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FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | .... | 30 | 31 | (Page 32) | 33 | 34 | .... | 57 | newer

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    1. I'm Willin' 3:32
    2. Song of Job 6:04
    3. Broken Morning 3:04
    4. Home to You 3:22
    5. Out Where the Hills 5:48
    6. Waiting for Elijah 3:35
    7. 13 Questions 2:58
    8. Oh My Love/Sally Goodin'... 15:26
    9. Sally Goodin' 2:19
    10. Creepin' Midnight 5:32
    11. O.B.S 5:16

    Jim Roberts - Vocals
    Peter Rowan - Guitar, Vocals
    Lloyd Baskin - Keyboards, Vocals
    Richard Greene - Keyboards, Viola, Violin, Vocals
    Andy Kulberg - Bass, Flute, Vocals
    Larry Atamanuik - Drums, Percussion
    Ervin T. Rouse - Composer

    AMG:
    "Roots-fusion combo Seatrain formed from the ashes of the Blues Project - following the exits of the New York-based group's other members. Flutist/bassist Andy Kulberg and drummer Roy Blumenfeld relocated to Marin County, CA, forming a new lineup with vocalist Jim Roberts, ex-Mystery Trend guitarist John Gregory, former Jim Kweskin Jug Band violinist Richard Greene, and saxophonist Don Kretmar. Though the group's 1968 album, Planned Obsolescence, was issued under the Blues Project name out of contractual obligations, the sextet immediately rechristened itself Seatrain to release a self-titled 1969 LP highlighted by their unique blend of rock, bluegrass, folk, and blues. A series of roster changes plagued the group in the months to follow, however, and in 1970 Seatrain - now comprising Kulberg, Roberts and Greene in addition to keyboardist Lloyd Baskin, drummer Larry Atamanuik, and former Earth Opera guitarist Peter Rowan - released their second album, also eponymously-titled, scoring a minor hit with the single '13 Questions.' The George Martin-produced Marblehead Messenger followed a year later, with Greene and Rowan soon exiting to join Muleskinner; Roberts and Atamanuik left Seatrain as well, with the latter eventually resurfacing in Emmylou Harris' Nash Ramblers. The remaining duo of Kulberg and Baskin recruited guitarist Peter Walsh, keyboardist Bill Elliot, and drummer Julio Coronado for one final LP, 1973's Watch."



    Seatrain

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    Seatrain


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    1. Since I Been Gone 4:19
    2. Ain't No Price on Happiness 4:03
    3. I'm Glad You Walked into My Life 4:51
    4. I'm Coming Home 3:24
    5. He'll Never Love You Like I Do 3:56
    6. Love Has Gone Away 3:35
    7. Love Don't Love Nobody 3:37
    8. Mighty Love 3:16
    9. I Wish I Could Sleep 3:04
    10. I Just Gotta Make It Happen 3:31
    11. Mr. Big Man 4:04
    12. You Sure Are Nasty 3:31

    Bobbie Smith - Tenor (Vocal)
    Henry Fambrough - Baritone (Vocal)
    Billy Henderson - Tenor (Vocal)
    Pervis Jackson - Bass (Vocal)
    +
    Jack Faith - Flute, Sax (Alto)
    Joseph DeAngelis - French Horn
    Rocco Bene - Trumpet
    Robert Hartzell - Trumpet
    Freddy Joiner - Trombone
    Eddie Keskarella - Trombone
    Bob Moore - Trombone
    Don Renaldo - Strings
    Roland Chambers - Guitar
    Norman Harris - Guitar
    Bobby Eli - Guitar
    Vince Montana - Marimba, Vibraphone
    Thom Bell - Keyboards
    Ronnie Baker - Bass
    Earl Young - Drums
    Larry Washington - Percussion
    Philippe Wynne - Tenor (Vocal)
    Yvette Benson - Vocals (Background)
    Carla Benton - Vocals (Background)
    Linda Creed - Vocals (Background)
    Barbara Ingram - Vocals (Background)

    AMG:
    "Riding high off of a Grammy nod as Producer of the Year for his work on the Spinners 1973 eponymous album, Philly soul mastermind Thom Bell infused their next collection Mighty Love (1974) with the similar mix of lushly scored slow jams and stylish mid-tempo R&B entries. Although the group had been around since the mid-'50s, by the time the quintet began their stint on Atlantic Records the lineup featured Henry Fambrough (baritone vocal), Billy Henderson (tenor vocal), Pervis Jackson (bass vocal), Bobbie Smith (tenor vocal) and the then most recent addition in 1971 Philippe Wynne (tenor vocal). Several of Bell's distinct arrangements would not only become instant enthusiast favorites, but crossover hits as well. While chronologically the first cut to make the charts - as it had been released several weeks before the long-player - the title track 'Mighty Love' was ironically the last on the platter. The luminous and brisk melody is complemented by optimistic leads from Smith and Wynne. The latter turned in a soulful outing comparable to that of Al Green. When featured as a focus track, it was split into two parts with 'Mighty Love Pt. 1' vaulting to the top of the R&B survey and up to number 20 as a Pop single. The Bell co-penned 'I'm Coming Home' followed with a chipper groove that shows off the tight horn section and a vibe that would reappear slightly reconfigured and significantly pumped up on 'Rubberband Man' several years later. Conversely, the tender seven-plus-minute ballad 'Love Don't Love Nobody' is a heart-wrenching yet all too common tale of unrequited affection. It's likewise a perfect vehicle for Wynne's precise tone and elastic vocal range, following in the successful footsteps of 'I'm Coming Home' and 'Love Don't Love Nobody' landing in the upper reaches (number four) of the R&B as well as into the Top 20 (number 15) of the Pop countdown. Tucked in between the more prominent selections are a few lesser-known but equally worthwhile sides, such as the exquisite and refined 'He'll Never Love You Like I Do' and the funky laid-back 'Ain't No Price on Happiness,' oozing the unmistakable sound of Philly soul. The mid-'90s CD reissue of Mighty Love was augmented by four seminal supplementary recordings that were from an unrealized Motown session circa 1972."



    Mighty Love

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    Mighty Love


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    1. Fuckxotica 4:18
    2. Hilo Himo 3:14
    3. Shiso Baba 8:24
    4. UFOFF 7:34
    5. Bar Time With Eno 3:44
    6. Kiri Taki 3:44
    7. 4AB 1:54
    8. Fat Anarchy on Airtube 9:37
    9. Espimo 2:12
    10. Macabro Delicato 2:13

    Yamantaka Eye - Banjo, Electronics, Guitar, Objects, Organ, Percussion, Sound Effects, Vocals, Voices
    John Zorn - Sax (Alto), Bells, Drum Machine, Percussion, Piano, Tabla, Tibetan Bells

    AMG:
    "Much has happened since Yamatsuka Eye and John Zorn convened for the first Nani Nani in 1995. Zorn has continued, more or less, as he always has, chasing a dozen different spirits in a haunted house of his own construct. From his soundtrack work in the ongoing Film Works series (check Vol. 13, Invitation to a Suicide, a highlight of the impressive series) through the continuing unfolding of the Masada songbook from its original jazz quartet into string groups and guitar ensembles, the man is endlessly searching and ever the creative wellspring. Eye is a kindred spirit, although his path has had a few more sharp turns than his musical partner. First the Boredoms had a cosmic overhaul, shifting from the cut-and-paste rock collage insanity that was their trademark to a blissed-out Krautrock jam machine. Then, they broke up, supposedly to be replaced by the Voordoms, only to have the Boredoms name suddenly reappear. He's also kept busy as an artist, providing cover art for Beck and releasing a book as well. Naninani II doesn't sound like a latter-day Boredoms record, but the same cosmic spirit is present, especially on mellower excursions like 'Bar Time With Eno' and 'Hilo Himo.' It still has its moments of spazz and skronk, like the alto and electronics blowout of 'UFOFF,' but Naninani II is defined by its more sublime moments. Choosing to turn inward rather than freaking out makes this the most satisfying meeting of Eye and Zorn yet."



    Naninani II

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    Naninani II


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    1. Anaklasis, for string orchestra & percussion 6:05
    2. Threnody (for the Victims of Hiroshima), for 52 strings 10:03
    3. Fonogrammi, for flute & chamber orchestra 6:48
    4. De Natura Sonoris I, for orchestra 7:22
    5. Capriccio for violin & orchestra 11:45
    6. Canticum canticorum Salomonis, for chorus & orchestra 16:54
    7. De Natura Sonoris II, for orchestra 9:10
    8. The Dream of Jacob, for orchestra 7:31

    1. Emanations, for 2 string orchestras 6:56
    2. Partita, for harpsichord, electric guitar, bass guitar, harp, double-bass & orchestra 19:22
    3. Cello Concerto No. 1 14:53
    4. Symphony No. 1: 1. Arche - Dynamis 1 19:51
    5. Symphony No. 1: 2. Dynamis 2 - Arche 2 11:23

    Krzysztof Penderecki - Conductor
    Felicja Blumental - Harpsichord
    Wanda Wilkomirska - Violin
    Siegfried Palm - Cello
    London Symphony Orchestra
    Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
    Krakow Philharmonic Choir

    AMG:
    "Anaklasis: Penderecki's orchestral color study 'Anaklasis', of approximately 6 minutes duration, was commissioned by Baden-Baden Radio and completed in 1960. It is scored for the unusual orchestral ensemble of 42 strings, celesta, harp, piano, claves, and six percussionists. It is similar to the compositions 'De Natura Sonoris' Nos. 1 & 2 in being an open structure essay in new sounds. The first of the work's three sections opens with a extremely quiet drone and sharp stabs in the strings. Then eerie tremolo strings with slow slides is sustained for about a half minute, until high icy string harmonic form a new drone and a dense harmonic field is built up. Loud and vigorous drums, wood blocks, and cymbals seque into fast repeated notes on bells, piano, xylophone and vibraphone. The music then quietly drifts on a slowly undulating thin surface of strings. Trilling clusters amass and float away in frightened tremolos join by small percussive sounds. The final sounds we hear are objects (a pencil or something similar) are dropped on the piano strings, which are then crossed with a wire brush (producing an airy sound), struck in the lowest range with a soft tympani stick, and then plucked in a small interval with the fingers. The sounds just fade away.
    Threnody: Threnody was completed in 1960, and remains one of Penderecki's best-known works. Composed at a time when serial technique dominated avant-garde music, Threnody is instead a deeply personal work, disturbing in its evocations of human misery and terror. Though it is dedicated to the victims of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima at the end of the Second World War, Penderecki drew on his own experiences in Nazi-occupied Poland in composing this work. He noted that Nazi war crimes, especially 'the great Apocalypse' of Auschwitz, have been in his 'subconscious mind since the war.' As a result, this work, like much of Penderecki's music, is emotionally powerful and in large part autobiographical, but at the same time expresses a universal mourning for the victims of war.
    Threnody is scored for 52 strings, and features a number of spectacular instrumental effects - most significantly microtonal glissandi. Threnody is also a work of limited or 'controlled' aleatoric elements: musical gestures are represented graphically on the score, but the performers are at times allowed some freedom in the realization of musical elements like pitch and duration. The work is divided roughly into three sections, with the outermost sections allowing the greatest freedom for the performers. At certain points in the score, performers may simply play their instruments' highest notes, or, when pitch is specified, performers may move from pitch to pitch by quarter tones.
    Penderecki also demands unconventional bowing for effect, including bowing between the bridge and the tailpiece, and bowing the bridge or tailpiece. He also calls for striking the soundboard with the fingers. Instruments were divided into groups and assigned a particular range of pitches, within which they move by glissando. In terms of rhythm, Threnody is very nearly an arrhythmic piece, as there is no regular pulse to be found; instead, individual sections are measured by clock time, in minutes and seconds.
    The result of Penderecki's controlled aleatoricism is a work of considerable expressive force - a musical representation of human suffering that, despite its considerable technical difficulties, strikes home with surprising sincerity. Each string section, as it ebbs and swells, engages in a kind of dialogue with other sections, and the effect of many instruments playing glissandi at once simulates, rather distressingly, the sound of human voices wailing in a swirling, hellish polyphony. It is a vivid evocation of the horrors of war, and also a good example of Penderecki's so-called 'sensualist,' Neo-Romantic style.
    Fonogrammi: Penderecki's 'Fonogrammi', an unusual and still unpublished ensemble work for three flutes, strings, harpsichord and percussion (incl. piano) of approximately 6 and 1/2 minutes duration was composed in 1961. This is another of Penderecki's intriguing and sensual sound studies that have no overt programme (although perhaps a private one for the composer). Penderecki was a 'romantic' in this sense at a time when most composers were involved in some intellectual compositional procedure or other. (That situation still hasn't changed much.) It opens with a clash of suspended cymbals and gong. Strummed piano strings, icy harmonics, and a wild mass of strings with wide vibrato, lead into more percussion. A wacky bass solo is accompanied by string instruments struck quasi-randomly on their bodies, and a crazed cacophony of flutes and percussive sounds follows. Solo flutes play in unusual techniques, fluttertongue, the log drum-like sound of the snapping of the flute keys, which is imitated by knocking on the piano, cymbal flutters and a loud crash with random tubular bells. A serious string chord leads to flute solo accompanied by bells and vibraphone and the very 1960's sound of a vibraslap. Two low, moaning flute tones lead the music out.
    De Natura Sonoris I: This orchestral study of sonorities and harmonic tension, composed in 1966, marked a new creative direction for the composer. He fused several elements of his earlier composition with ideas from electronic music (applying them to acoustic instruments) and created a triptych with the first and third music sections open to a great deal of free playing on notated ideas by the performers (including some 'walking bass' jazz-influenced passages). Contrastingly, the middle section is built on densely structured serial logic. The result is highly dramatic music with highlighted sound-combinations but also with a forward momentum usually found in more fully notated styles.
    Capriccio: Penderecki's powerful and shocking 'Capriccio' for violin and orchestra was composed in 1967 and lasts approximately 11 and 1/2 minutes. The orchestra is unusually expanded and includes, besides the regular forces, four saxophones, a contrabass clarinet, musical saw, electric bass guitar, harmonium and piano. A group of this size is however necessary to make the overwhelming impression required by the piece. The music is rhapsodic, that is, open in form, but is not lyrical - instead it is a highly emotional depiction of flight, with apparent war references (interestingly, it was premiered in Germany as part of the Donaueschingen Festival in October, 1967), occuring in a surrealist landscape. A tremendous roar quickly builds in the drums and the brass swelling in palpitating, blaring tones, and the violin quickly enters with fast quasi-improvisatory on-rushing passages pitted against wild woodwinds and the opening drums. The violin is left in silence for an enthusiastic cadence ending on a high sustained note. The low saxes and then winds enter on passages as fast as the violin. The violin stutters as a Mid-eastern sounding sax plays a line freely beneath it. A wild exchange of violent string pizzicati. Low trombone blasts. Another pizzicati section backed up with high drums. A massive string cluster than falls in slithery microtones. Sighs, and more microtonal sliding clusters in the deep bass ranges. A musical saw slides upward and crashing tubular bells signal some transformation. High, quiet piercing tones warn of danger. The violin slides in its highest registers. Air-like sounds and fading drones. Extremely low and slow counterpoint underscores a lamenting violin. The tempo of both lines increases in sudden blasts from the full orchestra. Absolute panic ensues. Massive punctuations. Gross imitation of a German waltz. Terror and the grotesque. No little doubt is left about the war reference. An on-rushing dissonant panic builds again. Cracks and snaps from the strings. A furious violin solo, and punctuations from the percussion, as the work suddenly ends.
    Canticum canticorum Salomonis: Written between 1970 and 1973 this approximately 17-minute work for choir and small orchestra is a setting of an erotic text drawn from the Song of Solomon. The crashing, clattering of percussion, random showers of high bell sounds, electronic-like sounds of bowed gongs and harmonium dissonances, sensual string glissandos and other unique orchestral timbres underline the dense vocals. Delicate clusters and dreamy interweaving choral patterns open the work. 'Let him kiss me with a kiss of his mouth, your breasts are better than wine ... deck me with flowers, revive me with apples because I am weak with love ... you have wounded my heart with one of your looks and with one lock of hair of your neck ... rise up north wind, come south wind and blow through my garden to waft its fragrance into the air ... I come into my garden ... I harvest my myrrh and my spices.' An electronic-like sustaining section is followed by clattering bells, and quasi-random pizzicati. Non-pitched, snaky, erotically moaning choral sounds with whispered phonemes is joined by the bell and pizzicati group. This is suddenly interrupted by the crashing of wooden and drum percussion interwoven with multi-voice speech and whispering. Clack! Everything stops. Clack! It all begins again. Icy harmonics float above the choir which is calling through the stillness. Low flutes and icy harmonics and bells. Sliding strings and uninhibited choral moaning and sounds of desire. Non-synchronous multi-voice slides and other vocalizations, eventually pulsed by bells. The choral masses fade away into one voice sing a single note, as if all the voice originate from that one person. Crystalline percussion sounds are followed by a siren-like chorus. Gentle hand-muted horn notes lead out the chorus on a high cluster that fades gradually away.
    De Natura Sonoris II: Composed in 1971, and of approximately 9 minutes duration, this second orchestral sound study uses a smaller instrumental group than 'De Natura Sonoris No. 1', and in texture is more of a sustained and mysterious landscape - icy string harmonics and glissandi with wide vibrato, suspended cymbal, sliding wind clusters, metal rods, low trombone blasts. The unusual and large percussion section includes a sliding bird-whistle, a musical saw, and a piece of railway track. Midway into the piece the orchestra breaks loose with huge scrapping sounds on the strings (somewhat similar to the sound effect of the sideways brushing of a plectrum on koto strings). There are magnificent trombone glissandos, and the brass section imitates the sound of an on-coming train, a highly dramatic, dense and compelling sound aggregation. Suddenly all is still. There are two tympani strokes, and the conflagration begins again, eventually flattening out to a low drone. The on-rushing of low strings brings back the mysterious opening texture returns, along with a few string stabs reminiscent of 'De Natura Sonoris No. 1', and the piece concludes on a single string tone.
    The Dream of Jacob: Penderecki's The Dream of Jacob (aka The Awakening of Jacob) was composed for large orchestra in 1974, and lasts approximately seven and a half minutes. It was commissioned for the 25th anniversary of the accession of Prince Rainier III of Monaco. Like most of the composer's other work of the 1960s and 1970s (De Natura Sonoris Nos. 1 and 2, Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima, Fonogrammi, Dimensions of Time and Silence, etc.), this piece is a giant soundscape employing tone clusters, unusual methods of playing instruments, some unusual instruments such as the musical saw, and, while producing strong emotional effects, avoiding melody, harmony, and development in the traditional sense. The title refers to Jacob's well-known dream in the desert of a ladder to heaven on which angels were ascending and descending: 'Jacob woke from his sleep and said: Truly the Lord is in this place, and I did not know it,' Genesis 28:16. The Dream of Jacob opens by creating a surreal dreamscape: low pitched brass chords pulse, a thin electronic-like sustain appears above that, and lower strings add to the drone. Shivering tremolos from the strings appear and disappear. Then great tone clusters in the strings and woodwinds sigh with the timbre of air raid sirens. This develops into larger glissandi interrupted several times with brass choir clusters with scattered punctuations among the solo instruments in the group. Everything slowly disappears except the upper strings which slide by themselves in clusters. This continues as an inverted high pedal point as on-rushing strings join in beneath, and again create a momentary, overwhelming wave. A gong interrupts this activity, everything becomes still again, like a lonely night in the desert, and we return to the opening airy sustain. The sound gradually dissipates.
    Emanations: Written in 1958, the 'Emanations' is a seminal work for two string orchestras tuned a semi-tone apart, of approximately 7 minutes duration, presents many of the sounds and much of the sound-painting compositional style that would characterize the composer's later works of the 60's and early 70's. Seemingly an essay on unstable but energetic sounds, the piece begins with a slowly undulating wide vibrato, and then the music builds into dissonant sustained chords and tremolo shakes pulsing at different rates. Then massive tone cluster walls of sound bring everything to a silent standstill. Fragments of contrapuntal tone rows fly between sustained dissonances and breaking sounds (col legno battuta, pizzicati). Sections of tremolo glassy sounds (eg., sul ponticello bowing on the bridge) are followed by hollow detective movie-like textures (flautando, bowing over the fingerboard). The music then slowly begins to de-construct itself, and the piece ends by fading away into the mystery with which it began.
    Partita: Composed in 1971, this dynamic composition is set for harpsichord and an orchestra of 9 woodwinds, 22 strings, celesta and various percussion instruments. At the onset, long tones a semi-tone apart begin pulsing, followed by clusters, tremolo tones, fast cycles and whirls of sound in similar pulsations. The harpsichord solos on fast cyucles in different rhythms, backed up by splattering horns, and a wildly avant-garde jazz ombo of amplified instruments. The pulsations then start to fragment in many directions, and fiery cycles shoot off ffrom the winds. This falls apart into glassy sounds, and soon the sawing of strings becomes insistent again. Not to be forgotten, the harpsichordist sounding like Cecil Taylor on speed, comes in again with a wild solo, and the small band develops multi-rhythmic chops, soon taken over by the orchestra. All comes to a halt for a harpsichord solo equally built on fast bi-tonal exercise arpeggios interspersed with chops. This is again taken up by the orchestra, which mutates the texture into a heavenly shimmer. The harpsichordist's energy wanes into almost arhythmical obsession with a passage of clusters, joined by tiny bells and rattling percussion. A breath. Tiny bells, small percussion begins in slow pulse and swells to a faster pulse (that Japanese Zen gesture), this idea is then imitated by the orchestra in uncoordinated sections of high strings and basses. Tubular bells then take over the arhythmical shake, this modulating into the amplified guitar and percussive strings. The harpsichord comes in with a low tone, and immediately speaks in prose-like passages quickly turning into whirls. This spreads out to the orchestra, who follow with many variations on the idea of trills and quick random runs from the bass to the high treble - in between, deep brass come in, the strings chop (like Herrmann's 'Psycho' music), the combo chops, the whole orchestra pulsates each in their own rhythm. Eventually, this settles down in a few repetitions of a single note in the harpsichord. The high strings appear from the silence with a high pitched pulsation accompanied by a slowly sliding tone underneath, like a siren. Very quietly, the deep bass intone a few low tones. The piece is over. An incredibly energetic experience that seems to have had a narrative, but that story is whatever has been evoked in each listener's mind.
    Symphony No. 1 : Krzysztof Penderecki has said that he looks on his Symphony No. 1, written when he was 40 years old, as something of a summing-up of his first stylistic period. 'I was then attempting to make a reckoning of my two decades' worth of musical experience - a time of radical, avant-garde seeking. It was the summa of what I could say as an avant-garde artist.' Composed in 1973, the Symphony No. 1 - Penderecki's first large work for full orchestra - was commissioned by, and is dedicated to, Perkins Engines Group. It was first performed in the Cathedral of the city of Peterborough on July 19, 1973.
    Formally, the five-part arch of the symphony, inspired by a painting of two angels that Penderecki had seen in Ravenna, is analogous to a sonata-allegro, with its statement of the main ideas of the work, the development of those ideas, and their return in something like their original guise. But the ideas in this work are not melodic themes, as would usually be the case; the structure of Penderecki's symphony is held together by the multifarious tone colors produced by the large orchestra and its expanded percussion section. Some of the textures produced are busily contrapuntal, while others remain static for extended periods. Many of the sonorities familiar from Penderecki's notorious early works, such as the Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima (1960), are present here as well - tone clusters, wild glissandi, microtones, strident chorales, and a wide variety of extended techniques for all the instrumental choirs.
    The work's first section, 'Arche,' opens with a series of seven strikes of the slapstick. Other percussion instruments and pizzicato strings gradually join in as the music gains momentum. A sustained octave A in the horns leads into 'Dynamis I,' the beginning of the development section, featuring brass fanfares and some faster-paced, scherzo-like music. A central, mysteriously beautiful section in the form of a passacaglia is the largest part of the work. 'Dynamis II' repeats in varied form some of the sounds and gestures of 'Dynamis I,' and another A in the horns leads into the concluding 'Arche I'; it ends with a still, spare coda, featuring a throbbing low A flat in the double basses."



    Orchestral Works

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    Orchestral Works


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    1. Get Ourselves Together 2:25
    2. Someday 3:29
    3. Ghetto 4:55
    4. When the Battle Is Over 3:32
    5. Dirty Old Man 2:31
    6. Love Me a Little Bit Longer 2:57
    7. I Can't Take It Much Longer 3:07
    8. Do Right Woman, Do Right Man 5:23
    9. Soldiers of the Cross 3:10
    10. Gift of Love 2:53

    Bonnie – Lead Vocals
    Delaney – Vocals, Guitar
    Bob Keys – Saxophone
    Jim Price – Trumpet, Trombone
    Jerry McGee – Guitar
    Leon Russell – Guitar, Piano
    Bobby Whitlock – Organ, Backing Vocals
    Carl Radle – Bass
    Jim Keltner – Drums
    Rita Coolidge – Backing Vocals

    AMG:
    "While Delaney & Bonnie will be forever associated with Eric Clapton and Layla & Other Assorted Love Songs, the couple, along with a loose association of friends, recorded a number of classics in their own right. Released in 1969, Accept No Substitute contained the same blend of soul and rock & roll that would show up on Layla the following year. While the production, as Matthew Greenwald points out in the liner notes, has a 'pop sheen,' Delaney & Bonnie's earthy vocals, along with the band's rhythm & blues assault, nonetheless dictate the proceedings. The horn section and expressive guitar create a lovely mix on 'Get Ourselves Together' and 'Someday,' giving the listener a taste of what gospel might sound like if performed by a good '60s rock band. This religious connection is even more predominate on 'Soldiers of the Cross,' a piece of lyrical fundamentalism that would fit quite comfortably into a Baptist choir's repertoire. This isn't to infer that Accept No Substitute is pious in any way; only that Delaney & Bonnie and their friends add a spiritual quality to the music they perform. One also shouldn't miss the imaginative 'Ghetto,' a song that cleverly combines soulful piano with strings. For those unfamiliar with Delaney & Bonnie's other work, Accept No Substitute is a good place to start."



    Accept No Substitutes

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    Accept No Substitutes


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    1. Tadpole 4:29
    2. Summer Stars 7:20
    3. Peach 8:21
    4. F-line 5:58
    5. Qylin - Monoceros 4:11
    6. Near by Life 7:21
    7. Bassie 4:50
    8. Knishtet 9:43
    9. Harappa - A Wild Zone 6:07

    Mayumi Tsuda - Syntheseizer
    David Edgar - Cello, Voice
    Johnny Reinhard - Bassoon, Voice
    Guy Tyler - String Bass, Voice

    Wiki:
    "Microtonal music is music using microtones—intervals of less than an equally spaced semitone. Microtonal music can also refer to music which uses intervals not found in the Western system of 12 equal intervals to the octave.
    Microtonal music can refer to all music which contains intervals smaller than the conventional contemporary Western semitone. The term implies music containing very small intervals but can include any tuning that differs from the western 12-tone equal temperament. Traditional Indian systems of 22 śruti; Indonesian gamelan music; Thai, Burmese, and African musics, and music using just intonation, meantone temperament, or other alternative tunings may be considered microtonal.
    Microtonal variation of intervals is standard practice in the African-American musical forms of spirituals, blues and jazz.
    Many microtonal equal divisions of the octave have been proposed, usually (but not always) in order to achieve approximation to the intervals of just intonation.
    Terminology other than 'microtonal' is used by theorists and composers. Ivan Wyschnegradsky used the term ultra-chromatic for intervals smaller than the semitone and infra-chromatic for intervals larger than the semitone. Ivor Darreg proposed the term xenharmonic."



    Microtonal Works

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    Microtonal Works


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    1. Introdizione 2:08
    2. Girovago 4:14
    3. Intermezzo 1 2:38
    4. Eterno/Stasera 4:19
    5. Intermezzo 2 2:43
    6. Perché? 4:54
    7. Sempre Notte 2:33
    8. Inizio/Solitudine/Lontano 2:47
    9. Inizio/L'Illuminata Rugiada/Proverbi (Uno) 2:36
    10. Intermezzo 3 1:17
    11. Destino/Rilucere Inveduto/Un'Altra Notte 3:47
    12. Se Una Tua Mano 5:04
    13. Intermezzo 4 1:28
    14. Vanità 2:45
    15. Quando Un Giorno/Le Ansie 3:47
    16. E Senza Fiato 3:00
    17. Intermezzo 5 1:27
    18. No Gridate Più 4:32
    19. Tutto Ho Perduto 5:40

    Michael Mantler - Trumpet
    Mona Larsen - Vocals
    Bjarne Roupé - Guitar
    Kim Kristensen - Piano
    Marianne Sørensen - Violin
    Gunnar Lychou - Viola
    Mette Winther - Viola
    Helle Sørensen - Cello
    Danish Radio Big Band
    Ole Kock Hansen - Conductor

    AMG:
    "Michael Mantler's Cerco Un Paese Innocente is a tribute to the Italian writer Giuseppe Ungaretti. Mantler sets Ungaretti's poetry to evocative chamber music that brings new textures and emotions to Ungaretti's words. Not all of the compositions work, but those that do are majestic and the entire effort is quite admirable."



    Cerco Un Paese Innocente

    or

    Cerco Un Paese Innocente


    0 0


    1. Piseq (Ritus III), for saxophone & percussion 14:22
    2. Spiral Ladder II, for 2 accordions 7:47
    3. Ritus II, for percussion 13:19

    Windgeboren, for 4 trumpets
    4. Intonation 2:28
    5. Passage 10:14
    6. Hymn 8:38

    James Crabb - Accordion
    Geir Draugsvoll - Accordion
    Frode Hansen - Percussion
    Michaelstrompeter (Ensemble)
    DuoDenum (Ensemble)
    Touché (Ensemble)

    AMG:
    "Niels Rosing-Schow is a major voice in Danish contemporary music, and this DaCapo 'open space' release Winds and Percussion features four works of recent vintage. Piseq - Ritus III appeared previously on the DuoDenum album Four Works for Saxophone and Percussion. It is the weakest of the four, consisting mostly of a kind of wandering around in the dark. When it finally gets going, it is exciting, except by then its 15 minutes is almost up. Much better is Spiral Ladder II featuring the fiery virtuoso accordion playing of Geir Draugsvoll and James Crabb. Spiral Ladder II is fast music based around loop structures that are carefully modified, so it is not fair to refer to the piece as repetitive or minimalistic. Yet it has that effect, and Rosing-Schow reconsiders the accordion apart from the 'noisemaker' status with which many people, especially in America, associate it, into the free-reed instrument that it truly is.
    Equally good is Ritus II, a low-key percussion piece played by the group Touché. It is reminiscent of Henry Cowell's Ostinato Pianissimo but is much longer and divided into three sections, played without pause. Far from being a collection of sound effects, Ritus II maintains a constant sense of pulse that is attractive and should find its way into the repertoire of percussion ensembles worldwide. Windgeboren, at 22 minutes, is an unusually long piece for a brass ensemble - unlike other chamber groups, brass players need to come up for air once in awhile. Like Ritus II, Windgeboren is scored in three sections, and it is still a lot of work, but nothing seems too hard for trumpeter Markus Stockhausen's group Die Michaelstrompeter, who burn through this piece like it is no big deal. Stylistically, the first two parts are reminiscent of Carl Ruggles, and there is a very creative use of mutes in the second movement 'Passage.' The concluding 'Hymn' utilizes simple, common chords with the occasional tricky modulation in a manner worthy of Gordon Jacob. Rosing-Schow looks like a contender; a contemporary composer whose interesting, and good, music succeeds in being innovative without being torturous or boring."



    Winds And Percussion

    or

    Winds And Percussion


    0 0


    1. Hodina slovenčiny 3:12
    2. Zaľúbil sa chlapec 3:17
    3. Dva a dva 4:38
    4. Pestrý život 4:32
    5. Čo je, čo je, čo chceš 3:07
    6. Poďme sa báť 4:27
    7. Valiace sa kamene 3:27
    8. Emdéžet 3:54
    9. Stužková 3:03
    10. Kráľovná bielych tenisiek 3:38
    11. Kaskadér bez peňazí 3:45
    12. Zvláštny smútok viťazov 4:46

    Juraj Farkaš - gitara, vokály
    Ján Baláž - sólová gitara, spev
    Václav Patejdl - klávesy, spev
    Jozef Ráž - basová gitara, spev
    Zdeno Baláž - bicie
    Ján Došek - zvukové efekty
    +
    Ľuboš Stankovský - bicie

    Wiki:
    "Elán is a Slovak pop-rock band, founded in 1969 by Jožo Ráž, Juraj Farkaš, Vašo Patejdl and Ján Baláž. It became one of the most popular Czechoslovak bands during the 1980s. In 1993, the group represented Slovakia in the preliminary round of the Eurovision Song Contest but having finished in fourth place, failed to qualify for the finals in Ireland. Elán's status in the 2000s (decade) is that of Slovakia's most successful pop group of all time; it may be the only Slovak music act consistently capable of selling out stadiums for their live performances. The biggest such concert took place in Prague, Czech Republic, in September 2003, in front of an audience of 90 thousand fans. They performed at the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2009 in Liberec, Czech Republic as part of the championships' entertainment festivities."



    Hodina Slovenciny

    or

    Hodina Slovenciny


    0 0

    Thanks to gubalance

    0 0


    1. My Opera 5:56
    2. Aguanta La Lengua 5:42
    3. Chili Beans 3:09
    4. When We Get Married 3:19
    5. The Prayer 4:41
    6. Puerto Rico Me Llama 5:11
    7. Es Tu Cosa 3:24
    8. Make Me Smile 3:02
    9. More Today That Yesterday 2:31
    10. Juan Juan Lechero 3:36

    Joe Bataan - Piano, Vocals
    Freddy Delgado - Vocals
    Robert Rodriguez - Flute, Saxophone
    Eddie Hernandez - Coro, Trombone
    Robert Lemas - Trombone
    Louie Devis - Bass, Fender Rhodes
    Eddie Nater - Drums, Timbales
    Milton Albino - Percussion

    AMG:
    "Joe Bataan shot to popularity in Latin music circles by covering soul hits, starting with a radical revision of Curtis Mayfield and the Impression's 'Gypsy Woman' that's brassy and built around the chorus. He also ethnicity-switches Aretha Franklin to 'Young, Gifted and Brown,' and his version of 'Shaft' floats Latin horns and flute over that circular rhythm undercurrent. The liner notes focus on his 'Joe the Rebel' persona, and one trademark is a rowdier edge than most Latin musicians. Tracks like 'Muneca' and 'Mambo de Bataan' fall within the canon but their energy (check the former's rat-a-tat-tat bridge) and blowsy trombones add an extra kick, just as the ragged loose ends in the vocals don't detract from the locked-down-in-clave-city pocket of 'Aguanta La Lengua.''Magic Rose' has a brassy trombone solo over a strong piano hook that's off-kilter from the Latin norm, but totally killer at hip level, while 'Chili Beans' is just a fine example of a lean, clean Latin soul instrumental. 'Riot (It's a Good Feeling)' is pretty oddball, though, since it seems to celebrate dancing in the streets more than running wild in them. 'Good good feeling' is the chorus over a bring-it-on-home gospel foundation riff and the very Latin R&B/rock & roll feel recalls Mitch Ryder & the Detroit Wheels' take on 'Little Latin Lupe Lu.''Subway Joe' is a pure N.Y.C. street life tale about hitting the subway for Chinese food and getting into a funny subway battle with a pretty girl who physically kicks his butt with blaring trombones over a frenetic rhythm. 'My Opera' is a story song that builds drama with dynamics and tempo shifts but doesn't rate the 'sicko song' label it gets in the liners (which are sketchy, marred by inaccuracies, and spend more time on Bataan's later career than his Fania stint or these tracks.) 'Special Girl' is a nice salsa ballad, and 'What Good Is a Castle' goes from slow part one to rip it up a bit on part two. The CD version of Mr. New York takes the original LP - Joe Bataan's debut Fania LP - and tacks on seven of his most popular songs from his eight albums for the label at the end. Good move - the original LP selections are solid enough, but they lack the catchiness of the hits, and the extra tracks add a lot, especially for Bataan neophytes. Mr. New York winds ups a bit scattershot, but adding those hits from the latter stages of his Fania stay turn this disc into a makeshift, de facto, best-of collection. It's not the comprehensive one Joe Bataan probably deserves, or maybe not even an ideal introduction to his music, but it's a good one with a lot of strong performances that illuminate the late-'60s Latin soul era."



    Mr.New York and the East Side Kids

    or

    Mr.New York and the East Side Kids


    0 0


    1. Don't Take Your Time 2:32
    2. With a Little Help from My Friends 2:50
    3. Don't Go Breaking My Heart 2:48
    4. I Can See Only You 2:58
    5. Snow Queen 3:26
    6. Love So Fine 2:02
    7. Kinda Wasted Without You 2:23
    8. Just Beyond Your Smile 2:20
    9. I'll Be Back 2:37
    10. Cocoanut Grove 2:37
    11. Didn't Want to Have to Do It 2:37
    12. Can I Go? 2:10

    Roger Nichols - Bass, Guitar, Piano, Vocals
    Melinda MacLeod - Vocals
    Murray MacLeod - Guitar
    +
    Randy Newman
    Van Dyke Parks
    Lenny Waronker

    AMG:
    "Well, not quite complete, depending upon how one feels about 'St. Bennie the Sno-Dog,' which later turned up on the Rev-Ola Records CD re-release of the group's one album along with everything else on this CD ' but since Roger Nichols regards that 1964 Ava Records issue as a much too early experiment by something that wasn't really the Small Circle of Friends, the title here is still valid. This Japanese CD was for most of a decade the best (and only) way to obtain this music. As to the latter, the mastering brings out the most delicate textures of the singing and the lightly orchestrated accompaniment ' the price is worth it just for the splendors, vocal and instrumental, brought out in the version of 'Snow Queen' featured here, the best of a string of great ones by co-author Carole King herself as well as the Association and Blood, Sweat & Tears, and also their folk-rock/sunshine pop rendition of the Beatles' Merseybeat-era 'I'll Be Back'. The bonus tracks include the early work of the Roger Nichols Trio, precursor to the Small Circle of Friends, among them 'I'll Be Back', 'Just Beyond Your Smile', 'Our Day Will Come', and 'Love Song, Love Song', which is attractive folky pop/rock but not nearly as well put-together as the work of the later group, and the subsequent work of Nichols and his new collaborator, Paul Williams ' the latter seems, for 1969, even more out of place in its elegant production than the stuff off of the original LP, a strange hybrid of singer/songwriter material and sunshine pop that was far removed from the strife-laden end of the 1960s. The notes are in Japanese, of course, but the music is pretty enough and the mastering so clean and sharp that the price is not out of line for those who appreciate such matters. The 2005 Rev-Ola release, however, significantly reduces the appeal of this import, though the inclusion of 'St. Bennie the Sno-Dog' is more for completists than for real music listeners."



    The Small Circle Of Friends

    or

    The Small Circle Of Friends


    0 0


    1. 440 6:51
    2. The Lone Arranger 7:59
    3. Dreams So Real 7:34
    4. Baby Baby 7:32
    5. Joyful Noise 5:07
    6. Egyptian 6:18
    7. Blunt Object 4:02

    Carla Bley - Conductor
    Orazio Maugeri - Sax (Alto)
    Alessandro Palacino - Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor)
    Claudio Montalbano - Sax (Alto), Sax (Soprano)
    Antonio Pedone - Sax (Baritone)
    Massimo Greco - Trumpet
    Giovanni Guttilla - Trumpet
    Gary Valente - Trombone
    Salvatore Pizzo - Trombone
    Maurizio Persia - Trombone (Bass)
    Ignazio Garsia - Piano
    Steve Swallow - Bass
    Paolo Mappa - Drums

    AMG:
    "Carla Bley's sometimes comical, always compelling compositions provide the material for this respectful repertory album from The Orchestra Jazz Sicilina. The roster features mainly European musicians, and the album emphasizes band interaction and ensemble execution rather than solo skills and individual voices."



    The Music of Carla Bley

    or

    The Music of Carla Bley


    0 0


    1. Fratres, for strings & percussion 8:54
    2. Fratres, for violin, strings & percussion 10:44
    3. Festina lente, for strings & harp ad lib 7:50
    4. Fratres, for string quartet 8:41
    5. Fratres, for cello & piano 11:52
    6. Summa, for string orchestra 3:45
    7. Fratres, for 4, 8 or 12 cellos 11:50
    8. Fratres, for wind octet & percussion 7:45
    9. Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten, for string orchestra & bell 7:39

    Hungarian State Opera Orchestra
    Tamás Benedek - Conductor

    AMG:
    "Fratres, for 4, 8 or 12 cellos Originally written in 1977 for a group of seven early instruments and percussion, its central feature is a pedal point, the notes A and E, that are sustained throughout the piece. At the end of 1980, Part made a version for 12 cellos. During the twelve minutes that the piece lasts, a six-bar theme is repeated eight times. The theme begins with two percussion bars, six muted beats on the cello body, taking the place of the original percussion instruments. The dynamics describe an arch, beginning very quietly, raising to a moderate intensity and then slowly decreasing again until almost vanishing. The effect is hypnotic and static.
    Fratres, for string quartetThere are seven versions of Fratres by Arvo Pärt, of which this string quartet rendition is chronologically the fifth. Originally, the composer scored the work for string quintet and wind quintet in 1977. Later versions included one for cello and piano (1980), one for eight cellos (1982), and one for solo violin (1992). All versions are similar, but hardly mere transcriptions of the original, some - like the cello/piano and solo violin rendition - sounding quite different from the others. Lengths of the versions vary from about eight to 12 minutes. Pärt, after an early tonal stage in the 1960s, began writing serial music. He soon abandoned it, however, after studying Gregorian chant and other medieval and Renaissance-era music, elements of which he used to forge a new style. The original Fratres (Brothers) was among his first successful works in this new mode.
    In the string quartet version, the slow, mesmerizing theme - a mystical, medieval-sounding creation - is played softly, almost tentatively, as in the openings to the other renditions. String pizzicatos imitate percussive sonorities to punctuate ends of phrases here and a drone is heard throughout as the music gradually swells, conveying more passion and a greater sense of animation. But just when the music reaches its most voluminous levels, it begins to subside, imparting the effect of an approaching, then passing procession of singers or instrumentalists."



    Fratres

    or

    Fratres


    0 0


    1. Rumblers' Wild Weekend 2:09
    2. Boss 2:23
    3. Pack Rat 1:54
    4. It's a Gass 2:14
    5. Summertime Blues 2:20
    6. Rumbling 2:01
    7. Destruction 2:18
    8. Bashful 2:29
    9. Roll Off 2:34
    10. Night Scene 2:13
    11. Hi-Octane 2:07
    12. Volcano 2:43
    13. Slippin' 2:51
    14. The Hustler 2:15
    15. Son of Boss 2:12
    16. Maid 'N Japan 1:53
    17. Nervous Set 2:21
    18. A-Go-Go 2:22
    19. Ebb Tide 2:51
    20. Sweet Potato 2:01
    21. Soulful Jerk 1:57
    22. Hey de de da Da 2:15
    23. Riot in Cell Block #9 2:18

    Bob Jones - Saxophone
    Johnny Kirkland - Lead Guitar
    Mike Kelishes - Rhythm Guitar
    Wayne Matteson - Bass Guitar
    Adrian Lloyd - Drums

    AMG:
    "The Rumblers are known mostly for their one instrumental hit, 'Boss,' which made it to number 52 in early 1963. The Southern Californian group, however, recorded quite a bit in the subsequent two years, never repeating the success of 'Boss.' Though sometimes thought of as a surf band, they recorded in a variety of raucous instrumental rock & roll styles, as well as doing some vocal numbers. The Rumblers were formed at the end of the '50s by teenagers in the Los Angeles suburb of Norwalk, and by 1962, were doing some recording, hooking up with the small independent Downey label (based in the L.A. suburb of the same name). Downey had just one big hit, the Chantays' 1963 surf classic 'Pipeline,' and couldn't replicate the same level of success with The Rumblers, though 'Boss' got to the Top Ten at some local stations, going all the way to number two on KFWB in Los Angeles. 'Boss' and their local popularity, however, were enough to get them an LP on Downey and numerous follow-up 45s, including some recordings done under different names, such as the Nylons and Bel Canto's, whose 'Feel Aw Right' has an arrangement by a young Barry White. Distinguished from some other acts associated with the surf scene by their prominent use of saxophones (at one point the lineup included two sax players) and a heavier R&B orientation, The Rumblers broke up in late 1965 after guitarist Johnny Kirkland was drafted. They evolved into the Interns, who had a 1967 single in the vocal garage-pop-rock style whose popularity had made surf music largely a thing of the past."



    Boss!

    or

    Boss!


    0 0


    Peter Brötzmann - Reeds
    Alexander Von Schlippenbach - Piano
    Peter Kowald - Bass

    0 0


    1. Childrens' Song 4:17
    2. Hard Work Jam (A Passenger To Paramaribo) 4:46
    3. You Sure Know How To Fool Me 4:36
    4. Separation 3:59
    5. Last Call 5:12
    6. Volunteer 4:18
    7. When The Sun Comes Up 3:44
    8. Big Time Jam 4:22
    9. Cool Texas Shuffle 4:05
    10. On The Rocky Road 4:25
    11. Gipsy 3:28

    Jukka Tolonen - Guitar, Piano
    Hasse Larsson - Bass, Double Bass
    Kjell Gustavsson - Drums, Percussion
    +
    Jane Kitto - Vocals (2,3)
    Sven Zetterberg - Vocals (6,9), Backing Vocals (7)
    Peter R Erickson - Vocals (7)
    Max Schultz - Guitar (1,8)
    Björn J:Son Lindh - Flute (1,4,5)
    Tommy Lydell - Organ (6,7,8,9)

    Wiki:
    "Jukka Tolonen (born April 16, 1952, Helsinki) is a Finnish jazz guitarist. Tolonen became famous as guitarist for the band Tasavallan Presidentti.
    His first solo album Tolonen!, recorded and released in 1971 while he was only 19 years old, displayed his prowess on both guitar (electric and acoustic) and piano, and instrumental songwriting which comfortably seques from classical, jazz, folk, blues, and rock. Tolonen! peaked at number 6 on the Finnish charts in 1971, and was voted album of the year. 'Windermere Avenue', a song from his 1975 Hysterica album, became a minor radio hit in Finland. While making several other solo albums and projects he also played on albums Tombstone Valentine (1970) and Fairyport (1971) by Wigwam.
    Tolonen is a virtuoso guitarist, who is highly respected in his native Finland as well as in Sweden, where he has lived for long periods. Among Tolonen's side projects are Guitarras Del Norte, Trio Tolonen, and Jukka Tolonen Band (JTB). He has used many different guitars over the years, such as the Gibson ES-335 and Ibanez Artist. Since the 1990s he has used Finnish handmade instruments by Ruokangas Guitars (electric) and Lottonen Guitars (acoustic).
    Despite his earlier successes, Jukka Tolonen was eventually twice divorced, homeless, and drug-addicted. In May, 2008 Tolonen was found guilty of stabbing his girlfriend and was sentenced to 27 months in jail for aggravated assault. When released in 2010, he told the media, that he was quitting guitar playing due to osteoarthritis. While in prison Jukka Tolonen dedicated his life to Jesus Christ, and in 2011 he released 'Juudan Leijona' ('Lion of Judah'), a CD of traditional Finnish hymns, in which he sings and plays piano, occasionally accompanied by other instruments and voices. He continues to perform live concerts of Christian music on piano along with other musicians and vocalists."



    Big Time

    or

    Big Time


    0 0


    1. All the Gossips Left for Home 2:28
    2. Variations on Themes of Two Russian Folk Songs 6:55
    3. Expanses of My Homeland 2:55
    4. Russian Intermezzo 2:48
    5. Kalinka 3:17
    6. Evenings Near Moscow 3:15
    7. What's That Ringing? 2:28
    8. Memory Waltz 3:10
    9. Glory 1:47
    10. Bright Moon 2:57
    11. Down the Long Road 2:51
    12. Gypsy Fantasy 3:50

    Peter Rothe - Prima Balalaika, Alto Domra,Bass Domra
    Jonathan Rothe - Prima Domra,Bass Domra, Gusli
    Ksenia Sudarikova - Prima Balalaika, Alto Balalaika
    Linda O'Brien - Alto Balalaika, Bayan, Vocals
    David Lieberman - Contrabass Balalaika, Guitar

    nonesuch.com:
    "A favorite Russian folk instrument for centuries, the balalaika is a three-stringed fretted instrument with a distinctive triangular shape. The first balalaika ensemble gave its premiere concert in 1888, establishing the instrument’s place in both the peasant fields and the concert hall. The Odessa Balalaikas carry on this tradition here with a set of Russian folk and popular songs."



    The Art of the Balalaika

    or

    The Art of the Balalaika


    0 0


    1. Livwe!! 40:28

    Yamantaka Eye
    – lead vocals, noise, sampler, sevena
    Yoshimi P-We– drums, percussion, vocals, djembe, keyboards, trumpet
    Yojiro Tatekawa– drums, percussion
    Shinji Masuko - guitars, noise

    AMG:
    "It's been a while since the Japanese band Boredoms parted with their noisy, Dadaist conception of hardcore music and took the leap towards their current Krautrock-infused, drum circle aesthetics under the Boredoms moniker. What we are offered in the ninth volume of their glaringly uneven Super Roots series is a follow-up to those Motorik leanings. Recorded live in 2004, Super Roots, Vol. 9 finds the Boredoms adding a 24-piece choir to their regular line-up of three drum kits handled by Yoshimi, ATR, and Yojiro, plus Yamataka Eye on CDs and analog turntables. Eye manipulates the ethereal choir parts live, creating oscillating melodic phrases above the cloak woven by the pounding rhythm section. The music here follows the trail of earlier Boredoms efforts 'Vision Creation Newsun' and 'Seadrum/House of Sun,' with their linear, impetuous polyrythms, rudimentary electronics, and ecstatic wordless chants. However, unlike those stellar turning points in the band's career, Super Roots, Vol. 9 leaves a disappointing taste of deja vu. This symphony of sorts flows for 40 minutes without any remarkable surprises, stressing on angelic vocal samples and repetitive drum patterns that end up eroding the listener's interest, with Eye's shamanic yelling and the music's dance-like nature unable to keep the ship afloat. Super Roots, Vol. 9 shows that the line between hypnotic and tedious is sometimes too thin."



    Super Roots 9

    or

    Super Roots 9


    0 0


    1. Ooh Wee - Baby You're the One for Me 5:32
    2. Don't Ask to Stay Until Tomorrow 4:39
    3. Feel Like Makin' Love 9:19
    4. What a Difference a Day Made 7:04
    5. Rose Marie (Mon Cherie) 5:59
    6. Until I Met You 6:09
    7. 'Round Midnight 8:13
    8. My Foolish Heart 9:23
    9. Loving You Was Like a Party 5:22

    Marlena Shaw - Vocals
    Rickey Woodard - Sax (Tenor)
    Clarence McDonald - Piano
    Jeff Chambers - Bass
    Ron Otis - Drums

    AMG:
    "There are vocalists who can sing well, and swing too; and then there are seasoned professionals who master any material, making each song sound like a fresh thought and an intimate conversation. Marlena Shaw, who began with Count Basie and still works steadily and internationally all through the year, has each of these elements, plus a stage presence that manages to be both electrifying and endearing. This live release, recorded at Tokyo's B Flat club in June 2002, and reissued about a year later by 441 Records, supplies a taste of Shaw's warm, easy rapport with her audience, and their delighted response. What is fully documented is her splendid voice and range, and her relaxed, personal delivery of the material. Here it moves from her own, finger-snapping 'Ooh Wee - You're the One for Me,' to a slow-burning rendition of 'What a Difference a Day Makes.' Shaw recalls her Basie days with 'Until I Met You,' aka 'Corner Pocket,' and heats up both 'Round Midnight' and 'Feel Like Makin' Love,' which was a hit for Roberta Flack in a more subdued version. Whether interpreting jazz classics or pop tunes, Shaw puts her signature on each track, inviting the listener in with her direct, earthy approach, and her unique lyrical improvisations that enhance the meaning of each song. This CD is strong, honest, tuneful, and recommended."



    Live in Tokyo

    or

    Live in Tokyo


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