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FreeFall - LiveJournal.com

older | 1 | .... | 17 | 18 | (Page 19) | 20 | 21 | .... | 57 | newer

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    Suite in D major, Op. 2, No. 1:
    1. I. Prelude 3:30
    2. II. Allemande La Royalle 2:46
    3. III. Rondeau Le Duc d' Orleans 2:11
    4. IV. Sarabande La d' Armagnac 2:42
    5. V. Gavotte La Meudon 1:39
    6. VI. Menuet Le Comte de Brione - 2e Menuet 3:16
    7. VII. Gigue La Folichon 1:23
    Les Delices, ou Le Fargis - Rondeau le Champetre:
    8. I. Les Delices ou Le Fargis 2:35
    9. II. Rondeau le Champetre 2:42
    Suite in G major, Op. 2, No. 2:
    10. I. Prelude 1:44
    11. II. Allemande L'Atalante 2:01
    12. III. Sarabande La Fidelle 3:00
    13. IV. Petit Air tendre 1:13
    14. V. Gavotte en Rondeau La Maillebois - 2e Gavotte 2:29
    15. VI. Rondeau Le Baron 1:27
    Suite in G major, Op. 2, No. 3:
    16. I. Allemande La Cascade de Saint-Cloud 2:44
    17. II. Sarabande La Guimon 2:55
    18. III. Courante-Double L'indifferente 2:38
    19. IV. Rondeau Le Plaintif 2:56
    20. V. Menuet Le Mignon 0:59
    21. VI. Gigue L'Italienne 1:22
    22. VII. Echos pour la flute traversiere seule 3:26
    Suite in E minor, Op. 2, No. 4:
    23. I. Prelude 2:46
    24. II. Allemande La Fontainebleau 3:20
    25. III. Sarabande Le Depart 2:31
    26. IV. Air Le Fleuri 1:43
    27. V. Gavotte La Matilde 1:29
    28. VI. Branie de Village L'Auteuil 0:44
    29. VII. Menuet La Beaulieu: 2e Menuet 2:15
    30. VIII. Allemande La Chauvet 2:30
    31. IX. Rondeau Le Lutin 1:13
    32. X. Gigue la Perousine 1:35

    Philippe Allain-Dupre - Baroque Transverse Flute
    Yasuko Uyama-Bouvard - Harpsichord
    Vincent Dumestre - Theorbo
    Jean-Francois Bouges - Flute
    Philippe Pierlot - Viol

    Wiki:
    "Jacques-Martin Hotteterre was born in Paris, the son of Martin Hotteterre (d. 1712) and Marie Crespy.In about 1704, Jacques-Martin Hotteterre succeeded his cousin Jacques in the post of basse de hautbois et taille de violon at the royal court.
    Hotteterre lived and studied in Rome early in his career, and his nickname le Romain (the Roman) came from this period. He spent two years (1698–1700) employed by Prince Francesco Ruspoli in Rome, before adopting the nickname of "Le Romain" at some point between 1705 and 1707. By 1708, he became a musician to the king of France, in the king's 'Grande Écurie, and in 1717, he inherited René Pignon Descoteaux's post as Jouëur de Fluste de la musique de chambre.
    Hotteterre owed his fame largely to his talent playing the flute, an instrument for which he wrote a number of pieces, significantly extending the repertory for the instrument. In addition, he played the bassoon, oboe, and musette. Jacques-Martin Hotteterre was also an internationally celebrated teacher to aristocratic patrons. He wrote one method for the transverse flute, recorder, and oboe, published in 1707, as well as a method for the musette, published in 1737. His L'Art de préluder sur la flûte traversière was published in 1719. It underscores his highly developed technique and includes pieces in nineteen keys.
    In addition to performance and teaching, Hotteterre continued his family's tradition of wind instrument making. It may have been Hotteterre who made a number of changes in the design of the transverse flute, though there is little concrete evidence for this. Most notably, the flute, which had previously been made in one cylindrical piece, was cut in three pieces: the head (with the mouthpiece), the body (with most of the holes), and the foot (with one, keyed hole for the low E Flat)."



    Music for Flute

    or

    Music for Flute


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    1. Alegre Pescador
    2. Tu Y Tus Frutos
    3. Un Dia
    4. Plena Como La Luna Llena
    5. Los Amantes Son Eternos
    6. Sebastian
    7. Que Sientes?
    8. Raquel
    9. Canta Negro
    10. El Indio Llora

    Humberto Monroy - Guitarra, armonica y voz
    Edgar Restrepo - Piano, teclados, percusion
    Juan F. Echevarria - Flauta, percusion, coros
    Tania Moreno - Coros
    Mario Sarasty - Bajo
    Betty Vargas - Flauta

    forcedexposure.com:
    "1975, only one year after their second and probably most successful release, was the time for Genesis to get the third in stores. They gave it the title of Yakta Mama. This followed the same direction as their second album, and you get a new amazing set of extremely well done mixes of folk, rock, psychedelia and Andean folklore flavors. Killer stuff and no more! This is an obligatory purchase for anyone into folk, psychedelic and ethnic rock! Nice release with a full color booklet with info and pictures, remastered sound and the usual slimcase like all releases on Guerssen."



    Yakta Mama

    or

    Yakta Mama


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    1. Port Na Bpúcai 3:53
    2. Seoladh Na Ngamhna Fé'n Bhfásach4:18
    3. Baso More 4:00
    4. Cucúin 5:24
    5. Ode To Bridget 3:30
    6. Thugamar Féin An Samhradh Linn 3:28
    7. Suantraithe 3:50
    8. Cití Na Gcumann 6:21
    9. Kay Boshilay 5:00
    10. Dónal Óg 4:39
    11. Down By The Sally Gardens 5:52
    12. Láirín An Gheartaltaigh 4:36

    Nóirín Ní Riain - vocals
    Jerry O'Sullivan - uilleann pipes
    Joannie Madden - pennywhistle
    Steve Gorn - bansuri
    Jordan Rudess - keyboards
    Russ Landau - bass
    Ray Speigel - Indian percussion
    +
    The Paul Winter Consort:
    Paul Winter - soprano sax
    Paul Halley - keyboards
    Eugene Friesen - cello
    Glen Velez - percussion

    livingmusic.com:
    "Limerick, Nóirín studied music at University College, Cork. She later gained an M.A. degree for her research on traditional religious song in Irish. This research provided Nóirín with the inspiration and the basis for recordings with the Benedictine monks of Glenstal Abbey, as well as books, articles and recordings on aspects of women's songs and the religious song tradition in Ireland. Nóirín is the honoured recipient of many old style songs collected by her mentor and teacher, Pilib O Laoghaire, some of which are included on her Living Music album, Celtic Soul.
    Nóirín also feels a sense of kinship with India: its culture, people and song have also been very important to her over the past ten years. She has learnt many spiritual songs in Hindi in India and in Ireland. Nóirín's Living Music album, Celtic Soul, is imbued with Indian influences, reflecting her interest in spiritual songs in Hindi as well as her traditional Irish personal and musical base and her classical training.
    Frequently accompanying herself on Shruti boxes (Indian drones), Surpeti (Indian harmonium) and a reproduction of the medieval Symphony (early hurdy gurdy), Nóirín Ní Riain performs regularly in Ireland and worldwide. She has introduced the Dalai Lama in song to an interfaith conference as part of an international peace gathering in Costa Rica and has also represented Ireland at many recent international gatherings, such as the United Nations Summit in Rio de Janiero in 1992, where she performed at the closing session for Religious and Spiritual World Leaders, and the UN Earth Summit in Copenhagen in 1995. She performed at the United Nations Conference on Women in Beijing, China, and has been selected three times by the Irish government as the national delegate for cultural exchanges to India.
    Nóirín has performed on many occasions with Paul Winter and the Consort, and has often joined Winter in his annual Winter and Summer Solstice Celebrations in New York's Cathedral of St John the Divine. With Living Music, she is a featured soloist on the live recording of the Winter Solstice Concert, Solstice Live! Nóirín's stunning debut album for Living Music is Celtic Soul."



    Celtic Soul

    or

    Celtic Soul


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    Chamber Symphony:
    1 Mongrel Airs 7:50
    2 Aria with Walking Bass 8:13
    3 Roadrunner 5:50
    Grand Pianola Music, for 3 sopranos, 2 pianos, winds, brass & percussion
    4 Part 1A 15:12
    5 Part 1B 7:50
    6 On the Dominant Divide 7:54

    John Alley - Piano
    Shelagh Sutherland - Piano
    London Sinfonietta
    John Adams - Conductor

    AMG:
    "Schoenberg surprised some contemporaries by citing both Wagner and Brahms, two composers seen by many as overseeing opposing musical camps, as influences on his compositional style. How then would the leader of the Second Viennese School react upon learning that he was one of two even more contradictory inspirations for John Adams' Chamber Symphony -- his counterpart being the delightfully frenzied music that accompanied 1950s cartoons? As Adams tells the story, he was studying the score of Schoenberg's Chamber Symphony, Op. 9, while his seven-year-old son watched cartoons in the next room. This odd combination resulted in one of Adams' most adventurous works, one that helped set a new musical trajectory that would distance Adams farther than ever before from his minimalist counterparts Reich and Glass. In fact, by the time the Chamber Symphony was composed, Adams' musical language had evolved into one much too free in rhythm, harmony, and melody to still be called minimalist. This trend would continue a year later with his rhapsodic and exploratory Violin Concerto.
    The Chamber Symphony's frantic beginning, with its absurdly insistent percussion and caricatural accompaniment, somehow recalls both Schoenberg and Looney Tunes. Perhaps these two aesthetics are not that far apart. Composed in 1907, Schoenberg's Chamber Symphony, Op. 9, emerged at the end of his initial thrust towards atonality, but before his codification of dissonance into the twelve-tone system. Thus the work retains some remnants of traditional harmony, almost ending some phrases with tonal cadences, while maintaining an overall melodic angularity. On the other hand, the cartoon music of mid-century American television used increased dissonance as a comic tool, with dizzying chromatic runs and deliberately odd harmonies exaggerating the slapstick action on the screen. In the final analysis, the two worlds are not so far apart.
    Adams proves this, composing his Chamber Symphony for an ensemble identical to the one called for in Schoenberg's Op. 9, but adds a jazz combo of sorts, including drum set, synthesizer, trombone, and trumpet. Schoenberg's obtuse lines are blended with the musical pyrotechnics that could set a cartoon land chase scene, and is done in such a way that the two elements are indiscernible at any given moment. Adams also acknowledges other influences in this amalgam, namely Milhaud's La Création du monde, Stravinsky's L'Histoire du Soldat, and Hindemith's Kleine Kammermusik. Occasionally, the motoric patterns and static harmonies of Adams' earlier works re-emerge in the Chamber Symphony, but by and large this piece reflects and engenders a compositional style that becomes increasingly distanced from those of Steve Reich, Philip Glass, and Terry Riley, and increasingly difficult to describe as minimalist.

    While his minimalist colleagues Steve Reich and Philip Glass came to prominence via electronic works and works for their own repertory ensembles, John Adams made his earliest impact on the contemporary music world primarily as an orchestral composer. Calling for an ensemble of winds, percussion, sopranos, and two pianos, Grand Pianola Music (1982) recalls the music of Charles Ives in its creative synthesis of various musical styles. The listener is greeted with a wide spectrum of sonic allusions, ranging from band marches to gospel tunes, from Beethoven's sonatas to melodramatic movie-hall stylings. The result is a work that walks the line between sincerity and irony.
    Grand Pianola Music is divided into three movements. The first is intense and pulsing, blocks of harmonic stasis giving rise to angular yet lush melodies. The second maintains an underlying rhythmic drive from the first, its harmonies growing ever more intriguing as the movement progresses. It is here that Adams employs the 'pianola' effect: the two pianos are given identical figures slightly out of sync with one another, creating a glimmering echo. Gradually, the pulsing chords of the movement's opening are replaced by sustained harmonies in the voices and winds, bringing the work to its most reflective moment. The third movement unfolds as a driving, entertaining finale with a sweeping, late-Romantic grandeur and a gospel-music energy marshaled by Adams' characteristically brilliant orchestration."



    Chamber Symphony; Grand Pianola Music

    or

    Chamber Symphony; Grand Pianola Music


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    1. Yesterday's Kids 2:25
    2. Is It Day or Night? 2:27
    3. Let's Party Tonight 2:13
    4. All Right Now 3:12
    5. Thunder 2:04
    6. Rock & Roll 3:47
    7. American Nights 3:35
    8. California Paradise 2:06
    9. I'm a Star 1:42
    10. You Drive Me Wild 2:47
    11. Born to Be Bad 4:11
    12. Wild Thing 3:40

    Joan Jett - Guitar, Vocals
    Micki Steele - Bass
    Sandy West - Drums, Vocals

    AMG:
    "This Runaways 'first ever recording after five days of being a band' is actually Joan Jett, Micki Steele, and Sandy West as a power trio, produced and directed by Kim Fowley. It truly is an historical document, despite Fowley's penchant for extreme hype - his name is splashed on the front cover, back cover, inside back cover, and inside gatefold. The gals are mentioned once on the inside back cover. Perhaps that means we can blame Fowley for the dreadful sound on these tapes - Phil Spector he ain't, although he seems to want his name posted more than the creator of 'Be My Baby.' The former producer of Helen Reddy (credit the man with getting Reddy her last Top 20 hit, 'You're My World,' in 1977, two years after this) is in his element here, and though these tapes are not as appealing as when Dinky Dawson engineered Fowley's work with Jonathan Richman and the Modern Lovers, he does get these young gals to give a go at Chip Taylor's 'Wild Thing,' as well as an almost carbon copy of Mitch Ryder's version of Lou Reed's chestnut 'Rock 'n' Roll.' You see, Bob Ezrin helped guitarist Steve Hunter record an amazing rearrangement of a Velvet Underground staple, so imaginative that the Runaways made it one of their showstoppers. That Top 40 soundalikes Blue Swede would eventually cop the same riff and attempt to send it up the charts is a testament to Fowley's sense of what was truly 'hip.' But if you want to talk about 'raw,' it is interesting that Mercury, the home of the New York Dolls, would find these demos so appealing as to give the Runaways the deal. Listening to them, it is easier to imagine Kim Fowley knew how to schmooze the powers that be, but that's OK, because the raw energy of a future Joan Jett, someone who would graduate to Ritchie Cordell and Kenny Laguna - becoming their female Tommy James - makes these classic tapes very special indeed. Jett does a credible basement version of Free's 'All Right Now,' and a bunch of titles like 'Let's Party Tonight,' 'Thunder,' 'You Drive Me Wild,' 'I'm a Star,' and others. It doesn't say if 'I'm a Star' is the Joe South tune or not. Why credit songwriters when the room can be used to put Kim Fowley's name for a fifth time on the left-hand corner of the back cover? (Twice on the back.) The sad thing about this project is that fans don't get more information on how it all came together; the liner notes, written by Kim Fowley in 1991, just ramble. The sonic quality is horrible, your typical microphone in the room while a band makes noise routine, but it is Joan Jett, and for fans it works, it definitely works, and it's nice to know she eventually found people to work with who knew enough to put her name on the marquee instead of theirs."



    Born to Be Bad

    or

    Born to Be Bad


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    1. Mascoma 8:56
    2. FM 9:32
    3. Impex 7:59
    4. E101 12:52
    5. Mine Was the Shoulder You Cried on That Day 4:22
    6. Fenrus 6:54
    7. Mile 6:47

    Martin Siewert - Electronics, Guitar
    Joe Williamson - Bass
    Martin Brandlmayr - Drums

    AMG:
    "Without oversimplifying, Trapist's Highway My Friend is in immediate continuity with SSSD's Home. In both albums, Viennese guitarist Martin Siewert pursues a form of post-improv folk, of improvised instrumental songs informed by the Free culture (from Caspar Brötzmann Massaker's rage-on blows to the restraint of Berlin reductionism) but hammered into something more structured and - dare it be said - more palatable. On this album Siewert also integrates lessons from experimental electronica. Accompanied by drummer Martin Brandlmayr and bassist Joe Williamson, Siewert lays down contemplative riffs and cutting-edge noise-making. Tracks like 'Impex' and 'Mine Was the Shoulder You Cried On That Day' could almost be mistaken for the Necks tunes (minus the duration, of course). Williamson locks himself up in a smooth ostinato, Brandlmayr sticks to decorative brushing and hitting, while the guitarist walks in circles around a simple motif. It's all done delicately, with an effort to push the music into new territories while keeping it grounded into an atavistic form of song-making. Other pieces like 'FM' and 'Fenrus' remain in the realm of electro-acoustic free improv, developing slowly over a limited amount of sonic material, yet captivating the listener. A tension is established between the two musical forms, giving Highway My Friend its distinct personality. Trapist comes out of this session a tightly knit unit, and Siewert's ongoing musical journey produces yet another fascinating postcard. Recommended."



    Highway My Friend

    or

    Highway My Friend


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    1. La Jalousie 18:18
    2. Red Run 18:12
    3. Herakles 2 15:07
    4. Befreiung 14:09

    Christoph Anders - Narrator, Sprecher
    Dietmar Wiesner - Flute
    Wolfgang Stryi - Clarinet (Bass), Saxophone
    Franck Ollu - French Horn
    Bruce Nockles - Trumpet
    Bill Forman - Trumpet
    Uwe Dierksen - Trombone
    Mathias Tacke - Violin
    Michael Klier - Viola
    Eva Böcker - Cello
    Klaus Obermaier - Guitar (Electric)
    Ueli Wiget - Piano, Sampling
    Rainer Römer - Percussion
    Peter Rundel - Conductor

    AMG:
    "Heiner Goebbels likens his work as a composer to that of a theater director (and he's a notable one) and vice versa. Consciously abandoning the traditionally German notion of 'absolute music,' his extensive and accomplished use of sampling keyboards introduces sounds as diverse as croaking frogs, car engines, crickets, and footsteps into the fabric of the musical discourse. His long-standing collaboration with German playwright Heiner Müller (also documented on the ECM triple-CD set Hörstücke) is once more to the fore in 'Herakles 2,' which sets a prose fragment from Müller's 'Zement.' 'Befreiung' ('Liberation') sets texts by another German playwright, Rainald Goetz, while 'La Jalousie,' as its title indicates, references Alain Robbe Grillet's groundbreaking nouveau roman of the same name, deftly conjuring up its paranoid world with refracted detuned keyboards and ominous samples. 'Red Run,' though not sourced in any specific text, also refers to the wider art world, being originally a ballet score for the William Forsythe Company in Goebbels' hometown of Frankfurt. Goebbels' background in free improvisation and progressive rock, notably in the group Cassiber (with Chris Cutler, Alfred Harth, and Christoph Anders) is also a rich source of inspiration, and Frankfurt's exemplary Ensemble Modern handles his intricate scores with customary aplomb."



    La Jalousie

    or

    La Jalousie


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    1. Boy 3:34
    2. I'm afraid to sleep 3:44
    3. Jinhausu Blues 4:22
    4. Hanaichimonme 5:12
    5. Govinda 4:09
    6. Boy (II) 3:26
    7. Blind flower 3:36
    8. The sea of clouds 3:35
    9. Amaryllis of the harbor 2:56
    10. If I became a prostitute 3:51
    11. Moses Godaun 2:30
    12. House of the rising sun 6:18

    Maki - Vocals
    Tahachi Mochizuki - Flute
    Toshiaki Yokota - Flute
    Kosuke Ichihara - Tenor Saxophone
    Fumio Nanri - Trumpet
    Masamichi Uetaka - Trombone
    Seiichi Tokura - Trombone
    Takeshi Aoki - Trombone
    Yoko Uehara - Sitar
    Sadanori Nakamure - Acoustic Guitar
    Minoru Akiyama - Guitar
    Shigeru Tashiro - Guitar
    Masaru Imada - Organ
    Hajime Iiyoshi - Piano
    Fumihiko Kazama - Melodica
    Yasuo Arakawa - Bass
    Sadakazu Tabata - Drums
    Kikutada Kashida - Taiko
    Academia Cello Quartet

    Wiki:
    "Maki Asakawa, January 27, 1942 – January 17, 2010) was a Japanese jazz and blues singer, lyricist and composer.
    Born in Ishikawa Prefecture, after graduating high school she worked as a civil servant for a short time before moving to Tokyo. Particularly influenced by the styles of Mahalia Jackson and Billie Holiday, she began her career singing at US Army bases and at cabarets.
    Asakawa made her debut recording, 'Tokyo Banka/Amen Jiro' with Victor in 1967. After appearing in a series of concerts organized by underground playwright Shuji Terayama in 1968, she signed with Toshiba, presently EMI Music Japan, and released the popular songs, 'Yo ga Aketara' and 'Kamome' in 1969. Her debut album, 'Asakawa Maki no Sekai', was released in 1970.
    In addition to writing and composing, she also released cover versions of US traditional folk and blues, translated to Japanese, such as 'Asahi ni ataru Ie' (The House of the Rising Sun).
    She became popular in the 1970s and had made more than 30 releases by the end of the 1990s, after which she was mostly known for performing live.
    Asakawa collaborated with musicians such as Yosuke Yamashita and Ryuichi Sakamoto. She continued performing live until the time of her death. Scheduled to perform in Nagoya January 15-17, 2010, she died before her show on the 17th, at the age of 67, of heart failure."



    Maki II

    or

    Maki II


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    1. Incantation 6:50
    2. Beauty in the Beast 4:00
    3. Poem for Bali 17:42
    4. Just Imaginings 12:10
    5. That's Just It 3:39
    6. Yusae-Aisae 3:15
    7. C'Est Afrique 6:16
    8. A Woman's Song 6:40

    Wendy Carlos - Synthesizers

    AMG:
    "Digital from the inside out, Beauty in the Beast takes electronic music far past the signposts Carlos erected with her Switched On... series. Instead, the music on this album cuts through a lot of the conventions and restraints that were used as frameworks for previous releases: instrumentation, tonality, and scaling, to name just a few. The result is an album filled with music that lives up to the title. At first listen, the music sounds terrifying - the microtonality causes a brain raised on Western pop music to readjust almost all of its expectations about sound and harmony - but those willing to listen and let it sink in will appreciate the beauty of the sounds."



    Beauty in the Beast

    or

    Beauty in the Beast


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    1. The Nine Cloud Dream 5:17
    2. Paradox 7:27
    3. Moving Portrait 10:05
    4. First Frost 6:30
    5. Roses Blue 2:52
    6. My Old Man 7:40
    7. The Same Situation 6:00
    8. Movement 8:09
    9. Romero 10:36

    David Douglas - Trumpet
    Bill Carrothers - Piano
    James Genus - Bass
    Billy Hart - Drums

    AMG:
    "Dave Douglas arguably became the most original trumpeter/composer of his generation. Douglas' stylistic range is broad yet unaffected; his music is not a pastiche, but rather a personal aesthetic that reflects a wide variety of interests. He explicitly cites such diverse influences as Igor Stravinsky, Stevie Wonder, and John Coltrane. As a composer, Douglas adapts and synthesizes unusual forms and creates his own out of disparate elements. As a trumpeter, he possesses a comprehensive jazz technique; certainly one hears the ghost of Lester Bowie in Douglas' expressive manipulations of timbre and pitch, but more pronounced is the integration of distinctive compositional and improvisational conceptions that ultimately defines his work.
    Douglas grew up in the New York City area. He started playing piano at the age of five, then trombone at seven before discovering the trumpet at nine. He learned jazz harmony in high school and began playing improvised music as an exchange student in Barcelona, Spain. From 1981 to 1983 he studied in Boston, first at the Berklee School of Music, then the New England Conservatory. He moved to New York City in 1984, where he attended New York University and studied with Carmine Caruso. In 1987, he toured Europe with Horace Silver. The early '90s saw Douglas begin to record in earnest; he led or co-led dates for the Hat Art, Soul Note, New World, and Arabesque labels. His various bands included the Tiny Bell Trio, a self-described 'jazz-Balkan-improv' group with drummer Jim Black and guitarist Brad Shepik (who used the surname Schoeppach at the time); his String Group, which included violinist Mark Feldman, cellist Erik Friedlander, bassist Mark Dresser, and drummer Michael Sarin; and his Quartet and Sextet, which included drummer Joey Baron. Also busy as a sideman, he could be heard during this period on recordings by Patricia Barber, Myra Melford, Anthony Braxton, and John Zorn (particularly the latter's original Masada quartet), among others, and the trumpeter has continued such collaborations through to the end of the new millennium's first decade.
    Douglas began recording for RCA in 2000 with a tribute to jazz pianist Mary Williams titled Soul on Soul, a Down Beat Album of the Year award-winner that markedly enhanced the trumpeter's profile on the jazz scene. That same year A Thousand Evenings, featuring accordionist Guy Klucevsek, was released, followed by El Trilogy and Witness in 2001. It was with Witness that Douglas began to broaden his already eclectic scope, incorporating electronic-savvy improvisers like Jamie Saft and Ikue Mori, as he had first begun to investigate with the samplers of Anthony Coleman and Yuka Honda on 1997's Sanctuary. His next album, The Infinite, featured a more familiar sound but surprising covers of songs by Rufus Wainwright and Björk. Freak In, a more electronic-oriented effort, was released in 2003.
    Douglas began his own Greenleaf Music label in 2003 and introduced it with the Mountain Passages album, released in early 2005 by a new aggregation, Dave Douglas & Nomad. Next came yet another new ensemble for the trumpeter, Keystone, which released an eponymous CD/DVD tribute to Roscoe 'Fatty' Arbuckle produced by Douglas and David Torn, also in 2005. The Dave Douglas Quintet (featuring an electrified Uri Caine on Fender Rhodes) releases Meaning and Mystery and Live at the Jazz Standard arrived in 2006 and 2007, followed by the Keystone group's Moonshine in 2008. In 2009, Douglas returned with Spirit Moves by his latest grouping, the brass ensemble Brass Ecstasy. In 2010, he collaborated with experimental filmmaker Bill Morrison to reinterpret the film Frankenstein for its 100th anniversary. Morrison recontextualized the film using new, archival, and distressed footage, while Douglas wrote an original score. The project was entitled Spark of Being. In addition to a soundtrack of the same name, Douglas and his Keystone group recorded two more albums and created a box set, though titles were available individually as well. Spark of Being: Expand was released in August of 2010, and featured the band playing extended but 'straight' versions of the cues used in the soundtrack. The final volume, Spark of Being: Burst, included themes recorded during the original soundtrack sessions, but were never used in the film. It followed in September of that year. In 2011, Douglas issued three 'EPs' on Greenleaf Music: the first, entitled Rare Metals, showcased five tunes by Brass Ecstasy; the second, Orange Afternoons, showcased a quintet with Ravi Coltrane, Vijay Iyer, Linda Oh, and Marcus Gilmore. The final disc, Bad Mango, featured Douglas' So Percussion group. The three titles were originally issued only as digital downloads, but were assembled for a physical CD release in box form in November."



    Moving Portrait

    or

    Moving Portrait


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    1. Earthbound 9:10
    2. Moon City 4:50
    3. Miracles Of The Gods 11:45
    4. The Gold Of The Gods 2:35
    5. Toktela 1:35
    6. Chariots Of The Gods 10:35
    7. Return To The Stars 9:55

    Phillip Saatchi - Guitar
    Paul Fishman - Keyboards
    Jon Astrop - Bass
    William Bruford - Percussion
    Kim Mackrell - Cello (6)

    progarchives:
    "Absolute Elsewhere is basically a solo effort by one Paul Fishman. He wrote it all, arranged it, played all the instruments (synths, sequencers, flute, pianos, mellotron) except guitars & percussion. 'In Search of Ancient Gods' is an instrumental album that's a musical interpretation of Erich Von Daniken's books. This is a real fine album of Heldon meets Crimson and Alan Parsons with tons of mellotrons. This is recommended to diehard fans of Bruford on drums or to fans of early synthesizer albums."



    In Search of Ancient Gods

    or

    In Search of Ancient Gods


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    1 Bamboo Forest 4:38
    2 Univoyage 10:54
    3 Tramp Blues 5:19
    4 Faith Run 4:58
    5 Sun Flower 7:21
    6 Miro Bop 4:03
    7 Beethoven 7:19
    8 Medium 5:10
    9 Brazil Waves 4:26

    Jan Garbarek - Sax(Soprano), Sax(Tenor)
    John McLaughlin - Guitar
    Chick Corea - Piano
    Miroslav Vitous - Double-bass
    Jack DeJohnette - Drums
    +
    Isaac Smith - Trombone (2-4)
    Wayne Bergeron - Trumpet (2-4)
    Valery Ponomarev - Trumpet, Flügelhorn (2-4)

    AMG:
    "On his first jazz date as a leader since 1992, Czechoslovakian bassist and composer Miroslav Vitous comes out of the gate with a host of heavyweights on one of the more lyrically swinging dates in modern jazz. Vitous' engaged, pulsing, and deeply woody tone is featured in the company of John McLaughlin, Jan Garbarek, Chick Corea, and Jack DeJohnette. While the crystalline sound of Manfred Eicher's ECM is everywhere here, as is the open-ended speculative jazz that the label is renowned -- and ridiculed for -- Vitous offers some startlingly beautiful twists and turns with his ensemble. Vitous, who has been through every music, from jazz-rock fusion as a founding member of Weather Report to being a classical composer, decided to revisit the skeletal remains of his very first session for the label in 1969. Produced by Herbie Mann the disc was, from a musical standpoint, a contentious, utterly brilliant marriage of ideas both old and new. Bandmembers DeJohnette and McLaughlin were present on those sides as well. Universal Syncopations is by turns a return to not the old forms, but rather to the manner of illustrating harmonic concepts in a quintet setting that allows for a maximum space between ensemble players while turning notions of swing, counterpoint, and rhythmic invention on their heads. From the wooly, expressionistic 'Tramp Blues,' with Vitous vamping around the changes, to the wide-open legato guitar phrasing of McLauglin against the double time in Vitous' bass on 'Univoyage,' to the simmering undulations of Garbarek's saxophones on top of Corea's intricate melodies and right-hand runs on 'Brazilan Waves,' all of it propelled, not anchored, by the leader's rich tone and accented and punctuated by Garbarek's tight, loping saxophone lines. This is one of those recordings that feels familiar in tone, but is timeless in concept and execution. Universal Syncopations is one of the most gorgeous sounding and toughly played dates of the calendar year."



    Universal Syncopations

    or

    Universal Syncopations


    0 0


    1. Gun Slinger 1:51
    2. Ride on Josephine 3:00
    3. Doing the Crawdaddy 3:00
    4. Cadillac 2:43
    5. Somewhere 2:32
    6. Cheyenne 1:58
    7. Sixteen Tons 2:26
    8. Whoa Mule (Shine) 2:27
    9. No More Lovin' 2:21
    10. Diddling 2:11
    11. Working Man 3:00
    12. Do What I Say 2:46

    Bo Diddley - Guitar, Vocals
    Jerome Green - Maracas
    Clifton James - Drums
    Frank Kirkland - Drums

    AMG:
    "Not only does it sport one of the most striking album covers of its era (Diddley decked out in cowboy finery, about to get the drop on some unfortunate varmint with one of his fieriest guitars lying at his feet), this 1961 album contains some fine music. The title track continues the legend of you-know-who, while 'Ride on Josephine' and 'Cadillac' rock like hell (and Ed Sullivan must have been glad to see that Diddley finally learned 'Sixteen Tons'). Two bonus cuts, 'Working Man' and 'Do What I Say,' make this one a must."



    Bo Diddley Is A Gunslinger

    or

    Bo Diddley Is A Gunslinger


    0 0


    1. Vetettem Violát 3:55
    2. Szeress Egyet, S Legyen Szép 4:18
    3. Három Árva 4:54
    4. Fújnaka Fellegek 1:27
    5. Hajnali Nóta 6:04
    6. Egy Pár Tánc Mezöségröl 6:16
    7. Széki M Agyar a 'Misié' 4:29
    8. Fuvom Azénekem 2:12
    9. Fehér Galamb Szállt a Házra 5:17
    10. Teremtés 4:06

    Márta Sebestyén - Recorder, Vocals
    Katalin Byenis - Vocals
    Katalin Gyenis - Vocals, Voices
    Andras Berecz - Jew's-Harp, Vocals, Voices
    Bela Halmos - Violin
    Csaba Okos - Violin
    Laszlo Porteleki - Violin
    Mihaly Sipos - Violin, Vocals, Zither
    Sándor Csoóri - Guitar, Hurdygurdy, Kobsa, Kontra
    Peter Eri - Bass, Bouzouki, Cello, Duduk, Kontra
    Antal Fekete - Bass, Kontra
    Daniel Hamar - Bass

    AMG:
    "Most popular in the West as the lead singer for the Hungarian group Muzsikas, Marta Sebestyen has also released several solo albums. among them Apocrypha (1992), which collects songs from three Hungarian-only traditional albums recorded with Karoly Cserepes (Love, Christmas and Emigration). High Days was released in fall 2000."



    Márta Sebestyén & Muzsikás

    or

    Márta Sebestyén & Muzsikás


    0 0


    1. Incipit Vita Nova, for male alto, violin, viola & cello 6:02
    2. Glorious Hill, for 4 voices 11:32
    3. Four Elements, ballet 28:46
    4. Sub Rosa, for recorder, clarinet, violin, double bass, vibraphone & piano 9:57

    Gavin Bryars - Double Bass
    David James - Counter Tenor (Vocal)
    Rogers Covey-Crump - STenor (Vocal)
    John Potter - Tenor (Vocal)
    Gordon Jones - Baritone (Vocal)
    Roger Heaton - Clarinet
    Glen Martin - Clarinet (Bass)
    James Potter - Sax (Tenor)
    Tim Payne - Sax (Alto)
    Henrik Sienkiewicz - French Horn
    Richard Martin - Flugelhorn
    Dave Whitson - Trombone
    Jamie McCarthy - Recorder
    Martin Allen - Vibraphone
    Gruffydd Owen - Keyboards
    Christopher Swithinbank - Piano
    John White - Piano
    Alexander Balanescu - Violin
    Annemarie Dreyer - Violin
    Ulrike Lachner - Viola
    Rebecca Firth - Cello
    Alan Taylor - Double Bass
    Keith Bartlett - Percussion
    Christopher Brannick - Percussion

    AMG:
    "Vita Nova includes four pieces by Bryars in which ECM appeared to be, at least partially, attempting to cash in on the new age-y vogue of the early '90s for the sort of quasi-medieval music made relatively popular by assorted singing monks, Arvo Pärt, and the Hilliard Ensemble with Jan Garbarek. Indeed, that latter group is on hand here to perform 'Glorious Hill,' and the results are as blandly attractive as the listener might guess given the following recipe: Take a mushily mystical text (in Latin), set to vaguely medieval sounding music, and spice with a dash of chromaticism and a pinch of minimalism. It's all handsomely produced and sung but terribly precious and overly palatable. How far Bryars had come from the rich reality of the tramp singing 'Jesus' Blood Never Failed Me Yet' in his masterpiece from the '70s. Unfortunately, the remainder of the disc also fails to deliver much more than prettiness. The longest composition, 'Four Elements,' falls into the same gauzily impressionistic, rudderless rut of much of his '90s work, and the introduction of David James, the same countertenor used in 'Incipit Vita Nova,' seems tacked on just to fit in with the ostensible 'medieval' feel of the album. The same applies to the use of a recorder on the final piece, 'Sub Rosa.' That work, however, does contain glimmers of the unique beauty and clarity of Bryars' earlier work as found on Hommages. But those instances are far too meager to be able to recommend this recording to anyone but listeners attempting to slowly crawl their way out of the new age morass."



    Vita Nova

    or

    Vita Nova


    0 0


    1. Euphoria 3:13
    2. Poison Sugar 2:20
    3. Oriental Lady 2:23
    4. The Cold Roll 3:08
    5. That Belly I Idolize 4:01
    6. August, 1967 (Hippies Call It STP) 4:00
    7. If You Want to Be a Bird/Wild Blue Yonder 3:14
    8. Pink Underwear 3:56
    9. God, What Am I Doing Here 3:10
    10. Sweet William 3:03
    11. Romping Through the Swamp 2:30
    12. Silly Boys 3:34
    13. TV Song 3:02
    14. Year of Jubilo 4:11
    15. Snappin' Pussy 5:13

    Robin Remaily - Fiddle, Guitar, Mandolin, Piano, Slide Guitar, Vocals
    Peter Stampfel - Banjo, Fiddle, Vocals
    Charlie Messing - Guitar, Vocals
    Peter Weber - Guitar, Vocals
    Richard Tyler - Piano
    Dave Reisch - Bass, Vocals
    Steve Weber - Bass, Guitar, Vocals

    AMG:
    "Unless, like the Holy Modal Rounders, you've spent a lot of time listening to Harry Smith's Anthology of American Folk Music while ingesting recreational drugs, their music might sound a bit odd to you. Actually, given the ramshackle performances, it sounds a bit odd in any case, but as with any humorously intended work, appreciation of it depends on one's sympathy with the artists. For initiates, this seventh (and, so it seemed at the time of its release, final) album was one of the Rounders' better ones, with Peter Stampfel, Chris Weber, and especially Robin Remaily turning out characteristic new work and covers of old songs like 'Euphoria' and 'If You Want to Be a Bird' backed by a rhythm section. 'August, 1967 (Hippies Call It STP),' borrows its tune from 'Fishin' Blues,' while head Rounders Peter Stampfel and Steve Weber sing a paean to psychedelic drug use that breaks down into odd references such as this allusion to Amos & Andy: ''Splain dat to me, Kingfish, it ain't too clear/King it to me, 'splainfsh, said the engineer.'The CD reissue released on June 27, 2000, added three bonus tracks. 'TV Song' is a tribute to the addictive power of television; 'Year of Jubilo' revives a Civil War victory celebration; and 'Snappin' Pussy' is an appropriately bawdy follow-up to an earlier Rounders favorite, 'Boobs a Lot'."



    Last Round

    or

    Last Round


    0 0


    1. Adios Nonino 8:04
    2. Otoño Porteño 5:10
    3. Michelangelo 70 3:20
    4. Coral 6:00
    5. Fugata 3:50
    6. Soledad 6:52
    7. Final 7:47

    Astor Piazzolla - Bandoneon
    Antonio Agri – Violin
    Oscar Lopez Ruiz – Guitar
    Dante Amicarelli – Piano
    Kicho Diaz – Contrabass

    AMG:
    "...In 1954, Piazzolla won a scholarship to study in Paris with the hugely influential Nadia Boulanger, who also taught Aaron Copland, Philip Glass, and Quincy Jones, among many others. Boulanger encouraged Piazzolla not to ignore tango, but to reinvigorate the form with his jazz and classical training. Piazzolla returned home in 1955 and immediately set the tango world on its ear, forming an octet that played tango as self-contained chamber music, rather than accompaniment for vocalists or dancers. The howls of protest from traditionalists continued unabated until 1958, when Piazzolla disbanded the group and went to New York City; there he worked as an arranger and experimented with a fusion of jazz and tango, also composing the famed 'Adios Nonino,' a lovely ode to his recently departed father..."



    Adios Nonino

    or

    Adios Nonino


    0 0


    1. Blues in the Closet 5:12
    2. The Sad Time 2:34
    3. Spanish Flames 11:26
    4. Enter, Ivory 11:07
    5. From Then to Then 5:44

    Jimmy Giuffre - Clarinet, Flute (Bass), Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor)
    Lee Konitz - Sax (Alto) (1, 2, 5)
    Bill Connors - Guitar (3)
    Paul Bley - Piano (4)

    AMG:
    "Although four musicians are listed for this date (Jimmy Giuffre, altoist Lee Konitz, guitarist Bill Connors and pianist Paul Bley), these five performances are actually a set of duets featuring Giuffre on tenor, clarinet, bass flute and soprano interacting with the other players. Three songs are duets with Konitz (there is also one apiece with Bley and Connors), including 'Blues In the Closet,' and these are the main reasons to acquire this disc. The CD reissue is an exact duplicate of the original LP, with just 37 minutes of music, but it is definitely worth hearing. This was the final release by Bley's Improvising Artists label."


    IAI Festival

    or

    IAI Festival


    0 0


    1. Marin Marais - La sonnerie de Sainte Geneviève du Mont à Paris
    2. Jean Henri d'Anglebert - Prelude in D minor for harpsichord
    3. Marin Marais - Tombeau de Mr. de Sainte-Colombe
    Antoine Forqueray - Suite V in C minor (from _Piecès de Viole)
    4. I. La Rameau
    5. II. La Guignon
    6. III. La Léon
    7. IV. La Boisson
    8. V. La Montigni
    9. VI. La Sylva
    10. VII. Jupiter

    Sigiswald Kuijken - Viola da Gamba
    Wieland Kuijken - Bass Viol
    Gustav Leonhardt - Harpsichord

    Extravagant music:
    "This music, the Music of Versailles (Musique a Versailles), consists of pieces from the composers Marin Marais, Jean Henri d'Anglebert, and Antoine Forqueray, composers of the late seventeenth/early eighteenth century. This is chamber music that was composed and performed at the Palace of Versailles for the French Royal Family and aristocracy. There is great expressiveness and ornamentation in the music, as one would expect in the highly decorated surroundings and courtly life of France of the period.
    Jean Henri d'Anglebert held the position as harpsicordist to King Louis XIV (before this he served as organist for the Duke of Orléans and the Jacobins in the rue St. Honoré), and was a court composer as well, making a major contribution to the evolution of French musical ornamentation with regard keyboard instruments. He succeeded Chambonnières as harpsichordist to Louis XIV, a position later held by his son. One of the notable accomplishments of d'Anglebert was to transcribe opera and other tunes for keyboard for the court.
    Marin Marais was a leading figure in France among bass violin composers and performers at this same time. His whole life was spent in Paris, most of it in royal service. First he appointed as Musicien Ordinaire de la Chambre du Roi in 1685, keeping that post throughout the reign of Louis XIV and for ten years served under the Regency and the reign of Louis XV. He was recognised by his fellow musicians as an outstanding performer and composer of note whose compositions became well known throughout France and beyond.
    Antoine Forqueray was 16 years younger than Marais, and considered a child prodigy. He grew up to have the reputation of being crabby, crotchety and odd in character, but his reputation as performer of the bass viol. He was appointed Musicien Ordinaire de la Chambre du Roi in 1689, with his wife often accompanying him on the harpsichord. By 1730 Antoine Forqueray had retired to Nantes, and was succeeded by his son Jean-Baptiste at court in 1742.
    The music performed here represents some of the best of the compositions of the period. It is highly stylised and extravagant, calling for performers sensitive and skillful for the type of music. Gustav Leonhardt, a Dutch harpischordist, as spent a career recovering faithfulness to this period of music. The brothers of Sigiswald and Wieland Kuijken on strings (violin and viola da gamba) complements his performance style nicely. This recording was done in 1970, transfered masterfully by Deutsche Harmonia Mundi in 1990 to CD."



    Musique A Versailles

    or

    Musique A Versailles


    0 0


    1. Go Away
    2. Baby I Love You
    3. Guarenteed
    4. Gotta Keep A Runnin'
    5. Under The Table
    6. Cross Country
    7. Candy's Going Bad

    8. Gotta Muv
    9. Rock Yer Sox Auf
    10. I'll Bi Yer Luv
    11. Luv Kage
    12. He's A Fool
    13. 714
    14. Hey Mama
    15. [Untitled]

    Mark Chatfield - Guitar, Vocals
    Bob Hill - Guitar, Keyboards, Vocals
    Eric Moore - Bass, Vocals
    Glen Cataline - Drums, Vocals

    AMG:
    "Not to be confused with the 1960s/early-'70s psychedelic band that was also called the Godz, this foursome was an obscure hard rock/arena rock outfit of the late '70s and '80s. This band was formed in the Midwest in 1976, when bassist/producer Eric Moore got together with lead guitarist Mark Chatfield, rhythm guitarist/keyboardist Bob Hill, and drummer Glen Cataline. All four of them contributed lead vocals. the Godz signed with Casablanca in 1977, which was also the year in which they had an opening spot on Kiss' Love Gun Tour. (Cheap Trick was the other opening act on that tour.) The Midwesterners recorded two little-known albums for Casablanca: 1978's The Godz and 1979's Nothing Is Sacred, both of which received very little attention. Some more albums followed in the 1980s, including 1985's I'll Get You Rockin' on Heavy Metal America and 1987's Mongolians on Grudge.

    Released in 1979, Nothing Is Sacred is the second of two albums that the second Godz recorded for Casablanca. The tunes on this LP are routine, generic hard rock and arena rock. None of the material is very distinguished, and the band isn't the least bit distinctive. But the Godz, who sound like a neighborhood bar band that somehow managed to land a deal with a well-known label, do come up with some catchy grooves here and there. 'Rock Yer Sox Auf,' 'Gotta Muv,' and the Kiss-like 'Luv Kage' won't win any awards for originality, but they are likable and fairly catchy. However, Nothing Is Sacred wasn't any more successful commercially than the Godz' first album, and Casablanca ended up dropping the band."



    The Godz/Nothing Is Sacred

    or

    The Godz/Nothing Is Sacred


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