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FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

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    OSS 117 se Déchaîne, film score
    1. OSS 117 hully-gully (générique) 3:11
    2. Hubert va cogner 3:10
    3. OSS 117 fait tout sauter 1:32
    4. Bagarre aquatique 2:43

    Banco à Bangkok pour OSS 117, film score
    5. Banco à Bangkok (générique) 2:53
    6. Bagarre à Bangkok 2:23
    7. Hubert prépare son coup 3:13
    8. OSS 117 danse avec nous 3:03
    9. Poursuite thaïlandaise 1:29
    10. Hubert contre Docteur Sinn 2:15

    Furia à Bahia pour OSS 117, film score
    11. Rytmos de amor (générique) 2:31
    12. Mystère à Copacabana 3:28
    13. Souper à Rio 3:44
    14. Batucada de Bahia 2:30
    15. Castagne sur les docks 2:14
    16. Fura à Bahia 3:04
    17. Samba furiosa 3:23

    Atout Coeur à Tokyo pour OSS 117, film score
    18. Hubert rit jaune 2:07
    19. Fleur de cactus sans épine 2:08
    20. OSS 117 à coeur ouvert 3:10
    21. Slow du soleil-levant 2:37
    22. Atout coeur à Tokyo 2:42

    OSS 117 se Déchaîne, film score
    23. Remix par Roudoudou 3:17

    Wiki:
    Michel Magne (born 20 March 1930, Lisieux, Calvados, France died 19 December 1984, Cergy-Pontoise, Val-d'Oise of suicide ") was a French film and experimental music composer. He was nominated in 1962 for an Academy Award and Golden Globe award for adapting the Jackie Gleason score to film Gigot. He also scored Barbarella and a series of OSS 117 films.
    Magne wrote some songs with lyrics by Françoise Sagan for Juliette Gréco and provided orchestral accompaniment.
    In 1962 he purchased the Chateau d'Herouville and converted it into a residential recording studio in 1969 which through the 1970s was used by a series of artists such as Elton John (at his Honky Château), Pink Floyd, David Bowie, Jethro Tull, Cat Stevens among many others."



    OSS 117

    or

    OSS 117


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    1. I Feel So Good (Boogie Chillun) 2:30
    2. Lookin' Good 2:58
    3. Walkin' by Myself 3:47
    4. (I'm Your) Hoochie Coochie Man 2:43
    5. That Ain't It 2:47
    6. That's All I Need 3:29
    7. What Have I Done Wrong? 3:20
    8. I Just Want a Little Bit 3:12
    9. Everything's Gonna Be Alright 4:04
    10. Keep on Doin' What You're Doin' 2:52
    11. Blues for Odie Payne 4:44
    12. Easy Baby 4:26
    13. Keep on Lovin' Me Baby 3:23

    Magic Sam - Guitar, Vocals
    Eddie Shaw - Sax (Tenor)
    Shakey Jake Harris - Harmonica
    Mighty Joe Young - Guitar
    Lafayette Leake - Piano
    Mack Thompson - Bass
    Odie Payne, Jr. - Drums
    Robert Richey - Drums

    AMG:
    "The 13 tracks on Magic Sam Legacy (1997) are culled from material initially discarded from his two Delmark studio LPs West Side Soul (1967) and Black Magic (1968). The principal caveat being the John Lee Hooker inspired 'I Feel So Good' - liberally copping Hooker's 'Boogie Chillun' - and the spirited instrumental 'Lookin' Good,' both of which date back to 1966. The mid-tempo 'Walkin' by Myself' and the indispensable 'Hoochie Coochie Man' are among the best of the West Side Soul related numbers. Shakey Jake (harmonica) blows powerful harp, perfectly complementing Magic Sam's (guitar/vocals) nimble fretwork. The guitarist provides blistering yet purposeful interjections setting the standard in terms of emotive Westside Chicago blues. 'That Ain't It' is an exceedingly soulful selection revealing Sam's R&B leanings and underrated vocal prowess. 'I Just Want a Little Bit' swings just as solidly as the Black Magic version, with this rendering sporting a slightly looser reading. The ringing tremolo effect on 'Everything's Gonna Be Alright' makes for one of the more interesting outtakes, sporting a few tasty runs from the legendary Lafayette Leake (piano). His style recalls earlier contributions as a staff musician for Chess Records, where he played a significant role on sessions from Chuck Berry, Muddy Waters, Willie Dixon and Howlin' Wolf among others. The free-form nature of 'Blues for Odie Payne' - the drummer on over half the material presented here - gives not only Sam a perfect platform for his string-bending and fiery fretboard antics, but likewise allows Eddie Shaw (tenor sax) to interpolate some equally clever melodic support. As the recorded legacy of Magic Sam was tragically curtailed when he passed in 1969 at the age of 32, any and all titles featuring Sam as a leader could be considered essential. While recent converts might be best advised to start with either West Side Soul or Black Magic, Magic Sam Legacy (1997) is a perfect companion volume, serving artist and enthusiast exceptionally well."



    The Magic Sam Legacy

    or

    The Magic Sam Legacy


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    1. Reach 4:10
    2. Something On My Mind 3:55
    3. Unless 4:40
    4. Southbound Excursion 2:32
    5. Natural 3:20
    6. Faithful Pillow (Part I) 1:39
    7. You'll Start A War 3:38
    8. Beyond Fridays Field 4:03
    9. Abergele Next Time 3:49
    10. Crazier 3:40
    11. Faithful Pillow (Part II) 1:59
    12. Palm Of My Hand 3:45
    13. Love's A Beautiful Place 4:13
    14. Meadow Of Love 3:03
    15. Thank You 3:06

    Mick Head – vocals, guitar
    Andy Diagram – trumpet, keyboards
    John Head – guitar
    Chris McCaffrey – bass guitar
    Thomas Whelan – drums, percussion
    M.Barradas - oil drums, percussion

    AMG:
    "The bounciness of the Pale Fountains went penalized in the days of Echo and the Bunnymen and the Smiths. 'Optimism - yuck.' Michael Head's stylistic hopscotch and wide-eyed sunnyness might have translated better in the late ‘90s, had he stuck with that program for his later band, Shack. If the band had set their sights on one or two areas of their record collections for inspiration instead of darn near everything, Pacific Street might not have been so out of place when it was released. Bold indeed, the expanded version of Pacific Street (issued by Virgin with four bonus tracks) veers from every angle of ‘70s AM soft rock, stylish soul pop à la Orange Juice (but not as effective), Bacharach/David, and Brazilian jazz. You can imagine Dionne Warwick singing the chorus of 'Abergele Next Time'; the non-album single 'Palm of My Hand' veers dangerously close to muzak, and the steel drum-and-trumpet combos were more than enough to incite gagging from the pop underground. Too bad. Like the following From Across the Kitchen Table, Pacific Street wasn't able to succeed on the charts, so the too varied and too happy Pale Fountains were left in limbo. For all its faults, the band's debut isn't half'' bad, and it doesn't sound horribly outdated decades later."



    Pacific Street

    or

    Pacific Street


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    1. Ouverture 1:15
    2. Elahi-Elahi 6:04
    3. Avaz-Bidad 11:15
    4. Ouverture 1:34
    5. Chant D'Elle 6:07
    6. Tchar-Mezrab Dacthi 5:00
    7. Avaz-Dachti 9:16
    8. Pich Daramade Ispahan 4:33
    9. Ouverture 0:37
    10. Botechine 8:27

    Marzieh - Vocals
    Kamyar Izadi - Tombak, Santaur, Daff
    Maziar Izadpanah - Nay
    Mohsen Jamshidi - Setar, Violin
    Hamid-Reza Taherzadeh - Oud, Setar, Taragat

    AMG:
    "Ashraf o-Sadat Mortezaie (1924 – 13 October 2010), known professionally as Marzieh, was a Tehran-born singer of Persian traditional music.
    Marzieh started her career in the 1940s at Radio Tehran and cooperated with some of the greatest 20th century Persian songwriters and lyricists like Ali Tajvidi, Parviz Yahaghi, Homayoun Khorram, Rahim Moeini Kermanshahi and Bijan Taraghi. Marzieh also sang with the Farabi Orchestre, conducted by Morteza Hannaneh, a pioneer of Persian polyphonic music, during the 1960s and 1970s. Her first major public performance was in 1942, when, though still a teenager, she played the principal role of Shirin at the Jame Barbud opera house in the Persian operetta Shirin and Farhad.
    Following the Islamic Revolution of 1979 public performances and broadcasts of record albums by solo female singers were banned outright for ten years. Ayatollah Khomeini had decreed: 'Women's voices should not be heard by men other than members of their own families'.
    She told the Daily Telegraph that in order to continue her vocal practice she used to walk by night from her home in the historic north-Tehran Niavaran foothills to her cabin in the mountains, where she would sing next to a roaring waterfall: 'Nobody could hear me. I sang to the stars and the rocks'.
    Upon the death of Khomeini the successor mullahs suggested that she could resume singing, provided that she undertook never to sing for men. She refused, declaring, 'I have always sung only for all Iranians,' and in 1994 she left Iran forever due to the political repression, making her new home in Paris.
    She performed several concerts in Los Angeles, California and Royal Albert Hall (London) in 1993, 1994 and 1995. The Paris-based composer Mohammad Shams and the Persian tar soloist Hamid Reza Taherzadeh were the main musicians who worked with Marzieh in exile.
    France 3, a regional TV news and entertainment channel, has compared Marzieh's singing voice to those of legendary songstresses Édith Piaf and Maria Callas. On the other hand, the European press have also compared her to Vanessa Redgrave and Melina Mercouri for her willingness to put political and human-rights beliefs ahead of her career, even her own safety."



    Monadjat

    or

    Monadjat


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    1. Underthru 16:27
    2. Remarks 14:29
    3. Routine Three 10:20
    4. Two Busses and a Long Walk 14:16
    5. Manipulatives 8:20

    Joe Morris - Guitar
    Mat Maneri - Baritone Violin, Violin
    Chris Lightcap - Bass
    Gerald Cleaver - Drums

    AMG:
    "There's no doubt Morris is an original electric jazz guitarist. Though short of Sonny Sharrock energy-wise and Derek Bailey in terms of innovation, Morris nonetheless holds high qualities of inventiveness, singular purpose, and individual vision. His is a spare, amplified, but not treated sound, thin on fiber and bulk but allowing those staccato notes to softly sing. Bassist Chris Lightcap, violinist Mat Maneri, and drummer Gerald Cleaver are all quite capable musicians well aware of what Morris seeks. They collectively fuel the smoldering embers with sight lines of their own. It is music firmly in the modern avant-garde, with signals from both underground and outer space informing but not dictating terms. The five compositions from Morris are all quite long, starting with the 16-minute title track. A bass-drums workout shows Lightcap and Cleaver can get next to these juxtaposed notions, as well. 'Remarks' is more conversational, a dirge blues with free intentions and melodies that flow then stop, flow then stop, repeated through the entire piece. Cleaver in particular has a handle on these changes; he seems to be initiating them with no cue from Morris. Blues beats morph unexpectedly at his command, and there's a peculiar reference to 'Stormy Weather.' More obtuse is a 6/4 to 4/4 in 'Routine Three,' which is very angular and Thelonious Monk-ish in nature. It swings on its own terms. 'Two Busses and a Long Walk' is termed by Morris as a 'flowthrough' composition with bass, drums, violin, and guitar. None of the four establish but a squint of melody, and hot water sounds swirl around and around. 'Manipulatives' is a launching pad for ideas to shoot forth simultaneously, decidedly free and unabashed, with Lightcap's best solo. Morris has an individualist's attitude which produces music that is not for everyone, but certainly well within listenable parameters. Timidity or resting on laurels is not in the vocabulary of this unique musician."



    Underthru

    or

    Underthru


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    1. Intro/Never in My Life 4:46
    2. Don't Look Around 4:21
    3. Mississippi Queen 6:13
    4. Baby I'm Down 8:19
    5. Long Red 6:44
    6. Silver Paper 9:33
    7. Guitar Solo 9:49

    1. The Animal Trainer and the Toad 5:59
    2. Nantucket Sleighride 5:57
    3. Theme for an Imaginary Western 4:15
    4. Travelling in the Dark 5:07
    5. Blood of the Sun 3:20
    6. Dreams of Milk and Honey 23:24
    7. Auld Lang Syne 1:02

    Leslie West - guitar, vocals
    Steve Knight - organ
    Felix Pappalardi - bass, vocals
    Corky Laing - drums

    wolfgangsvault:
    "There is no better example of Mountain at the height of its powers than this New Year's Eve concert at Fillmore East. The band was based out of Forest Hills so they were surrounded by friends, family, and an extremely enthusiastic audience. They had recently released their strongest and most cohesive album, Nantucket Sleighride and this great new material combined with the success of their previous album and single, 'Mississippi Queen,' inspires the group to play at peak capacity.
    Following the Happy New Year introduction, the recording begins with a powerful take on 'Never In My Life,' featuring Leslie West's massive guitar tone and the pummeling rhythm section of Pappalardi and Laing. They follow with a new song off Nantucket Sleighride called 'Don't Look Around,' which continues the intensity level. The hard rock crunch of 'Mississippi Queen' is next and they have some fun with the arrangement, expanding the guitar solos and doubling the length of the album version.
    Mountain next treats the home-town audience to a pair of relatively rare performances of 'Baby, I'm down' and 'Long Red,' both sourced from Leslie West's first pre-Mountain LP. Considerable jamming occurs in both and West's screeching voice never sounded more appropriate or passionate. Felix Pappalardi steps up to the microphone next for one of the best tracks from their previous album, Silver Paper, taking a more melodic approach, but still maintaining the bands distinctive crunch. An intriguing 10 minute guitar solo by West follows. This remarkably fluid solo electric guitar performance is quite captivating and shows that West, although highly influence by Clapton and Hendrix, was breaking ground and developing into a truly great and imaginative guitar player in his own right.
    Two of the most intriguing new songs follow. 'The Animal Trainer And The Toad' (named after a critic's description of Felix and Leslie) proves the band had a sense of humor that they could translate instrumentally and the new album's title track, 'Nantucket Sleighride,' shows the group's melodic and dramatic side. It's a step forward in dynamics and control and at its tight six minute length, contains none of the overindulgence that often marred Mountain's later-era performances of this song. (By the following year, this song was expanded to half an hour or more!)
    The group's heartfelt ode to the Woodstock Festival, 'For Yasgur's Farm' is up next, followed by another compelling new song, 'Traveling In The Dark.' They close the set, with the powerful riff driven 'Blood Of The Sun,' another vintage track from Leslie's first LP.
    They cap things off by returning for a lengthy jam on the encore. The highly expanded improvisational treatment given to 'Dreams Of Milk and Honey' pummels anyone left standing into submission. This is classic Mountain at their best, featuring a memorable call and response section between West and Pappalardi. Corky Laing's drumming is always spot on and powerful without being overindulgent. The energy level is astounding and the performance remains imaginative throughout its 23 minute length. This comes to a close and West belts out 'Old Lang Syne' before the group signs off on 1970. Few hard rock bands of the era had the sheer power or raw energy level of Mountain in their prime. This recording captures the classic lineup at the peak of their powers and out of all the existing live recordings of this era, remains one of their finest performances."



    New Year Concert

    or

    New Year Concert


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    1. Chris Chafe: Quadro 14:38
    2 Allan Schindler: Tremor of Night and Day, for cello & computer driven sounds 12:44
    3 David Jaffe: Telegram to the President 5:49
    4 Jonathan Berger: Diptych 12:59
    5 Dexter Morrill: Quartet, for violin, violoncello & tape 16:20

    Pamela Jordan - Soprano (Vocal)
    Nohema Fernandez - Piano
    Jefferson String Quartet

    "Christopher David Chafe, born 1952 in Bern, Switzerland, is a musician, scientist, and the director of the Stanford University Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). He is Duca Family Professor at Stanford University, holding a Doctor of Musical Arts in music composition from Stanford University (1983), a Master of Arts in music composition from University of California, San Diego, and a Bachelor of Arts in music from Antioch College. He won a Net Challenge Prize from the IEEE and Association for Computing Machinery in 2000, and a National Science Foundation research award in 1999. He has been performing with the Tintinnabulate ensemble at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

    Born in Stamford, Connecticut, Allan Schindler pursued his undergraduate education at Oberlin College (B.M. in Music Composition, B.A. in Literature), and his masters and doctoral studies in composition and musicology at the University of Chicago, where he with Ralph Shapey and Richard Wernick. Before coming to Eastman in 1978, he taught for a year at Ball State University and for seven years in the theory/composition department at Boston University, where he also ran the electronic music program.
    Schindler’s musical compositions, including purely acoustic works, works that feature or employ computer music resources, and multimedia compositions that include video/film or dance, been performed by leading soloists and ensembles throughout North America and Europe, as well as in Asia, South America, Australia and New Zealand, and have won numerous prizes and awards. Currently his music is available on Innova, Centaur, CDCM, Albany and Capstone compact disc releases, and in score publications by semar editore and Keyboard Percussion publications.

    David Aaron Jaffe (born April 29, 1955, in New Jersey) is an American composer who has written over ninety works for orchestra, chorus, chamber ensembles, and electronics. He is best known for his use of technology as an electronic-music or computer-music composer in works such as Silicon Valley Breakdown, though his non-electronic music has also been widely performed. He is also known for his development of computer music algorithmic innovations, such as the physical modeling of plucked and bowed strings, as well as for his development of music software such as the NeXT Music Kit.

    Jonathan Berger (born, New York, 1954) is an American composer. His works include orchestral, chamber, vocal, choral and electro-acoustic music. He has been commissioned by some of today’s most exciting chamber ensembles and has enjoyed commissions and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Bourges Festival, Westdeutscher Rundfunk and Chamber Music America. Berger’s recent commissions include a violin concerto, a piano trio, and his fourth string quartet. In addition to composition Berger is an active researcher with over sixty publications in a wide range of fields relating to music, science and technology. Berger lives in California where he is the Denning Family Provostial Professor in Music at Stanford University.
    Berger was the 2010 Composer in Residence at the Spoleto USA Festival, which commissioned a chamber work for soprano Dawn Upshaw and piano quintet.
    Berger’s recent recording of music for strings, Miracles and Mud, was released by Naxos on their American Masters series in 2008. His recent commissions include The Bridal Canopy for string quartet (Chamber Music Denver), a piano trio (Chamber Music Toronto and Stanford Lively Arts), a work for singer and chamber ensemble (The Spertus Institute), a work for interactive electronics, and a violin concerto (The Banff Centre for the Arts). In Spring 2009 he had two interactive sound installations on display at the Pasadena Museum of California Art. In addition to composing, Berger is involved in multidisciplinary research including studies in music cognition, recognition and transformation of musical patterns, and the use of music and sound to represent complex information for diagnostic and analytical purposes. Before returning to Stanford he taught at Yale where he was the founding director of Yale University's Center for Studies in Music Technology. Berger is the author of over 50 journal articles and book chapters.

    Dexter Morrill was born in North Adams, Massachusetts. At the age of eight he began trumpet lessons with Peter Fogg and later studied with Irwin Shainman at Williams College. He entered Colgate University in 1956 and studied composition with William Skelton, and attended the first Lenox School of Jazz in 1957, having trumpet lessons with Dizzy Gillespie and arranging with William Russo. In 1960 Morrill began graduate studies at Stanford University and studied composition with Leonard Ratner and orchestration with Leland Smith. During 1962–4 he was a Ford Foundation Young Composer Fellow in University City, Missouri, and later taught at St John’s University in New York, which commissioned his Three Lyric Pieces for Violin, premièred by Ruggiero Ricci at Lincoln Center in 1969. Morrill studied composition with Robert Palmer in the late 1960s at Cornell, and wrote his dissertation on Darius Milhaud’s early polytonal music. Morrill returned to teach music at Colgate in 1969 and, in the early 1970s, established one of the first mainframe computer studios in the world, with help from colleagues at Stanford University. He returned to Stanford often to study computer music with John Chowning and Leland Smith, and spent a part of his time doing research on the analysis/synthesis of trumpet tones. Morrill is currently Professor Emeritus at Colgate. His computer music compositions have received performances in the United States, Canada, Australia, Argentina, Brazil, Great Britain, Poland, the Czech Republic and most Western European countries, by the Tarr Brass Ensemble, the Syracuse and Baltimore Symphonies, Lambert Orkis, David Hickman and others. Morrill was a Guest Researcher at IRCAM in 1980, a Visiting Professor of Music at SUNY Binghamton and Stanford Universities, and has received several composition grants from the New York State Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts. He has also worked on special jazz projects for Stan Getz and Wynton Marsalis, and is the author of A Guide to the Big Band Recordings of Woody Herman published by the Greenwood Press. After 1976 Morrill began producing computer music concerts with soprano Neva Pilgrim under the name of Singing Circuits. In the late 1980s he developed a MIDI trumpet instrument with engineer Perry Cook, and he performed on many concerts with cellist Chris Chafe, saxophonist David Demsey and soprano Pamela Jordan. Both Demsey and Jordan recorded complete solo discs of Morrill’s computer music compositions for the Centaur label. Recently Morrill has composed music for violinist Laura Klugherz and pianist Jill Timmons, the Tremont String Quartet, trumpeter Mark Ponzo, saxophonist Stephen Duke, trombonists Jim Pugh and Bill Harris and the Syracuse Symphony."



    CDCM Computer Music Series, Vol. 8

    or

    CDCM Computer Music Series, Vol. 8


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    1. Lonely Woman 9:55
    2. Dolphy's Dance 4:00
    3. Sandino 4:43
    4. Fiasco 5:38
    5. Etude II 2:07
    6. Blues in Motian 6:59
    7. Silence 6:36
    8. Shuffle Montgomery 6:24
    9. Etude I 2:12

    Geri Allen - Piano
    Charlie Haden - Bass
    Paul Motian - Drums, Percussion

    AMG:
    "The very democratic trio of bassist Charlie Haden, drummer Paul Motian and pianist Geri Allen perform sensitive yet often exploratory group improvisations on several originals, Ornette Coleman's 'Lonely Woman,' and Herbie Nichols''Shuffle Montgomery.' The communication between these three masterful players is quite impressive."



    Etudes

    or

    Etudes


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    1. Johannesburg 4:52
    2. A Toast to the People 5:47
    3. The Summer of '42 4:41
    4. Beginnings (The First Minute of a New Day) 6:23
    5. South Carolina (Barnwell) 3:46
    6. Essex 9:17
    7. Fell Together 4:30
    8. A Lovely Day 3:29
    9. Johannesburg 6:29
    10. South Carolina (Barnwell) 4:23
    11. Save the Children 11:14
    12. Let Me See Your I.D. 7:30

    Gil Scott-Heron - Guitar, Piano, Vocals
    Brian Jackson - Flute, Keyboards, Vocals
    Bilal Sunni Ali - Flute, Harmonica, Saxophone
    Danny Bowens - Bass
    Bob Adams - Drums
    Victor Bowens - Bells, Tambourine, Vocals
    Charles Saunders - Congas, Drums
    Adenola - Congas, Percussion
    Barnett Williams - Percussion

    AMG:
    "The collaboration between Gil Scott-Heron and Brian Jackson was now a formal one, as they were issuing albums as a team. This was their second duo project to make the pop charts, and it included anti-nuclear and anti-apartheid themes, plus less political, more autobiographical/reflective material like 'Summer of '42,''Beginnings (The First Minute of a New Day),' and 'Fell Together.' Scott-Heron was now a campus and movement hero, and Jackson's production and arranging savvy helped make his albums as arresting musically as they were lyrically."



    From South Africa To South Carolina

    or

    From South Africa To South Carolina


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    1. Technopolis 4:14
    2. Absolute Ego Dance 4:37
    3. Rydeen 4:26
    4. Catsalia 3:31
    5. Behind the Mask 3:36
    6. Day Tripper 2:40
    7. Insomnia 4:57
    8. Solid State Survivor 3:58

    Ryuichi Sakamoto - Keyboards, Voices
    Harry 'Haruomi' Hosono - Bass, Keyboards, Voices
    Yukihiro Takahashi - Drums, Vocals
    +
    Jakota Ayukawa - Guitar
    Makoto Ayukawa - Guitar
    Sandii - Voices

    AMG:
    "The trio hit their stride with second album Solid State Survivor, a brisk and confident set of synth-disco-pop that continues along the line drawn five years before by Kraftwerk. Fun-loving and breezy where Kraftwerk had been ponderous and statuesque, the album sets out YMO's template for electronic pop with less minimalism and a more varying use of synthesizer lines. The English lyrics, written by Chris Mosdell but sung by YMO themselves, make for hilarious listening especially on a cover of the Beatles''Day Tripper'."



    Solid State Survivor

    or

    Solid State Survivor


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    1. Blue Kind of Mind 7:19
    2. Ovation 3:54
    3. Jungle Song 6:06
    4. Happy Landing 5:30
    5. Melancholia 5:53
    6. A Night at Kippie's 6:07
    7. Walking Man 4:17
    8. Green Lagoon 6:02
    9. Gimmee a Break 5:33
    10. La Moutte 4:27
    11. Escape 5:48

    Klaus Doldinger - saxophone (Tenor & Soprano)
    Peter O'Mara - guitar
    Roberto Di Gioia - multi instruments
    Wolfgang Haffner - drums
    Ernst Stroer - percussion
    Biboul Darouiche - percussion

    AMG:
    "Passport is the creation of saxophonist Klaus Doldinger, who has stated that Passport is not so much a set group but a label and a name for his many projects. Doldinger, who had started out playing Dixieland back in the 1950s, by the following decade was a modern tenor saxophonist who also worked in the studios. His mind has always remained quite open and in 1970 he formed Passport to explore the combination of advanced jazz improvising with rockish rhythms. Passport matches Doldinger's reeds (tenor, soprano, flute, and occasional keyboards) with an electric rhythm section. The group's first recording (1971's Passport) also included Olaf Kübler on second tenor and flute, organist Jimmy Jackson, electric bassist Lother Meid, and drummer Udo Lindenberg. Soon the group went through the first of many complete turnovers. The mid-'70s version usually teamed Doldinger with keyboardist Kristian Schultze, electric bassist Wolfgang Schmid, and drummer Curt Cress, and by 1978 the group had changed drastically again. However, no matter who was in the rhythm section, Klaus Doldinger's lead voice and his band's musical direction remained consistent through the years. Passport has released numerous albums, initially for Atlantic and subsequently via recordings and reissues for WEA and its subsidiaries and licensees, through into the 21st century, including 1996's Passport to Paradise, 1997's Passport Control (on Connoisseur), 1998's Move, 2000's Passport Live, and 2003's Back to Brazil."



    Passport To Paradise

    or

    Passport To Paradise


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    1. Señor Blues 6:18
    2. Subway 1:43
    3. I Know You Rider #1 3:54
    4. I Know You Rider #2 4:34
    5. Walk in Jerusalem 2:43
    6. Castles in the Sand 8:31
    7. May You Never Be Alone 2:18
    8. Warm Red Wine 3:03
    9. Look Over Yonder Wall/State Farm 3:50
    10. Wake Up, Dead Man, Pt. 1 5:34
    11. Wake Up, Dead Man, Pt. 2 3:31
    12. The Fool 8:51

    Dino Valente - Vocals
    John Cipollina - Guitar
    Nicky Hopkins - Piano
    David Freiberg - Bass
    Greg Elmore - Drums

    AMG:
    "On December 31, 1969, Quicksilver Messenger Service appeared at a New Year's Eve show in San Francisco with their fourth different lineup since their formation in 1965. Originally, the band had been a quintet consisting of guitarist John Cipollina, singer Jim Murray, bassist David Freiberg, guitarist Gary Duncan, and drummer Greg Elmore. Murray dropped out before the recording and release of the group's self-titled debut album in May 1968. After the appearance of the second album, Happy Trails, in March 1969, Duncan departed and was replaced by keyboardist Nicky Hopkins for the third album, Shady Grove, released in December 1969. But at that New Year's Eve show, Duncan returned, and he brought with him singer/songwriter/guitarist Dino Valente, who actually had been the original instigator of QMS, even though a prison term had prevented him from performing with the band at its inception, and after being paroled he had returned to his solo career. That might help explain how it could have been that Valente so thoroughly took charge of the group upon his belated arrival. Castles in the Sand brings into legitimate release a rehearsal tape of the newly reconfigured QMS, recorded either in late 1969 or early 1970, that has circulated among collectors and been bootlegged. Valente's domination is apparent throughout. He directs the rehearsal, stopping and starting the songs, calling out chord changes, giving instructions to the other musicians, and even making the admonition 'Wake up' a couple of times. Still, this is a perfunctory run-through of material in which Valente's whiny voice is the major element. The set includes folk and country tunes like 'I Know You Rider' that no doubt date from Valente's days as a folkie, along with evolving Valente originals such as an incomplete take of 'Subway' (which would appear on the album What About Me a year later). The final track, 'The Fool,' is not the same song as the one with that title that appeared on the band's debut album. Never intended for commercial release, these recordings provide an interesting inside view of a band in transition, and they will be of interest to fans, but they do not come up even to the level of the Valente-led albums that followed with this lineup, Just for Love and What About Me."



    Castles in the Sand

    or

    Castles in the Sand


    0 0


    1. Quarentão Simpático 2:23
    2. Êle e Ela 2:24
    3. Dez Leis (Is That Law) 4:18
    4. Pigmalião 2:56
    5. Que Eu Canse e Descanse 3:20
    6. Esperando o Messias 2:51
    7. Freio Aerodinâmico 2:43
    8. Os Grilos 2:33
    9. Suite Imaginária: Cançao/Corrente/Toada/Dança 8:59
    10. Os Grilos 2:16

    Marcos Valle – Vocals, Piano
    Nelson Ângelo – Guitar
    Tavito – Guitar
    Wagner Tiso – Keyboards
    Luiz Alves – Bass
    Novelli – Bass
    Robertinho Silva – Drums
    Ângela Valle – Vocals (2,7)

    AMG:
    "Marcos Valle's self-titled LP from 1970 finds the Brazilian maestro slowly making his way from the poignant bossa nova ballads of Samba '68 to the juiced-up electronic-funk of his mid-'70s masterpieces. Consequently, for every ballad like 'Que eu Canse e Descanse' or 'Êle e Ela' (the latter complete with giggling and nearly audible lovers' talk), Valle throws in a track like 'Pigmalião,' featuring a brassy orchestra and tilting rhythms continually being interrupted by jack-in-the-box studio effects, or the final track, 'Suite Imaginária,' a four-part work of experimental woodwinds, baroque vocal choirs, and soft arrangements. Preceding the suite, however, are two of his finest pop songs: 'Os Grilos' and 'Freio Aerodinâmico.' Definitely not a seamless listen, and since the best tracks are covered well on his hits collections, Marcos Valle is a pick only for you'll-buy-anything collectors floored by everything his hand touches."



    Marcos Valle

    or

    Marcos Valle


    0 0


    1. Star Wars Main Title (John Williams) 3:04
    2. Space Fantasy on Themes by Wagner and R. Strauss 9:12
    3. Pacific 231 (Arthur Honegger) 6:45
    4. The Unanswered Question (Charles Ives) 6:19
    5. Aranjuez-Adagio (Joaquín Rodrigo) 6:21
    6. Solveig's Song (Edvard Grieg) 4:48
    7. Hora Staccato (Grigoras Dinicu / Jascha Heifetz) 3:28
    8. The Sea Named "Solaris" (J.S. Bach) 12:26

    Tomita - Synthesizer

    AMG:
    "Isao Tomita is a brilliant interpreter. He has transcribed several classical and orchestral works for the synthesizer. Kosmos is a slick album of those works that translate well to Tomita's spacescapes and his visionary style. These pieces had acoustic atmospheric resonance in their original formats. Tomita's synthesized versions have all of the original bravado and essence and he has added ambient atmospheres to give each piece new meaning and depth. The modernized pieces are genuine spacescapes. The disc opens, somewhat predictably, with John Williams''Star Wars Theme.' Tomita's lighthearted version adds humor to the piece. Track two, 'Space Fantasy,' just might be Tomita's best work. He combines elements from 'Thus Spake Zoroaster' by Richard Strauss and 'Ride of the Valkyries' and 'Tannhauser Overture,' both by Richard Wagner. The depth of this performance on this is amazing. Arthur Honegger's 'Pacific 231' is an excellent transitional piece. Experimental sounds give it an avant-garde feel. 'The Unanswered Question' by Charles Ives is pure atmospheric minimalism in both its original and electronic form. Ives was a risk-taker and one of the foremost avant-garde composers of his time; he would like this treatment. Rodrigo's 'Aranjuez' takes on new beauty and character in Tomita's translation. Teamed with Ives' piece and the next piece, this is the travel and exploration leg of the journey. Edvard Grieg's 'Solveig's Song' from 'The Peer Gynt Suite' has tremendous atmospheric qualities also. While the journey continues, so does the beauty. 'Hora Staccato' represents an end or a milestone of the journey. This Grigoras Dinicu/Jascha Heifetz piece is brisk and energetic. 'The Sea Named Solaris' is based on Johann Sebastian Bach's 'Three Part Invention, No. 2' and'Ich Ruf zu Dir, Jesu Christ.' Tomita also wrote some of the music for this piece. It is a beautiful finish to a wondrous journey. This is one of the strongest albums in Tomita's discography. Only the work of Wendy Carlos can compare to Tomita's work."



    Kosmos

    or

    Kosmos


    0 0


    1. Title 5:04
    2. Rattles 6:23
    3. Losing Weight Through Prayer 6:11
    4. Jennifer Plastics 5:25
    5. Three Rapid Fire Shell Divisions 4:12
    6. Language Barrier 7:11
    7. Polyurethane 4:46
    8. Simulacrum 5:47

    Ann Schattle - Horn
    Erica Schattle - Bassoon
    Alec K. Redfearn - Accordion
    Frank Difficult - Electronics, Keyboards
    Michael Jeffries - Bass, Electronics, Sax (Baritone), Voices
    Jason McGill - Electronics, Percussion, Sax (Alto), Shortwave Radio
    Matt McLaren - Drums, Percussion

    AMG:
    "All kinds of music tossed in a blender can claim either diversity, or inanity and an unfocused noisy precept. Barnacled, hailing from Providence, RI, has no issues in mixing and matching multiple genres and instrumentation, ranging from prog rock, English Canterbury fusion, new wave '60s Impulse label saxophone jazz, various ethnic musics, calculated racket, the speak and spell toy or shortwave radio, and interstellar space sounds. Doing it all with no electric guitar present, the septet forges alchemistic gold from pewter, making improvised and thematic music that weaves in and out of earth, sea, and sky in a spontaneous manner similar to several '70s groups in the progressive music field. It's not difficult to hear the reference points utilized by Barnacled, starting with 'Title,' a fun, skronky jam with maddening mixed meters that echoes shades of early Gong, Henry Cow, the Muffins, and Eastern block or gypsy music. The most developed piece, 'Language Barrier,' features electric keyboardist Frank Difficult in a Sun Ra, Saturn based mode, using deeply hued galactic or robot-like phrasings. Collectively the band heads for dark and suggestive socialist territory - again à la Henry Cow - with the bassoon of Erica Schattle and sister Ann Schattle on her 'horn in F' playing a chamber segment, then a march rock stomp, very loose and loud. They discover beautiful and serene moments during 'Polyurethane,' switch back and forth from minimalist tuning up seriousness to free, controlled, but purely interactive improvisation. This sense of a conversational precept continues on 'Three Rapid Fire Shell Divisions,' as the horns trade off with drumkit workouts in banter, or argumentative discourse. 'Losing Weight Through Prayer' is a nuevo tango vehicle that morphs into heavy rock, while the whirling dervish 'Rattles' is more hard-edged punk thrash, especially from drummer Matt McLaren and bassist Michael Jeffries. 'Simulacrum' finishes this incredible journey through sound experimentation, with oceanic lighthouse beacons from the horns of Jeffries on baritone sax and the alto sax of Jason McGill switching on and off, while percussion clatters, the accordion of Alec K. Redfearn moans, and the band dances away to a Balkan beat. Aside from the concept inherent in this retro music being updated, the impressive musicianship and consistently fearless choices made by Barnacled turns this album into one of the more intriguing and enlivening modern-day fusions of recent memory, and perhaps for all time."



    Charles

    or

    Charles


    0 0


    1. To Boldly Go Where Everyone Has Gone Before 8:42
    2. The Reach 6:54
    3. People from the Past 8:03
    4. Traffic on the Bridge 7:35
    5. Inner Urge 4:20
    6. Days of Wine and Roses 5:41
    7. Soultrane 7:09
    8. Mileage 4:58
    9. My Romance 5:42
    10. Discovery Zone 5:10
    11. Blues for Ram 4:40

    Jerry Bergonzi - Sax (Tenor)
    John Abercrombie - Guitar
    Joey Calderazzo - Piano
    Bruce Gertz - Bass
    Adam Nussbaum - Drums

    allaboutjazz:
    "Born in Providence, Rhode Island, acoustic and electric bass player and composer Bruce Gertz began playing guitar at the age of ten. By age fourteen he changed to the bass guitar and started playing rock, blues and later jazz. While attending Berklee College of Music in Boston as a composition and arranging major, Bruce studied acoustic bass under John Neves and William Curtis. He began freelancing in the Boston area and soon built a reputation as a versatile player and soloist on both acoustic and electric bass. Gertz became associated with Bill Frisell, Mick Goodrick, Mike Stern,
    George Garzone, Jerry Bergonzi, Joe Lovano, Billy Drewes, Jamie Haddad, Kenny Werner, Ted Lo, Theo Saunders, John Scofield and other top players in Boston through time. Later Bruce studied more advanced jazz improvisation with Charlie Banacos and also through association with Jerry Bergonzi. Bruce has also toured with Billy Eckstine, Maynard Ferguson, Marlena Shaw, Gary Burton, Dave Brubeck, Jerry Bergonzi, Joey Calderazzo, Christian Jacob, Adam Nussbaum, Makoto Ozone and others. Performance Experience: Being an established performer in New England, Bruce has accompanied many well known, jazz artists: Gil Evans,Danilo Perez, Junior Cook, Dave Brubeck, Bob Berg, Mike Stern,Charles McPherson, George Cables, Diane Schurr, Bobby Tucker, Tom Harrell, Joe Lovano, Bill Frisell, Lee Konitz, Jon Hendricks, Cab Calloway, Joe Williams, Oliver Lake, Mark Murphy, George Coleman, John Abercrombie, Gary Burton, George Garzone, Tim Hagans, Kenny Werner, Billy Hart, Mick Goodrick, Pat Metheny, Ted Curson, Eddie Harris, Eric Kloss, The Fifth Dimension, The Coasters, Freddie Cole, Donald Byrd, Charlie Byrd, Joey Calderazzo,Cyrus Chestnut, Aaron Goldberg, Larry Goldings and Cecil Payne are some of these artists."



    Discovery Zone

    or

    Discovery Zone


    0 0


    1. Look Outside 3:33
    2. Thru the Milky Way 3:55
    3. Talkin''Bout a Feelin' 3:04
    4. Child of the Novelty 4:07
    5. Makin' My Wave 4:42
    6. A New Rock and Roll 3:09
    7. Changing 3:14
    8. Plastic Man 3:12
    9. Guit War 3:44
    10. Chains Of (S)pace 5:57
    11. Maxoom 2:52
    12. Buddy 3:41
    13. Magic Man 2:34
    14. Funky Woman 3:15
    15. Madness 4:50

    1. All in Your Mind 3:12
    2. Blues 7:05
    3. Boardwalk Lady 2:37
    4. Back on Home 3:16
    5. The New Beginning 1:52
    6. Tales of the Spanish Warrior 4:55
    7. The King Who Stole (The Universe) 3:57
    8. Satisfy Your Soul 3:15
    9. Land of 1000 Nights 4:44
    10. Moonlight Lady 4:05
    11. Dancing Lady 3:11
    12. Once Again 3:25
    13. Tryin' Anyway 3:50
    14. Dear Music 4:20
    15. Strange Universe 6:59

    Frank Marino - Guitar, Keyboards, Vocals
    Paul Harwood - Bass
    Jimmy Ayoub - Drums
    +
    Phil Bech - Piano
    Johnny McDiarmid - Organ

    AMG:
    "This Hendrix-influenced power trio from Montreal comprised guitarist Frank Marino, bassist Paul Harwood and drummer Jim Ayoub. The band released albums throughout the '70s, including Maxoom (1972), Child of the Novelty (1974), Strange Universe (1975), Mahogany Rush IV (1976), World Anthem (1977), Live (1978) and Tales of the Unexpected (1979). The band became known as Frank Marino and Mahogany Rush after 1980's What's Next, then simply Frank Marino after Jim Ayoub left."



    Child of the Novelty/Maxoom/Strange Universe

    or

    Child of the Novelty/Maxoom/Strange Universe


    0 0


    1. Bad Times 3:54
    2. Early Morning Love 4:46
    3. Dancing Dreams 5:51
    4. Something Special 4:39
    5. The Other Side 8:31
    6. North One 6:35
    7. French Kiss 5:56

    Michal Urbaniak – Violin
    Urszula Dudziak – Vocals
    Mike Stern – Guitar (2,3)
    Barry Eastmond – Keyboards (2,3,7)
    Kenny Kirkland – Keyboards (1,4-6)
    Marcus Miller – Bass (1,4,6)
    Tom Barney – Bass (2,3,7)
    Buddy Williams – Drums (2,3,5-7)
    Yogi Horton – Drums (1,4)

    AMG:
    "Once Poland's most promising import in the jazz-rock 1970s, Michal Urbaniak's chief value in retrospect was as a fellow traveler of Jean-Luc Ponty, a fluid advocate of the electric violin, the lower-pitched Violectra, and the Lyricon (the first popular, if now largely under-utilized wind synthesizer). Like many Eastern European jazzmen, he would incorporate elements of Polish folk music into his jazz pursuits, and his other heroes range from the inevitable Miles Davis to Polish classicist Witold Lutoslawski. His electric violin was often filtered with a gauze of electronic modifying devices, and on occasion, he could come up with an attractively memorable composition like 'Satin Lady.'
    Urbaniak began playing the violin at age six, followed by studies on the soprano and then tenor saxophones. His interests in jazz developed chronologically from Dixieland to swing to bop as he grew up, and he studied at the Academy of Music in Warsaw while working in various Polish jazz bands and playing classical violin. In 1965, he formed his own band in Scandinavia with singer Urszula Dudziak (later his wife), returning to Poland in 1969 to found Constellation, which included pianist Adam Makowicz. Having won a scholarship to the Berklee College of Music upon being voted Best Soloist at the 1971 Montreux Jazz Festival, Urbaniak made the U.S. his home in 1973. He soon formed a popular jazz-rock group called Fusion, recording for Columbia and Arista in a Mahavishnu Orchestra/Ponty fashion, with Dudziak adding darting, slippery scat vocals. This group lasted until 1977, and Urbaniak's profile would never be as high again, although he performed with Larry Coryell in 1982-1983, led the new electric group Urbanator in the 1990s, and has performed and recorded in other styles ranging from bop to free jazz into the 21st century."



    Michal Urbaniak

    or

    Michal Urbaniak


    0 0


    1. Heaven's in Here 6:05
    2. Tin Machine 3:36
    3. Prisoner of Love 4:51
    4. Crack City 4:36
    5. I Can't Read 4:53
    6. Under the God 4:07
    7. Amazing 3:06
    8. Working Class Hero 4:42
    9. Bus Stop 1:43
    10. Pretty Thing 4:39
    11. Video Crime 3:54
    12. Run 3:20
    13. Sacrifice Yourself 2:10
    14. Baby Can Dance 4:57

    David Bowie - Guitar, Vocals
    Reeves Gabrels - Guitar
    Tony Sales - Bass, Vocals
    Hunt Sales - Drums, Vocals
    +
    Kevin Armstrong - Keyboards, Organ (Hammond)

    AMG:
    "A remarkable recording for many reasons, the debut of Tin Machine predates by nearly half a decade much of the guitar-oriented alternative pop that followed the grunge explosion of 1991-1992. This does not sound like Bowie in a band; missing are the quirkiness and theatrics that characterize much of Bowie's solo work. This is a band with a band attitude, not exactly what the fans were wanting at the time. Stunt guitarist Reeves Gabrels provides much in the way of ambient guitar solos, not unlike Adrian Belew's work. Drummer Hunt Sales provides a sticky tenor vocal similar to Bowie's own voice in a higher register; they blend very well together. The music is hard-edged guitar rock with an intelligence missing from much of the work of that genre at the time. Highlights include the emotional 'Prisoner of Love' and the driving 'Under the God.' The band does a rocking rework of John Lennon's 'Working Class Hero,' with a killer machine-gun fire-sounding riff that permeated the track. The strongest analog to Bowie's earlier work is a five-minute number toward the beginning of the record called 'I Can't Read'; with its deliberately out-of-tune guitars and half-hearted vocals, it's a nice piece of artistry. This record would have been more popular had it been released five or six years later."



    Tin Machine

    or

    Tin Machine


    0 0


    1. Cookin' at the Continental 5:41
    2. Stormy Monday 5:17
    3. All Blues 7:38
    4. Birk's Works 6:02
    5. Goodbye Pork Pie Hat 5:20
    6. Señor Blues 6:16
    7. Blue Miles 5:33
    8. Mysterioso/Ba-Lue Bolivar Ba-Lues-Are 8:12
    9. Some Other Blues 3:47
    10. Aunt Hagar's Blues 7:21

    B.B. King - Guitar, Vocals
    Bob Mintzer - Clarinet (Bass), Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor)
    Nelson Rangell - Flute, Sax (Alto), Sax (Soprano)
    Eric Marienthal - Sax (Alto), Sax (Soprano)
    Tom Scott - Sax (Baritone), Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor)
    Ernie Watts - Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor)
    Michael Brecker - Sax (Tenor)
    Randy Brecker - Flugelhorn, Trumpet
    Chuck Findley - Flugelhorn, Trumpet
    Arturo Sandoval - Flugelhorn, Trumpet
    George Bohannon - Trombone
    Chick Corea - Piano
    Dave Grusin - Piano
    Ramsey Lewis - Piano
    Russell Ferrante - Organ (Hammond), Piano
    John Patitucci - Bass
    Dave Weckl - Drums

    AMG:
    "When one considers the large number of great players who participated in this project (including trumpeters Arturo Sandoval, Randy Brecker and Chuck Findley, trombonist George Bohanon, the reeds of Eric Marienthal, Nelson Rangell, Tom Scott, Ernie Watts and Bob Mintzer, such keyboardists as Dave Grusin, Chick Corea, Ramsey Lewis and Russell Ferrante, bassist John Patitucci, drummer Dave Weckl, and guests B.B. King and tenor great Michael Brecker), the rather predictable results are a disappointment. With the exception of Chick Corea's recent 'Blue Miles,' this album could have been titled 'Warhorses' due to the very familiar material. The arrangements by Michael Abene, Scott, Grusin, Mintzer and Ferrante contain no real surprises (other than some unexpected moments on 'Misterioso'), and none of the solos are long enough to really build. There is a certain novelty in hearing some of the crossover players like Rangell, Scott and Lewis playing hard bop tunes such as 'Birks Works,''Senor Blues' and 'Cookin' at the Continental,' but why waste B.B. King on yet another version of 'Stormy Monday Blues?'"



    All Blues 1994

    or

    All Blues 1994


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