieces to straight-ahead jazz with touches of '70s funk included in the mix. The supporting cast includes keyboardist Bob James on most tracks, guitarist Gene Bertoncini, bassist Ron Carter, drummer Steve Gadd, three strings, and Hubert's brother Ronnie on tenor (his solo on John Coltrane's 'Moment's Notice' is arguably Ronnie's best ever on record). Whether it be works by Satie or Sonny Rollins, this recording is one of the most rewarding of Hubert Laws' career."



    In The Beginning

    or

    In The Beginning


    0 0


    1. Piano Avant-Garde 5:10
    2. Mark Jacobs 1:26
    3. Mark Jacobs 2:12
    4. Very Heroin 2:07
    5. Beta-Meditating 5:04
    6. Trip (StutteRing) 0:54
    7. ArchitectonicaUdioparachute 4:49
    8. Distorted 3:30

    Akio Mokuno - Sampling
    Yoshida Tatsuya - Drums (8)

    spiraloop:
    "Akio Mokuno is an electronic music composer, a sound engineer and a noise performer. After exploring psychedelic rock in Japan, he moved to New York in 1994 and joined the Post No Wave/Noise band, Electoputas as a bass and voice performer. In the late 90’s, he performed as a sampler improviser and jam with various free jazz/experimental musicians and visual artists, such as Damo Suzuki, Sabir Marteen, Tatsuya Yoshida, 99Hooker, and Benton C Bainbridge. He also worked with Nou dancer/ film director, Toshi Hamada by mixing sound collage of traditional Japanese and Balinese sounds. Gerard Malanga once called him 'a remarkable and multidimensional talent – a true avant-gardiste of the first order."



    ArchitectonicaUdioparachute

    or

    ArchitectonicaUdioparachute


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