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FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | .... | 24 | 25 | (Page 26) | 27 | 28 | .... | 57 | newer

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    1. Focus 3:47
    2. Force Cuisine 9:25
    3. Ediface 8:12
    4. Bosnia 7:58
    5. For Miles 6:18
    6. Castles for Carter 23:17

    Theo Bleckmann - Voice
    Dave Douglas - Trumpet
    Denman Maroney - Piano
    Mark Dresser - Bass
    Phil Haynes - Drums

    AMG:
    "This set of eight adventurous compositions by bassist Mark Dresser has some otherworldly sounds, some free improvising and plenty of spacey stretches. The latter is due to the flexible and chancetaking singing of Theo Bleckmann, who often functions as part of the ensembles and sticks to wordless improvising. The group also includes trumpeter Dave Douglas (who sometimes sounds traditional and in other spots is as adventurous as Bleckmann, pianist Denman Maroney and drummer Phil Haynes. The music is stimulating but sometimes disturbing, easier to respect than to love."



    Force Green

    or

    Force Green


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    1. In The Flesh? - Adrian Belew, Alan White & Steve Porcaro
    2. The Thin Ice - Ian Anderson & Tony Levin
    3. Another Brick In The Wall Part 1 - Steve Morse & Billy Sherwood
    4. The Happiest Days Of Our Lives - Billy Sherwood & Vinnie Coliauta
    5. Another Brick In The Wall Part 2 - Fee Waybill, Ronnie Montrose & Mike Porcaro
    6. Mother - John Wetton, Adrian Belew & Alan White
    7. Goodbye Blue Sky - Steve Howe & Billy Sherwood
    8. Empty Spaces - Billy Sherwood & Robby Krieger
    9. Young Lust - Glenn Hughes
    10. One Of My Turns - Tommy Shaw
    11. Don't Leave Me Now - Robby Krieger & Tommy Shaw
    12. Another Brick In The Wall Part 3 - Steve Lukather & Tony Levin
    13. Goodbye Cruel World - Billy Sherwood & Tony Levin

    1. Hey You - John Wetton, Steve Lukather, Tommy Shaw & Alan White
    2. Is There Anybody Out There? - Adrian Belew & Billy Sherwood
    3. Nobody Home - Rick Wakeman
    4. Vera - Tommy Shaw & Steve Howe
    5. Bring The Boys Back Home - Billy Sherwood & Jay Schellen
    6. Comfortably Numb - Chris Squire & Alan White
    7. The Show Must Go On - Adrian Belew & Vinnie Coliauta
    8. In The Flesh - Billy Sherwood, Steve Porcaro & Vinnie Coliauta
    9. Run Like Hell - Jason Chefe, Dweezil Zappa & Tony Kaye
    10. Waiting For The Worms - Billy Sherwood, Tony Levin & Vinnie Caliauta
    11. Stop - Billy Sherwood
    12. The Trial - Malcolm McDowell
    13. Outside The Wall - Billy Sherwood
    14. Isn't This Where We Came In - Malcolm McDowell

    AMG:
    "One of the most popular, and analyzed, rock albums ever is undoubtedly Pink Floyd's 1979 sprawling masterpiece The Wall. Although the definitive version remains the aforementioned studio album, there has also been a 1982 movie (starring a pre-Live Aid Bob Geldof), and two separate live albums - one by Roger Waters in 1990 (The Wall: Live in Berlin, 1990) and the other a delayed release of Pink Floyd performances from the early '80s (2000s Is There Anybody Out There? The Wall: Live 1980-1981). So you think that would be the last we heard from The Wall, right? Think again. A multitude of classic rockers/prog rockers have united to cover The Wall in its entirety, under the title Back Against the Wall. Led by producer Billy Sherwood, a rotating case of musicians was assembled to make anyone with a well-worn copy of Tales of Topographic Oceans drool with excitement - Yes' Rick Wakeman, Chris Squire, Alan White, and Geoffrey Downes; King Crimson's Adrian Belew, Tony Levin, and John Wetton; Styx's Tommy Shaw; ELP's Keith Emerson, and Jethro Tull's Ian Anderson, among countless others. Interestingly though, it can be argued that The Wall was Pink Floyd's least 'progressive' album, as the group focused on tight song structures - obviously inspired by the then burgeoning new wave and punk movements. The performances are expectedly spot-on (and it's quite impressive how they re-created all the sound effects/spoken word bits so precisely), and stick very close to the originals - except for a Chris Squire-led take of 'Comfortably Numb,' which adds a few extra bits. With an ever-increasing overabundance of versions of The Wall to choose from, you've got to wonder if Back Against the Wall was necessary at all."



    Back Against The Wall

    or

    Back Against The Wall


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  • 10/16/12--13:17: Billy Cobham, 1974

  • 0 0


    1. 'Antares' - The Star 5:25
    2. Bahama Mama 8:22
    3. Shadows 7:43
    4. Some Punk Funk 4:23
    5. Spindrift 7:19
    6. On A Magic Carpet Ride 7:10

    Tom Scott - sax(tenor), sax(soprano), lyricon
    Steve Khan - guitar
    Mark Soskin - keyboards
    Alphonso Johnson - bass, electric stick
    Billy Cobham - percussion

    AMG:
    "Drummer Billy Cobham is heard on this live set heading an all-star quintet also including Tom Scott on tenor, soprano and lyricon, keyboardist Mark Soskin, guitarist Steve Khan and electric bassist Alphonso Johnson. Although the music is mostly funky and uses plenty of electronics (Scott sounds quite faceless on lyricon), there are some strong solos, particularly from Khan and Scott (when he is on tenor). The six group originals are highlighted by 'Bahama Mama,' 'Some Punk Funk' and 'On a Magic Carpet Ride.' Due to the amount of variety and spontaneity, Alivemutherforya is superior to most of these musicians' individual projects of the era."



    Alivemutherforya

    or

    Alivemutherforya


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    1. The Lord's Prayer 2:40
    2. He's Got the Whole World in His Hands 3:04
    3. Ave Maria (Gounod) 3:01
    4. The Impossible Dream (The Quest) 2:36
    5. Day by Day 3:09
    6. Battle Hymn of the Republic 3:29
    7. Amazing Grace 3:25
    8. My Sweet Lord 4:14
    9. Ave Maria (Schubert) 4:30
    10. You'll Never Walk Alone 2:24
    11. May Each Day 2:49

    AMG:
    "The compilers of this budget album of Andy Williams's Columbia recordings must have had trouble coming up with a disc's worth of religious material from the singer, since they licensed 'He's Got the Whole World in His Hands' and 'You'll Never Walk Alone' from his Cadence Records catalog, settled for Broadway musical material of only a nominal inspirational nature, such as 'You'll Never Walk Alone' and 'The Impossible Dream (The Quest),' and put on two recordings of 'Ave Maria.' The performances are fine, but potential religious consumers should realize that this was something tossed together, not an album Williams deliberately recorded."



    Songs Of Faith

    or

    Songs Of Faith


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    1. Open Fire 3:52
    2. Bye Bye Blackbird 4:07
    3. In the Still of the Night 2:35
    4. Embraceable You 3:28
    5. I'll Be Seeing You 4:26
    6. Tenderly 2:58
    7. When I Fall in Love 4:31
    8. I Concentrate on You 3:16
    9. Please Be Kind 3:24
    10. You'll Never Know 4:07
    11. I'm Just a Boy in Love 2:44
    12. My Funny Valentine 3:37

    Johnny Mathis - Vocals
    Tony Mottola - Guitar
    Al Caiola - Guitar
    Frank Carroll - Bass
    Milt Hinton - Bass

    AMG:
    "The open fire of the title is a warm hearth, not an invitation to gunplay. On this 1959 album, Johnny Mathis creates an atmosphere of fireside intimacy by dispensing with his usual orchestral accompaniment so that the purity of his voice entices the listener's full attention. Al Caiola and Tony Mattola play the two guitars that supplement Mathis' crooning, with an upright bass providing the album's only other instrument. Producer Mitch Miller is often associated with gimmicky or novelty productions, but his work on Open Fire, Two Guitars is perfectly understated, emphasizing the gentle caress of Mathis' voice over the relaxed counterpoint of the two guitars. The songs give prominence to the pop standards of Rodgers & Hart, Cole Porter, and the Gershwins, but the title track, 'Open Fire,' is a new composition by Leiber & Stoller. The album's effect seems nearly a cappella at times, but 'In the Still of the Night' finds Mathis intoning the lyrics over gently rhythmic guitar figures that educe new harmonic complexities from a well-known song. The enduring popularity of Open Fire, Two Guitars is attributable in part to its hypnotic aura of closeness and confidentiality, but also to the simple instrumentation that appeals to many rock-era listeners' preference for guitars over orchestral arrangements."



    Open Fire, Two Guitars

    or

    Open Fire, Two Guitars


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    1-39. El Pueblo Unido Jamas Sera Vencido!
    40. Down By The Riverside
    41. Winnsboro Cotton Mill Blues

    Marc-André Hamelin - Piano

    AMG:
    "This Frederic Rzewski masterwork had been recorded at least twice previously (the original version was performed by Ursula Oppens, and another, with Rzewski himself at the piano, was released on hat ART), but Stephen Drury manages to wring out some new and impressive findings in this rendition. The first and most striking addition is the inclusion, at the very beginning of a tape, of the song 'El Pueblo Unido Jamas Sera Vencido!,' performed in concert (1975) by the Chilean band Quilapayun, and sung-along to by the crowd in boisterous fashion. Drury, long a champion of contemporary piano music, is a spectacular player, combining a strong attack with extremely graceful delicacy. He perhaps lacks the steeliness and pure passionate drive of Rzewski himself (whose version is still, arguably, the finest) but only slightly. As the hat ART release remained out of print and rare as of 2002, this recording should be first choice, it's superior sonic quality lifting it above the Oppens rendition. The music itself, of course, is absolutely thrilling and magnificent. Interestingly, this disc provides track divisions on each of the 36 variations, allowing the interested listener to parse all of the fascinatingly recursive structures used by Rzewski. More importantly, the spirit of the music, an all-encompassing vision that ranges from folk forms to serialism to free jazz and beyond, eventually culminating in the extraordinarily powerful final recapitulation of the main theme, is beautifully represented. The People United Will Never Be Defeated! is one of the great works of late 20th century music, and this reading by Stephen Drury is a fine place to hear it."



    The People United Will Never Be Defeated!

    or

    The People United Will Never Be Defeated!


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    1. 18 Years Old 3:40
    2. Come Closer 4:22
    3. Crime 4:29
    4. 1n 1965 5:45
    5. Sunny Day 4:50
    6. Junky & How To Live 3:29
    7. Cynthia 4:14
    8. Candle Light 3:05
    9. Loosing Time 2:35
    10. Same Sun 4:04
    11. The Advantage of Music For Me 3:11
    12. My Dear Suzanne 3:20
    13. Circle of Love 5:30
    14. The End of the World 6:05
    15. Pensive 8:02
    16. Some Day 5:24

    1. I'm Still In Luv' Wit Ya' 4:44
    2. Gut Rock 3:58
    3. Young Widow 7:49
    4. Wise World 5:32
    5. Night Train 5:17
    6. In 1973 2:43
    7. Stroll-On 6:37
    8. 18 Years Old II 3:49
    9. Woman of Desire 5:51
    10. Talked About My Girl 5:29
    11. Struggle For Life 6:06
    12. Calls Himself a Rider 5:31
    13. Looking For Peace & Freedom 5:19
    14. A Signal From Outer Space 8:32

    Benny Soebardja - vocal, guitars
    Albert Warnerin - guitars
    Triawan - keyboards
    Erwin Badudu - keyboards
    Adhy Sibolangit - bass
    Haddy Arief - drums

    lightintheattic:
    "Benny Soebardja, the self-proclaimed founder of the private press scene and by all accounts one of the most important figures from the Indonesian music industry finally gets his due with these reissues. Having been a member of bands such as The Peels, Shark Move and the infamous Giant Step, Benny left his mark across many memorable albums throughout the years, including his contributions to the recent Those Shocking, Shaking Days compilation (which was curated by Strawberry Rain’s MoSS) on Now Again. During the mid 70's, Benny also recorded solo efforts, which many regard as some of the best music to ever surface from the region. With the help of British poet Bob Dook, Benny recorded numerous English based songs filled with incredible musicianship and melodies that have an underlying progressive nature. Backed by the almost unknown Lizard (which contained members of both Giant Step and Harry Roesli’s Philosophy Gang), his solo efforts are in line with the sound of his other bands, yet stand on their own as a unique progressive offering.
    Having almost been signed to Virgin Records UK in the 70's as a part of Giant Step, his talents were apparent and would be world renown by this time if not for his music being lost within Indonesia all these years. Here, for the first time we present to you his first three private press solo efforts, Lizard, Gut Rock and Night Train. Unlike many bands within the Indonesian scene, Benny had no label influence while recording these offerings, making them true private press recordings without any filler. All three albums are included as a 2 x CD set with a 36 page booklet full of concert photo’s, album covers and information about Benny’s musical history."



    Lizard Years

    or

    Lizard Years


    0 0




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    1. Dr. Yes 3:07
    2. Teasing the Korean 4:27
    3. This Never Happened to the Other Feller 7:29
    4. 007 2:35
    5. Battle at Piz Gloria 4:25
    6. You Only Live Twice 5:37
    7. Bond With Bongos 4:30
    8. Oddjob's Pressing Engagement 6:46
    9. Bond Back in Action Again 2:56
    10. Over and Out 5:47
    11. Dawn Raid on Fort Knox 8:02
    12. Nobody Does It Better 6:44
    13. Dr. Yes (Reprise) 0:58

    Steven Bernstein - Mellophonium, Slide Trumpet
    Briggan Krauss - Sax (Alto), Sax (Baritone)
    John Medeski - Organ
    Tony Scherr - Bass
    Kenny Wollesen - Drums, Percussion, Timpani

    AMG:
    "Sex Mob Does Bond is the soundtrack to an imaginary James Bond flick, and a tribute, of sorts, to the music of John Barry. Aside from the leadoff track and its reprise ('Dr. Yes,' ostensibly the title of the film), the program is a collection of Barry tracks taken from various Bond films. As always, Sex Mob applies its own swaggering brilliance to the proceedings, spicing up the somewhat familiar music with outrageous musicianship and a sly grin. Joined by guests John Medeski (organ) and the Sex Mob Soul Choir (backing vocals), Sex Mob rip through the Barry songbook, infusing each piece with a sexy, almost trashy vibe that was always subdued in the Bond films. In the liner notes, Steven Bernstein says he wanted his Bond film to be more explicit than the existing ones, and thus the addition of a 'porno-beat' section (his term) to many of the pieces, giving them a vintage strip club-style bawdiness. The playing is uniformly excellent. Bernstein is the undisputed master of the slide trumpet (can you name another?), and Briggan Krauss is just plain sick (in the best way possible); he sounds like no one else on alto saxophone. Medeski's role is mainly to add orchestrations and color, but he also throws down on a few tracks, like 'Battle at Piz Gloria.' Tony Scherr and Kenny Wollesen can ably handle anything Bernstein (or anyone else, for that matter) throws at them. Co-producer and engineer Scotty Hard adds some subtle but wonderful sonic touches to several pieces, like the dub-style echo on the drums on 'Teasing the Korean.' The kitschy backing vocals on several songs just add to the fun. Sex Mob is notorious for bringing new tunes to the jazz canon, sometimes kicking and screaming (can you say 'Fernando'?), and Sex Mob Does Bond is no exception. These tunes play great whether you're a fan of James Bond and John Barry or not. As sexy as anything Bond should be, and more fun than you thought jazz could be, Sex Mob has delivered the goods once again."



    Sex Mob Does Bond

    or

    Sex Mob Does Bond


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    1. Prokofiev's Balcony Scene 7:44
    2. Reflections 7:14
    3. The Clouds Above 7:51
    4. Wide Open Spaces 7:22
    5. June Song 7:53
    6. Butterfly 5:34

    Soren Moller - piano
    Dick Oatts - saxophones, flute

    allaboutjazz:
    "The Clouds Above is the continuation of a duet project that pianist Soren Moller and saxophonist Dick Oatts began with Storytelling (Audial, 2005). Like that release, The Clouds Above brags all originals save for one classical adaptation, in this case Sergei Prokofiev's Balcony Scene from his 1935 ballet, Romeo and Juliet, here captured lyrically by Moller's most restrained pianism. Oatts plays alto on the piece, weaving in and out of the scaffolding erected by Moller. The effect is one of nervous excitement, sharply presented.
    Oatts moves to soprano for 'Reflections,' his serpentine lines melding with Moller's rhythmic attack. On 'Wide Open Spaces,' the pair dons an almost pastoral tone that is both reflective and aloof. Moller solos angularly and with a quiet intensity, while Oatts' cold silk tone slides over the piano like dry snow, blown by Moller's gently propulsive wind. This is intimate, interior music, creative thought manifest.
    The Clouds Above is kin to Bill Anschell and Brent Jensen's We Couldn't Agree More (Origin, 2009). These duets tend to be edgier and more modern sounding than Art Pepper's Tete-a-Tete (Galaxy, 1982) and Going Home (Galaxy, 1982), or Frank Morgan's Double Image (Contemporary, 1986), both with George Cables. Moller and Oatts opt for a more originals-oriented, cerebral approach in their duets. The result is a thoughtful recording that is often un-nerving, but always rewarding."



    The Clouds Above

    or

    The Clouds Above


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    1. Umleitung 7:11
    2. Nanana 0:52
    3. Somethings Going on in My Head 4:45
    4. Mean Girl 3:54
    5. Nanana 1:13
    6. Gerdundula 3:50
    7. Railroad 5:29
    8. Someone's Learning 7:09
    9. Nanana 2:30
    10. Tune To The Music 3:36
    11. Good Thinking 3:40
    12. Time To Fly 4:18
    13. Nanana 2:58
    14. Mean Girl 3:58

    Mike Rossi - Guitar, Vocals
    Rick Parfitt - Guitar, Keyboards, Vocals
    Alan Lancaster - Bass, Guitar
    John Coghlan - Drums, Percussion

    AMG:
    "The change was going on. In 1971, while Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple, and Black Sabbath were competing to be considered the genuine pioneers of the hard rock genre, Status Quo was involved in an inner struggle to find themselves and their own sound. Nobody would have said then that a few years later, Francis Rossi, Rick Parfitt, Alan Lancaster, and John Coghlan would be fighting in the peak of European charts with the groups before mentioned. Dog of Two Head was going to be their first step, a very powerful one, in being considered a serious and significant rock band and not another easy-come, easy-go psychedelic group. This was their first record where the basic wall of sound formed by mighty guitar-bass-drums won the game to the more flavored sound of their beginnings. The band forsook psychedelic experimentation and delved into more blues-oriented rock rhythms. The record contained the revision of the Arabesque 'Gerdundula,' one of their most intriguing tunes and a favorite in the concerts of years to come. They began to show that year their love for boogie rock in the long and powerful 'Umleitung' and in 'Someone's Learning,' which proved to be one of the rare occasions the band touched on political issues (Irish terrorist quarrels, in this case). The album also contains the intimate ballad 'Na Na Na,' a two-minute résumé of the composition techniques and humble philosophy of Status Quo ('Writing words that I feel I should change/It's all right if they sound just like other songs/Making sounds that can go on and on/It's all right if you stay right on to the end'). Finally, Dog of Two Head includes one of the most brilliant compositions of the band, the stunning 'Railroad.' Maybe the record is not as representative of Status Quo's sound as Hello! or On the Level, but it keeps being one of the band's more unusual and inspired achievements. They were going to find their characteristic sound in their posterior effort, Piledriver, but never again were they going to sound as innovative and inventive as they sound here."



    Dog Of Two Head

    or

    Dog Of Two Head


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    1. Superstition
    2. Johnny B Good
    3. Roll Over Bethoven
    4. Rock And Roll Music
    5. Sweet Little Sixteen
    6. A Place In The Sun
    7. Sunny
    8. Sex Machine
    9. It's A Man's World
    10. Please Please Please
    11. I Got You, Feel Good
    12. Papa Got A Brand New Bag
    13. For Once In My Life
    14. Shoo-Be-Doo-Be-Doo-Da-Day
    15. You Met Yout Match
    16. Maybellene




    Oldies Best Rock & Roll

    or

    Oldies Best Rock & Roll


    0 0


    1. Tok O' the Town 7:11
    2. The Ocean 5:06
    3. The Rain Song 8:13
    4. It's There 6:11
    5. Hangin Out 4:16
    6. Thank You 5:20
    7. Dazed and Confused 5:32
    8. Stairway to Heaven 5:39
    9. Stay Forever 4:29

    David Liebman - Sax (Soprano)
    Terumasa Hino - Trumpet
    John Scofield - Guitar
    Mike Stern - Guitar
    Karen Mantler - Organ
    Steve Swallow - Bass
    Motohiko Hino - Drums

    AMG:
    "Drummer Motohiko Hino and his notable sidemen (which include either John Scofield or Mike Stern on guitars and guest spots for Dave Liebman on soprano and trumpeter Terumasa Hino) perform four of his originals plus five rock songs by Jimmy Page and Robert Plant. The generally rockish material does not seem to have much potential but the two guitarists (who are both on 'The Rain Song' and otherwise take turns) create consistently interesting solos. Although organist Karen Mantler does little more than set an atmosphere with long tones (making one wonder if she is ready for prime time yet), bassist Steve Swallow works well with the drummer/leader. It takes about three listens to get into this music but the set does reward the time invested. The material is uplifted and the solos are generally quite colorful and stimulating, making this an unlikely success worth checking out by open-minded listeners."



    It's There

    or

    It's There


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    1. Harujänta 7:49
    2. Rainbox 3:14
    3. Doppler 4:34
    4. Clandestine 5:48
    5. Temporal you are 4:32
    6. Original 13 II 4:46
    7. Ten tango 5:40
    8. Antsong 5:11
    9. Tail of antsong 2:05

    Lars Hollmer - keyboards, accordion, percussion, glockenspiel, vocals
    Denis Brely - bassoon, oboe, voice, baryton sax, Soprano flute
    Jan Garret - bass, bass pedals, guitar, percussion, vocals
    Eino Haapala - guitar, bass, cello, mandoline, percussion, vocals

    AMG:
    "After the initial breakup of Samla Mammas Manna in 1980, keyboardist Lars Hollmer and guitarist Eino Haapala made a few recordings for a projected album. They delayed the release to join quirky French musician Albert Marcoeur for a tour in 1981, and performed some of their new material along with Marcoeur's songs and the Zamla repertoire. The tour was so successful that Hollmer and Haapala enlisted Marcoeur's wind player Denis Brély and bass player Jan Garret to complete the recordings for this album. The deliberate omission of a drummer (although Zamla drummer Hans Bruniusson lent them a snare drum) gives the album a very different sound than any of their other releases. They still work with odd time signatures and melodies based on Swedish folk music, but the counterpoint that is such an important part of their other album No Make Up! is very much in evidence here. The opening track, 'Harujänta,' is one of the most compelling pieces the group ever performed, a combination of folk melodies and rock rhythms that builds to a superb driving climax. 'Rainbox' is also one of the best melodies the group composed, and without the rock drums, it has a delicacy completely absent from other Zamla work. Although there is some indulgence to the Python-esque vocals of the other Zamla albums, as well as some intense rock as on the previous release Familjesprickor (Family Cracks), this is a superb combination of studio work and musicianship, one of the best products of the progressive rock and RIO movements."



    Zamlaranamma

    or

    Zamlaranamma


    0 0


    1. Foots 4:02
    2. My Sweetness 3:26
    3. (Do You) Want Some off This 5:59
    4. Looking for the Juice 3:53
    5. Reflections of Divine Love 5:02
    6. How Long Will It Last? 4:19
    7. Sun Song 4:27
    8. Happy Farms 3:45
    9. Dixie/Up on the Roof 6:41

    Cornell Dupree - Guitar
    Eric Gale - Guitar
    Richard Tee - Keyboards
    Gordon Edwards - Bass, Percussion
    Steve Gadd - Drums, Percussion
    Chris Parker - Drums, Percussion

    AMG:
    "Stuff never won the respect of bop snobs, but that isn't what they were going for. The band's specialty was an accessible, groove-oriented blend of jazz, R&B, and pop, and not everyone who bought their records was a jazz expert. Though some of Stuff's fans knew a lot about jazz, others were Average White Band or Chaka Khan fans who bought the occasional Grover Washington, Jr. album. Stuff's LPs weren't amazing, but they were generally likable. That is the case with this self-titled debut album, which was produced by Herb Lovelle and Tommy LiPuma and earned the band a loyal following in 1976. While congenial tunes like 'Reflections of Divine Love' and 'Foots' aren't breathtaking, they're pleasant and easy to like. Guitarist Eric Gale, drummer Steve Gadd, and other Stuff members were capable of a lot more. Nonetheless, the band's recording career was off to a decent, if unremarkable, start with this 1976 LP."



    Stuff

    or

    Stuff


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    1. Ooby Dooby 2:03
    2. Racker Tacker 2:08
    3. Blue Suede Shoes 1:54
    4. Brown Eyed Handsome Man 2:17
    5. St. Louis Blues 1:56
    6. All by Myself 1:57
    7. Lawdy Miss Clawdy 2:18
    8. Jam 2:01
    9. Rock House 1:54
    10. Singing the Blues 2:07
    11. Pretend 2:12
    12. Rip It Up 3:04
    13. Trying to Get to You 2:22
    14. TK Blues 2:21
    15. Go! Go! Go! 1:33
    16. Bo Diddley 2:03
    17. Do You Remember? (Talk About The Teen Kings)) 38:34

    Roy Orbison
    Billy Pat Ellis
    Jack Kennelly
    James Morrow

    AMG:
    "It seems difficult to believe at this late date, but there is a chapter in the musical life of the late Roy Orbison that's hardly ever been mentioned or discussed - an eight-year musical relationship that yielded recordings and newspaper recognition, at least in Wink and Denton, TX, and numerous radio and television appearances, as well as getting him notice by Sam Phillips and signed to Sun Records. That chapter was the Teen Kings, Orbison's first musical outlet and his first attempt at doing something that might matter in music. Indeed, the Teen Kings' history predates the birth of rock & roll - much less Orbison's aspirations to stardom in that field - by more than five years.
    the Teen Kings' roots go back to 1948, two years after his family moved to Wink, TX, when the 12-year-old Orbison began playing guitar with a friend and schoolmate named James Morrow. The following year, the two put together a quintet - Morrow on electric mandolin, Orbison on lead guitar, Charles 'Slob' Evans on upright bass, Richard 'Head' West at the piano, and Billy Pat 'Spider' Ellis on drums. At a teacher's suggestion, they christened themselves the Wink Westerners, and they played school dances and other small local events. Within two years, they were good enough to get some radio appearances, and by 1953 they had their own sponsored show on KERB once each week. The Wink Westerners played country & western, and their repertory included lots of instrumentals, among them 'In the Mood' and 'Little Brown Jug.' They were popular at local dances, presenting a lively show that the kids appreciated, and at the center of it was Roy Orbison, who was not only a strong singer but a talented lead guitarist. He didn't yet have the operatic depth to his singing that would make him internationally famous a decade later, but he could wail out a ballad or rip through a dance number like nobody's business. The group's radio show, as was the case with most performers in those days, was barely a break-even affair financially, but it served well as a promotional medium to get them the performing gigs. They also appeared on the KERB Jamboree with other local bands, again doing country & western material. The group was good enough to impress their high school principal, who got them a performance at a Lion's Club convention in Chicago. By 1954, they were also backing up players like Slim Whitman. Orbison and Ellis attended North Texas State College in Denton, and the group held together during this period, sufficiently long enough to discover rock & roll by the end of 1954. Around that time, they'd even added 'Shake, Rattle & Roll' to their repertory. It was while at North Texas State that Orbison first encountered a fellow fraternity member, Wade Lee Moore, who had co-authored a song called 'The Ooby Dooby' with Dick Penner. The Wink Westerners later auditioned for Columbia Records using the latter song, to no avail. Following a brief hiatus, the Wink Westerners resumed their activities during the summer of 1955, and managed to get an appearance on a television show on KMID-TV in Midland, TX, doing country songs but also covering what was becoming increasingly familiar rock & roll material, including the current hit 'Rock Around the Clock' by an ex-Western swing band, and 'That's All Right' by that Elvis Presley fellow out of Memphis, and Moore and Penner's 'Ooby Dooby.' As the radio show had been, the television appearances were used mostly to promote the band's live appearances. The band had gotten very good, and doubly so in the context of local performing groups. Although he was no Scotty Moore (who could play anything), Orbison had become a formidable lead guitarist and singer, and the band matched him. The kids were also starting to dance more enthusiastically to R&B songs (what were called 'rhythm numbers' in those days), and the group was performing more Little Richard, Bo Diddley, Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley, and Big Joe Turner than Hank Williams. A change in name was called for, and the Wink Westerners became the Teen Kings. The group had a few lineup shifts - Orbison himself had to teach Evans' successor on bass, Jack Kennelly, how to play the instrument - but kept playing and hoping for a break. Texas in those days was filled with hundreds, perhaps thousands of small bands that were evolving out of country music and into rock & roll. Buddy Holly was just getting into the music seriously around that time, and a lot of veteran country players were busy adapting their styles to the new music, or trying to. The Teen Kings were young enough that it wasn't a stretch, and the results were natural. Their break came with help from the father of a woman that James Morrow was dating. Having heard the group's radio broadcasts, and seen some shows and television spots, he arranged for a recording session at Norman Petty's studio in Clovis, NM, which yielded a pair of songs, 'Trying to Get to You,' which had been a single by an R&B vocal group called the Eagles, and had been covered (but not yet released) by Elvis Presley, and 'Ooby Dooby.' They were issued on two sides of a single (45 and 78 rpm) in early 1956 on the Je-Wel label. The songs were played by a record store owner friend of the band in Odessa TX, over the telephone to Sam Phillips of Sun Records. By the end of March, the band was under contract to Sun and playing gigs with Johnny Cash. The Sun single of 'Ooby Dooby' had a different B-side,'Go! Go! Go!' Ironically, the original B-side of Je-Wel, 'Trying to Get to You,' went through a bizarre odyssey of its own - Weldon Rogers had also recorded the song, and the Teen Kings' version was sent to Lew Chudd at Imperial Records by mistake, along with Rogers' rendition and the song 'So Long, Good Luck, and Goodbye' - the Teen Kings' version accidentally ended up on the B-side of the latter single by Rogers, and was 'lost' and forgotten in the Imperial catalog for the next 36 years, until it was licensed for inclusion on Sony Music Special Products' 1991 box set The Legendary Roy Orbison. The Teen Kings' 'Ooby Dooby' (which already credited Orbison more than the rest of the group) peaked at number 59 nationally, and their next single, 'You're My Baby' b/w 'Rockhouse,' again credited to Orbison and the Teen Kings, failed to chart nationally. Sam Phillips' strategy was becoming clear - he'd pegged Orbison for stardom, and the other group members came to resent this, not only in the billing on their records but, ultimately, the structure of the recording sessions. The end came when they turned up for a recording session and saw that Phillips had booked in additional musicians to work with Orbison. His success at Sun ended with 'Ooby Dooby,' and it would take another half-decade for another label and producer, Fred Foster (ironically, the producer of the Eagles' original version of 'Trying to Get to You') at Monument Records, to help Orbison achieve the level of success that Phillips saw in his potential. The Teen Kings only left behind a handful of Sun and Je-Wel tracks, but in 1995, a group of 16 live recordings from KOSA-TV in Odessa in 1956 were unearthed and released for the first time by Rollercoaster Records. Featuring the last incarnation of the band, it's a special body of work for a variety of reasons, presenting Orbison at the peak of his early rockabilly period, and also a rare chance to hear live-in-the-studio performances by an early Sun act, with no producer getting in between the artists and their music, or the public and appreciating it."



    Lost & Found

    or

    Lost & Found


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    1. Fire Girl
    2. X-Rated Movie
    3. Flying High
    4. Three Times a Lady
    5. Such a Woman
    6. Say Yeah
    7. I Like What You Do
    8. Visions
    9. Gettin' It
    10. Midnight Magic
    11. You're Special
    12. Still
    13. Wonderland
    14. Sexy Lady
    15. Loving You
    16. Sail On
    17. 12.01 A.M. - Reprise

    Lionel Richie - Vocals
    William King - Trumpet
    Thomas McClary - Guitar, Vocals
    Milan Williams - Guitar, Keyboards
    Ronald LaPread - Bass
    Walter Orange - Drums, Vocals

    AMG:
    "When it came time for Motown to package its Commodores catalog for the CD market, they paired up the albums into a series of two-fers, one of the more suitable pairings being Natural High/Midnight Magic. These back to back albums, from 1978 and 1979 respectively, flow together well. Neither is one of the group's best overall albums, but each has a good share of hits that add up to a satisfying albeit spotty sum, one that includes a pair of gigantic hits, 'Three Times a Lady' and 'Still.' These two crossover hits are both quiet piano ballads sung by Lionel Richie, who had made such songs his stock-in-trade by this point, delivering one or two on every successive Commodores album, to generally greater and greater (and broader) success each go round. There are several other noteworthy songs here on this two-fer, including good old-fashioned soul-funk jams from Natural High like 'Fire Girl' and 'Flying High' and self-conscious disco-funk steppers from Midnight Magic like the title track and 'Sexy Lady.' Above all, it's this leap from soul- to disco-funk that distinguishes the two albums from one another, to the chagrin of many longtime fans at the time, no doubt. Regardless, Natural High/Midnight Magic functions well as a two-fer, as neither album is particularly noteworthy on its own; it's a great value for anyone who has chosen to round up all the Commodores albums rather than settle for a one-stop compilation or cherry-pick a couple albums."



    Natural High / Midnight Magic

    or

    Natural High / Midnight Magic


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    1. November Steps, for shakuhachi, biwa & orchestra 19:06
    2. Eclipse, for shakuhachi & biwa 10:56
    3. A String around Autumn, for viola & orchestra 16:13

    Nobuka Imai - Viola
    Katsuya Yokoyama - Shakuhachi
    Kinshi Tsuruta - Biwa
    Saito Kinen Orchestra
    Seiji Ozawa - Conductor

    AMG:
    "At first glance Toru Takemitsu's November Steps, composed in 1967 for the New York Philharmonic's 125th birthday, would seem to exemplify the inevitability of Oriental/Occidental musical exchange in the age of global communication and commerce. After all, it counterpoises against the lush, booming sound of the Western orchestra two soloists playing exotic instruments from his native Japan: the shakuhachi flute and the lute-like biwa. Takemitsu presents this not as a diplomatic gesture, however, but rather a dialectical one. 'Sometimes these two worlds of East and West envelope me with gentleness,' the composer confided to musicologist Luciana Galliano in 1995, 'but more often than not they tear me apart. What I try to do is to follow both directions. I wish not to find a resolution to this creative paradox, but to bring the two opposing sides into conflict.' The concerto would seem the perfect genre to depict this tension: its connotation of the individual apart from society, the few against the many, taken to embody the position of a composer both admittedly self-conscious about his own native musical tradition and never fully at home in his adopted idiom.
    This approach lends the piece a palpable energy. The two sides rarely seek to find common ground, but rather emphasize the borders of their own and each others' idiomatic profiles. Those borders, it should be noted, expand exponentially in the hands of Takemitsu, who elicits from the ensemble and soloists a seemingly unending supply of new sonorities. Throughout the piece's 11 sections (or 'Steps,' the term in the title corresponding roughly to a word akin to 'movement' in the Japanese classical tradition), though a few structural aspects of the piece are left variable, the moment-to-moment details are deliberately conceived and notated with painstaking detail. Every sound in the composer's universe, then, is a designed and created entity. The biwa, with its pointed attack, abundant overtones, and quasi-percussive possibilities finds challenge in the orchestra's timbral agility, while one of the shakuhachi's intonational nuances might send shimmering, dissonant ripples across the strings. In performance, these reactions and interactions take on an almost theatrical element: the orchestra is distributed in an unusual fashion around the stage behind the soloists, lending a spatial aspect to the translucent layers of highly individualized elements that fill the score. They also assume a careful pace, as Takemitsu interpolates his surreal, apparitional sonorities with pensive, heavy silences.

    Toru Takemitsu's work is often considered as a manifestation of global culture: not only does he bring an Eastern sensibility to the Western symphonic ensemble, he also combines Japanese and European instruments. In November Steps, for example, the orchestra provides accompaniment for and contrast to a featured pair of Japanese instruments: the biwa, a traditional lute-like instrument with silk strings and a propensity for dramatic intonational inflections, and the shakuhachi, a bamboo recorder characterized by its variety of articulations and timbres.
    Just prior to his bridging the East-West cultural gap with November Steps, Takemitsu's Eclipse emerged as his first concert work for Japanese instruments. Scored for biwa and shakuhachi as well, it served to pave the way for his subsequent intercultural efforts. The somewhat shopworn but nonetheless accurate analogy of the Japanese rock garden serves well to describe the sonic landscape of Eclipse. Combining two instruments whose character is so dominated by details of articulation and inflection of individual notes through intonation or texture, the piece draws attention to minute details of musical surfaces and leaves ample space between sound events to focus the ear's concentration. A note on the shakuhachi may emerge seamlessly from a long silence, or appear suddenly with explosive breath; pitches bend slowly, as if succumbing to gravity, or slowly shimmer with increasing vibrato before leaping elsewhere with unanticipated force and agility. The scrape of the plectrum against the strings of the biwa is sometimes nimble and melodic, but almost percussive in its friction at times of increased drama.
    Despite the leisurely pace with which the piece unfolds and the ambiguous sense of trajectory that it conveys, the melodic contours and dramatic inflections are not left to the fancy of the performers. Rather, Takemitsu uses a special kind of notation for each instrument to indicate every nuance of sound shape. The biwa player reads from a special tablature system enhanced by graphic symbols for pitch alterations, attack qualities, and other directives, while the shakuhachi player reads lines and shapes mapped onto a time axis. There is some flexibility in the work's performance; however, portions of the piece may be repeated or juxtaposed at the performer's discretion and the spaces between some events are left unspecified. The biwa player is given additional, if ambiguous, guidance by the insertion into the score of lines of poetry by Rabindranath Tagore. Takemitsu conveys certain emotional suggestions to the performers through another method as well, one in which the image conveyed by the work's title infiltrates the very notation of the piece. Part of the score is rendered as a negative image of white notation against a black background, a visual eclipse to accompany the contrasts of sound color that comprise the essence of the music.

    This work was commissioned by the Festival d'Automne á Paris as part of the celebration of the bicentennial of the French Revolution. The title may have been intended to encompass both the images of a piece for a string instrument (the solo viola, in this instance) and a festival happening during the autumn of the year (the Festival d'Autumne). In any case, this is a magnificient and subtle piece scored for a Debussy-like symphonic orchestra (French Romantic period size plus two harps and extended percussion). The viola part throughout is virtuosic and more declarative than most of Takemitsu's sound-painting orchestral works. The basic gesture of its melody, often taken over by the orchestra, is of an upward climb taken in increasingly larger steps. One can imagine speeches and poetry in an autumnal landscape of rich harmonies. The activity is built up so much, that midway through the score must bear the necessary indication for a change to 'Dolce !' - sweetly with an exclamation mark. In the beginning of the piece, Takemitsu places his more impressionist harmonies in the foreground with the string section, and the less closely related harmonics (dissonances) in the wind and brass sections creating a strange kind of misty memory landscape (somewhat like the orchestration technique of Charles Ives famous 'Three Places in New England'). We again hear the beginning with fuller chords and a more expanded progression immediately following the brief 'Dolce !' section. The music again builds up to heroic gestures and the viola solo becomes even more active, rhetorically complex and impassioned. The ninth and thirteenth chord impressionist harmonies become exquisitely overwhelming with full-bodied sustains alternating with the internal excitement suggested by the various kinds of tremolo figures. For all the complexity of the orchestration, however, Takemitsu's central motifs are clearly outlined and discernible to the ear. At the conclusion, we are left with an unresolved thirteenth chord (C major over open D) in the strings that holds promises for the future (the ascending figures in all the other sections of the orchestra, and the final declarations of the viola), and yet there is an autumnal feeling (the non-vibrato, to vibrato, to non-vibrato sustained strings, plus the concluding extreme range harmonics in the solo viola) that surrounds those hopes."



    Viola Concerto/November Steps/Eclipse

    or

    Viola Concerto/November Steps/Eclipse


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    1. Glad All Over 2:44
    2. Bits and Pieces 2:00
    3. Do You Love Me 2:45
    4. Can't You See That She's Mine 2:23
    5. Because 2:23
    6. Don't Let Me Down 1:42
    7. Any Way You Want It 2:31
    8. Everybody Knows (I Still Love You) 1:42
    9. Any Time You Want Love 2:13
    10. Thinking of You Baby 2:33
    11. Whenever You're Around 2:56
    12. Little Bitty Pretty One 1:31
    13. Crying Over You 2:09
    14. Don't Be Taken In 2:24
    15. When 2:30
    16. Reelin' and Rockin' 2:47
    17. Come Home 2:49
    18. Mighty Good Loving 2:41
    19. Hurting Inside 2:38
    20. Having a Wild Weekend 1:51
    21. 'Til the Right One Comes Along 1:55
    22. Catch Us If You Can 1:56
    23. I'll Be Yours My Love 2:43
    24. I Am on My Own 2:33
    25. I Need Love 3:40

    1. Try Too Hard 2:10
    2. All Night Long 3:11
    3. Look Before You Leap 2:20
    4. Please Tell Me Why 1:33
    5. Somebody Find a New Love 2:01
    6. Satisfied With You 1:58
    7. At the Scene 1:53
    8. I Miss You 2:14
    9. Do You Still Love Me 2:02
    10. Nineteen Days 1:51
    11. I've Got to Have a Reason 1:54
    12. I Like It Like That 1:38
    13. Over and Over 2:01
    14. You Got What It Takes 2:59
    15. Doctor Rhythm 2:48
    16. Small Talk 2:21
    17. Concentration Baby 2:32
    18. Everybody Knows (I Still Love You) 2:21
    19. Inside and Out 2:55
    20. At the Place 2:25
    21. Best Day's Work 2:37
    22. Maze of Love 2:37
    23. Here Comes Summer 2:48
    24. Live in the Sky 2:43
    25. Everybody Get Together 3:18

    Denis Payton - Guitar, Harmonica, Sax, Vocals
    Lenny Davidson - Guitar, Vocals
    Mike Smith - Organ, Piano, Vocals
    Rick Huxley - Bass, Vocals
    Dave Clark - Drums, Percussion, Vocals

    AMG:
    "For many years, the Dave Clark Five were one of the few major groups of the 1960s whose work was unavailable on compact disc. This two-disc, 50-track reissue not only rectifies that situation but arguably includes more than all but devoted fans will want to hear. All of the band's mammoth mid-'60s hits -'Glad All Over,' 'Bits and Pieces,' 'Because,' 'Catch Us If You Can,' 'Any Way You Want It,' and others - are included, and while they don't rival the work of British Invasion heavyweights like the Beatles, Stones, and Kinks, they still burst with exuberant melodies, harmonies, and dense production. This compilation also features worthy lesser-known hits like 'Try Too Hard' and 'Everybody Knows,' as well as obscure but commendable beat ballads and raveups from their B-sides and albums. Nonetheless, there is a fair amount of filler, and their post-1966 work is undistinguished by either artistic growth or the hooks and heavy beat of their early material. But at their peak, the DC5 captured the joie de vivre of the British Invasion with a lasting power that cannot be dismissed. This reissue includes a comprehensive booklet featuring recollections from Dave Clark himself."



    The History Of The Dave Clark Five

    or

    The History Of The Dave Clark Five


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