Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | .... | 33 | 34 | (Page 35) | 36 | 37 | .... | 57 | newer

    0 0


    1. Mon Coeur Balance 2:10
    2. Copenhague 2:21
    3. La Joueuse 1:30
    4. Le Jardin Anglais 2:17
    5. Le Manteau de Fourrure 1:38
    6. Le Jardin Botanique 1:51
    7. Le Coup de Feu 2:26
    8. Le Plus Beau Jour de Ma Vie 2:02
    9. Parlez-Vous Anglais Mr. Katerine? 2:17
    10. L' Homme Invisible 2:16
    11. Les Grands Magasins 2:57
    12. Chanson des Jours Bénis 2:31
    13. Entre Nous 1:50
    14. Les Pays Lointains 2:15
    15. Vacances À l'Hôpital 1:34
    16. Lorsque Je Dors 1:52

    Philippe Katerine - Chant
    Geoffray Tamisier - Trumpet
    Philippe Eveno - Guitar
    Nicolas Moreau - Synthesizer
    Anthony Ka - Drums
    Valérie Leulliot - Choeurs

    AMG:
    "Philippe Katerine, generally known simply as Katerine, is a French alternative singer/songwriter who emerged to underground acclaim in the mid-'90s and steadily gained commercial success in subsequent years as his renown grew. Born Philippe Blanchard on December 8, 1968, in Chantonnay, Vendée, he made his full-length commercial recording debut in 1991 with Les Mariages Chinois on the Rosebud label. A home-recorded lo-fi album comprised of one- or two-minute minimalist songs, Les Mariages Chinois proved highly influential and was reissued with bonus material in 1993 as Les Mariages Chinois et la Relecture. Subsequent albums L'Éducation Anglaise (1994), Mes Mauvaises Fréquentations (1996), Les Créatures (1997), and L'Homme à Trois Mains (1999) solidified Katerine's reputation as a leading light of the French indie pop scene. His reputation was further enhanced by a variety of collaborations; most notably, he wrote an entire album for Anna Karina, Historie d'Amour (2000). By the turn of the century, Katerine's fan base had grown to the point where he began hitting the French albums chart with regularity, beginning with 8ème Ciel (2002). His mainstream breakthrough came in 2005 with Robots Après Tout, which reached the Top 30 of the French albums chart and spawned the Top 40 hit single 'Louxor J'adore.' Thanks to the popularity of 'Louxor J'adore' and the follow-up single '100% V.I.P.,' Robots Après Tout spent nearly two years on the French albums chart, logging 97 weeks in total. In the wake of his mainstream breakthrough, the album Studiolive (2007), essentially a re-recording of Robots Après Tout done live in the studio, was released in a couple different formats, one of which included a lengthy DVD. His self-titled release in 2010 was accompanied by videos for each track - directed by his friend and bassist Gaëtan Chestnut - which combined the wonderful imagery Katerine had created with the visuals captured by Chestnut. In 2011, he embarked on a triple album project with a jazz band formed by saxophonist François Ripoche. The album, 52 Reprises dans l'Espace, consisted of 52 cover versions of songs by artists such as Pierre Bachelet and Phenomenal Club. In addition to his musical output, Katerine established himself as a talented actor after the turn of the century, appearing in numerous films."



    Mes Mauvaises

    or

    Mes Mauvaises


    0 0


    1. Windowsill of love
    2. Between today and tomorrow
    3. Silent Love
    4. Blue Eyes (On this little star)
    5. Now, to a friend
    6. Yet out of darkness (Naka)
    7. Give me a chance
    8. Circus blue sky
    9. Frisbee memories
    10. Beyond the 800 million light-years

    1. Say hello to sadness
    2. I Love You
    3. Mutousu
    4. Sad parting day
    5. I must give thanks to God
    6. Windowsill of love
    7. Season have Setsuna
    8. Rain
    9. Would you like to you
    10. Answering machine
    11. Someday Somewhere

    Kazuo Zaitsu - vocals, guitar, keyboard
    Tatsuya Himeno - vocals, keyboard, guitar
    Toshiyuki Abe - guitar
    Akio Yoshida - bass
    Masatoshi Ueda - drums

    Wiki:
    "...Sometimes also beginning in the late sixties, but mostly active in the seventies, are musicians mixing rock music with American-style folk and pop elements, usually labelled 'folk' by the Japanese because of their regular use of the acoustic guitar. This includes bands like Off Course, Tulip, Alice (led by Shinji Tanimura), Kaguyahime, Banban, and Garo..."



    Someday Somewhere

    or

    Someday Somewhere


    0 0


    1. Dona da Casa Boa Noite
    2. Bloco da Madrugada
    3. Volta Por Cima
    4. Cha de Louro
    5. Nao Posso Parar de Cantar
    6. Copo de Saudade
    7. Sexta-Feira DePois Do Carnaval
    8. Passista Regra 3
    9. Mao Amiga
    10. Sambista Apaixonado
    11. Zombou de Mim
    12. Cadeira de Bar

    AMG:
    "Launcher of several classics of Brazilian popular music, Noite Ilustrada recorded many albums in his prolific career, having success with 'A Flor e o Espinho' (Nelson Cavaquinho/Guilherme de Brito/Alcides Caminha), 'O Neguinho e a Senhorita' (Noel Rosa de Oliveira/Abelardo da Silva), 'Depois do Carnaval' (Jorge Costa/Paulo Roberto), 'Sim' (Cartola/Osvaldo Martins), 'Barracão' (Luís Antônio/Oldemar Magalhães), and 'Balada NO 7 - Mané Garrincha' (Alberto Luís). Moving to Rio de Janeiro in the mid-'50s, Noite Ilustrada joined the Portela samba school. Still in that decade, he moved to São Paulo, where worked in nightclubs as a singer and was hired in 1958 by Rádio Nacional and TV Paulista. Noite Ilustrada recorded his first album in that year, with the samba 'Cara de Boboca' (Jaime Silva/Edmundo Andrade) and 'Castiguei.' He would only have a hit four years later with Paulo Vanzolini's samba 'Volta Por Cima,' turned into a classic that was re-recorded several times. The first LP also came that year, O Ilustre."



    Noite Ilustrada

    or

    Noite Ilustrada


    0 0


    1. Waitin 7:54
    2. Rallier 6:31
    3. The Current Underneath 9:07
    4. Pumbum 6:02
    5. The Whimbler 8:16
    6. Spektiv 5:59
    7. Curlycue 11:30
    8. In the Distance 3:54
    9. Kimkwella 5:46

    Ellery Eskelin - Sax (Alto), Sax (Tenor)
    Herb Robertson - Trumpet
    Mark Helias - Bass
    Gerry Hemingway - Drums

    AMG:
    "The music on drummer Gerry Hemingway's The Whimbler is consistently fascinating and intriguing. All four musicians essentially operate as equals and, although the music is technically 'avant-garde,' there is no shortage of improvised melodies, rhythmic patterns, and close group interplay. The musicians listen closely to each other and are not afraid to develop the group improvisations, display wit, or echo each other's ideas. There is a point to each song and each minute of each song, even though the music is never predictable. Trumpeter Herb Robertson and tenor saxophonist Ellery Eskelin constantly play off each other, bassist Mark Helias pushes the horns, and Hemingway, who contributed all of the originals, is subtle (using space expertly) but forceful. The Whimbler is a classic of its kind, modern jazz for the early 21st century."



    The Whimbler

    or

    The Whimbler


    0 0


    1. Jailbamboozle 3:06
    2. Lady You're Nasty 4:40
    3. One to Beam Up 2:05
    4. Avatar 5:00
    5. Old Judge Jones 4:56
    6. Baby Sweet Baby 5:35
    7. What's It Gonna Be 3:27
    8. Zorro Rides Again 5:50
    9. I Remember 7:01

    Les Dudek - Guitar, Vocals
    Alan Feingold - Keyboards
    David Paich - Keyboards
    David Sancious - Keyboards
    Ted Straton - Keyboards
    Joachim Jymm Young - Keyboards
    Gerald Johnson - Bass
    Robert "Pops" Popwell - Bass
    Chuck Rainey - Bass
    Jeff Porcaro - Drums
    Tony Williams - Drums
    Pat Murphy - Percussion
    Reymondo - Percussion
    Kevin Calhoun - Percussion
    Clydie King - Vocals
    Rebecca Louis - Vocals
    Sherlie Matthews - Vocals

    AMG:
    "Guitarist Les Dudek has played with some of rock and pop's biggest names (Stevie Nicks, Steve Miller, Dave Mason, Cher, Boz Scaggs, and the Allman Brothers Band, among others), in addition to issuing solo albums on his own. Born on August 2, 1957, in Rhode Island, Dudek began playing guitar at the age of 11 (first inspired by such pop hitmakers as Elvis Presley and the Beatles), and only three years later, would sneak into bars to play with bands. It was during his teenaged years that Dudek discovered such blues masters as Freddie, Albert, and B.B. King, as well as such then-modern day blues rockers as Paul Butterfield and Steve Miller. By the early '70s, Dudek was residing in Florida, playing in the obscure group Power, whose keyboard player was friends with the Allman Brothers' Dickey Betts. Soon a friendship was struck up between Betts and Dudek, as Betts contemplated forming a side band in addition to his Allman duties. The duo cut some demos, but the group was disbanded when work on the Allman's classic Brothers and Sisters album got underway. But Dudek was present for the recording sessions, laying down some guitar lines alongside Betts on 'Ramblin' Man' and helping co-write one of the Allman's best-known songs, 'Jessica' (for which Dudek also played on).
    After his brief detour with the Allman Brothers, Dudek signed on with Boz Scaggs, playing with him for five years and appearing on the 1976 release Silk Degrees. Dudek became friends with one of his main guitar influences during this time, Steve Miller, leading to a co-headlining tour between Scaggs and Miller, which saw Dudek appearing with both artists each night. (Miller would subsequently record a few of Dudek's original compositions, including 'Sacrifice' for his Book of Dreams release, while Dudek also played on Miller's Fly Like an Eagle album.) A planned acoustic tour with just Dudek and Miller was shelved at the last minute, as Dudek returned for a tour with Scaggs. With all this activity, Dudek still found time to sign a solo deal with Columbia Records, issuing four albums between 1976 and 1981 - 1976's self-titled debut, 1977's Say No More, 1978's Ghost Town Parade, and 1981's Gypsy Ride - as well as launching the DFK Band (which saw Dudek joined by keyboardist Mike Finnigan and guitarist Jim Krueger), who issued a lone, self-titled release in 1979.
    Dudek also played with Cher briefly in the early '80s, as the famous singer attempted to launch a rock-based outfit, Cher & Black Rose, which failed to get off the ground due to record label turmoil. Cher launched her successful movie acting career shortly thereafter and even helped Dudek land a bit part in 1985's Mask as a boyfriend (Cher and Dudek demoed a song for the movie which has remained unissued). Dudek then guested on Stevie Nicks' 1985 release, Rock a Little, and was the guitarist on the album's ensuing tour. The '90s saw Dudek return to his blues roots, as he appeared on Steve Miller's back-to-basics release, 1993's Wide River, and issued his fifth solo release overall, 1994's Deeper Shade of Blues."



    Say No More

    or

    Say No More


    0 0


    1. Outer Stopper 5:19
    2. Harpy 4:42
    3. Hot AX 6:53
    4. Nowhere House 7:22
    5. We Have No Banana!! 3:56
    6. Afirah Majimn 7:35
    7. Dogged Dog 4:56
    8. Rumba Delacantilado 6:59
    9. Black Jack 7:09

    Kazutoki Umezu - alto sax, clarinet
    Natsuki Kido - guitar
    Takeharu Hayakawa - bass
    Joe Trump - drums

    .progarchives:
    "Kazutoki Umezu spent much of the 1970's developing his saxophone chops and his eclectic jazz/rock syyle in New York City, playing with artsists like Lester Bowie and Sunny Murray. In the 1990's he worked with artists in the Knitting Factory crowd with his bands First Deserter and Eclecticism.
    In 1999, preparing for a tour of Africa, Umezu created the Kiki Band (the first ki comes from the Swahili work kipara which means bald head, the second from kinyonga or chameleon). And this bald chameleon lives up to the title, playing a mixture of rock, jazz, prog, funk, avant-garde, and even klezmer music, always in a bold, aggressive style."



    Demagogue

    or

    Demagogue


    0 0
  • 02/19/13--05:54: America in Musikladen, 1975

  • 0 0


    1. Riverside 3:02
    2. Sandman 5:03
    3. Three Roses 3:54
    4. Children 3:07
    5. A Horse With No Name 4:10
    6. Here 5:30
    7. I Need You 3:04
    8. Rainy Day 3:00
    9. Never Found the Time 3:50
    10. Clarice 4:00
    11. Donkey Jaw 5:17
    12. Pigeon Song 2:17

    Gerry Beckley - Bass, Guitar, Piano, Vocals
    Dan Peek - Bass, Guitar, Piano, Vocals
    Dewey Bunnell - Drums, Guitar, Vocals
    +
    David Lindley - Guitar
    Kim Haworth - Drums
    Dave Attwood - Drums
    Ray Cooper - Bell Tree, Percussion

    AMG:
    "America's debut album is a folk-pop classic, a stellar collection of memorable songs that would prove influential on such acts as the Eagles and Dan Fogelberg. Crosby, Stills & Nash are the group's obvious stylistic touchstone here, especially in the vocal harmonies used (compare the thick chordal singing of 'Sandman' and 'Children' to CS&N's 'You Don't Have to Cry' and 'Guinevere') and the prominent use of active strummed acoustic guitar arrangements (contrast 'Riverside' to CS&N's 'Suite: Judy Blue Eyes'). America's intricate interplay of acoustic guitar textures is more ambitious than that of their influences, however. Performance quality is usually good, though on occasion sloppily executed or out of tune (especially on the openings to 'Donkey Jaw' and 'I Never Found the Time'). Lengthy instrumental introductions ('Donkey Jaw'), middle improvisatory interludes ('Here'), and closings ('Clarice') are frequently encountered. Most of these selections boast highly unusual and inventive chord progressions that work well without drawing undue attention to themselves. Lyrics are sometimes trite ('I need you/Like the flower needs the rain') or obscure ('He flies the sky/Like an eagle in the eye/Of a hurricane that's abandoned'), but the music more than makes up for any verse problems; only the odd 'Pigeon Song' seems an unsalvageable misstep. Sound quality here has a covered, intimate feel that lends a ghostly aura to this release. Chart hits from this album include the spectrally loping 'A Horse with No Name,' the squarishly tuneful 'I Need You,' and the nervously dour 'Sandman.' Other highlights include the buoyantly charming 'Three Roses,' the yearningly lovely 'Rainy Day,' and the quietly ringing 'Clarice.' In spite of its flaws, this platter is very highly recommended."



    America

    or

    America


    0 0


    1. Les Fleur 3:18
    2. Completeness 3:32
    3. Come to My Garden 3:19
    4. Memory Band 4:05
    5. Rainy Day in Centerville 5:22
    6. Close Your Eyes and Remember 3:38
    7. Oh, by the Way 2:58
    8. Expecting 3:51
    9. Only When I'm Dreaming 3:24
    10. Whenever, Wherever 3:33

    Minnie Riperton - Vocals
    Ramsey Lewis - Piano
    Phil Upchurch - Guitar
    Maurice White - Drums
    Elsa Harris - Vocals
    Kitti Hayward - Vocals

    AMG:
    "Minnie Riperton's solo debut is in many respects her finest hour - devoid of the overly syrupy production that hampers her later work, Come to My Garden instead couches her miraculous voice in the elegant arrangements of the great Charles Stepney, striking a perfect balance between romantic melodrama and sensual nuance. Call Stepney's singular approach 'chamber soul'-the nimble melodies and insistent grooves swell with orchestral flourishes, while the jazz-inspired rhythms (courtesy of Ramsey Lewis' group) at times evoke Van Morrison's masterpiece Astral Weeks. Stepney creates the ideal backdrop for Riperton's soaring vocals, which reveal a subtlety and restraint absent from the glass-shattering bombast of her subsequent performances - the opening 'Les Fleurs' (covered decades later by 4Hero) crystallizes the entire record, embracing both intimacy and majesty to haunting effect."



    Come To My Garden

    or

    Come To My Garden


    0 0


    1. Islamic Suite 12:28
    2. Arch's Groove 2:21
    3. Malahari Raga 4:02
    4. David 4:09
    5. Japanese Love Song 4:40
    6. Minimum 10:49
    7. When I Look At You 2:31
    8. Raised Eyebrows 5:50

    Charlie Munro - bass clarinet, soprano sax, alto sax, tenor sax, flute, cello
    Bob McIvor - trombone
    Neville Whitehead - bass
    Mark Bowden - drums, vibraharp, marimba

    allaboutjazz:
    "The statement that jazz music has universal appeal is a well-worn cliché, but like most, a very true one. This is no more evident than in Eastern Horizons, a long out-of-print classic from Australian cellist and multi-reed player Charlie Munro, now available on CD. Recorded in 1967, it is considered to be a landmark of Australian jazz, which is basically a blend of jazz and quintessential American music played by non-Americans, and Eastern music played by Westerners. Such a description might suggest otherwise, Eastern Horizon is anything but a cheesy record.
    Although not for purists, Munro—supported by a bottom-heavy bass sound with trombone and percussion—succeeds in producing a compelling work of art where Eastern time signatures, jazz improvisations and Western classical harmonies meld seamlessly. The music is sometimes modal in structure, and occasionally freer in style, but never loses its mellifluousness.
    This record has been compared to Pharoah Sanders' Karma (Impulse!, 1969) and Alice Coltrane's Indo-centric recordings. Apart from the fact that all of these recordings draw inspiration from Eastern music, there are very few similarities between them. While Sanders and Coltrane induce the feeling of meditating in a quiet, incense-perfumed temple, Eastern Horizons is more like traveling to, or viewing a film about, exotic locations.
    The musical interaction amongst the quartet members eschews the traditional labor division of frontline and rhythm section for a more egalitarian distribution of solos and flights of musical ideas. Munro exhibits equal virtuosity on both reeds and cello, while the others also excel on their respective instruments. The sound of the CD has been impeccably remastered with new notes and photos added to the original booklet liner notes and handsomely reproduced cover art.
    An intriguing record with an exotic sound from a part of the world not well known for its jazz, Eastern Horizons rewards and delights with repeated listens."



    Eastern Horizons

    or

    Eastern Horizons


    0 0
  • 02/21/13--16:10: Origa - Origa, 1994 (World)

  • 1. Lirica (Я Подарю тебе Музыку)
    2. Aoi hitomi (Голубые Глаза)
    3. My Angel-Tenshi no Shiroi Tsubomi (Мой Ангел)
    4. Ai no kakera (Каждый Раз)
    5. Tyoutyou san (Chouchan San) (Чиочио-Сан )
    6. Moji no nai tegami (Мне Без Тебя Трудно)
    7. Akaneiro no Kousen (Счастливое Лето)
    8. Yume no ato ni ame ga furu (Дождь! Задержи Его!)
    9. Panimayu (Только Я Понимаю)
    10. MOPE (Umi-Gatsu no Hitori) (Море)

    Wiki:
    "Ol'ga Vital'evna Yakovleva (born October 12, 1970 in Kochenёvo, Novosibirsk oblast, Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic, Soviet Union), better known as Origa, is a Russian singer who works mostly in Japan.
    After graduating from music school in 1990, she took an opportunity to visit Japan in 1991 and finally contracted with the ROAD&SKY Organization [1] in 1993. Origa has since participated in several projects with various artists in addition to the Radio Japan Series and being part of the chorus for the Kobe earthquake disaster charity single.
    Origa has released seven solo albums, two mini-albums, and 3 singles. She gained popularity outside of Japan with the release of Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex and the subsequent original soundtracks, Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex O.S.T. and Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex O.S.T. 2.
    These were written by long-time friend and composer Yoko Kanno, and both the first season's theme song, Inner Universe (featuring boy soprano Ben Del Maestro) and the second season's theme song, Rise used Origa's vocals. Origa first performed with Kanno for ∀ Gundam, singing Gabriela Robin's 'Moon' with the Gey's AX chorus.
    In 2005, Origa performed songs for the anime series Fantastic Children, most notably the ending theme 'Mizu no Madoromi'.
    In 2006 Origa was involved in lyrics & vocal performance for the opening song ('Player') and the ending theme ('date of rebirth') from the movie Ghost in the Shell: S.A.C. Solid State Society.
    In 2007, Origa performed with Yoko Kanno for the Ragnarok 2 Concert. There, she performed all three Ghost in the Shell opening themes, 'Player' for Solid State Society, 'Inner Universe' for the first season, and 'Rise' for 2nd Gig respectively, and substituted for Ilaria Graziano on 'Yoru_Vo', Pierre Bensusan on 'ELM', and Gabriela Robin on 'Torukia'.
    She also performed alongside fellow vocalists Maaya Sakamoto and Mai Yamane and joined in singing selected songs originally performed only by Maaya.
    Origa is no longer active in Russia, but she still holds concert tours across the globe.
    In 2008, she performed at Sugizo's 'Rise to Cosmic Dance' concert held on 2008.12.19 at Shibuya-AX hall in Tokyo. She later appeared on his 2011 single 'The Edge'."



    Origa

    or

    Origa


    0 0


    1. Lady 3:48
    2. Blindman 6:01
    3. Goldies Place 5:03
    4. Whitesnake 4:22
    5. Time on My Side 4:26
    6. Peace Lovin' Man 4:53
    7. Sunny Days 3:31
    8. Hole in the Sky 3:23
    9. Celebration 4:11
    10. Peace Lovin' Man 5:04
    11. Sunny Days 3:21

    David Coverdale – Vocals, Piano, Percussion
    Ron Aspery – Saxophone, Flute
    Micky Moody – Guitar, Percussion, Vocals
    Tim Hinckley – Organ, Percussion, Vocals
    Roger Glover – Bass, Melodica, Percussion, Vocals
    De Lisle Harper – Bass, Percussion, Vocals
    Simon Phillips – Drums, Percussion
    Barry St. John - Vocals
    Helen Chappelle - Vocals
    Liza Strike - Vocals

    AMG:
    "After Deep Purple crumbled in the mid-'70s, vocalist David Coverdale began a solo career with 1977's White Snake. Before too long, Coverdale would adopt that album title as the name of his new band. Coverdale gathered future Whitesnake guitarist Micky Moody, keyboardist Tim Hinckley, bassist De Lisle Harper, and noted session drummer Simon Phillips. Background singers Liza Strike, Helen Chappelle, and Barry St. John are prominently featured, too. Uncredited horn players also contribute to the album. Ex-Deep Purple bassist Roger Glover produced the album and also added some synthesizer parts. White Snake is a tentative, generally disappointing album because Coverdale is clearly flummoxed regarding the direction the music should take. There are some blues-rock numbers that benefit from Coverdale's rich, throaty vocals and Moody's reliable guitar parts. (They would settle on this style for Whitesnake.) However, much of the album shows Coverdale's love of R&B and soul. Remember that it was this route that Deep Purple took, particularly on 1974's Stormbringer, that drove guitarist Ritchie Blackmore to quit the band in disgust. 'Lady' manages to blend R&B and hard rock elements effectively thanks to Moody's slithering guitar and the punchy horns. The smoldering 'Blindman' is the best song because of its blues-rock purity; it actually sounds like a blend of Free, Bad Company, and, ultimately, future Whitesnake. 'Goldies Place' is a blue-eyed stab at R&B and funk. 'Whitesnake' is a guilty pleasure rocker; the sexual symbolism surpasses mere double entendre, but it's not quite hardcore porn. 'Peace Lovin' Man' goes so far as to approach gospel-influenced soul. 'Hole in the Sky' is a smooth, dreamy ballad. Spitfire Records' 2000 CD reissue includes decent liner notes and first takes of 'Peace Lovin' Man' and 'Sunny Days' as bonus tracks."



    White Snake

    or

    White Snake


    0 0


    1. Struttin' 4:45
    2. Lady Madonna 3:58
    3. 12 Bars From Mars 3:11
    4. Earthlings 4:49
    5. Spazmo Strikes Again 0:22
    6. Time 2:56
    7. Pooh Bear 5:02
    8. Lockie's Inspiration 0:45
    9. I'll See You Soon 6:30
    10. Night Games 3:57
    11. Cosmic Indigo 0:50

    Jamie Glaser - Guitar
    Nick Moroch - Guitar
    James W. Alexander - Keyboards, Mini Moog
    Don Blackman - Keyboards, Vocals
    Larry Dunn - Synthesizer, Mini Moog, Synthesizer Programming
    Denzil Miller - Keyboards
    Marcus Miller - Bass
    Lenny White - Bass, Percussion, Drums, Keyboards
    Chaka Khan - Vocals
    Dianne Reeves - Vocals

    AMG:
    "Lenny White's 1977 recording The Adventures of Astral Pirates was an incredibly tough act to follow - so tough, in fact, that anything less than a five-star gem was likely to seem a bit disappointing. Streamline, the 1978 LP that came right after The Adventures of Astral Pirates, isn't a five-star gem, but it isn't bad either. Although not in a class with The Adventures of Astral Pirates or 1975's Venusian Summer, let alone White's work with Return to Forever, Streamline is a generally decent, if mildly uneven, collection of instrumental jazz fusion and R&B vocal numbers. While this album (which White produced with Earth, Wind & Fire keyboardist Larry Dunn) isn't as R&B-oriented as White's Twennynine projects would be, the drummer is obviously going after R&B audiences on 'Time' (a somewhat Earth, Wind & Fire-ish funk item) and an interesting cover of the Beatles''Lady Madonna' (which features soul goddess Chaka Khan). But there is also plenty of fusion, and instrumentals like 'Night Games,''Struttin',' and the Brazilian-influenced 'Pooh Bear' are enjoyable even though they fall short of the brilliance of the material on The Adventures of Astral Pirates and Venusian Summer. While Streamline isn't among White's essential albums, it's a likable set."



    Streamline

    or

    Streamline


    0 0


    1. Music for My Mother 5:18
    2. Music for My Mother (Instrumental) 6:13
    3. Can't Shake It Loose 2:28
    4. As Good as I Can Feel 2:32
    5. I Bet You 3:58
    6. Qualify and Satisfy 3:02
    7. Open Our Eyes 4:01
    8. I Got a Thing, You Got a Thing, Everybody's Got a Thing 2:59
    9. Fish, Chips & Sweat 2:59
    10. I Wanna Know If It's Good to You? 2:51
    11. I Wanna Know If It's Good to You? (Instrumental) 3:10
    12. You and Your Folks, Me and My Folks 3:48
    13. Funky Dollar Bill 3:06
    14. Can You Get to That 2:49
    15. Back in Our Minds 2:39
    16. I Miss My Baby 4:18

    1. Baby I Owe You Something Good 3:50
    2. Hit It and Quit It 2:46
    3. A Whole Lot of BS 1:18
    4. Loose Booty 3:13
    5. A Joyful Process 3:25
    6. Cosmic Slop 3:22
    7. If You Don't Like the Effects, Don't Produce the Cause 3:33
    8. Standing on the Verge of Getting It On 3:18
    9. Jimmy's Got a Little Bit of Bitch in Him 2:29
    10. Red Hot Mama 3:24
    11. Vital Juices 3:11
    12. Better by the Pound 2:42
    13. Stuffs and Things 2:12
    14. Let's Take It to the Stage 3:20
    15. Biological Speculation 3:08
    16. Undisco Kidd 4:12
    17. How Do Yeaw View You? 3:42

    AMG:
    "Though Tales of Kidd Funkadelic brought together some oddballs and rarities from Funkadelic's early- to mid-'70s existence, it wasn't until Music for Your Mother came out that there was a full compilation of all the band's singles from birth to the mid-decade switch to Warner Bros. And what a compilation it is: Bringing together some of the band's best material as well as some of its craziest, Music for Your Mother does the business for any self-respecting P-Funk clone. Given that the focus is on A- and B-sides rather than album cuts, it isn't a truly exhaustive overview - that would require the inclusion of songs like 'Maggot Brain' and 'Free Your Mind and Your Ass Will Follow,' for a start. It's a small quibble in context, though, especially given the inclusion of a number of songs that never made it onto the original eight albums. Most notable is a curious rarity, the semi-smooth soul 'I Miss My Baby' single, which was credited to U.S., with music by Funkadelic (U.S. being a group led by eventual P-Funk guitarist Gary Shider). As for the other B-sides and uncollected numbers, they're an understandably mixed but often interesting bunch, including alternate instrumental takes of 'Music for Your Mother' and 'I Wanna Know if It's Good to You,' the unreleased 'Can't Shake It Loose' single, the gospel/feedback freakout 'Open Our Eyes,' and the hilariously titled 'Fish, Chips and Sweat.' The amazing bonus to the whole collection is the exhaustive 24-page booklet, reviewing the entire early history of Funkadelic via archival photos and a slew of interviews with the surviving participants. Plenty of fun tales are told, but George Clinton didn't participate - not surprising, given the unflattering picture eventually painted of him - while the depressing fates of Eddie Hazel and Tawl Ross get deserved attention."



    Music For Your Mother

    or

    Music For Your Mother


    0 0


    1. Je Cherche un Homme (I Want a Man) 2:47
    2. Just an Old Fashioned Girl 2:51
    3. Lazy Afternoon 2:20
    4. St. Louis Blues 2:45
    5. Smoke Gets in Your Eyes 3:01
    6. My Heart Belongs to Daddy 3:00
    7. Avril au Portugal (The Whisp'ring Serenade) 3:24
    8. C'Est Si Bon 2:56
    9. Hey Jacque 2:37
    10. Mademoiselle Kitt 2:29
    11. Beale Street Blues 3:11
    12. Let's Do It (Let's Fall in Love) 3:06
    13. I'm a Funny Dame 2:07
    14. A Woman Wouldn't Be a Woman 2:00
    15. Toujour Gai 2:07
    16. Monotonous 3:44

    Eartha Kitt - Vocals
    Henri Rene, His Orchestra And Chorus
    Shorty Rogers And His Orchestra
    Joe Reisman And His Orchestra
    The Shinbone Alley Orchestra And Chorus

    Wiki:
    "...In 1950, Orson Welles gave Kitt her first starring role, as Helen of Troy in his staging of Dr. Faustus. A few years later, she was cast in the revue New Faces of 1952, introducing 'Monotonous' and 'Bal, Petit Bal', two songs with which she is still identified. In 1954, 20th Century Fox filmed a version of the revue, titled New Faces, in which she performed 'Monotonous', 'Uska Dara', and 'C'est Si Bon'.[6] Though it is often alleged that Welles and Kitt had an affair during her 1957 run in Shinbone Alley, Kitt categorically denied this in a June 2001 interview with George Wayne of Vanity Fair. 'I never had sex with Orson Welles', Kitt told Vanity Fair: 'It was a working situation and nothing else'.[7] Her other films in the 1950s included Mark of the Hawk (1957), St. Louis Blues (1958) and Anna Lucasta (1959).
    Throughout the rest of the 1950s and early 1960s, Kitt recorded; worked in film, television, and nightclubs; and returned to the Broadway stage, in Mrs. Patterson (during the 1954–1955 season), Shinbone Alley (in 1957), and the short-lived Jolly's Progress (in 1959).[8] In 1964, Kitt helped open the Circle Star Theater in San Carlos, California. In the late 1960s, the television series Batman featured her as Catwoman after Julie Newmar left the role..."



    'Miss Kitt', To You

    or

    'Miss Kitt', To You


    0 0


    John's Book of Alleged Dances, for string quartet
    1. Judah to Ocean 2:32
    2. Toot Nipple 1:15
    3. Dogjam 2:31
    4. Pavane: She's So Fine 6:32
    5. Rag the Bone 3:00
    6. Habanera 4:46
    7. Stubble Crotchet 2:39
    8. Hammer & Chisel 1:11
    9. Alligator Escalator 3:50
    10. Ständchen: The Little Serenade 4:53
    11. Judah to Ocean 2:31

    Gnarly Buttons, for clarinet & ensemble
    12. The Perilous Shore 9:55
    13. Hoe-down (Mad Cow) 5:45
    14. Put Your Loving Arms around Me 8:32

    Michael Collins - Clarinet
    Gareth Hulse - Horn (English)
    David Purser - Trombone
    John Orford - Bassoon
    Steven Smith - Banjo, Guitar, Mandolin
    Dave Maric - Piano, Sampling
    Shelagh Sutherland - Piano, Sampling
    Lynda Houghton - Double Bass
    Joan Atherton - Violin
    David Harrington - Violin
    Rebecca Hirsch - Violin
    John Sherba - Violin
    Roger Chase - Viola
    Hank Dutt - Viola
    Joan Jeanrenaud - Cello
    Christopher van Kampen - Cello
    John Adams - Conductor

    AMG:
    "These dances, says Adams, are 'alleged' because 'the steps for them have yet to be invented.' They were written for the Kronos Quartet. Adams 'prepared' a piano in the fashion of John Cage: he attached screws, bolts, rubber erasers, weather stripping, and other material to the strings of the piano. The key playing that string would then produce a given percussive sound rather than a note. Then Adams sampled the prepared piano sounds, organized them into loops, and set them up as short rhythm tracks. The idea was that, as called for in six of the dances, a member of the quartet would trigger these loops to perform them 'live.' This idea proved to be too complicated, so Adams just recorded them. In those six numbers the quartet plays with the pre-recorded prepared piano loops. The order of movements is that used in a recording of the work supervised by the composer. However, essentially there is no fixed order. The exuberance, one could even call it rowdiness, of these dances, makes for a score that is technically extremely demanding. Interestingly, the composer supplies highly entertaining notes to explain all the titles, also mentioning the musical contents of some of the pieces. 'Judah to Ocean,' for example, is the route of streetcar that Adams could from hear his window. 'Toot Nipple' (the name is from the novel Postcards by E. Annie Proulx), features 'furious chainsaw triads on the cello.''Dogjam' is a demon fiddle piece, 'in twisted hillbilly chromatics.' Other movements include a tender song for a young teenager, a scat-like song, a portrait of an aging Cuban dictator, a portrait of two housing contractors hired by the composer, a sluggish escalator in a local Macy's, and a serenade in unclear rhythms. The overall effect is humorous, attractive, and sometimes quite wild.

    Although the clarinet was Adams' instrument, he composed no music featuring that instrument until his fiftieth year. This may relate to a sad story Adams tells about his father, a professional clarinetist but later a victim of Alzheimer's disease, who became obsessed with the idea that someone was trying to steal his two treasured Selmer instruments. Ultimately, he disassembled them and tried to hide them in the laundry hamper. After he got them, the younger Adams did not play them until he began to compose this piece. It was written for Michael Collins, a British clarinetist 'whose way of playing the instrument most approximates my own ideal.' The work was commissioned by the London Sinfonietta and Present Music, an ensemble in Milwaukee.
    Adams explains that 'gnarly' means 'knotty or twisted.' However, California-American surfer-teen talk also uses the word to mean 'awesome,''neat,' and the like. 'Buttons' refers to Gertrude Stein's 'Tender Buttons,' but also to the increasing ubiquity of buttons our modern age demands be pushed.
    The first movement is based on an old Protestant hymn found in a nineteenth-century shape-note hymnal, specifically upon the first line, 'O Lord, steer me from that Perilous Shore.' This hymn tune is 'twisted and embellished from the start,' Adams says. Its first appearance is in a single voice, and then it is set with progressively greater complexity. These complications generate musical material that is used in subsequent movements. The second movement is a rodeo as seen through the eyes of the cattle, who generally are roped, tied, wrestled, ridden and otherwise antagonized. The title also refers to the Mad Cow disease scare in England, which occurred just as Adams's British friends were preparing the piece for performance. The final movement is a gentle love song that starts out in a tender mood, and ends up 'gnarled and crabbed'."



    John's Book of Alleged Dances/Gnarly Buttons

    or

    John's Book of Alleged Dances/Gnarly Buttons


    0 0


    1. It was spring
    2. Sparkler
    3. Letter of good Kagawa
    4. Kindness
    5. Summer vacation
    6. Horse
    7. I always get wet
    8. Koenji
    9. Facing us here
    10. Maybe in time
    11. Apple
    12. I will see you again
    13. Travel inn (Album Version)
    14. After the festival
    15. Word of the glass




    Hello! I'm Takuro Yoshida!

    or

    Hello! I'm Takuro Yoshida!


    0 0


    1. Miss Miss 6:34
    2. Ladies' Choice 6:30
    3. Hawk's Theme 6:28
    4. Low Ride 2:26
    5. Stella and Frenchie 8:00
    6. Softly Rolling 7:28

    Robben Ford - Guitar, Saxophone
    Paul Nagle - Keyboards
    Stanley Poplin - Bass
    Jim Baum - Drums

    AMG:
    "Robben Ford has had a diverse career. He taught himself guitar when he was 13 and considered his first influence to be Mike Bloomfield. At 18 he moved to San Francisco to form the Charles Ford Band (named after his father, who was also a guitarist) and was soon hired to play with Charlie Musselwhite for nine months. In 1971, the Charles Ford Blues Band was re-formed and recorded for Arhoolie in early 1972. Ford played with Jimmy Witherspoon (1972-1973), the L.A. Express with Tom Scott (1974), George Harrison, and Joni Mitchell. In 1977 he was a founding member of the Yellowjackets, which he stayed with until 1983, simultaneously having a solo career and working as a session guitarist. In 1986, Ford toured with Miles Davis and had two separate periods (1985 and 1987) with Sadao Watanabe, but he really seemed to find himself in 1992 when he returned to his roots: the blues. Ford formed a new group, the Blue Line, and subsequently recorded a couple of blues-rock dates for Stretch that are among the finest of his career. In 1999, he released Sunrise on Rhino and Supernatural on Blue Thumb. Ford signed to the Concord Jazz label in 2002 and released Blue Moon that same year, followed by Keep on Running in 2003 and Truth in 2007. That same year, he was a billed special guest on Larry Carlton's Live in Tokyo. He followed this with the predominantly live Soul on Ten in 2009. In 2013, Ford began his label association with Provogue, and issued the studio album Bringing It Back Home, comprised mostly of blues and R&B covers played by an all-star band."



    Schizophonic

    or

    Schizophonic


    0 0


    1. A millions miles away 3:45
    2. The love of a woman 3:30
    3. Blue smoke 4:38
    4. I don't wanna go home 2:50
    5. December dream 4:06
    6. Magentalane 2:33
    7. At the end of a rainbow 3:25
    8. Mrs. Toad's Cookies 3:07
    9. Maybe I'll move to mars 5:00
    10. Magentalane ..it feel so good 0:45

    Dee Long - vocals, guitar, synthesizers
    John Woloschuk - vocals, bass, guitar, sitar, keyboards
    Terry Draper - vocals, drums, percussion, guitar, keyboards, trombone

    AMG:
    "Originally issued in 1981, Klaatu's fifth and final album, Magentalane, is highlighted by the elegiac ballad 'December Dream,' an homage to the recently slain John Lennon that eerily mirrors the fallen Beatle's own late-period work. Even with the mystery of their identities long ago solved, Klaatu still recalls the Fab Four with remarkable accuracy: 'I Don't Wanna Go Home' conjures vintage McCartney, while 'Mrs. Toad's Cookies' is like a Yellow Submarine track left on the cutting room floor. 'A Million Miles Away' and 'The Love of a Woman,' on the other hand, bring to mind Electric Light Orchestra - inspiration once removed."



    Magentalane

    or

    Magentalane


    0 0


    1. Firen Di Mekhutonim Aheym
    2. Dem Ganefs Yiches
    3. Ani Maamin
    4. Bulbes / Trellohaposervico
    5. Finf Un Tsvantsiger
    6. Rustemal Ca La Listeava
    7. El Mole Rahamim
    8. Khassidishe Nigun
    9. Rozhinkes Mit Mandlen
    10. Der Shtille Bulgar (Suite)
    11. Zogt Der Rebbe
    12. Yoshke Yoshke
    13. Vi Azoy S'Iz Nisht Git Tsu Geyn
    14. Trink Briderl
    15. Dire Gelt
    16. Yiddish Folk Song
    17. Di Fartraibung Vun Dem Moshiach
    18. Quadrille
    19. Tants Yidelekh
    20. Nigun
    21. Shabes
    22. Tants/Freilech
    23. Le Dovyd Mizmoyr
    24. Friling/Fidl Volach
    25. Wen Der Rebbe
    26. Vilna

    Wiki:
    "Ovadia was born in Plovdiv, Bulgaria, in 1946 to a Jewish family who moved to Milan in Ovadia's early childhood. Here he graduated in political science and made his debut in the theatre world under Roberto Leydi, as singer and musician in the band Almanacco Popolare. In 1972, he founded a company, the Gruppo Folk Internazionale, playing mainly songs and music from the Balkans.
    Ovadia's debut as a theatrical actor was in 1984. In 1990, he created the Theatre Orchestra and produced Oylem Goylem, which he successfully toured in Italy, France, Germany and USA. Oylem Goylem (Yiddish for 'The world is dumb') skillfully melded satire and klezmer music sung by Ovadia himself. In 2005, the spectacle was broadcast by RAI, Italy state TV.
    In 1995, Ovadia wrote Dybbuk, about the Shoah, considered one of the most important Italian theatrical shows of the period. In the same year, he produced Taibele e il suo demone and Diario ironico dall'esilio, written with Roberto Andò. His following spectacles include Ballata di fine millennio (1996), Pallida madre, tenera sorella (1996), Il caso Kafka ('The Kafka File', 1997, with Andò), Trieste, ebrei e dintorni (1998), Mame, mamele, mamma, mamà... (1998), Joss Rakover si rivolge a Dio (1999), il banchiere errante (2001), L'armata a cavallo (2003).
    In 2005, he collaborated with the band Modena City Ramblers for their album Appunti partigiani.
    He has been an outspoken opponent of what he regards as growing racism in Italian society. He received an award from the University of Pavia in October 2007; in his acceptance speech he denounced the treatment of immigrants, especially Roma.
    In 2009, he appeared in the movie Memories of Anne Frank.
    In Sept./Oct. 2003, Ovadia gave an extensive interview to Vered Zaykovsky of the Israeli cultural magazine Eretz acheret. It can be found at www.jewish-theatre.com."



    Oylem Goylem

    or

    Oylem Goylem


older | 1 | .... | 33 | 34 | (Page 35) | 36 | 37 | .... | 57 | newer